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Behavioral Predictors Associated With COVID-19 Vaccination and Infection Among Men Who Have Sex With Men in Korea
Minsoo Jung
J Prev Med Public Health. 2024;57(1):28-36.   Published online November 27, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.23.381
  • 766 View
  • 96 Download
AbstractAbstract AbstractSummary PDF
Objectives
This study investigated the impact of socioeconomic factors and sexual orientation-related attributes on the rates of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) vaccination and infection among men who have sex with men (MSM).
Methods
A web-based survey, supported by the National Research Foundation of Korea, was conducted among paying members of the leading online portal for the lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, or queer and questioning (LGBTQ+) community in Korea. The study participants were MSM living in Korea (n=942). COVID-19 vaccination and infection were considered dependent variables, while sexual orientation-related characteristics and adherence to non-pharmacological intervention (NPI) practices served as primary independent variables. To ensure analytical precision, nested logistic regression analyses were employed. These were further refined by dividing respondents into 4 categories based on sexual orientation and disclosure (or “coming-out”) status.
Results
Among MSM, no definitive association was found between COVID-19 vaccination status and factors such as socioeconomic or sexual orientation-related attributes (with the latter including human immunodeficiency virus [HIV] status, sexual orientation, and disclosure experience). However, key determinants influencing COVID-19 infection were identified. Notably, people living with HIV (PLWH) exhibited a statistically significant predisposition towards COVID-19 infection. Furthermore, greater adherence to NPI practices among MSM corresponded to a lower likelihood of COVID-19 infection.
Conclusions
This study underscores the high susceptibility to COVID-19 among PLWH within the LGBTQ+ community relative to their healthy MSM counterparts. Consequently, it is crucial to advocate for tailored preventive strategies, including robust NPIs, to protect these at-risk groups. Such measures are essential in reducing the disparities that may emerge in a post–COVID-19 environment.
Summary
Korean summary
한국에서 남성 동성애자의 코로나-19 예방접종과 그들의 사회경제적 지위 또는 성적 지향과 관련된 요인 사이에는 명확한 연관성이 없었지만, HIV에 감염된 남성 동성애자는 코로나-19의 감염 위험이 유의미하게 높았다. 또한, 남성 동성애자의 비약물적 중재 실천율이 높을수록 그들의 코로나-19 감염 가능성은 감소하는 경향이 있었다. 이 연구는 LGBTQ+ 커뮤니티 내의 HIV 양성 동성애자와 같은 취약한 집단을 보호하고 포스트 코로나-19 환경에서 성 소수자 간의 건강 격차를 줄이기 위한 강력한 맞춤형 예방 전략의 필요성을 강조한다.
Key Message
While there were no clear associations between COVID-19 vaccination and socioeconomic or sexual orientation-related factors among men who have sex with men (MSM) in Korea, individuals living with HIV (PLWH) had a significantly higher risk of COVID-19 infection. Additionally, greater adherence to non-pharmacological intervention (NPI) practices was linked to a reduced likelihood of COVID-19 infection among MSM. This study emphasizes the need for tailored preventive strategies, including robust NPIs, to protect at-risk groups like PLWH within the LGBTQ+ community and reduce health disparities in a post-COVID-19 environment.
Health Behaviors Before and After the Implementation of a Health Community Organization: Gangwon’s Health-Plus Community Program
Joon-Hyeong Kim, Nam-Jun Kim, Soo-Hyeong Kim, Woong-Sub Park
J Prev Med Public Health. 2023;56(6):487-494.   Published online August 17, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.23.121
  • 1,176 View
  • 188 Download
AbstractAbstract AbstractSummary PDF
Objectives
Community organization is a resident-led movement aimed at creating fundamental social changes in the community by resolving its problems through the organized power of its residents. This study evaluated the effectiveness of health community organization (HCO), Gangwon’s Health-Plus community program, implemented from 2013 to 2019 on residents’ health behaviors.
Methods
This study had a before-and-after design using 2011-2019 Korea Community Health Survey data. To compare the 3-year periods before and after HCO implementation, the study targeted areas where the HCO had been implemented for 4 years or longer. Therefore, a total of 4512 individuals from 11 areas with HCO start years from 2013 to 2016 were included. Complex sample multi-logistic regression analysis adjusting for demographic characteristics (sex, age, residential area, income level, education level, and HCO start year) was conducted.
Results
HCO implementation was associated with decreased current smoking (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 0.73; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.57 to 0.95) and subjective stress recognition (aOR, 0.79; 95% CI, 0.64 to 0.97). Additionally, the HCO was associated with increased walking exercise practice (aOR, 1.39; 95% CI, 1.13 to 1.71), and attempts to control weight (aOR, 1.36; 95% CI, 1.12 to 1.64). No significant negative changes were observed in other health behavior variables.
Conclusions
The HCO seems to have contributed to improving community health indicators. In the future, a follow-up study that analyzes only the effectiveness of the HCO through structured quasi-experimental studies will be needed.
Summary
Korean summary
건강주민운동은 지역사회 건강지표 향상에 기여한 것으로 보여진다. 따라서 주민참여형 건강증진사업이 주민들의 건강을 향상하기 위해서는 주민이 주체가 되어 조직화된 힘으로 지역사회의 근본적인 변화를 만들어가는 주민운동의 관점으로 시행될 필요가 있다.
Key Message
The Health Community Organization (HCO) appears to contribute to the enhancement of community health indicators. Therefore, in order to improve the health of residents through community-based participatory health promotion programs, it is necessary to implement them from the perspective of the HCO in which residents organize themselves as a mobilized force to bring about fundamental changes in the community.
Associations Between Conventional Healthy Behaviors and Social Distancing During the COVID-19 Pandemic: Evidence From the 2020 Community Health Survey in Korea
Rang Hee Kwon, Minsoo Jung
J Prev Med Public Health. 2022;55(6):568-577.   Published online October 14, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.22.351
  • 2,608 View
  • 112 Download
  • 2 Web of Science
  • 3 Crossref
AbstractAbstract AbstractSummary PDF
Objectives
Many studies have shown that social distancing, as a non-pharmaceutical intervention (NPI) that is one of the various measures against coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), is an effective preventive measure to suppress the spread of infectious diseases. This study explored the relationships between traditional health-related behaviors in Korea and social distancing practices during the COVID-19 pandemic.
Methods
Data were obtained from the 2020 Community Health Survey conducted by the Korea Disease Control and Prevention Agency (n=98 149). The dependent variable was the degree of social distancing practice to cope with the COVID-19 epidemic. Independent variables included health-risk behaviors and health-promoting behaviors. The moderators were vaccination and unmet medical needs. Predictors affecting the practice of social distancing were identified through hierarchical multiple logistic regression analysis.
Results
Smokers (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 0.924) and frequent drinkers (aOR, 0.933) were more likely not to practice social distancing. A greater degree of physical activity was associated with a higher likelihood of practicing social distancing (aOR, 1.029). People who were vaccinated against influenza were more likely to practice social distancing than those who were not (aOR, 1.150). However, people with unmet medical needs were less likely to practice social distancing than those who did not experience unmet medical needs (aOR, 0.757).
Conclusions
Social distancing practices were related to traditional health behaviors such as smoking, drinking, and physical activity. Their patterns showed a clustering effect of health inequality. Therefore, when establishing a strategy to strengthen social distancing, a strategy to protect the vulnerable should be considered concomitantly.
Summary
Korean summary
본 연구는 코로나-19 판데믹 기간 동안 한국사회에서 전통적인 건강 행태와 의료이용 행태가 사회적 거리두기 실천과 어떻게 연관되는지 탐구하였다. 연구 결과에 따르면 흡연과 음주 같은 건강위험 행태는 사회적 거리두기의 실천 가능성을 낮추었고 운동과 같은 건강증진 행태는 사회적 거리두기의 실천 가능성을 높였다. 아울러 인플루엔자 백신 접종을 받은 집단은 미접종 집단에 비하여 사회적 거리두기의 실천 가능성이 높았다. 따라서 사회적 거리두기와 같은 방역정책을 수립할 때 인구집단의 건강행태 특성을 고려할 필요가 있다.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Behavioral Predictors Associated With COVID-19 Vaccination and Infection Among Men Who Have Sex With Men in Korea
    Minsoo Jung
    Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health.2024; 57(1): 28.     CrossRef
  • Physical Distancing for Gay Men from People Living with HIV During the COVID-19 Pandemic
    Minsoo Jung
    Journal of Homosexuality.2024; : 1.     CrossRef
  • Non-rigorous versus rigorous home confinement differently impacts mental health, quality of life and behaviors. Which one was better? A cross-sectional study with older Brazilian adults during covid-19 first wave
    Lucimere Bohn, Pedro Pugliesi Abdalla, Euripedes Barsanulfo Gonçalves Gomide, Leonardo Santos Lopes da Silva, André Pereira dos Santos
    Archives of Public Health.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
Association Between Sleep Quality and Anxiety in Korean Adolescents
Hyunkyu Kim, Seung Hoon Kim, Sung-In Jang, Eun-Cheol Park
J Prev Med Public Health. 2022;55(2):173-181.   Published online February 10, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.21.498
  • 4,095 View
  • 226 Download
  • 8 Web of Science
  • 11 Crossref
AbstractAbstract AbstractSummary PDF
Objectives
Anxiety disorder is among the most prevalent mental illnesses among adolescents. Early detection and proper treatment are important for preventing sequelae such as suicide and substance use disorder. Studies have suggested that sleep duration is associated with anxiety disorder in adolescents. In the present study, we investigated the association between sleep quality and anxiety in a nationally representative sample of Korean adolescents.
Methods
This cross-sectional study was conducted using data from the 2020 Korea Youth Risk Behavior Web-based Survey. The Generalized Anxiety Disorder-7 questionnaire was used to evaluate anxiety. The chi-square test was used to investigate and compare the general characteristics of the study population, and multiple logistic regression analysis was used to analyze the relationship between sleep quality and anxiety.
Results
In both sexes, anxiety was highly prevalent in participants with poor sleep quality (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 1.56; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.43 to 1.71 in boys; aOR, 1.30; 95% CI, 1.19 to 1.42 in girls). Regardless of sleep duration, participants with poor sleep quality showed a high aOR for anxiety.
Conclusions
This study identified a consistent relationship between sleep quality and anxiety in Korean adolescents regardless of sleep duration.
Summary
Korean summary
청소년건강행태조사를 이용하여 청소년들의 수면의 질과 불안과의 연관성을 분석하였다. 좋지 않은 수면의 질은 불안감과 연관성이 있었으며 이 연관성은 대상자들의 수면시간과 상관없이 나타났다.

Citations

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  • Analysis of the underlying mechanism of Ziziphi Spinosae Semen for treating anxiety disorder in a zebrafish sleep deprivation model
    Jian Zhang, Junli Feng, Chenyu Feng
    Pharmaceutical Science Advances.2024; 2: 100019.     CrossRef
  • Insomnia and Migraine: A Missed Call?
    Angelo Torrente, Lavinia Vassallo, Paolo Alonge, Laura Pilati, Andrea Gagliardo, Davide Ventimiglia, Antonino Lupica, Vincenzo Di Stefano, Cecilia Camarda, Filippo Brighina
    Clocks & Sleep.2024; 6(1): 72.     CrossRef
  • The Association between High-Caffeine Drink Consumption and Anxiety in Korean Adolescents
    Ji Ann Cho, Soyeon Kim, Haein Shin, Hyunkyu Kim, Eun-Cheol Park
    Nutrients.2024; 16(6): 794.     CrossRef
  • Association between smartphone overdependence and generalized anxiety disorder among Korean adolescents
    Yeon-Suk Lee, Jae Hong Joo, Jaeyong Shin, Chung Mo Nam, Eun-Cheol Park
    Journal of Affective Disorders.2023; 321: 108.     CrossRef
  • Adölesan Döneminde Sık Görülen Sağlık Riskleri ve Sorunları
    Betül UNCU, Elif DOĞAN, Rukiye DUMAN
    Sakarya Üniversitesi Holistik Sağlık Dergisi.2023; 6(2): 338.     CrossRef
  • The influences of mental health problem on suicide-related behaviors among adolescents: Based on Korean Youth Health Behavior Survey
    Eunok Park
    The Journal of Korean Academic Society of Nursing Education.2023; 29(1): 98.     CrossRef
  • Anxious-Withdrawal and Sleep Problems during Adolescence: The Moderating Role of Peer Difficulties
    Julie C. Bowker, Jessica N. Gurbacki, Chloe L. Richard, Kenneth H. Rubin
    Behavioral Sciences.2023; 13(9): 740.     CrossRef
  • Effects of a Single Session of OnabotulinumtoxinA Therapy on Sleep Quality and Psychological Measures: Preliminary Findings in a Population of Chronic Migraineurs
    Angelo Torrente, Paolo Alonge, Laura Pilati, Andrea Gagliardo, Lavinia Vassallo, Vincenzo Di Stefano, Antonino Lupica, Irene Quartana, Giovanna Viticchi, Mauro Silvestrini, Marco Bartolini, Cecilia Camarda, Filippo Brighina
    Toxins.2023; 15(9): 527.     CrossRef
  • A pooled analysis of temporal trends in the prevalence of anxiety-induced sleep loss among adolescents aged 12–15 years across 29 countries
    Guodong Xu, Lian Li, Lijuan Yi, Tao Li, Qiongxia Chai, Junyang Zhu
    Frontiers in Psychiatry.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Factors Influencing Adolescent Generalized Anxiety Disorder: A Zero-Inflated Negative Binomial Regression Model
    Kyung Im Kang, Chan Mi Kang
    Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services.2023; : 1.     CrossRef
  • Impact of sleep dysfunction on psychological burden in patients with empty nose syndrome
    Chien‐Chia Huang, Pei‐Wen Wu, Yun‐Shien Lee, Chi‐Che Huang, Po‐Hung Chang, Chia‐Hsiang Fu, Ta‐Jen Lee
    International Forum of Allergy & Rhinology.2022; 12(11): 1447.     CrossRef
Spatio-temporal Distribution of Suicide Risk in Iran: A Bayesian Hierarchical Analysis of Repeated Cross-sectional Data
Seyed Saeed Hashemi Nazari, Kamyar Mansori, Hajar Nazari Kangavari, Ahmad Shojaei, Shahram Arsang-Jang
J Prev Med Public Health. 2022;55(2):164-172.   Published online February 10, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.21.385
  • 2,399 View
  • 115 Download
  • 2 Web of Science
  • 1 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Objectives
We aimed to estimate the space-time distribution of the risk of suicide mortality in Iran from 2006 to 2016.
Methods
In this repeated cross-sectional study, the age-standardized risk of suicide mortality from 2006 to 2016 was determined. To estimate the cumulative and temporal risk, the Besag, York, and Mollié and Bernardinelli models were used.
Results
The relative risk of suicide mortality was greater than 1 in 43.0% of Iran’s provinces (posterior probability >0.8; range, 0.46 to 3.93). The spatio-temporal model indicated a high risk of suicide in 36.7% of Iran’s provinces. In addition, significant upward temporal trends in suicide risk were observed in the provinces of Tehran, Fars, Kermanshah, and Gilan. A significantly decreasing pattern of risk was observed for men (β, -0.013; 95% credible interval [CrI], -0.010 to -0.007), and a stable pattern of risk was observed for women (β, -0.001; 95% CrI, -0.010 to 0.007). A decreasing pattern of suicide risk was observed for those aged 15-29 years (β, -0.006; 95% CrI, -0.010 to -0.0001) and 30-49 years (β, -0.001; 95% CrI, -0.018 to -0.002). The risk was stable for those aged >50 years.
Conclusions
The highest risk of suicide mortality was observed in Iran’s northwestern provinces and among Kurdish women. Although a low risk of suicide mortality was observed in the provinces of Tehran, Fars, and Gilan, the risk in these provinces is increasing rapidly compared to other regions.
Summary

Citations

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  • Spatial, geographic, and demographic factors associated with adolescent and youth suicide: a systematic review study
    Masoud Ghadipasha, Ramin Talaie, Zohreh Mahmoodi, Salah Eddin Karimi, Mehdi Forouzesh, Masoud Morsalpour, Seyed Amirhosein Mahdavi, Seyed Shahram Mousavi, Shayesteh Ashrafiesfahani, Roya Kordrostami, Nahid Dadashzadehasl
    Frontiers in Psychiatry.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
Protection Motivation Theory and Rabies Protective Behaviors Among School Students in Chonburi Province, Thailand
Mayurin Laorujisawat, Aimutcha Wattanaburanon, Pajaree Abdullakasim, Nipa Maharachpong
J Prev Med Public Health. 2021;54(6):431-440.   Published online November 16, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.21.457
  • 3,630 View
  • 146 Download
  • 2 Web of Science
  • 2 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
The aim of this study was to predict rabies protective behaviors (RPB) based on protection motivation theory (PMT) among fourth-grade students at schools in Chonburi Province, Thailand.
Methods
This cross-sectional study was conducted from December 2020 to February 2021. A multistage sampling technique was used for sample selection. The questionnaire was divided into socio-demographic data and questions related to PMT and RPB. Descriptive statistical analysis was conducted using the EpiData program and inferential statistics, and the results were tested using the partial least squares model with a significance level of less than 5%.
Results
In total, 287 subjects were included, of whom 62.4% were girls and 40.4% reported that YouTube was their favorite media platform. Most participants had good perceived vulnerability, response efficacy, and self efficacy levels related to rabies (43.9, 68.6, and 73.2%, respectively). However, 54.5% had only fair perceived severity levels related to rabies. Significant positive correlations were found between RPB and the PMT constructs related to rabies (β, 0.298; p<0.001), and the school variable (S4) was also a predictor of RPB (β, -0.228; p<0.001). Among the PMT constructs, self efficacy was the strongest predictor of RPB (β, 0.741; p<0.001).
Conclusions
PMT is a useful framework for predicting RPB. Future RPB or prevention/protection intervention studies based on PMT should focus on improving self efficacy and response efficacy, with a particular focus on teaching students not to intervene with fighting animals. The most influential PMT constructs can be used for designing tools and implementing and evaluating future educational interventions to prevent rabies in children.
Summary

Citations

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  • Screening Intention Prediction of Colorectal Cancer among Urban Chinese Based on the Protection Motivation Theory
    Wenshuang Wei, Miao Zhang, Dan Zuo, Qinmei Li, Min Zhang, Xinguang Chen, Bin Yu, Qing Liu
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2022; 19(7): 4203.     CrossRef
  • Career resilience of the tourism and hospitality workforce in the COVID-19: The protection motivation theory perspective
    Diep Ngoc Su, Thi Minh Truong, Tuan Trong Luu, Hanh My Thi Huynh, Barry O'Mahony
    Tourism Management Perspectives.2022; 44: 101039.     CrossRef
The Effect of an Educational Intervention on Health Literacy and the Adoption of Nutritional Preventive Behaviors Related to Osteoporosis Among Iranian Health Volunteers
Leila Dehghankar, Rahman Panahi, Elham Hasannia, Fatemeh Hemmati, Fatemeh Samiei Siboni
J Prev Med Public Health. 2021;54(6):404-411.   Published online October 22, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.21.183
  • 3,537 View
  • 158 Download
  • 2 Web of Science
  • 2 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
Given the increase in osteoporosis among health volunteers and the effect of health literacy on the adoption of nutritional preventive behaviors, this study aimed to determine the effects of an educational intervention on health literacy and the adoption of nutritional preventive behaviors related to osteoporosis among health volunteers.
Methods
This was a quasi-experimental, interventional study of health volunteers conducted in 2020. In this study, 140 subjects (70 in both intervention and control groups) were selected using the random multi-stage sampling method. An educational intervention was conducted using the Telegram application, and educational messages were sent to the health volunteers in the intervention group across 6 sessions. Data were collected via a demographic questionnaire, the Health Literacy for Iranian Adults survey, and a nutritional performance questionnaire, which were completed before and 3 months after the intervention. The data were collected and analyzed using SPSS version 23.
Results
Before the intervention, there were no significant differences in the mean scores for health literacy variables and the adoption of nutritional preventive behaviors between the intervention and control groups (p>0.05). After the intervention, there was a significant change in the mean scores for health literacy and the adoption of preventive behaviors in the intervention group (p<0.05) as opposed to the control group.
Conclusions
Interventions aimed at increasing health literacy are effective for promoting the adoption of preventive and healthy nutritional behaviors related to osteoporosis.
Summary

Citations

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  • Factors related with nursing students’ health literacy: a cross sectional study
    Enrique Ramón-Arbués, José Manuel Granada-López, Isabel Antón-Solanas, Ana Cobos-Rincón, Antonio Rodríguez-Calvo, Vicente Gea-Caballero, Clara Isabel Tejada-Garrido, Raúl Juárez-Vela, Emmanuel Echániz-Serrano
    Frontiers in Public Health.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Health literacy interventions among patients with chronic diseases: A meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials
    Yingshan Shao, Huaqin Hu, Yaxin Liang, Yangyang Hong, Yiqing Yu, Chenxi Liu, Yihua Xu
    Patient Education and Counseling.2023; 114: 107829.     CrossRef
The Relationships Among Occupational Safety Climate, Patient Safety Climate, and Safety Performance Based on Structural Equation Modeling
Hamed Aghaei, Zahra Sadat Asadi, Mostafa Mirzaei Aliabadi, Hassan Ahmadinia
J Prev Med Public Health. 2020;53(6):447-454.   Published online October 22, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.20.350
  • 4,133 View
  • 221 Download
  • 10 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
The aim of the present study was to investigate the relationships among hospital safety climate, patient safety climate, and safety outcomes among nurses.
Methods
In the current cross-sectional study, the occupational safety climate, patient safety climate, and safety performance of nurses were measured using several questionnaires. Structural equation modeling was applied to test the relationships among occupational safety climate, patient safety climate, and safety performance.
Results
A total of 211 nurses participated in this study. Over half of them were female (57.0%). The age of the participants tended to be between 20 years and 30 years old (55.5%), and slightly more than half had less than 5 years of work experience (51.5%). The maximum and minimum scores of occupational safety climate dimensions were found for reporting of errors and cumulative fatigue, respectively. Among the dimensions of patient safety climate, non-punitive response to errors had the highest mean score, and manager expectations and actions promoting patient safety had the lowest mean score. The correlation coefficient for the relationship between occupational safety climate and patient safety climate was 0.63 (p<0.05). Occupational safety climate and patient safety climate also showed significant correlations with safety performance.
Conclusions
Close correlations were found among occupational safety climate, patient safety climate, and nurses’ safety performance. Therefore, improving both the occupational and patient safety climate can improve nurses’ safety performance, consequently decreasing occupational and patient-related adverse outcomes in healthcare units.
Summary

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    Yongzhong Sha, Yongbao Zhang, Yan Zhang
    Journal of Safety Research.2024; 89: 160.     CrossRef
  • Rethinking frontline health workers’ safety performance in times of pandemic: the role of spiritual leadership
    Francisca Arboh, Baozhen Dai, Prince Ewudzie Quansah, Stephen Addai-Dansoh, Samuel Atingabilli, Esther Agyeiwaa Owusu, Ebenezer Larnyo, Baaba Boadziwa Sackey
    International Journal of Occupational Safety and Ergonomics.2024; : 1.     CrossRef
  • A fuzzy Bayesian network DEMATEL model for predicting safety behavior
    Mohsen Mahdinia, Iraj Mohammadfam, Ahmad Soltanzadeh, Mostafa Mirzaei Aliabadi, Hamed Aghaei
    International Journal of Occupational Safety and Ergonomics.2023; 29(1): 36.     CrossRef
  • Fatigue in nurses and medication administration errors: A scoping review
    Tracey Bell, Madeline Sprajcer, Tracey Flenady, Ashlyn Sahay
    Journal of Clinical Nursing.2023; 32(17-18): 5445.     CrossRef
  • Family Support to Improve Knowledge, Attitude, and Practices of Occupational Health and Safety (OHS) in the Informal Sector
    Sukismanto Sukismanto, Hartono Hartono, Sumardiyono Sumardiyono, Tri Rejeki Andayani
    Malaysian Journal of Medicine and Health Sciences.2023; 19(2): 175.     CrossRef
  • Key factors for effective implementation of healthcare workers support interventions after patient safety incidents in health organisations: a scoping review
    Sofia Guerra-Paiva, Maria João Lobão, Diogo Godinho Simões, Joana Fernandes, Helena Donato, Irene Carrillo, José Joaquín Mira, Paulo Sousa
    BMJ Open.2023; 13(12): e078118.     CrossRef
  • The influencing factors of clinical nurses’ problem solving dilemma: a qualitative study
    Yu Mei Li, Yi Fan Luo
    International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Factors affecting nurses' attitudes towards risks in the work environment: A cross‐sectional study
    Sibel Gülen, Ülkü Baykal, Nilgün Göktepe
    Journal of Nursing Management.2022; 30(7): 3264.     CrossRef
  • Survey of the health, safety and environment climate and its effects on occupational accidents
    Behzad Fouladi Dehaghi, Gholamheidar Teimori-Boghsani, Davood Rahmani, Leila Ibrahimi Ghavamabadi, Sajad Zare
    Work.2022; 73(4): 1255.     CrossRef
  • Healthcare Workers' Mental Health in Pandemic Times: The Predict Role of Psychosocial Risks
    Carla Barros, Pilar Baylina, Rúben Fernandes, Susana Ramalho, Pedro Arezes
    Safety and Health at Work.2022; 13(4): 415.     CrossRef
Association Between Parental Marital Status and Types of Suicidal Behavior Among Korean Adolescents: A Cross-sectional Study
Yoon Sik Park, Eun-Cheol Park
J Prev Med Public Health. 2020;53(6):419-428.   Published online September 21, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.20.004
  • 3,729 View
  • 175 Download
  • 3 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
Adolescent suicide is a global problem. This study aimed to identify associations between parental marital status and suicidal behavior.
Methods
This study analyzed 118 715 middle and high school students from the 13th and 14th Korea Youth Risk Behavior Web-based Survey. The odds ratios (ORs) of suicidal ideation, planning, and attempts were calculated based on parental marital status, living situation, and socioeconomic factors. The data were analyzed using multiple logistic regression.
Results
When compared to those living with 2 married biological parents, the ORs of suicidal ideation among adolescents living with either remarried or no parents were 1.34 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.17 to 1.53) and 1.36 (95% CI, 1.11 to 1.66), respectively. For suicidal planning, the OR of those living with 1 remarried biological parent was 1.24 (95% CI, 1.01 to 1.52), and that of those living without parents was 1.28 (95% CI, 0.95 to 1.73), when compared to adolescents living with 2 married biological parents. For suicide attempts, when compared to adolescents with 2 married biological parents, the OR of those living with 1 remarried biological parent was 1.48 (95% CI, 1.17 to 1.87) and that of those living without parents was 2.02 (95% CI, 1.44 to 2.83). For adolescents living with 1 remarried biological parent, suicidal behavior was strongly associated with having no siblings and were weakly associated with not living with grandparents.
Conclusions
Suicidal behavior among adolescents was associated with the remarriage and loss of parents. Therefore, special attention and interventions are needed for adolescents in those situations.
Summary

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  • Family Functioning and Suicide Attempts in Mexican Adolescents
    Francisco Alejandro Ortiz-Sánchez, Aniel Jessica Leticia Brambila-Tapia, Luis Shigeo Cárdenas-Fujita, Christian Gabriel Toledo-Lozano, María Alejandra Samudio-Cruz, Benjamín Gómez-Díaz, Silvia García, Martha Eunice Rodríguez-Arellano, Edgar Oswaldo Zamora
    Behavioral Sciences.2023; 13(2): 120.     CrossRef
  • Childhood adversities and mental health problems: A systematic review
    Titik Juwariah, Fendy Suhariadi, Oedojo Soedirham, Agus Priyanto, Erni Setiyorini, Auliasari Siskaningrum, Heni Adhianata, Angelina da Costa Fernandes
    Journal of Public Health Research.2022; 11(3): 227990362211066.     CrossRef
  • Experiences and needs of parents whose child has attempted suicide
    Kayla Raney, Kim Popa, Cara Gallegos
    Nursing.2022; 52(11): 57.     CrossRef
Educational Intervention Based on the Health Belief Model to Modify Risk Factors of Cardiovascular Disease in Police Officers in Iran: A Quasi-experimental Study
Mohsen Saffari, Hormoz Sanaeinasab, Hassan Jafarzadeh, Mojtaba Sepandi, Keisha-Gaye N. O'Garo, Harold G. Koenig, Amir H. Pakpour
J Prev Med Public Health. 2020;53(4):275-284.   Published online June 18, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.20.095
  • 6,865 View
  • 350 Download
  • 6 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Objectives
Police officers may be at a greater risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD) than the general population due to their highstress occupation. This study evaluated how an educational program based on the health belief model (HBM) may protect police officers from developing CVD.
Methods
In this single-group experimental study, 58 police officers in Iran participated in a 5-week intervention based on HBM principles. Outcomes included changes in scores on an HBM scale, time spent on moderate to vigorous physical activity (International Physical Activity Questionnaire), body mass index (BMI), blood lipid profile, blood glucose, and blood pressure. The intervention consisted of 5 HBM-based educational sessions. Follow-up was conducted at 3 months post-intervention. The paired t-test was used to examine differences between baseline and follow-up scores.
Results
All aspects of the HBM scale improved between baseline and follow-up (p<0.05), except the cues to action subscale. Self-efficacy and preventive behaviors improved the most. BMI decreased from 26.7±2.9 kg/m2 at baseline to 25.8±2.4 kg/m2 at follow-up. All components of the lipid profile, including triglycerides, cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein, and low-density lipoprotein, showed significant improvements post-intervention. Blood glucose and blood pressure also decreased, but not significantly. Nearly 25% of participants who were not physically active at baseline increased their physical activity above or beyond the healthy threshold.
Conclusions
A relatively brief educational intervention based on HBM principles led to a significant improvement in CVD risk factors among police officers. Further research is needed to corroborate the effectiveness of this intervention.
Summary

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  • Cardiovascular Risk Factors and Metabolic Syndrome among Police Officers in Kozhikode Corporation
    Aparna Padmanabhan, Jayakrishnan Thayyil, G Alan, Siju Kumar
    Indian Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine.2024; 28(1): 45.     CrossRef
  • Effect of educational intervention on risk factors of cardiovascular diseases among school teachers: a quasi-experimental study in a suburb of Kolkata, West Bengal, India
    Anubrata Karmakar, Aritra Bhattacharyya, Bijit Biswas, Aparajita Dasgupta, Lina Bandyopadhyay, Bobby Paul
    BMC Public Health.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • An Intervention Program Using the Health Belief Model to Modify Lifestyle in Coronary Heart Disease: Randomized Controlled Trial
    Mohsen Saffari, Hormoz Sanaeinasab, Hojat Rashidi-jahan, Fardin Aghazadeh, Mehdi Raei, Fatemeh Rahmati, Faten Al Zaben, Harold G. Koenig
    International Journal of Behavioral Medicine.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • The effect of educational intervention in the prevention of cardiovascular diseases in patients with hypertension with application of health belief model: A quasi-experimental study
    Fatemeh Mohammadkhah, Abbas Shamsalinia, Fatemeh Rajabi, Pooyan Afzali Hasirini, Ali Khani Jeihooni
    JRSM Cardiovascular Disease.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Assessment of Compliance with Healthy Lifestyle Standards by the Instructional Staff of Higher Educational Institutions
    Ivan М. Okhrimenko, Viacheslav V. Zasenko, Olena V. Chebotaryova, Alla L. Dushka, Andrii V. Lapin, Nataliia O. Kvitka, Iryna A. Holovanovа
    Acta Balneologica.2022; 64(5): 463.     CrossRef
  • Educational interventions in relation to the level of physical activities for police officers: a systematic literature review
    Cleise Cristine Ribeiro Borges Oliveira, Carla Tatiane Oliveira Silva, Carolina de Souza-Machado, Fernanda Carneiro Mussi, Ana Carla Carvalho Coelho, Cláudia Geovana Da Silva Pires
    International Journal for Innovation Education and Research.2022; 10(12): 301.     CrossRef
Interactions of Behavioral Changes in Smoking, High-risk Drinking, and Weight Gain in a Population of 7.2 Million in Korea
Yeon-Yong Kim, Hee-Jin Kang, Seongjun Ha, Jong Heon Park
J Prev Med Public Health. 2019;52(4):234-241.   Published online July 3, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.18.290
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  • 1 Crossref
AbstractAbstract AbstractSummary PDF
Objectives
To identify simultaneous behavioral changes in alcohol consumption, smoking, and weight using a fixed-effect model and to characterize their associations with disease status.
Methods
This study included 7 000 529 individuals who participated in the national biennial health-screening program every 2 years from 2009 to 2016 and were aged 40 or more. We reconstructed the data into an individual-level panel dataset with 4 waves. We used a fixed-effect model for smoking, heavy alcohol drinking, and overweight. The independent variables were sex, age, lifestyle factors, insurance contribution, employment status, and disease status.
Results
Becoming a high-risk drinker and losing weight were associated with initiation or resumption of smoking. Initiation or resumption of smoking and weight gain were associated with non-high-risk drinkers becoming high-risk drinkers. Smoking cessation and becoming a high-risk drinker were associated with normal-weight participants becoming overweight. Participants with newly acquired diabetes mellitus, ischemic heart disease, stroke, and cancer tended to stop smoking, discontinue high-risk drinking, and return to a normal weight.
Conclusions
These results obtained using a large-scale population-based database documented interactions among lifestyle factors over time.
Summary
Korean summary
이 분석은 흡연, 음주, 체중의 동시적 변화에 대해 패널분석방법론인 고정효과 모형을 이용하여 분석하였으며, 2009년부터 2016년까지 2년 주기로 4차례 모두 건강검진을 수검받은 720만 명을 대상으로 하였다. 흡연, 음주, 체중의 동시적 변화에 대한 방향성을 탐색하여 생활습관 관련 행태가 독자적이 아닌 유기적으로 변화하는 양상을 확인하였다, 또한 당뇨병, 뇌졸중, 암이 신규로 진단되었을 때 행태 변화가 나타나는 것을 확인하였다.

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  • Association between Body Mass Index and Risk of Gastric Cancer by Anatomic and Histologic Subtypes in Over 500,000 East and Southeast Asian Cohort Participants
    Jieun Jang, Sangjun Lee, Kwang-Pil Ko, Sarah K. Abe, Md. Shafiur Rahman, Eiko Saito, Md. Rashedul Islam, Norie Sawada, Xiao-Ou Shu, Woon-Puay Koh, Atsuko Sadakane, Ichiro Tsuji, Jeongseon Kim, Isao Oze, Chisato Nagata, Shoichiro Tsugane, Hui Cai, Jian-Min
    Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention.2022; 31(9): 1727.     CrossRef
Concordance in the Health Behaviors of Couples by Age: A Cross-sectional Study
Seungmin Jeong, Sung-Il Cho
J Prev Med Public Health. 2018;51(1):6-14.   Published online November 27, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.17.137
  • 10,197 View
  • 251 Download
  • 11 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Objectives
To investigate concordance in the health behaviors of women and their partners according to age and to investigate whether there was a stronger correlation between the health behaviors of housewives and those of their partners than between the health behaviors of non-housewives and those of their partners.
Methods
We used data obtained from women participants in the 2015 Korea Community Health Survey who were living with their partners. The outcome variables were 4 health behaviors: smoking, drinking, eating salty food, and physical activity. The main independent variables were the partners’ corresponding health behaviors. We categorized age into 4 groups (19-29, 30-49, 50-64, and ≥ 65 years) and utilized multivariate logistic regression analysis, stratifying by age group. Another logistic regression analysis was stratified by whether the participant identified as a housewife.
Results
Data from 64 971 women older than 18 years of age were analyzed. Of the 4 health behaviors, the risk of smoking (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 4.65; 95% confidence interval [CI], 3.93 to 5.49) was highest when the participant’s partner was also a smoker. Similar results were found for an inactive lifestyle (aOR, 2.56; 95% CI, 2.45 to 2.66), eating salty food (aOR, 2.48; 95% CI, 2.36 to 2.62); and excessive drinking (aOR, 1.89; 95% CI, 1.80 to 1.98). In comparison to non-housewives, housewives had higher odds of eating salty food.
Conclusions
The health behaviors of women were positively correlated with those of their partners. The magnitude of the concordance differed by age group.
Summary

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    Fredo Tamara, Jonny K. Fajar, Gatot Soegiarto, Laksmi Wulandari, Andy P. Kusuma, Erwin A. Pasaribu, Reza P. Putra, Muhammad Rizky, Tajul Anshor, Maya Novariza, Surya Wijaya, Guruh Prasetyo, Adelia Pradita, Qurrata Aini, Mario V.P.H. Mete, Rahmat Yusni, Ya
    F1000Research.2024; 12: 54.     CrossRef
  • The refusal of COVID-19 vaccination and its associated factors: a systematic review
    Fredo Tamara, Jonny K. Fajar, Gatot Soegiarto, Laksmi Wulandari, Andy P. Kusuma, Erwin A. Pasaribu, Reza P. Putra, Muhammad Rizky, Tajul Anshor, Maya Novariza, Surya Wijaya, Guruh Prasetyo, Adelia Pradita, Qurrata Aini, Mario V.P.H. Mete, Rahmat Yusni, Ya
    F1000Research.2023; 12: 54.     CrossRef
  • Let’s Enjoy an Evening on the Couch? A Daily Life Investigation of Shared Problematic Behaviors in Three Couple Studies
    Theresa Pauly, Janina Lüscher, Corina Berli, Christiane A. Hoppmann, Rachel A. Murphy, Maureen C. Ashe, Wolfgang Linden, Kenneth M. Madden, Denis Gerstorf, Urte Scholz
    Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin.2023; : 014616722211437.     CrossRef
  • Between- and Within-Couple Concordance for Health Behaviors Among Japanese Older Married Couples: Examining the Moderating Role of Working Time
    Kazuhiro Harada, Kouhei Masumoto, Shuichi Okada
    International Journal of Behavioral Medicine.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Mitchell Conery, Struan F. A. Grant
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  • Evidence of correlations between human partners based on systematic reviews and meta-analyses of 22 traits and UK Biobank analysis of 133 traits
    Tanya B. Horwitz, Jared V. Balbona, Katie N. Paulich, Matthew C. Keller
    Nature Human Behaviour.2023; 7(9): 1568.     CrossRef
  • Similarities in cardiometabolic risk factors among random male-female pairs: a large observational study in Japan
    Naoki Nakaya, Kumi Nakaya, Naho Tsuchiya, Toshimasa Sone, Mana Kogure, Rieko Hatanaka, Ikumi kanno, Hirohito Metoki, Taku Obara, Mami Ishikuro, Atsushi Hozawa, Shinichi Kuriyama
    BMC Public Health.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Jessica K. Perrotte, Eric C. Shattuck, Colton L. Daniels, Xiaohe Xu, Thankam Sunil
    BMC Public Health.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Spousal similarities in cardiometabolic risk factors: A cross-sectional comparison between Dutch and Japanese data from two large biobank studies
    Naoki Nakaya, Tian Xie, Bart Scheerder, Naho Tsuchiya, Akira Narita, Tomohiro Nakamura, Hirohito Metoki, Taku Obara, Mami Ishikuro, Atsushi Hozawa, Harold Snieder, Shinichi Kuriyama
    Atherosclerosis.2021; 334: 85.     CrossRef
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    Dann-Pyng Shih, Chu-Ting Wen, Hsien-Wen Kuo, Wen-Miin Liang, Li-Fan Liu, Chien-Tien Su, Jong-Yi Wang
    Nutrients.2020; 12(11): 3332.     CrossRef
  • Determinants of successful lifestyle change during a 6-month preconception lifestyle intervention in women with obesity and infertility
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    European Journal of Nutrition.2019; 58(6): 2463.     CrossRef
Factors Associated With Subjective Life Expectancy: Comparison With Actuarial Life Expectancy
Jaekyoung Bae, Yeon-Yong Kim, Jin-Seok Lee
J Prev Med Public Health. 2017;50(4):240-250.   Published online June 27, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.17.036
  • 7,863 View
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  • 13 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
Subjective life expectancy (SLE) has been found to show a significant association with mortality. In this study, we aimed to investigate the major factors affecting SLE. We also examined whether any differences existed between SLE and actuarial life expectancy (LE) in Korea. Methods: A cross-sectional survey of 1000 individuals in Korea aged 20-59 was conducted. Participants were asked about SLE via a self-reported questionnaire. LE from the National Health Insurance database in Korea was used to evaluate differences between SLE and actuarial LE. Age-adjusted least-squares means, correlations, and regression analyses were used to test the relationship of SLE with four categories of predictors: demographic factors, socioeconomic factors, health behaviors, and psychosocial factors. Results: Among the 1000 participants, women (mean SLE, 83.43 years; 95% confidence interval, 82.41 to 84.46 years; 48% of the total sample) had an expected LE 1.59 years longer than that of men. The socioeconomic factors of household income and housing arrangements were related to SLE. Among the health behaviors, smoking status, alcohol status, and physical activity were associated with SLE. Among the psychosocial factors, stress, self-rated health, and social connectedness were related to SLE. SLE had a positive correlation with actuarial estimates (r=0.61, p<0.001). Gender, household income, history of smoking, and distress were related to the presence of a gap between SLE and actuarial LE. Conclusions: Demographic factors, socioeconomic factors, health behaviors, and psychosocial factors showed significant associations with SLE, in the expected directions. Further studies are needed to determine the reasons for these results.
Summary

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    Wendemi Sawadogo, Tilahun Adera, James B. Burch, Maha Alattar, Robert Perera, Virginia J. Howard
    Journal of Stroke and Cerebrovascular Diseases.2024; 33(4): 107615.     CrossRef
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    Jiao Lu, Linhui Liu, Jiaming Zheng, Zhongliang Zhou
    BMC Public Health.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Associations between existing and newly diagnosed chronic health conditions and change in subjective life expectancy: Results from a panel study
    Anushiya Vanajan, Catalin Gherdan
    SSM - Population Health.2022; 20: 101271.     CrossRef
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    Marian Reiff, Erik Šoltés, Silvia Komara, Tatiana Šoltésová, Silvia Zelinová
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    American Journal of Human Biology.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Jeong-Hwa Ho
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    Pedro Fuentes, Sandra Amador, Ana Maria Lucas-Ochoa, Lorena Cuenca-Bermejo, Emiliano Fernández-Villalba, Valeria Raparelli, Colleen Norris, Alexandra Kautzky-Willer, Karolina Kublickiene, Louise Pilote, María Trinidad Herrero
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    Michael T. McKay, James R. Andretta, Noah R. Padgett, Jon C. Cole
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    Richard K. Moussa, Vakaramoko Diaby
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    Jihye Lee, Jin-Ah Sim, Ji-Won Kim, Young Ho Yun
    Asian Nursing Research.2019; 13(2): 99.     CrossRef
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The Impact of Educational Status on 10-Year (2004-2014) Cardiovascular Disease Prognosis and All-cause Mortality Among Acute Coronary Syndrome Patients in the Greek Acute Coronary Syndrome (GREECS) Longitudinal Study
Venetia Notara, Demosthenes B. Panagiotakos, Yannis Kogias, Petros Stravopodis, Antonis Antonoulas, Spyros Zombolos, Yannis Mantas, Christos Pitsavos
J Prev Med Public Health. 2016;49(4):220-229.   Published online June 24, 2016
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.16.005
  • 9,213 View
  • 130 Download
  • 15 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
The association between educational status and 10-year risk for acute coronary syndrome (ACS) and all-cause mortality was evaluated.
Methods
From October 2003 to September 2004, 2172 consecutive ACS patients from six Greek hospitals were enrolled. In 2013 to 2014, a 10-year follow-up (2004-2014) assessment was performed for 1918 participants (participation rate, 88%). Each patient’s educational status was classified as low (<9 years of school), intermediate (9 to 14 years), or high (>14 years).
Results
Overall all-cause mortality was almost twofold higher in the low-education group than in the intermediate-education and high-education groups (40% vs. 22% and 19%, respectively, p<0.001). Additionally, 10-year recurrent ACS events (fatal and non-fatal) were more common in the low-education group than in the intermediate-education and high-education groups (42% vs. 30% and 35%, p<0.001), and no interactions between sex and education on the investigated outcomes were observed. Moreover, patients in the high-education group were more physically active, had a better financial status, and were less likely to have hypertension, diabetes, or ACS than the participants with the least education (p<0.001); however, when those characteristics and lifestyle habits were accounted for, no moderating effects regarding the relationship of educational status with all-cause mortality and ACS events were observed.
Conclusions
A U-shaped association may be proposed for the relationship between ACS prognosis and educational status, with participants in the low-education and high-education groups being negatively affected by other factors (e.g., job stress, depression, or loneliness). Public health policies should be aimed at specific social groups to reduce the overall burden of cardiovascular disease morbidity.
Summary

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    Birinder S. Cheema, Zumin Shi, Rhiannon L. White, Evan Atlantis
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    Amalie H. Simoni, Juliane Frydenlund, Kristian H. Kragholm, Henrik Bøggild, Svend E. Jensen, Søren P. Johnsen
    International Journal of Cardiology.2022; 356: 19.     CrossRef
  • Low educational status correlates with a high incidence of mortality among hypertensive subjects from Northeast Rural China
    Shasha Yu, Xiaofan Guo, GuangXiao Li, Hongmei Yang, Liqiang Zheng, Yingxian Sun
    Frontiers in Public Health.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Alena Buková, Erika Chovanová, Zuzana Küchelová, Jan Junger, Agata Horbacz, Mária Majherová, Silvia Duranková
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School Violence, Depressive Symptoms, and Help-seeking Behavior: A Gender-stratified Analysis of Biethnic Adolescents in South Korea
Ji-Hwan Kim, Ja Young Kim, Seung-Sup Kim
J Prev Med Public Health. 2016;49(1):61-68.   Published online January 21, 2016
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.15.060
  • 12,006 View
  • 160 Download
  • 19 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
In South Korea (hereafter Korea), the number of adolescent offspring of immigrants has rapidly increased since the early 1990s, mainly due to international marriage. This research sought to examine the association between the experience of school violence and mental health outcomes, and the role of help-seeking behaviors in the association, among biethnic adolescents in Korea.
Methods
We analyzed cross-sectional data of 3627 biethnic adolescents in Korea from the 2012 National Survey of Multicultural Families. Based on the victim’s help-seeking behavior, adolescents who experienced school violence were classified into three groups: ‘seeking help’ group; ‘feeling nothing’ group; ‘not seeking help’ group. Multivariate logistic regression was applied to examine the associations between the experience of school violence and depressive symptoms for males and females separately.
Results
In the gender-stratified analysis, school violence was associated with depressive symptoms in the ‘not seeking help’ (odds ratio [OR], 7.05; 95% confidence interval [CI], 3.76 to 13.23) and the ‘seeking help’ group (OR, 2.77; 95% CI, 1.73 to 4.44) among male adolescents after adjusting for potential confounders, including the nationality of the immigrant parent and Korean language fluency. Similar associations were observed in the female groups. However, in the ‘feeling nothing’ group, the association was only significant for males (OR, 8.34; 95% CI, 2.82 to 24.69), but not females (OR, 0.77; 95% CI, 0.18 to 3.28).
Conclusions
This study suggests that experience of school violence is associated with depressive symptoms and that the role of victims’ help-seeking behaviors in the association may differ by gender among biethnic adolescents in Korea.
Summary

Citations

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