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Volume 53(5); September 2020
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COVID-19: Original Article
The Effects of Border Shutdowns on the Spread of COVID-19
Nahae Kang, Beomsoo Kim
J Prev Med Public Health. 2020;53(5):293-301.   Published online August 30, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.20.332
  • 5,410 View
  • 247 Download
  • 11 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Objectives
At the beginning of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, some countries imposed entry bans against Chinese visitors. We sought to identify the effects of border shutdowns on the spread of the COVID-19 outbreak.
Methods
We used the synthetic control method to measure the effects of entry bans against Chinese visitors on the cumulative number of confirmed cases using World Health Organization situation reports as the data source. The synthetic control method constructs a synthetic country that did not shut down its borders, but is similar in all other aspects.
Results
Six countries that shut down their borders were evaluated. For Australia, the effects of the policy began to appear 4 days after implementation, and the number of COVID-19 cases dropped by 94.4%. The border shutdown policy took around 13.2 days to show positive effects and lowered COVID-19 cases by 91.7% on average by the end of February.
Conclusions
The border shutdowns in early February significantly reduced the spread of the virus. Our findings are informative for future planning of public health policies.
Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Predisposing, Enabling, and Reinforcing Factors of COVID-19 Prevention Behavior in Indonesia: A Mixed-methods Study
    Putri Winda Lestari, Lina Agestika, Gusti Kumala Dewi
    Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health.2023; 56(1): 21.     CrossRef
  • Exploring homesickness among international students in China during border closure
    Yohana Kifle Mekonen, Michael Agyemang Adarkwah
    International Journal of Intercultural Relations.2023; 94: 101800.     CrossRef
  • Effectiveness assessment of non-pharmaceutical interventions: lessons learned from the COVID-19 pandemic
    Adrian Lison, Nicolas Banholzer, Mrinank Sharma, Sören Mindermann, H Juliette T Unwin, Swapnil Mishra, Tanja Stadler, Samir Bhatt, Neil M Ferguson, Jan Brauner, Werner Vach
    The Lancet Public Health.2023; 8(4): e311.     CrossRef
  • Effectiveness of international border control measures during the COVID-19 pandemic: a narrative synthesis of published systematic reviews
    Karen Ann Grépin, John Aston, Jacob Burns
    Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society A: Mathematical, Physical and Engineering Sciences.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Problems with evidence assessment in COVID-19 health policy impact evaluation: a systematic review of study design and evidence strength
    Noah A Haber, Emma Clarke-Deelder, Avi Feller, Emily R Smith, Joshua A. Salomon, Benjamin MacCormack-Gelles, Elizabeth M Stone, Clara Bolster-Foucault, Jamie R Daw, Laura Anne Hatfield, Carrie E Fry, Christopher B Boyer, Eli Ben-Michael, Caroline M Joyce,
    BMJ Open.2022; 12(1): e053820.     CrossRef
  • Quarantine and testing strategies to ameliorate transmission due to travel during the COVID-19 pandemic: a modelling study
    Chad R. Wells, Abhishek Pandey, Meagan C. Fitzpatrick, William S. Crystal, Burton H. Singer, Seyed M. Moghadas, Alison P. Galvani, Jeffrey P. Townsend
    The Lancet Regional Health - Europe.2022; 14: 100304.     CrossRef
  • The methodologies to assess the effectiveness of non-pharmaceutical interventions during COVID-19: a systematic review
    Nicolas Banholzer, Adrian Lison, Dennis Özcelik, Tanja Stadler, Stefan Feuerriegel, Werner Vach
    European Journal of Epidemiology.2022; 37(10): 1003.     CrossRef
  • Improving the management and security of COVID 19 diagnostic test data with a digital platform in resource-limited settings: The case of PlaCARD in Cameroon
    Jules Brice Tchatchueng-Mbougua, Loique Landry Messanga Essengue, Francis Jaudel Septoh Yuya, Vanessa Kamtchogom, Achta Hamadou, Serge Alain Sadeuh-Mbah, Paul Alain Tagnouokam-Ngoupo, Maurice Tchuente, Richard Njouom, Sara Eyangoh, Mathurin Cyrille Tejiok
    PLOS Digital Health.2022; 1(10): e0000113.     CrossRef
  • International travel-related control measures to contain the COVID-19 pandemic: a rapid review
    Jacob Burns, Ani Movsisyan, Jan M Stratil, Renke Lars Biallas, Michaela Coenen, Karl MF Emmert-Fees, Karin Geffert, Sabine Hoffmann, Olaf Horstick, Michael Laxy, Carmen Klinger, Suzie Kratzer, Tim Litwin, Susan Norris, Lisa M Pfadenhauer, Peter von Philip
    Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Public health effects of travel-related policies on the COVID-19 pandemic: A mixed-methods systematic review
    Lama Bou-Karroum, Joanne Khabsa, Mathilda Jabbour, Nadeen Hilal, Zeinab Haidar, Pamela Abi Khalil, Rima Abdul Khalek, Jana Assaf, Gladys Honein-AbouHaidar, Clara Abou Samra, Layal Hneiny, Sameh Al-Awlaqi, Johanna Hanefeld, Fadi El-Jardali, Elie A. Akl, Ch
    Journal of Infection.2021; 83(4): 413.     CrossRef
  • Impact Evaluation of Coronavirus Disease 2019 Policy: A Guide to Common Design Issues
    Noah A Haber, Emma Clarke-Deelder, Joshua A Salomon, Avi Feller, Elizabeth A Stuart
    American Journal of Epidemiology.2021; 190(11): 2474.     CrossRef
COVID-19: Brief Report
The Evolving Policy Debate on Border Closure in Korea
Su JIn Kang, Jihyun Moon, Heewon Kang, Heekyoung Nam, Sangwoo Tak, Sung-Il Cho
J Prev Med Public Health. 2020;53(5):302-306.   Published online September 11, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.20.213
  • 4,391 View
  • 134 Download
  • 5 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Objectives
In this paper, we aimed to investigate the evolving debate over border closure in Korea during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, to address the main themes associated with border closure, and to discuss the factors that need to be considered when making such decisions.
Methods
We collated and reviewed previously conducted review studies on border closures during infectious disease outbreaks to derive relevant themes and factors.
Results
According to our systematic review on border closures and travel restrictions, the effects of such containment efforts are limited. We suggest considering the following factors when determining whether to impose border closure measures: (1) disease characteristics, (2) timeliness of implementation, (3) transmission delay and the basic reproduction number, (4) globalization and pandemics, and (5) social and economic costs.
Conclusions
Our assessment indicates that the effects of border closures are at best temporary and limited. Alternative measures must be contemplated and implemented to suppress the spread of COVID-19 in particular and infectious diseases more broadly.
Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Schengen Borders as Lines that Continue to Separate? Media Representations of Pandemic Dimensions of Insecurity in Eastern German Border Regions to Poland
    Nona Renner, Judith Miggelbrink, Kristine Beurskens, Antonia Zitterbart
    Journal of Borderlands Studies.2022; 37(4): 825.     CrossRef
  • Classification Schemes of COVID-19 High Risk Areas and Resulting Policies: A Rapid Review
    Olalekan A. Uthman, Olatunji O. Adetokunboh, Charles Shey Wiysonge, Sameh Al-Awlaqi, Johanna Hanefeld, Charbel El Bcheraoui
    Frontiers in Public Health.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • A measure to estimate the risk of imported COVID-19 cases and its application for evaluating travel-related control measures
    Heewon Kang, Kyung-Duk Min, Seonghee Jeon, Ju-Yeun Lee, Sung-il Cho
    Scientific Reports.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Towards sustainable airport waste management through the adoption of a "green" airport strategy: The case of Incheon International Airport
    Glenn Baxter
    Clean Technologies and Recycling.2022; 2(4): 247.     CrossRef
  • Pathways between COVID-19 public health responses and increasing overdose risks: A rapid review and conceptual framework
    Tribesty Nguyen, Jane A. Buxton
    International Journal of Drug Policy.2021; 93: 103236.     CrossRef
COVID-19: Perspective
Beyond SARS-CoV-2: Lessons That African Governments Can Apply in Preparation for Possible Future Epidemics
Mary Aigbiremo Oboh, Semeeh Akinwale Omoleke, Christian Eseigbe Imafidon, Olumide Ajibola, Eniyou Cheryll Oriero, Alfred Amambua-Ngwa
J Prev Med Public Health. 2020;53(5):307-310.   Published online August 18, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.20.259
  • 4,065 View
  • 138 Download
  • 1 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has placed unprecedented pressure on healthcare systems, even in advanced economies. While the number of cases of SARS-CoV-2 in Africa compared to other continents has so far been low, there are concerns about under-reporting, inadequate diagnostic tools, and insufficient treatment facilities. Moreover, proactiveness on the part of African governments has been under scrutiny. For instance, issues have emerged regarding the responsiveness of African countries in closing international borders to limit trans-continental transmission of the virus. Overdependence on imported products and outsourced services could have contributed to African governments’ hesitation to shut down international air and seaports. In this era of emerging and re-emerging pathogens, we recommend that African nations should consider self-sufficiency in the health sector as an urgent priority, as this will not be the last outbreak to occur. In addition to the Regional Disease Surveillance Systems Enhancement fund (US$600 million) provided by the World Bank for strengthening health systems and disease surveillance, each country should further establish an epidemic emergency fund for epidemic preparedness and response. We also recommend that epidemic surveillance units should create a secure database of previous and ongoing pandemics in terms of aetiology, spread, and treatment, as well as financial management records. Strategic collection and analysis of data should also be a central focus of these units to facilitate studies of disease trends and to estimate the scale of requirements in preparation and response to any future pandemic or epidemic.
Summary

Citations

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  • Evaluation de la capacité de préparation et de riposte aux urgences sanitaires du Sénégal
    Bernard Sawadogo, Babacar Fall, Babacar Ndoye, Ibrahim Sonko, Delia Akosua Bandoh, Ernest Kenu, Virgil Lokossou
    Journal of Interventional Epidemiology and Public Health.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
COVID-19: Correspondence
Fighting an Infodemic in the Time of the COVID-19 Pandemic in India: Leveraging Technology and Social Media
Sakshi Jindal, Gaurav Anand
J Prev Med Public Health. 2020;53(5):311-312.   Published online September 30, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.20.345
  • 3,409 View
  • 150 Download
  • 4 Crossref
PDF
Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Management of the COVID-19 Infodemic in Asian Countries: What Should We Know? (Systematic Review)
    Mansoureh Damerchiloo, Fatemeh Baghalha
    Libri.2023; 73(3): 187.     CrossRef
  • The moderating effects of entertainers on public engagement through government activities in social media during the COVID-19
    Xuefan Dong, Ying Lian
    Telematics and Informatics.2022; 66: 101746.     CrossRef
  • The causes, impacts and countermeasures of COVID-19 “Infodemic”: A systematic review using narrative synthesis
    Wenjing Pian, Jianxing Chi, Feicheng Ma
    Information Processing & Management.2021; 58(6): 102713.     CrossRef
  • An alternate view on Covid-19 infodemic in India: A prospective longitudinal survey on prevalent myths (Preprint)
    Dr Raghavendra Rao M, Dr Deepak KK, Dr. Vadiraja Hosakote Sanjeevarao, Dr. Borligarla Venkateshwar Rao, Dr Vivek Udupa Udupa, Dr. A Mohan Rao, Dr. Prashanth Shetty, Dr. Nandeesh Nanjangud Subbanna
    JMIR Infodemiology.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
Original Articles
Incidence, Risk Factors, and Prediction of Myocardial Infarction and Stroke in Farmers: A Korean Nationwide Population-based Study
Solam Lee, Hunju Lee, Hye Sim Kim, Sang Baek Koh
J Prev Med Public Health. 2020;53(5):313-322.   Published online July 14, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.20.156
  • 4,964 View
  • 233 Download
  • 8 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
This study was conducted to determine the incidence and risk factors of myocardial infarction (MI) and stroke in farmers compared to the general population and to establish 5-year prediction models.
Methods
The farmer cohort and the control cohort were generated using the customized database of the National Health Insurance Service of Korea database and the National Sample Cohort, respectively. The participants were followed from the day of the index general health examination until the events of MI, stroke, or death (up to 5 years).
Results
In total, 734 744 participants from the farmer cohort and 238 311 from the control cohort aged between 40 and 70 were included. The age-adjusted incidence of MI was 0.766 and 0.585 per 1000 person-years in the farmer and control cohorts, respectively. That of stroke was 0.559 and 0.321 per 1000 person-years in both cohorts, respectively. In farmers, the risk factors for MI included male sex, age, personal history of hypertension, diabetes, current smoking, creatinine, metabolic syndrome components (blood pressure, triglycerides, and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol). Those for stroke included male sex, age, personal history of hypertension, diabetes, current smoking, high γ-glutamyl transferase, and metabolic syndrome components (blood pressure, triglycerides, and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol). The prediction model showed an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.735 and 0.760 for MI and stroke, respectively, in the farmer cohort.
Conclusions
Farmers had a higher age-adjusted incidence of MI and stroke. They also showed distinct patterns in cardiovascular risk factors compared to the general population.
Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Lowering Barriers to Health Risk Assessments in Promoting Personalized Health Management
    Hayoung Park, Se Young Jung, Min Kyu Han, Yeonhoon Jang, Yeo Rae Moon, Taewook Kim, Soo-Yong Shin, Hee Hwang
    Journal of Personalized Medicine.2024; 14(3): 316.     CrossRef
  • Ischemic heart disease and stroke in male couriers: a cohort study using the national health insurance data and national employment insurance data
    Jiyoung Yoon, Jeehee Min, Eun Mi Kim, Jaiyong Kim, Inah Kim
    Frontiers in Public Health.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Development of rapid and effective risk prediction models for stroke in the Chinese population: a cross-sectional study
    Yuexin Qiu, Shiqi Cheng, Yuhang Wu, Wei Yan, Songbo Hu, Yiying Chen, Yan Xu, Xiaona Chen, Junsai Yang, Xiaoyun Chen, Huilie Zheng
    BMJ Open.2023; 13(3): e068045.     CrossRef
  • Varying combination of feature extraction and modified support vector machines based prediction of myocardial infarction
    A. Razia Sulthana, A. K. Jaithunbi
    Evolving Systems.2022; 13(6): 777.     CrossRef
  • Binary cutpoint and the combined effect of systolic and diastolic blood pressure on cardiovascular disease mortality: A community-based cohort study
    Ju-Yeun Lee, Ji Hoon Hong, Sangjun Lee, Seokyung An, Aesun Shin, Sue K. Park, Tariq Jamal Siddiqi
    PLOS ONE.2022; 17(6): e0270510.     CrossRef
  • Relationship Between Agricultural Crop Handling and Health Among Community-Dwelling Older Adults
    Mitsuhiro NOSE, Yumi KIMURA, Ryota SAKAMOTO
    JOURNAL OF THE JAPANESE ASSOCIATION OF RURAL MEDICINE.2022; 71(1): 31.     CrossRef
  • Epidemiology of cardiovascular disease and its risk factors in Korea
    Hyeon Chang Kim
    Global Health & Medicine.2021; 3(3): 134.     CrossRef
  • Presence of Thrombectomy-capable Stroke Centers Within Hospital Service Areas Explains Regional Variation in the Case Fatality Rate of Acute Ischemic Stroke in Korea
    Eun Hye Park, Yong Jin Gil, Chanki Kim, Beom Joon Kim, Seung-sik Hwang
    Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health.2021; 54(6): 385.     CrossRef
Sexual Intercourse and Its Correlates Among School-aged Adolescents in Indonesia: Analysis of the 2015 Global School-based Health Survey
Anissa Rizkianti, Iram Barida Maisya, Nunik Kusumawardani, Christine Linhart, Jerico Franciscus Pardosi
J Prev Med Public Health. 2020;53(5):323-331.   Published online August 7, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.20.028
  • 6,871 View
  • 264 Download
  • 5 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
This study aimed to determine the prevalence and correlates of sexual intercourse among junior secondary and high school students in Indonesia from the 2015 Global School-based Health Survey (GSHS).
Methods
The survey was conducted among 11 110 students from 75 schools in Indonesia using a self-administered questionnaire. Univariate and multivariate analyses were conducted to explore associations between sexual intercourse and socio-demographic variables, substance use, mental distress, and protective factors.
Results
Overall, 5.3% of students reported having ever had sex (6.9% of boys and 3.8% of girls). Of students who engaged in sexual intercourse, 72.7% of boys and 90.3% of girls had an early sexual debut (before reaching the age of 15) and around 60% had multiple sex partners. Sexual intercourse was associated with gender, school grade, smoking, alcohol consumption, drug use, suicidal ideation, truancy, peer support, and parental supervision.
Conclusions
These findings indicate a pressing need to develop more comprehensive sexual health education in the national curriculum. An effective strategy should also address other risky behaviours.
Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • The Development and Initial Validation of the Youth Sexual Intention Scale: Indonesian Version
    Rahmi Lubis, Zahrotur R. Hinduan, Ratna Jatnika, Baydhowi Baydhowi, Hendriati Agustiani
    INQUIRY: The Journal of Health Care Organization, Provision, and Financing.2022; 59: 004695802210878.     CrossRef
  • Factors Related to Sexual Intercourse Among Korean Middle and High School Students
    Joohee Shim, Jihyun Baek, Seungwoo Han
    Frontiers in Public Health.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Investigation of the Relationship Between Sociodemographic Characteristics and Sexual Health Behaviours of University Students
    Şahika ŞİMŞEK ÇETİNKAYA, Esra DEMİRARSLAN
    Gümüşhane Üniversitesi Sağlık Bilimleri Dergisi.2022; 11(2): 425.     CrossRef
  • Knowledge, Attitude, and Practice Towards Reproductive Health Issue of Adolescents in Rural area, Indonesia: A Cross-sectional Study
    JM Seno Adjie, Andrew Pratama Kurniawan, Raymond Surya
    The Open Public Health Journal.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • A second demographic transition in Indonesia?
    Ariane Utomo, Aris Ananta, Diahhadi Setyonaluri, Calvin Aryaputra
    China Population and Development Studies.2022; 6(3): 288.     CrossRef
The Association Between the Basic Old-Age Pension and Depression of the Older Adults in Korea
Jaewon Kim, Tae-Jin Lee, Cheong-Seok Kim
J Prev Med Public Health. 2020;53(5):332-341.   Published online July 13, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.20.024
  • 7,897 View
  • 222 Download
  • 3 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Objectives
The purpose of this study was to investigate the association between the Basic Old-Age Pension (BOP), which is a noncontributory pension, and depression in BOP beneficiaries in Korea.
Methods
We used the second and third waves (2007-2008) of the Korea Welfare Panel Study to identify the effect of the BOP on mental health in the year of its introduction. The Center for Epidemiological Studies-Depression Scale, applied in a Korean context, was used to evaluate mental health. To analyze the effect of the BOP, a difference-in-difference approach was used in analyses of all subjects and subgroups.
Results
For this study population of 760 adults, the BOP did not have a statistically significant relationship with depression in its beneficiaries. After controlling for type of household, the BOP was still not associated with lower reporting of depression, either in singlebeneficiary or double-beneficiary households, in the year of the benefit.
Conclusions
The BOP policy had no significant relationship with the level of depression among recipients. However, this should not be interpreted as implying that income subsidy programs for older adults, such as the BOP, do not affect mental health, considering the importance of economic hardship in this population and the program’s socioeconomic effects.
Summary

Citations

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  • Association of the Type of Public Pension With Mental Health Among South Korean Older Adults: Longitudinal Observational Study
    Seung Hoon Kim, Hyunkyu Kim, Sung Hoon Jeong, Eun-Cheol Park
    JMIR Public Health and Surveillance.2024; 10: e49129.     CrossRef
  • Factors Associated with Aging in Place among Community-Dwelling Older Adults in Korea: Findings from a National Survey
    Myong Sun Cho, Mi Young Kwon
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2023; 20(3): 2740.     CrossRef
  • Comparing the mental health effects of different social assistance programmes in Hong Kong
    Chenhong Peng, Paul S. F. Yip
    Journal of Asian Public Policy.2022; : 1.     CrossRef
Relationship Between Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease and Decreased Bone Mineral Density: A Retrospective Cohort Study in Korea
Jisun Sung, Seungho Ryu, Yun-Mi Song, Hae-Kwan Cheong
J Prev Med Public Health. 2020;53(5):342-352.   Published online July 17, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.20.089
  • 3,825 View
  • 145 Download
  • 12 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
The aim of this retrospective cohort study was to investigate whether non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) was associated with incident bone mineral density (BMD) decrease.
Methods
This study included 4536 subjects with normal BMD at baseline. NAFLD was defined as the presence of fatty liver on abdominal ultrasonography without significant alcohol consumption or other causes. Decreased BMD was defined as a diagnosis of osteopenia, osteoporosis, or BMD below the expected range for the patient’s age based on dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate the hazard ratio of incident BMD decrease in subjects with or without NAFLD. Subgroup analyses were conducted according to the relevant factors.
Results
Across 13 354 person-years of total follow-up, decreased BMD was observed in 606 subjects, corresponding to an incidence of 45.4 cases per 1000 person-years (median follow-up duration, 2.1 years). In the model adjusted for age and sex, the hazard ratio was 0.65 (95% confidence interval, 0.51 to 0.82), and statistical significance disappeared after adjustment for body mass index (BMI) and cardiometabolic factors. In the subgroup analyses, NAFLD was associated with a lower risk of incident BMD decrease in females even after adjustment for confounders. The direction of the effect of NAFLD on the risk of BMD decrease changed depending on BMI category and body fat percentage, although the impact was statistically insignificant.
Conclusions
NAFLD had a significant protective effect on BMD in females. However, the effects may vary depending on BMI category or body fat percentage.
Summary

Citations

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  • Anti-osteoporotic treatments in the era of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease: friend or foe
    Maria Eleni Chondrogianni, Ioannis Kyrou, Theodoros Androutsakos, Christina-Maria Flessa, Evangelos Menenakos, Kamaljit Kaur Chatha, Yekaterina Aranan, Athanasios G. Papavassiliou, Eva Kassi, Harpal S. Randeva
    Frontiers in Endocrinology.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Bone mass, microarchitecture and turnover among young Indian women with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease
    Alpesh Goyal, Suraj Kubihal, Yashdeep Gupta, Shalimar, Devasenathipathy Kandasamy, Mani Kalaivani, Nikhil Tandon
    Endocrine.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Effects of Metabolic Dysfunction-Associated Steatotic Liver Disease on Bone Density and Fragility Fractures: Associations and Mechanisms
    Shaghayegh Khanmohammadi, Mohammad Shafi Kuchay
    Journal of Obesity & Metabolic Syndrome.2024; 33(2): 108.     CrossRef
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    Minzhe Zheng, Junxiang Xu, Zongxian Feng
    Bone Reports.2024; : 101785.     CrossRef
  • Association between body fat and bone mineral density in Korean adults: a cohort study
    Hyunjung Yoon, Eunju Sung, Jae-Heon Kang, Cheol-Hwan Kim, Hocheol Shin, Eunsol Yoo, Minyoung Kim, Mi Yeon Lee, Sujeong Shin
    Scientific Reports.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Ilaria Barchetta, Carla Lubrano, Flavia Agata Cimini, Sara Dule, Giulia Passarella, Arianna Dellanno, Alberto Di Biasio, Frida Leonetti, Gianfranco Silecchia, Andrea Lenzi, Maria Gisella Cavallo
    Hepatology International.2023; 17(2): 357.     CrossRef
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    Oxana M. Drapkina, Anastasia Yu. Elkina, Anna F. Sheptulina, Anton R. Kiselev
    International Journal of Molecular Sciences.2023; 24(9): 8445.     CrossRef
  • Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease Is Associated With Decreased Bone Mineral Density in Adults: A Systematic Review and Meta‐Analysis
    Ying‐Hao Su, Kuo‐Liong Chien, Shu‐Hua Yang, Wei‐Tso Chia, Jen‐Hau Chen, Yen‐Ching Chen
    Journal of Bone and Mineral Research.2023; 38(8): 1092.     CrossRef
  • The National Consensus statement on the management of adult patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and main comorbidities
    Marina V. Maevskaya, Yulia V. Kotovskaya, Vladimir T. Ivashkin, Olga N. Tkacheva, Ekaterina A. Troshina, Marina V. Shestakova, Valeriy V. Breder, Natalia I. Geyvandova, Vladimir L. Doshchitsin, Ekaterina N. Dudinskaya, Ekaterina V. Ershova, Khava B. Kodzo
    Terapevticheskii arkhiv.2022; 94(2): 216.     CrossRef
  • Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and osteoporosis: A potential association with therapeutic implications
    Ilias D. Vachliotis, Athanasios D. Anastasilakis, Antonis Goulas, Dimitrios G. Goulis, Stergios A. Polyzos
    Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism.2022; 24(9): 1702.     CrossRef
  • Hepatic fibrosis is associated with an increased rate of decline in bone mineral density in men with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease
    Ji Won Yoon, Min Joo Kim, Goh-Eun Chung, Jong In Yang, Jeong Yoon Yim, Jin Ju Kim, Sun Mie Kim, Min-Sun Kwak
    Hepatology International.2021; 15(6): 1347.     CrossRef
  • NAFLD Associated Comorbidity
    L. B. Lazebnik, S. V. Turkina
    Experimental and Clinical Gastroenterology.2021; (10): 5.     CrossRef
Exploring Reproductive Health Education Needs in Infertile Women in Iran: A Qualitative Study
Zohreh Khakbazan, Raziyeh Maasoumi, Zahra Rakhshaee, Saharnaz Nedjat
J Prev Med Public Health. 2020;53(5):353-361.   Published online July 14, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.20.056
  • 4,153 View
  • 234 Download
  • 5 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
An inadequate understanding of infertility can affect individuals’ self-efficacy and ability to perform self-care; thus, reproductive health education is an important part of infertility treatment. The present qualitative study aimed to explore the experiences and educational needs of infertile women with regard to reproductive health.
Methods
In this qualitative study, we utilized a content analysis approach. Purposive sampling was performed to ensure maximum diversity. In total, 23 individual interviews were conducted with 20 Iranian women with infertility and 3 key informants between July 2018 and February 2019 in northern Iran. Data were collected through in-depth, semi-structured interviews. Data analysis was performed using a conventional content analysis approach.
Results
Reproductive health education needs were identified by analyzing interview data from 4 main categories: familiarity with the fertility process and preparation for pregnancy, recognition of infertility and expectations around seeking treatment, recognition of preventive actions associated with reproductive health, and correction of false beliefs. Recognizing the causes of infertility and understanding the different approaches to infertility treatment are among the most important educational needs of infertile women. The potential for neglect of health-related issues due to concerns about fertility and the maternal experience necessitates education about preventive measures for cervical cancer, breast cancer, and sexually transmitted infections. Correcting misconceptions, including those related to contraceptives and traditional medicine, can also help promote reproductive health.
Conclusions
In infertile women, the educational needs associated with reproductive health are multifaceted. Satisfying these needs can help achieve optimal treatment results and promote reproductive health.
Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • The impact of stigma on mental health and quality of life of infertile women: A systematic review
    Yue Xie, Yue Ren, Changmin Niu, Ying Zheng, Ping Yu, Lin Li
    Frontiers in Psychology.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
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Breaking the Gender Gap: A Two-part Observational Study of the Gender Disparity Among Korean Academic Emergency Physicians
Mi Jin Lee, ChangHo Kim
J Prev Med Public Health. 2020;53(5):362-370.   Published online August 7, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.20.286
  • 3,527 View
  • 84 Download
  • 1 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Objectives
Despite greater access to training positions and the presence of more women in emergency medicine, it has remained a men-dominated field. This study aims to identify the key issues causing the gender gap in Korea and establish measures to overcome them.
Methods
Using the annual statistical reports of the National Emergency Medical Center and data published on the Korean Society of Emergency Medicine website, cases that listed the current status and positions of members in its organization and its committees were analyzed. Secondary analysis was conducted using data from the 2015 Korean Society of Emergency Survey that included physicians’ demographics, academic ranking, years of experience, clinical work hours, training and board certification, core faculty status, position, and salaries.
Results
As of September 2019, women account for only 12.7% of the total number of emergency physicians (EP) in Korea; of 119 chair/ vice‐chair academic positions, women represented only 9.2%. Women EP were more often assistant professors and fellowship-trained, with fewer in core faculty. However, they worked the same numbers of clinical hours as their men counterparts. The median annual salary of women EP was less than that of men EP after adjusting for academic hospital rank, clinical hours, and core faculty status.
Conclusions
A gender gap still exists among Korean EP, and women earn less than men regardless of their rank, clinical hours, or training. Future studies should evaluate more data and develop system-wide practices to eliminate gender disparities.
Summary

Citations

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    European Journal of Emergency Medicine.2021; 28(5): 380.     CrossRef
Effects of Socio-demographic Factors on the Decreasing Trend in the Sex Ratio at Birth in Korea, 1997-2017
Jisuk Bae
J Prev Med Public Health. 2020;53(5):371-380.   Published online August 7, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.20.282
  • 3,296 View
  • 104 Download
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Objectives
This study investigated the effects of socio-demographic factors on the decreasing trend in the sex ratio at birth from 1997 to 2017 in Korea.
Methods
Data from 10 349 602 live births registered with Statistics Korea from 1997 to 2017 were analyzed. The secondary sex ratio (SSR), defined as the ratio of male to female live births, during the study period (1997-1999 [phase I], 2000-2002 [phase II], 2003-2005 [phase III], 2006-2008 [phase IV], 2009-2011 [phase V], 2012-2014 [phase VI], and 2015-2017 [phase VII]) was calculated according to selected socio-demographic factors, such as parental age, education, occupation, and birth order. Logistic regression models were used to estimate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals for a male birth after adjusting for potential confounders.
Results
The SSR gradually decreased from 1.10 (in 1998-2000 and 2002) to 1.05 (in 2013-2016). While a decreasing trend in the SSR was not noted among first births, male-biased sex ratios were prominent among third and higher-order births, for which the highest SSR was 1.46 in 1998. Higher birth order was significantly associated with an excess of male births in phases I-VI (≥third vs. first, OR range, 1.03 to 1.35). Advanced maternal age was significantly associated with an excess of female births in phases II, III, and V (≥40 vs. 20-24 years, OR range, 0.92 to 0.95).
Conclusions
This study demonstrated that advanced maternal age and reduction of the artificially-biased SSR among third and higher-order births may partially explain the decreasing trend in the SSR from 1997 to 2017 in Korea.
Summary
Brief Report
Impact of Admission Diagnosis on the Smoking Cessation Rate: A Brief Report From a Multi-centre Inpatient Smoking Cessation Programme in Singapore
Jason Jia Hao See, Kay Choong See
J Prev Med Public Health. 2020;53(5):381-386.   Published online July 17, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.20.134
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  • 127 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
Few studies have been published regarding the relevance of the admission diagnosis to the smoking cessation rate. We studied smoking cessation rates in relation to admission diagnoses in our inpatient smoking cessation programmes.
Methods
This retrospective study included all patients recruited into our inpatient smoking cessation programmes at 2 institutions in Singapore between June 2008 and December 2016. Patients were given individualized intensive counselling and were followed up via phone interviews for up to 6-month to assess their smoking status. Multivariable logistic regression was used to analyse potential associations between admission diagnoses and 6-month abstinence.
Results
A total of 7194 patients were included in this study. The mean age was 54.1 years, and 93.2% were male. In total, 1778 patients (24.7%) were abstinent at the 6-month follow-up call. Patients who quit smoking tended to be of Chinese ethnicity, have initiated smoking at a later age, be better educated, and have lower Fagerström Test of Nicotine Dependence scores. After adjusting for these factors, patients with a cardiovascular admission diagnosis had a significantly higher probability of quitting tobacco use than patients with a respiratory or other diagnosis.
Conclusions
In patients acutely admitted to the hospital, a diagnosis of cardiovascular disease was associated with the highest quit rate. Smoking cessation interventions need to be incorporated into all cardiovascular disease treatment pathways to leverage the patient’s motivation and to improve the quit rate. In addition, patients in groups with lower quit rates may benefit from more intensive programmes to increase the rate of successful cessation.
Summary

JPMPH : Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health