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Original Articles
Association Between Parental BMI and Offspring’s Blood Pressure by Mediation Analysis: A Study Using Data From the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey
Hyowon Choi, Hunju Lee, Yeon-Soon Ahn
J Prev Med Public Health. 2023;56(6):533-541.   Published online October 30, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.23.289
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  • 67 Download
AbstractAbstract AbstractSummary PDFSupplementary Material
Objectives
This study analyzed the relationship between parental body mass index (BMI; BMI_p) and hypertension in their adolescent offspring (HTN_a), focusing on the mediating effect of adolescents’ BMI (BMI_a).
Methods
Utilizing data from the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, including participants aged 12-18, we conducted a mediation analysis while controlling for confounding factors such as age, sex, physical activity, dietary habits, household income quartile, and parents’ alcohol and smoking habits.
Results
The study included a total of 5731 participants, of whom 3381 and 5455 participants had data on fathers’ and mothers’ BMI, respectively. For adolescent systolic blood pressure (SBP_a), the father’s BMI (BMI_f) had a significant total effect (β, 0.23; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.12 to 0.34) and average controlled mediated effect (ACME) (β, 0.27; 95% CI, 0.23 to 0.32), but the average direct effect (ADE) was not significant. The mother’s BMI (BMI_m) had a significant total effect (β, 0.17; 95% CI, 0.09 to 0.25), ACME (β, 0.25; 95% CI, 0.22 to 0.28) and ADE (β, -0.08; 95% CI, -0.16 to 0.00). For adolescent diastolic blood pressure, both BMI_f and BMI_m had significant ACMEs (β, 0.10; 95% CI, 0.08 to 0.12 and β, 0.09; 95% CI, 0.07 to 0.12, respectively), BMI_m had a significant ADE (β, -0.09; 95% CI, -0.16 to -0.02) but BMI_f had an insignificant ADE and total effect.
Conclusions
The study found that parental BMI had a significant effect on SBP_a, mediated through BMI_a. Therefore, a high BMI in parents could be a risk factor, mediated through BMI_a, for systolic hypertension in adolescents, necessitating appropriate management.
Summary
Korean summary
본 연구를 통해 부모의 BMI가 청소년기의 BMI를 매개하여 청소년의 수축기 혈압에 영향을 미침을 확인할 수 있었습니다. 그러나 본 연구는 단면적인 데이터를 활용하였으며, 후향적 연구로 이에 대한 한계를 가지고 있으며, 이후 이에 대한 추가 연구가 필요합니다.
Key Message
This study was able to confirm that parents' BMI mediated their BMI during adolescence and affected systolic blood pressure in adolescents. However, this study utilized cross-sectional data, and has limitations on this as a retrospective study, so further studies are needed.
Multilevel Analysis of the Relationship Between Prescribing Institutions and Medication Adherence Among Patients With Hypertension and Diabetes in Korea
Haryeom Ghang, Juhyang Lee
J Prev Med Public Health. 2023;56(6):504-514.   Published online October 5, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.23.252
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  • 89 Download
AbstractAbstract AbstractSummary PDFSupplementary Material
Objectives
This study investigated the relationship between prescribing institutions and medication adherence among patients newly diagnosed with hypertension and diabetes.
Methods
This study investigated patients with new prescriptions for hypertension and diabetes in Korea in 2019 with using data collected from general health screenings. A multilevel logistic regression model was applied to explore the relationship between patients’ first prescribing institution and their medication adherence, defined as a medication possession ratio (MPR) over 80%.
Results
The overall adherence rates were 53.7% and 56.0% among patients with hypertension and diabetes, respectively. The intraclass correlation coefficients were 13.2% for hypertension and 13.8% for diabetes (p<0.001), implying that the first prescribing institution had a significant role in medication adherence. With clinics as the reference group, all other types of hospitals showed an odds ratio (OR) less than 1.00, with the lowest for tertiary hospitals (OR, 0.30 for hypertension; 0.45 for diabetes), and the next lowest in health screening specialized clinics (OR, 0.51 for hypertension; 0.46 for diabetes). Among individual-level variables, female sex, older age, higher insurance premium level, and residing in cities were positively associated with adherence in both the hypertension and diabetes samples.
Conclusions
This study showed that the prescribing institution had a significant relationship with medication adherence. When the first prescribing institution was a clinic, newly diagnosed patients were more likely to adhere to their medication. These results highlight the important role played by primary care institutions in managing mild chronic diseases.
Summary
Korean summary
2019년 일반건강검진을 통해 발견된 고혈압과 당뇨병의 신규 환자를 대상으로 복약순응도를 분석하였다. 그 결과 검진 후 첫번째 처방기관이 의원인 경우에 비해 다른 종별 의료기관인 경우 복약순응 오즈비가 모두 감소하였는데 상급종합병원이 가장 낮았고(고혈압 0.30, 당뇨병 0.45), 그 다음은 검진전문의원인 것으로 나타났다(고혈압 0.51, 당뇨병 0.46).
Key Message
This study investigated the relationship between prescribing institutions and medication adherence among patients newly diagnosed with hypertension and diabetes using general health screening data in Korea in 2019. The results showed that with clinics as the reference group, all other types of hospitals showed an odds ratio (OR) less than 1.00, with the lowest for tertiary hospitals (OR, 0.30 for hypertension; 0.45 for diabetes), and the next lowest in health screening specialized clinics (OR, 0.51 for hypertension; 0.46 for diabetes).
Special Article
Examining the Role of Psychosocial Stressors in Hypertension
Komal Marwaha
J Prev Med Public Health. 2022;55(6):499-505.   Published online November 30, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.21.266
  • 3,915 View
  • 223 Download
  • 5 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Despite advances in medicine and preventive strategies, fewer than 1 in 5 people with hypertension have the problem under control. This could partly be due to gaps in fully elucidating the etiology of hypertension. Genetics and conventional lifestyle risk factors, such as the lack of exercise, unhealthy diet, excess salt intake, and alcohol consumption, do not fully explain the pathogenesis of hypertension. Thus, it is necessary to revisit other suggested risk factors that have not been paid due attention. One such factor is psychosocial stress. This paper explores the evidence for the association of psychosocial stressors with hypertension and shows that robust evidence supports the role of a chronic stressful environment at work or in marriage, low socioeconomic status, lack of social support, depression, anxiety, post-traumatic stress, childhood psychological trauma, and racial discrimination in the development or progression of hypertension. Furthermore, the potential pathophysiological mechanisms that link psychosocial stress to hypertension are explained to address the ambiguity in this area and set the stage for further research.
Summary

Citations

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  • Health-related factors and dysregulation of epigenetic related genes in metabolic syndrome trigger finger patients and smoker trigger finger patients: preliminary analysis of patient-derived sample
    Abdulaziz M. F. Shayea, Amna A. Alshatti, Danah H. Alfadhli, Almutairi Fatimah Ibrahim, Mariam Kh. Almutairi, Mohammed Sh. Nadar
    Journal of Orthopaedic Surgery and Research.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Adjustment disorders, hypertension and type 2 diabetes: a cardiologist’s view (literature review)
    D.K. Miloslavsky, S.M. Koval
    INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF ENDOCRINOLOGY (Ukraine).2023; 19(5): 383.     CrossRef
  • Letter to the Editor: Insights on Health, Religion/Spirituality, and Vulnerable Populations
    Fides A. del Castillo
    Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health.2023; 56(1): 97.     CrossRef
  • Moderating effect of mindfulness on the relationship between anxiety and somatization symptoms in middle‐aged and elderly female patients with hypertension
    Haifei Shen, Ri Zhang, XiuJie Zhang, Ying Zhang, Yan Liu, Wei Song, Yunpeng Cheng, Minghui Yang, Yinong Jiang, Yan Lu
    The Journal of Clinical Hypertension.2023; 25(7): 647.     CrossRef
  • Exploring the health of child protection workers: A call to action
    Javier F. Boyas, Debra Moore, Maritza Y. Duran, Jacqueline Fuentes, Jana Woodiwiss, Leah McCoy, Antonella Cirino
    Health Promotion Perspectives.2022; 12(4): 381.     CrossRef
Original Articles
Effects of Marital Status and Income on Hypertension: The Korean Genome and Epidemiology Study (KoGES)
Mia Son, Yeon Jeong Heo, Hye-Jin Hyun, Ho Jong Kwak
J Prev Med Public Health. 2022;55(6):506-519.   Published online October 7, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.22.264
  • 5,449 View
  • 199 Download
  • 1 Web of Science
  • 1 Crossref
AbstractAbstract AbstractSummary PDF
Objectives
This study aimed to analyze the associations of income, marital status, and health behaviors with hypertension in male and female over 40 years of age in the Korea.
Methods
The data were derived from the Korean Genome and Epidemiology Study (KoGES; 4851-302) which included 211 576 participants. To analyze the relationships of income, marital status, and health behaviors with hypertension in male and female over 40 years of age, multiple logistic regression was conducted with adjustments for these variables.
Results
The prevalence of hypertension increased linearly as income decreased. The odds ratio for developing hypertension in people with an income of <0.5 million Korean won (KRW) compared to ≥6.0 million KRW was 1.55 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.25 to 1.93) in the total population, 1.58 (95% CI, 1.27 to 1.98) in male, and 1.07 (95% CI, 0.35 to 3.28) in female. The combined effect of income level and marital status on hypertension was significant. According to income level and marital status, in male, low income and divorce were most associated with hypertension (1.76 times; 95% CI, 1.01 to 3.08). However, in female, the low-income, married group was most associated with hypertension (1.83 times; 95% CI, 1.71 to 1.97).
Conclusions
The results of this study show that it is necessary to approach male and female marital status separately according to income in health policies to address inequalities in the prevalence of hypertension.
Summary
Korean summary
이 연구는 한국의 40세 이상 성인 남녀를 대상으로 소득수준, 결혼, 건강행태요인이 고혈압에 미치는 영향을 분석하였다. 이 연구는 한국인유전체역학조사사업조사(KoGES; 4851-302, 2001-2011)에서 구축한 211576명을 대상으로 다중 로지스틱회귀모델을 이용하여 분석했다. 소득이 고혈압에 미치는 영향은 역의 선형으로 소득이 적을수록 고혈압이 증가하는 경향이 뚜렷하게 나타났다. 소득수준과 혼인상태, 고혈압과의 연관성은 여성보다 남성이 더 강하게 나타났다. 소득수준과 혼인상태가 상호작용하여 고혈압에 미치는 영향에서, 저소득층에서 별거 상태가 고혈압에 미치는 전반적인 영향이 가장 강하게 나타났으며, 남성의 경우 이혼 상태, 여성의 경우 결혼을 유지하고 있는 상태가 고혈압과 가장 강하게 연관되어, 남녀사이에 차이가 존재함을 보여주었다. 이 연구는 소득, 결혼이 고혈압에 중요하게 영향을 미치는 것으로 나타나, 고혈압예방대책에 저소득과 별거 이혼등의 결혼상태를 고려하는것이 필요하다는 것을 제안한다.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Shapely additive values can effectively visualize pertinent covariates in machine learning when predicting hypertension
    Alexander A. Huang, Samuel Y. Huang
    The Journal of Clinical Hypertension.2023; 25(12): 1135.     CrossRef
Associations of Socioeconomic Status With Depression and Quality of Life in Patients With Hypertension: An Analysis of Data From the 2019 Community Health Survey in Korea
Hye Ri Kim, Mia Son
J Prev Med Public Health. 2022;55(5):444-454.   Published online August 24, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.22.214
  • 2,244 View
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AbstractAbstract AbstractSummary PDF
Objectives
We aimed to identify the factors related to depression and quality of life in patients with hypertension by using multilevel regression analysis.
Methods
In 2019, 229 043 participants in the Korean Community Health Survey were selected as the study group. Individual factors were identified using data from the 2019 Community Health Survey. Regional factors were identified using data from the National Statistical Office of Korea. Multilevel regression analysis was conducted to find individual and local factors affecting depression and quality of life in patients with hypertension and to determine any associated interactions.
Results
As individual factors in patients with hypertension, women, those with lower education-levels, recipients of basic livelihood benefits, and those with poor dietary conditions showed stronger associations with depression and quality of life. As regional factors and individual-level variables in patients with hypertension, lower gross regional personal income, fewer doctors at medical institutions, and lower rates of participation in volunteer activities presented stronger associations with depression and quality of life. In addition, the associations of depression with gross regional personal income, the number of doctors at medical institutions, and dietary conditions were significantly stronger in patients with hypertension than in patients without hypertension. The associations of gender and employment status with quality of life were also significantly greater.
Conclusions
Policy interventions are needed to adjust health behaviors, prevent depression, and improve quality of life for patients with hypertension, especially for those with the risk factors identified in this study.
Summary
Korean summary
2019년 지역사회건강조사, 대한민국 통계청 자료를 통해, 다수준 회귀분석을 이용하여 고혈압 환자의 우울 및 삶의 질과 관련된 요인을 파악한 결과, 비고혈압 집단 대비 고혈압 환자의 지역총소득, 의료기관 종사 의사수, 식생활 형편이 우울과 연관성이 유의미하게 컸고, 성별, 직업수준이 삶의 질과 연관성이 유의미하게 컸다.
The Determinants of Undiagnosed Hypertension Among Indonesian Adults: A Cross-sectional Study Based on the 2014-2015 Indonesia Family Life Survey
Yeni Mahwati, Dieta Nurrika, Kamaluddin Latief
J Prev Med Public Health. 2022;55(1):60-67.   Published online January 6, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.21.500
  • 3,776 View
  • 231 Download
  • 5 Web of Science
  • 4 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Objectives
This study investigated the determinants of undiagnosed hypertension among Indonesian adults.
Methods
This study involved an analysis of secondary data from the 2014 Indonesia Family Life Survey (IFLS) on 5914 Indonesian adults (≥40 years). The determinant variables examined in this cross-sectional study were education level, monthly per capita expenditures (PCE), whether the participant experienced headaches in the morning, and other general health variables. The outcome variable was undiagnosed hypertension, which was defined as participants with hypertension who had not received a hypertension diagnosis from a health professional and had never been prescribed medication for treating hypertension. The data were analyzed using logistic regression.
Results
A total of 3322 participants (56.2%) were found to have undiagnosed hypertension. The odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of undiagnosed hypertension were significantly higher among those who completed primary school or lower (OR, 1.60; 95% CI, 1.29 to 1.98), had low monthly PCE (OR, 1.28; 95% CI, 1.13 to 1.43), did not report experiencing headaches in the morning (OR, 1.97; 95% CI, 1.76 to 2.21), and reported a general health status of healthy (OR, 2.05; 95% CI, 1.82 to 2.30) than those who had a higher education level, had high monthly PCE, experienced headaches in the morning, and were unhealthy.
Conclusions
Education level, monthly PCE, the experience of headaches in the morning, and general health status were associated with undiagnosed hypertension. The monitoring system for detecting undiagnosed hypertension cases must be strengthened. Health promotion is also necessary to reduce the prevalence of undiagnosed hypertension.
Summary

Citations

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  • Factors associated with diabetes mellitus among adults: Findings from the Indonesian Family Life Survey-5
    Mohammed Alfaqeeh, Sofa D. Alfian, Rizky Abdulah
    Endocrine and Metabolic Science.2024; 14: 100161.     CrossRef
  • The mediating effect of sleep disturbance on the association between hypertension and depression: a national data analysis
    Kamaluddin Latief, Samuel Akyirem, Siriluk Sithichoksakulchai, Dieta Nurrika, Mokh. Sujarwadi, Faizul Hasan
    Clinical Hypertension.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Body Mass Index Asian populations category and stroke and heart disease in the adult population: a longitudinal study of the Indonesia Family Life Survey (IFLS) 2007 and 2014
    Kamaluddin Latief, Dieta Nurrika, Min-Kuang Tsai, Wayne Gao
    BMC Public Health.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Prevalence and associated factors of undiagnosed hypertension among adults in the Central African Republic
    Supa Pengpid, Karl Peltzer
    Scientific Reports.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
Effects of Income Level on the Association Between Hypertension and Depression: 2010-2017 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey
San Kang, Hyeon Chang Kim
J Prev Med Public Health. 2020;53(6):439-446.   Published online October 8, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.20.337
  • 3,702 View
  • 139 Download
  • 3 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Objectives
This study analyzed the associations of hypertension (HTN) with symptoms and diagnosis of depression by income level among Korean adults.
Methods
This study was based on the 2010-2017 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey data; a total of 29 425 adults (aged 20 years or older) were analyzed. HTN was defined as a systolic blood pressure ≥140 mmHg, diastolic blood pressure ≥90 mmHg, or use of hypertensive medications. Depression symptoms were evaluated based on a questionnaire about depression-related symptoms. A depression diagnosis was defined based on questionnaire responses indicating that a participant had been diagnosed with depression. Household income was divided into higher or lower income ranges based on the median income of the participants. Multiple logistic regression analyses were performed to assess the associations between HTN and depression symptoms/diagnosis in the higher-income and lower-income groups.
Results
In the higher-income group, the odds ratio (OR) for the association between HTN and depression symptoms was 1.15 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.97 to 1.37), and the OR for the association between HTN and depression diagnosis was 1.41 (95% CI, 1.13 to 1.76). In the lower-income group, the OR for the association between HTN and depression symptoms was 1.18 (95% CI, 1.04 to 1.34), whereas the OR for the association between HTN and depression diagnosis was 0.82 (95% CI, 0.70 to 0.97).
Conclusions
The associations of HTN with symptoms and diagnosis of depression differed by income level.
Summary

Citations

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  • Impacts of Anxiety and Depression on Clinical Hypertension in Low-Income US Adults
    Rohan M. Shah, Sahil Doshi, Sareena Shah, Shiv Patel, Angela Li, Joseph A. Diamond
    High Blood Pressure & Cardiovascular Prevention.2023; 30(4): 337.     CrossRef
  • Machine learning-based predictive modeling of depression in hypertensive populations
    Chiyoung Lee, Heewon Kim, Gennady S. Cymbalyuk
    PLOS ONE.2022; 17(7): e0272330.     CrossRef
  • The Association between Plasma Concentration of Phytoestrogens and Hypertension within the Korean Multicenter Cancer Cohort
    Juyeon Lee, Ju-Young Kang, Kwang-Pil Ko, Sue-Kyung Park
    Nutrients.2021; 13(12): 4366.     CrossRef
Comparison of Trends in Blood Pressure and the Prevalence of Obesity Among Korean and American Adolescents: A 12-Years Cross-sectional Study
Somi Heo, Seyoung Kwon, Yu-Mi Lee, Ji-Yeon Shin, Duk-Hee Lee
J Prev Med Public Health. 2020;53(1):45-55.   Published online November 20, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.19.198
  • 4,570 View
  • 195 Download
  • 7 Crossref
AbstractAbstract AbstractSummary PDFSupplementary Material
Objectives
This study was conducted to explore recent trends in the prevalence of pediatric elevated blood pressure and hypertension (HTN) in Korea and the United States, applying the new HTN reference values for adolescents.
Methods
This study analyzed 17 339 (8755 Korean and 8584 American) adolescents aged 10 to 17 who participated in the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey and the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, respectively, between 2005 and 2016. HTN was defined using percentile-based reference values for non-overweight adolescents from 7 nations, and obesity was defined by body mass index (BMI) based on country-specific growth charts. All analyses were stratified by sex and year-over-year changes were evaluated by calculating the p for trend.
Results
Systolic blood pressure showed a statistically meaningful upward trend in Korean boys and girls, while diastolic blood pressure did not show any significant changes. Both systolic and diastolic blood pressure levels declined among United States boys and girls. The prevalence of elevated blood pressure and HTN remained similar in Korean adolescents, but declined in both sexes among United States adolescents. BMI increased in both sexes among Korean adolescents, although the overweight and obesity rates stayed the same. No significant trends were found in any obesity indices among United States adolescents. The prevalence of elevated blood pressure and HTN by obesity level was higher among Korean adolescents than among their United States peers in both sexes, and the gap became higher at more severe levels of obesity.
Conclusions
Despite the strong correlation between obesity and HTN, recent trends in the prevalence of HTN and obesity among Korean and United States adolescents were strikingly different. Follow-up studies are necessary to determine why the prevalence of HTN was more than twice as high among Korean adolescents than among their United States counterparts.
Summary
Korean summary
본 연구에서는 새로운 소아청소년 고혈압 기준을 이용하여, 최근 한국과 미국 소아청소년들의 혈압 및 고혈압 유병률의 변화 추이를 비교하였다. 비만과 고혈압간의 높은 관련성에도 불구하고 한국과 미국 소아청소년의 고혈압 유병률과 비만율은 서로 다른 변화 추이를 나타내었으며, 고혈압 발생에 있어서 한국 소아청소년들이 미국 소아청소년들보다 비만에 더 취약할 가능성을 나타내고 있어 이에 관한 후속연구가 필요하다.

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  • Body Mass Index, Waist Circumference, Hip Circumference, Waist-To-Height Ratio: Which Affects Adolescent Hypertension More?
    Melike TELLİOĞLU, Muammer YILMAZ, İnci ARIKAN, Yaşar ÇAKMAKÇI
    Phoenix Medical Journal.2023; 5(1): 17.     CrossRef
  • Combined associations of general obesity and central obesity with hypertension stages and phenotypes among children and adolescents in Zhejiang, China
    Dong Zhao, Jiali Zhou, Danting Su, Yun Li, Weidi Sun, Boren Tan, Shuting Li, Ronghua Zhang, Peige Song
    The Journal of Clinical Hypertension.2023; 25(11): 983.     CrossRef
  • Дискордантные тренды повышенного артериального давления и избыточной массы тела у подростков 14–18 лет Новосибирска (по данным популяционных исследований в Новосибирске – 1989–2019 гг.)
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    Ateroscleroz.2023; 19(3): 210.     CrossRef
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    Sangjun Lee, Jieun Jang, Sarah Krull Abe, Shafiur Rahman, Eiko Saito, Rashedul Islam, Prakash C Gupta, Norie Sawada, Akiko Tamakoshi, Xiao-Ou Shu, Woon-Puay Koh, Atsuko Sadakane, Ichiro Tsuji, Jeongseon Kim, Isao Oze, Chisato Nagata, San-Lin You, Myung-He
    International Journal of Epidemiology.2022; 51(4): 1190.     CrossRef
  • Correlates of Undiagnosed Hypertension Among Chinese and Korean American Immigrants
    Brittany N. Morey, Connie Valencia, Sunmin Lee
    Journal of Community Health.2022; 47(3): 425.     CrossRef
  • Association between Body Mass Index and Risk of Gastric Cancer by Anatomic and Histologic Subtypes in Over 500,000 East and Southeast Asian Cohort Participants
    Jieun Jang, Sangjun Lee, Kwang-Pil Ko, Sarah K. Abe, Md. Shafiur Rahman, Eiko Saito, Md. Rashedul Islam, Norie Sawada, Xiao-Ou Shu, Woon-Puay Koh, Atsuko Sadakane, Ichiro Tsuji, Jeongseon Kim, Isao Oze, Chisato Nagata, Shoichiro Tsugane, Hui Cai, Jian-Min
    Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention.2022; 31(9): 1727.     CrossRef
  • Association Between Obesity and Blood Pressure Among Iranian Children and Adolescents: A Sub-analysis from the SHED LIGHT Study
    Avisa Tabib, Akbar Nikpajouh, Maryam Aryafar, Niloufar Samiei, Yousef Rezaei, Hassan Ziaodini, Azam Goodarzi, Bahareh Kazemborji, Nasim Naderi, Sepideh Taghavi, Hooman Bakhshandeh, Saeid Hosseini
    Pediatric Cardiology.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
Effects of Comorbid Sleep Disorders on Cardiovascular Complications of Hypertension Among Patients With Newly-diagnosed Hypertension: An Analysis of the Korean National Health Insurance Service-National Sample Cohort
Jeongmook Kang, Yoon-Hyung Park, Kwang Ik Yang, Jose Rene Bagani Cruz, Young Hwangbo
J Prev Med Public Health. 2020;53(1):37-44.   Published online November 6, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.19.248
  • 8,743 View
  • 146 Download
  • 1 Crossref
AbstractAbstract AbstractSummary PDF
Objectives
This study investigated the effects of comorbid sleep disorders (SD) on the incidence of cardiovascular complications among newly-diagnosed hypertension (HTN) patients.
Methods
As study population, 124 057 newly-diagnosed essential HTN patients aged 30 or older, without cardiovascular complications at diagnosis with HTN, were selected from the National Health Insurance Service-National Sample Cohort. The incidence of cardiovascular complications was calculated, Cox proportional-hazards regression model was used to analyze the risk of complications, and the population attributable fraction (PAF) for cardiovascular complications of having comorbid SD at HTN diagnosis was calculated.
Results
Over 10 years, 32 275 patients (26.0%) developed cardiovascular complications. In HTN patients with comorbid SD at diagnosis of HTN, the incidence of cardiovascular complications (78.3/1000 person-years; 95% confidence interval [CI], 75.8 to 80.9) was higher than in those without comorbid SD (58.6/1000 person-years; 95% CI, 57.9 to 59.3) and the risk of cardiovascular complications was 1.21 times higher (95% CI, 1.17 to 1.25), adjusting for age, gender, income, area of residence, and comorbid diabetes mellitus. The PAF of having comorbid SD at diagnosis of HTN for the incidence of cardiovascular complications was 2.07% (95% CI, 1.69 to 2.44).
Conclusions
Newly-diagnosed essential HTN patients aged 30 or older who had comorbid SD at the time of their HTN diagnosis had a higher incidence of cardiovascular complications than those without comorbid SD. Age, gender, income, area of residence, and comorbid diabetes mellitus had a significant effect on the incidence of cardiovascular complications. Approximately 2% of cardiovascular complications were found to occur due to the presence of SD.
Summary
Korean summary
본 연구 결과 심뇌혈관 합병증이 없었던 30세 이상 신규 일차성 고혈압 환자에서 고혈압 진단시 수면장애을 동반한 경우 심뇌혈관합병증 발생율은 78.3/1000인년(95% CI 75.8-80.9)으로 나타났으며, 수면장애을 동반하지 않은 경우 심뇌혈관합병증 발생율은 58.6/1000인년(95%CI 57.9-59.3)인 것으로 관찰되었다. 고혈압 진단시의 연령, 성별, 수입, 거주지역, 동반된 당뇨병력을 보정한 다중회귀분석에서 수면장애병력이 있는 고혈압 환자군의 심뇌혈관합병증 발생 위험도는 수면장애병력이 없는 환자에 비하여 1.21배(95% CI 1.17-1.25) 높은 것으로 나타났으며, 연구대상자에게 발생한 심뇌혈관합병증의 약 2%는 고혈압 진단시 동반된 수면장애가 기여한 것으로 분석되었다.

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  • Association Between Sleep Quality and Anxiety in Korean Adolescents
    Hyunkyu Kim, Seung Hoon Kim, Sung-In Jang, Eun-Cheol Park
    Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health.2022; 55(2): 173.     CrossRef
Validity of Self-reported Hypertension and Factors Related to Discordance Between Self-reported and Objectively Measured Hypertension: Evidence From a Cohort Study in Iran
Farid Najafi, Yahya Pasdar, Ebrahim Shakiba, Behrooz Hamzeh, Mitra Darbandi, Mehdi Moradinazar, Jafar Navabi, Bita Anvari, Mohammad Reza Saidi, Shahrzad Bazargan-Hejazi
J Prev Med Public Health. 2019;52(2):131-139.   Published online March 29, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.18.257
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  • 18 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
Self-reporting can be used to determine the incidence and prevalence of hypertension (HTN). The present study was conducted to determine the validity of self-reported HTN and to identify factors affecting discordance between self-reported and objectively measured HTN in participants in the Ravansar Non-Communicable Diseases (RaNCD) cohort.
Methods
The RaNCD cohort included permanent residents of Ravansar, Iran aged 35-65 years. Self-reported data were collected before clinical examinations were conducted by well-trained staff members. The gold standard for HTN was anti-hypertensive medication use and blood pressure measurements. The sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values, and overall accuracy of self-reporting were calculated. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression were used to examine the discordance between self-reported HTN and the gold standard.
Results
Of the 10 065 participants in the RaNCD, 4755 (47.4%) were male. The prevalence of HTN was 16.8% based on self-reporting and 15.7% based on medical history and HTN measurements. Of the participants with HTN, 297 (18.8%) had no knowledge of their disease, and 313 (19.9%) had not properly controlled their HTN despite receiving treatment. The sensitivity, specificity, and kappa for self-reported HTN were 75.5%, 96.4%, and 73.4%, respectively. False positives became more likely with age, body mass index (BMI), low socioeconomic status, and female sex, whereas false negatives became more likely with age, BMI, high socioeconomic status, smoking, and urban residency.
Conclusions
The sensitivity and specificity of self-reported HTN were acceptable, suggesting that this method can be used for public health initiatives in the absence of countrywide HTN control and detection programs.
Summary

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    Alex Kato, Winnie Kibone, Jerom Okot, Joseph Baruch Baluku, Felix Bongomin
    Integrated Blood Pressure Control.2023; Volume 16: 71.     CrossRef
  • Validity of self‐reported hypertension and related factors in the adult population: Preliminary results from the cohort in the west of Iran
    Negar Piri, Yousef Moradi, Reza Ghanei Gheshlagh, Mahsa Abdullahi, Eghbal Fattahi, Farhad Moradpour
    The Journal of Clinical Hypertension.2023; 25(2): 146.     CrossRef
  • Sex-Specific Contributions of Alcohol and Hypertension on Everyday Cognition in Middle-Aged and Older Adults
    Madison Musich, Amy N. Costa, Victoria Salathe, Mary Beth Miller, Ashley F. Curtis
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  • National and regional prevalence rates of hypertension in Saudi Arabia: A descriptive analysis using the national survey data
    Aqeel M. Alenazi, Bader A. Alqahtani
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    David Sleurs, Caroline Dubertret, Baptiste Pignon, Sarah Tebeka, Yann Le Strat
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    Weixi Kang, Sònia Pineda Hernández
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    Hoang Thi Hai Van, Dang Thi Huong, Tran Ngoc Anh
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    BMC Public Health.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
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Blood Pressure and the Risk of Death From Non-cardiovascular Diseases: A Population-based Cohort Study of Korean Adults
Jeoungbin Choi, Jieun Jang, Yoonsuk An, Sue K. Park
J Prev Med Public Health. 2018;51(6):298-309.   Published online November 14, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.18.212
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AbstractAbstract AbstractSummary PDFSupplementary Material
Objectives
The objective of this study was to assess the relationship between systolic and diastolic blood pressure (SBP, DBP) and the risk of death from specific causes other than cardiovascular diseases.
Methods
We calculated the risk of specific death by SBP and DBP categories for 506 508 health examinees in 2002-2003 using hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) in a Cox proportional hazards model.
Results
Compared to normal levels (SBP <120 or DBP <90 mmHg), stage I systolic and diastolic hypertension (SBP 140-159, DBP 85- 89 mmHg, respectively) were associated with an increased risk of death from diabetes mellitus, alcoholic liver disease, and renal failure (HR, 1.83; 95% CI, 1.51 to 2.22; HR, 1.24; 95% CI, 1.06 to 1.46; HR, 2.30; 95% CI, 1.64 to 3.21; HR, 1.67; 95% CI, 1.27 to 2.20; HR, 1.99; 95% CI, 1.41 to 2.81; HR, 1.31; 95% CI, 0.99 to 1.73, respectively), but a decreased risk of death from intestinal pneumonia (HR, 0.64; 95% CI, 0.42 to 0.98; HR, 0.59; 95% CI, 0.39 to 0.91). Only stage II systolic hypertension (SBP ≥160 mmHg) was associated with an increased risk of death from pneumonia, liver cirrhosis, and intestinal ischemia (HR, 1.54; 95% CI, 1.19 to 1.98; HR, 1.46; 95% CI, 1.00 to 2.15; HR, 3.77; 95% CI, 1.24 to 11.40, respectively), and stage I and II diastolic hypertension (SBP 140-159 and ≥160 mmHg) were associated with an increased risk of death from intestinal ischemia (HR, 3.07; 95% CI, 1.27 to 7.38; HR, 4.39; 95% CI, 1.62 to 11.88, respectively).
Conclusions
An increase in blood pressure levels may alter the risk of death from certain causes other than cardiovascular diseases, a well-known outcome of hypertension, although the mechanism of these associations is not well documented.
Summary
Korean summary
2002년 및 2003년 한국 국민건강보험공단 건강검진 수검자 코호트(NHIS-HEALS) 중 506,508명을 대상으로 2013년 말일까지의 통계청 사망자료 기반 심뇌혈관질환을 제외한 기타 사망원인으로의 사망위험을 콕스회귀모형으로 분석한 결과에서 1단계 수축기 고혈압 군과 1단계 이완기 고혈압 군에서 당뇨, 알코올성 간질환, 콩팥부전 사망의 위험도가 통계적으로 유의하게 증가함을 보인 반면, 간질성 폐렴의 사망위험은 유의하게 감소함을 보였다. 2단계 수축기 고혈압 군에서는 폐렴, 간경화 및 허혈성 장질환의 사망위험이 증가하는 것을 보였다. 혈압의 증가가 기존에 알려진 심뇌혈관 질환 이외의 사망위험도에도 연관된 것으로 보이며, 고혈압의 질병부담 연구 및 보건정책 수립시 이 같은 점에 대한 고려가 필요하다.

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  • Binary cutpoint and the combined effect of systolic and diastolic blood pressure on cardiovascular disease mortality: A community-based cohort study
    Ju-Yeun Lee, Ji Hoon Hong, Sangjun Lee, Seokyung An, Aesun Shin, Sue K. Park, Tariq Jamal Siddiqi
    PLOS ONE.2022; 17(6): e0270510.     CrossRef
  • Hypertension, the renin–angiotensin system, and the risk of lower respiratory tract infections and lung injury: implications for COVID-19
    Reinhold Kreutz, Engi Abd El-Hady Algharably, Michel Azizi, Piotr Dobrowolski, Tomasz Guzik, Andrzej Januszewicz, Alexandre Persu, Aleksander Prejbisz, Thomas Günther Riemer, Ji-Guang Wang, Michel Burnier
    Cardiovascular Research.2020; 116(10): 1688.     CrossRef
  • Prevalence of hypertension, levels of lipids and blood glucose in patients with acute pancreatitis, chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer
    I. N. Grigorieva, O. V. Efimova, T. S. Suvorova, N. L. Tov, T. I. Romanova
    Russian Journal of Cardiology.2020; 25(6): 3823.     CrossRef
Gender Differences in Hypertension Control Among Older Korean Adults: Korean Social Life, Health, and Aging Project
Sang Hui Chu, Ji Won Baek, Eun Sook Kim, Katherine M. Stefani, Won Joon Lee, Yeong-Ran Park, Yoosik Youm, Hyeon Chang Kim
J Prev Med Public Health. 2015;48(1):38-47.   Published online January 14, 2015
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.14.043
  • 10,766 View
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AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
Controlling blood pressure is a key step in reducing cardiovascular mortality in older adults. Gender differences in patients’ attitudes after disease diagnosis and their management of the disease have been identified. However, it is unclear whether gender differences exist in hypertension management among older adults. We hypothesized that gender differences would exist among factors associated with hypertension diagnosis and control among community-dwelling, older adults.
Methods
This cross-sectional study analyzed data from 653 Koreans aged ≥60 years who participated in the Korean Social Life, Health, and Aging Project. Multiple logistic regression was used to compare several variables between undiagnosed and diagnosed hypertension, and between uncontrolled and controlled hypertension.
Results
Diabetes was more prevalent in men and women who had uncontrolled hypertension than those with controlled hypertension or undiagnosed hypertension. High body mass index was significantly associated with uncontrolled hypertension only in men. Multiple logistic regression analysis indicated that in women, awareness of one’s blood pressure level (odds ratio [OR], 2.86; p=0.003) and the number of blood pressure checkups over the previous year (OR, 1.06; p=0.011) might influence the likelihood of being diagnosed with hypertension. More highly educated women were more likely to have controlled hypertension than non-educated women (OR, 5.23; p=0.013).
Conclusions
This study suggests that gender differences exist among factors associated with hypertension diagnosis and control in the study population of community-dwelling, older adults. Education-based health promotion strategies for hypertension control might be more effective in elderly women than in elderly men. Gender-specific approaches may be required to effectively control hypertension among older adults.
Summary

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    Fatemeh Gorbani, Hassan Mahmoodi, Parvin Sarbakhsh, Abdolreza Shaghaghi
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  • CHANGES OF LIFE QUALITY SCORE DEPENDING ON THE ARTERIAL HYPERTENSION DEGREE IN THE GENDER ASPECT
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A Trend Analysis of the Prevalence, Awareness, Treatment, and Control of Hypertension by Age Group
Jong Youn Moon, Kwan Jun Park, Young Hwangbo, Mee Ri Lee, Byoung In Yoo, Jong Hye Won, Yoon Hyung Park
J Prev Med Public Health. 2013;46(6):353-359.   Published online November 28, 2013
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2013.46.6.353
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AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives

We examined the trends in prevalence, awareness, treatment, and control of hypertension in Korea as a basis for improving hypertension control programs.

Methods

12 598 participants of the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey were included in this study. Weighted linear regression to test time trends from 2007 to 2011 was performed.

Results

The prevalence of hypertension was 20.7% in 2007, 29.4% in 2009, and 26.2% in 2011. Awareness of hypertension was 64.8% in 2007 and 61.1% in 2011. Awareness in those aged 65 and over was greater than in younger groups (age 19 to 44 and 45 to 64; p<0.001). The treatment rates were 58.4% in 2007 and 56.8% in 2011. The treatment rate was greater for those 65 and over than for younger age groups (p<0.001). The percentage of controlled hypertension was 37.6% in 2011. The percentage of controlled hypertension in those 65 and over was higher than in younger age groups (p<0.001). The treatment-control rates were 65.9% in 2007 and 67.7% in 2011. The prevalence of hypertension was higher in the males (p<0.001), while the awareness (p<0.001), treatment (p<0.001), and control (p<0.001) rates were higher in the females.

Conclusions

The prevalence of hypertension was increasing and the hypertension awareness, treatment, and control rates were low in younger age groups and males.

Summary

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    Sang-Hoon Na, Hae-Young Lee, Sang Hong Baek, Hui-Kyung Jeon, Jin-Ho Kang, Yoon-Nyun Kim, Chang-Gyu Park, Jae-Kean Ryu, Moo-Yong Rhee, Moo-Hyun Kim, Taek-Jong Hong, Dong-Ju Choi, Seong-Wook Cho, Dong-Hun Cha, Eun-Seok Jeon, Jae-Joong Kim, Joon-Han Shin, Su
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    Minah Kang, Jaiyong Kim, Sang-Soo Bae, Yong-Jun Choi, Dong-Soo Shin
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Association of Selected Medical Conditions With Breast Cancer Risk in Korea
Sun Jae Jung, Minkyo Song, Ji-Yeob Choi, Nan Song, Sue Kyung Park, Keun-Young Yoo, Daehee Kang
J Prev Med Public Health. 2013;46(6):346-352.   Published online November 28, 2013
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2013.46.6.346
  • 9,872 View
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AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives

To estimate the effect of medical conditions in the population of Korea on breast cancer risk in a case-control study.

Methods

The cases were 3242 women with incident, histologically confirmed breast cancer in two major hospitals interviewed between 2001 and 2007. The controls were 1818 women each admitted to either of those two hospitals for a variety of non-neoplastic conditions. Information on each disease was obtained from a standardized questionnaire by trained personnel. Odds ratios (ORs) for each disease were derived from multiple logistic regression adjusted for age, age of menarche, pregnancy, age of first pregnancy, and family history of breast cancer.

Results

Among all of the incident breast cancer patients, pre-existing diabetes (OR, 1.33; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.99 to 1.78), hypertension (OR, 1.46; 95% CI, 1.18 to 1.83), thyroid diseases (OR, 1.26; 95% CI, 1.00 to 1.58), and ovarian diseases (OR, 1.70; 95% CI, 1.23 to 2.35) were associated with an increased risk of breast cancer when other factors were adjusted for. In a stratified analysis by menopausal status, pre-existing hypertension (pre-menopause OR, 0.80; 95% CI, 0.48 to 1.34 vs. post-menopause OR, 1.87; 95% CI, 1.44 to 2.43; p-heterogeneity <0.01) and ovarian disease (pre-menopause OR, 4.20; 95% CI, 1.91 to 9.24 vs. post-menopause OR, 1.39; 95% CI, 1.02 to 1.91; p-heterogeneity 0.01) showed significantly different risks of breast cancer.

Conclusions

Our results suggest the possibility that medical conditions such as hypertension affect breast cancer development, and that this can differ by menopausal status. Our study also indicates a possible correlation between ovarian diseases and breast cancer risk.

Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
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    Diabetes/Metabolism Research and Reviews.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
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The Association Between Serum Albumin Levels and Metabolic Syndrome in a Rural Population of Korea
Hye Min Cho, Hyeon Chang Kim, Ju-Mi Lee, Sun Min Oh, Dong Phil Choi, Il Suh
J Prev Med Public Health. 2012;45(2):98-104.   Published online March 31, 2012
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2012.45.2.98
  • 11,012 View
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  • 19 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives

A positive association between serum albumin levels and metabolic syndrome has been reported in observation studies, but it has not been established in the Korean population. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the association between serum albumin levels and the presence of metabolic syndrome among a sample of apparently healthy Korean adults.

Methods

This cross-sectional study analyzed data of 3189 community-dwelling people (1189 men and 2000 women) who were aged 40 to 87 years and were living in a rural area in Korea. Serum albumin levels were classified into quartile groups for each sex. Metabolic syndrome was defined according to the National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III guidelines with an adjusted waist circumference cut-off value (≥90 cm for men and ≥85 cm for women). An independent association between serum albumin levels and metabolic syndrome was assessed by multiple logistic regression analysis.

Results

Higher serum albumin levels were associated with increased prevalence of metabolic syndrome. The odds ratio (95% confidence interval) of the prevalence of metabolic syndrome for the highest versus the lowest serum albumin quartiles was 2.81 (1.91 to 4.14) in men and 1.96 (1.52 to 2.52) in women, after adjusting for age, smoking status, alcohol consumption, and physical activity. When each metabolic abnormality was analyzed separately, higher serum albumin levels were significantly associated with hypertriglyceridemia and hyperglycemia in both sexes, and with abdominal obesity in men.

Conclusions

These results suggest that higher serum albumin levels are positively associated with an increased risk of metabolic syndrome in Korean adults.

Summary

Citations

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JPMPH : Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health