Skip Navigation
Skip to contents

JPMPH : Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health

OPEN ACCESS
SEARCH
Search

Previous issues

Page Path
HOME > Browse Articles > Previous issues
7 Previous issues
Filter
Filter
Article category
Keywords
Authors
Volume 45(1); January 2012
Prev issue Next issue
Special Article
Molecular Typing in Public Health Laboratories: From an Academic Indulgence to an Infection Control Imperative
Franz Allerberger
J Prev Med Public Health. 2012;45(1):1-7.   Published online January 31, 2012
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2012.45.1.1
  • 9,985 View
  • 94 Download
  • 10 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF

Using three Austrian case studies, the variegated applications of molecular typing in today's public health laboratories are discussed to help illustrate preventive management strategies relying on DNA subtyping. DNA macrorestriction analysis by pulsed field gel electrophoresis has become the gold standard for subtyping of food borne pathogens like listeria, salmonella, campylobacter and Bacillus cereus. Using a Salmonella Mbandaka outbreak from the year 2010 as example, it is shown how the comparison of patterns from human isolates, food isolates, animal isolates and feed isolates can allow to identify and confirm a source of disease. An epidemiological connection between the simultaneous occurrence of tuberculosis in cattle and deer with cases of human tuberculosis due to Mycobacterium caprae in 2010 was excluded using mycobacterial interspersed repetitive units variable-number tandem repeats subtyping. Also in 2010, multilocus sequence typing with nonselective housekeeping genes, the so-called sequence based typing protocol, was used to elucidate connections between an environmental source (a hospital drinking water system) and a case of legionellosis. During the last decades, molecular typing has evolved to become a routine tool in the daily work of public health laboratories. The challenge is now no longer to simply type microorganisms, but to type them in a way that allows for data exchange between public health laboratories all over the world.

Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Ground water as the source of an outbreak of Salmonella Enteritidis
    Ana Kovačić, Željko Huljev, Edita Sušić
    Journal of Epidemiology and Global Health.2017; 7(3): 181.     CrossRef
  • Distribution of Salmonella serovars along the food chain in Poland, 2010–2015
    Magdalena Skarżyńska, Andrzej Hoszowski, Magdalena Zając, Anna Lalak, Ilona Samcik, Renata Kwit, Dariusz Wasyl
    Journal of Veterinary Research.2017; 61(2): 173.     CrossRef
  • The risk of carriage of Salmonella spp. and Listeria monocytogenes in food animals in dynamic populations
    Korana Stipetic, Yu‐Chen Chang, Kenlyn Peters, Ahmed Salem, Sanjay H. Doiphode, Patrick L. McDonough, Yung Fu Chang, Ali Sultan, Hussni O. Mohammed
    Veterinary Medicine and Science.2016; 2(4): 246.     CrossRef
  • Molecular typing of bacteria for epidemiological surveillance and outbreak investigation / Molekulare Typisierung von Bakterien für die epidemiologische Überwachung und Ausbruchsabklärung
    Werner Ruppitsch
    Die Bodenkultur: Journal of Land Management, Food and Environment.2016; 67(4): 199.     CrossRef
  • Legionella detection and subgrouping in water air-conditioning cooling tower systems in Kuwait
    Qadreyah Al-Matawah, Sameer Al-Zenki, Ahmad Al-Azmi, Tahani Al-Waalan, Fadila Al-Salameen, Ahmad Ben Hejji
    Environmental Science and Pollution Research.2015; 22(13): 10235.     CrossRef
  • Listeriosis cluster in Sydney linked to hospital food
    Zeina Najjar, Leena Gupta, Vitali Sintchenko, Craig Shadbolt, Qinning Wang, Narinder Bansal
    Medical Journal of Australia.2015; 202(8): 448.     CrossRef
  • Diversity of pulsed-field gel electrophoresis patterns of cereulide-producing isolates ofBacillus cereusandBacillus weihenstephanensis
    Virginie Castiaux, Elise N'Guessan, Izabela Swiecicka, Laurence Delbrassinne, Katelijne Dierick, Jacques Mahillon
    FEMS Microbiology Letters.2014; 353(2): 124.     CrossRef
  • Mycobacterium capraeinfection in humans
    Wolfgang M Prodinger, Alexandra Indra, Orhan K Koksalan, Zeki Kilicaslan, Elvira Richter
    Expert Review of Anti-infective Therapy.2014; 12(12): 1501.     CrossRef
  • Same-Day Subtyping of Campylobacter jejuni and C. coli Isolates by Use of Multiplex Ligation-Dependent Probe Amplification–Binary Typing
    Angela J. Cornelius, Olivier Vandenberg, Beth Robson, Brent J. Gilpin, Stephanie M. Brandt, Paula Scholes, Delphine Martiny, Philip E. Carter, Paul van Vught, Jan Schouten, Stephen L. W. On, D. J. Diekema
    Journal of Clinical Microbiology.2014; 52(9): 3345.     CrossRef
  • Strukturelle Voraussetzungen und Bedingungen für eine effektive mikrobiologische Diagnostik bei Ausbruchsgeschehen
    F. Allerberger
    Bundesgesundheitsblatt - Gesundheitsforschung - Gesundheitsschutz.2013; 56(1): 22.     CrossRef
Original Articles
Trend of Mortality Rate and Injury Burden of Transport Accidents, Suicides, and Falls
Ki Sook Kim, Soon Duck Kim, Sang Hee Lee
J Prev Med Public Health. 2012;45(1):8-13.   Published online January 31, 2012
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2012.45.1.8
  • 8,316 View
  • 75 Download
  • 6 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives

Recently injury has become a major world-wide health problem. But studies in Korea about injuries were very few. Thus, this study was conducted to analyze the trend of major injuries from 1991 to 2006 and to provide basic data for preventing injuries.

Methods

This study was based on the National Statistical Office data from 1991 to 2006 and calculated to estimate the burden of major injuries by using the standard expected years of life lost (SEYLL) and total lost earnings equation.

Results

For transport accidents, mortality, SEYLL and total lost earnings were increased from 1991 to 1996 and decreased from 2000 to 2006. On the other hand, for suicides, these were increased gradually. Since 2003, falls were included in ten leading causes of death. This study showed that injury causes major social and economical losses.

Conclusions

We could reduce injury related premature death through active interest in injury prevention program.

Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Joinpoint Regression About Injury Mortality and Hospitalization in Korea
    Hyun Jin Park, Ui Jeong Kim, Won kyung Lee, Bohyun Park, Yoonhee Shin, Seonhwa Lee, Eun Jeong Choi, Nam-eun Kim, Ju Ok Park, Hyesook Park
    Journal of Korean Medical Science.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Development of a modified trauma and injury severity score to predict disability in acute trauma patients
    Ki Jeong Hong, Kyoung Jun Song, Sang Do Shin, Young Sun Ro, Jeong Ho Park, Seung Chul Lee, Chu Hyun Kim
    Clinical and Experimental Emergency Medicine.2020; 7(4): 281.     CrossRef
  • Trend in Disability-Adjusted Life Years (DALYs) for Injuries in Korea: 2004–2012
    Yoonjic Kim, Yu Jin Kim, Sang Do Shin, Kyoung Jun Song, Jungeun Kim, Jeong Ho Park
    Journal of Korean Medical Science.2018;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • The Burden of Acute Pesticide Poisoning and Pesticide Regulation in Korea
    Seulki Ko, Eun Shil Cha, Yeongchull Choi, Jaeyoung Kim, Jong-Hun Kim, Won Jin Lee
    Journal of Korean Medical Science.2018;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Disability-Adjusted Life Years (DALYs) for Injuries Using Death Certificates and Hospital Discharge Survey by the Korean Burden of Disease Study 2012
    Won Kyung Lee, Dohee Lim, Hyesook Park
    Journal of Korean Medical Science.2016; 31(Suppl 2): S200.     CrossRef
  • The Burden of Premature Mortality in Hamadan Province in 2006 and 2010 Using Standard Expected Years of Potential Life Lost: A Population-based Study
    Jalal Poorolajal, Nader Esmailnasab, Jamal Ahmadzadeh, Tahereh Azizi Motlagh
    Epidemiology and Health.2012; 34: e2012005.     CrossRef
Impact of Individual and Combined Health Behaviors on All Causes of Premature Mortality Among Middle Aged Men in Korea: The Seoul Male Cohort Study
Chul Woo Rhee, Ji Young Kim, Byung Joo Park, Zhong Min Li, Yoon-Ok Ahn
J Prev Med Public Health. 2012;45(1):14-20.   Published online January 31, 2012
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2012.45.1.14
  • 9,681 View
  • 109 Download
  • 20 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives

The aim of this study was to evaluate and quantify the risk of both individual and combined health behaviors on premature mortality in middle aged men in Korea.

Methods

In total, 14 533 male subjects 40 to 59 years of age were recruited. At enrollment, subjects completed a baseline questionnaire, which included information about socio-demographic factors, past medical history, and life style. During the follow-up period from 1993 to 2008, we identified 990 all-cause premature deaths using national death certificates. A Cox proportional hazard regression model was used to estimate the hazard ratio (HR) of each health risk behavior, which included smoking, drinking, physical inactivity, and lack of sleep hours. Using the Cox model, each health behavior was assigned a risk score proportional to its regression coefficient value. Health risk scores were calculated for each patient and the HR of all-cause premature mortality was calculated according to risk score.

Results

Current smoking and drinking, high body mass index, less sleep hours, and less education were significantly associated with all-cause premature mortality, while regular exercise was associated with a reduced risk. When combined by health risk score, there was a strong trend for increased mortality risk with increased score (p-trend < 0.01). When compared with the 1-9 score group, HRs of the 10-19 and 20-28 score groups were 2.58 (95% confidence intervals [CIs], 2.19 to 3.03) and 7.09 (95% CIs, 5.21 to 9.66), respectively.

Conclusions

Modifiable risk factors, such as smoking, drinking, and regular exercise, have considerable impact on premature mortality and should be assessed in combination.

Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Non-occupational physical activity and risk of cardiovascular disease, cancer and mortality outcomes: a dose–response meta-analysis of large prospective studies
    Leandro Garcia, Matthew Pearce, Ali Abbas, Alexander Mok, Tessa Strain, Sara Ali, Alessio Crippa, Paddy C Dempsey, Rajna Golubic, Paul Kelly, Yvonne Laird, Eoin McNamara, Samuel Moore, Thiago Herick de Sa, Andrea D Smith, Katrien Wijndaele, James Woodcock
    British Journal of Sports Medicine.2023; 57(15): 979.     CrossRef
  • Coffee and tea consumption and mortality from all causes, cardiovascular disease and cancer: a pooled analysis of prospective studies from the Asia Cohort Consortium
    Sangah Shin, Jung Eun Lee, Erikka Loftfield, Xiao-Ou Shu, Sarah Krull Abe, Md Shafiur Rahman, Eiko Saito, Md Rashedul Islam, Shoichiro Tsugane, Norie Sawada, Ichiro Tsuji, Seiki Kanemura, Yumi Sugawara, Yasutake Tomata, Atsuko Sadakane, Kotaro Ozasa, Isao
    International Journal of Epidemiology.2022; 51(2): 626.     CrossRef
  • Association between body mass index and oesophageal cancer mortality: a pooled analysis of prospective cohort studies with >800 000 individuals in the Asia Cohort Consortium
    Sangjun Lee, Jieun Jang, Sarah Krull Abe, Shafiur Rahman, Eiko Saito, Rashedul Islam, Prakash C Gupta, Norie Sawada, Akiko Tamakoshi, Xiao-Ou Shu, Woon-Puay Koh, Atsuko Sadakane, Ichiro Tsuji, Jeongseon Kim, Isao Oze, Chisato Nagata, San-Lin You, Myung-He
    International Journal of Epidemiology.2022; 51(4): 1190.     CrossRef
  • Burden of Cancer Due to Cigarette Smoking and Alcohol Consumption in Korea
    Yoon-Sun Jung, Seok-Jun Yoon
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2022; 19(6): 3493.     CrossRef
  • First Report on the Co-Occurrence and Clustering Profiles of Cardiovascular Lifestyle Risk Factors among Adults in Burkina Faso
    Kadari Cissé, Sékou Samadoulougou, Yves Coppieters, Bruno Bonnechère, Patrice Zabsonré, Fati Kirakoya-Samadoulougou, Seni Kouanda
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2022; 19(14): 8225.     CrossRef
  • Associations Between Self-Reported Sleep Duration and Mortality in Employed Individuals: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis
    Paula R. Pienaar, Tracy L. Kolbe-Alexander, Willem van Mechelen, Cécile R. L. Boot, Laura C. Roden, Estelle V. Lambert, Dale E. Rae
    American Journal of Health Promotion.2021; 35(6): 853.     CrossRef
  • Public health nurses’ workforce factors and population health outcomes in the United States
    Seok Hyun Gwon, Young Ik Cho, Soonhwa Paek, Weiming Ke
    Public Health Nursing.2020; 37(6): 829.     CrossRef
  • Patterns of change in cardiovascular risks of Korean male workers: a 10-year cohort analysis using the National Health Insurance Service–National Sample Cohort (NHIS-NSC) 2.0 database
    Hosihn Ryu, Jiyeon Jung, Jihyun Moon
    BMJ Open.2020; 10(11): e038446.     CrossRef
  • Sleep duration and mortality in Korean adults: a population-based prospective cohort study
    Sohyeon Kwon, Hyeyoung Lee, Jong-Tae Lee, Min-Jeong Shin, Sangbum Choi, Hannah Oh
    BMC Public Health.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Sleep duration and risk of all-cause mortality: a systematic review and meta-analysis
    H. A. García-Perdomo, J. Zapata-Copete, C. A. Rojas-Cerón
    Epidemiology and Psychiatric Sciences.2019; 28(5): 578.     CrossRef
  • Time trends in healthy lifestyle among adults in Germany: Results from three national health interview and examination surveys between 1990 and 2011
    Jonas D. Finger, Markus A. Busch, Christin Heidemann, Cornelia Lange, Gert B. M. Mensink, Anja Schienkiewitz, David Meyre
    PLOS ONE.2019; 14(9): e0222218.     CrossRef
  • Simple sleep questions can predict 12-year mortality in a rural population
    Christina Darviri, Artemios Artemiadis, Xanthi Tigani, Panagiota Darvyri, Charalambos Gnardellis
    Sleep and Biological Rhythms.2018; 16(2): 253.     CrossRef
  • Self‐Reported Sleep Duration and Quality and Cardiovascular Disease and Mortality: A Dose‐Response Meta‐Analysis
    Chun Shing Kwok, Evangelos Kontopantelis, George Kuligowski, Matthew Gray, Alan Muhyaldeen, Christopher P. Gale, George M. Peat, Jacqueline Cleator, Carolyn Chew‐Graham, Yoon Kong Loke, Mamas Andreas Mamas
    Journal of the American Heart Association.2018;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Sleep duration and risk of all-cause mortality: A flexible, non-linear, meta-regression of 40 prospective cohort studies
    Tong-Zu Liu, Chang Xu, Matteo Rota, Hui Cai, Chao Zhang, Ming-Jun Shi, Rui-Xia Yuan, Hong Weng, Xiang-Yu Meng, Joey S.W. Kwong, Xin Sun
    Sleep Medicine Reviews.2017; 32: 28.     CrossRef
  • Cohort Profile:Ten to Men(the Australian Longitudinal Study on Male Health)
    Jane Pirkis, Dianne Currier, John Carlin, Louisa Degenhardt, Shyamali C. Dharmage, Billie Giles-Corti, Ian R. Gordon, Lyle C. Gurrin, Jane S. Hocking, Anne Kavanagh, Louise Keogh, Rachel Koelmeyer, Anthony D. LaMontagne, George Patton, Lena Sanci, Matthew
    International Journal of Epidemiology.2016; : dyw055.     CrossRef
  • The Australian longitudinal study on male health-methods
    Dianne Currier, Jane Pirkis, John Carlin, Louisa Degenhardt, Shyamali C. Dharmage, Billie Giles-Corti, Ian Gordon, Lyle Gurrin, Jane Hocking, Anne Kavanagh, Louise A. Keogh, Rachel Koelmeyer, Anthony D. LaMontagne, Marisa Schlichthorst, George Patton, Len
    BMC Public Health.2016;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • The relationship between mild alcohol consumption and mortality in Koreans: a systematic review and meta-analysis
    Ji-Eun Park, Tae-young Choi, Yeonhee Ryu, Sung-Il Cho
    BMC Public Health.2015;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Adverse Lifestyle Leads to an Annual Excess of 2 Million Deaths in China
    G. Neil Thomas, Man Ping Wang, Sai Yin Ho, Kwok Hang Mak, Kar Keung Cheng, Tai Hing Lam, Hamid Reza Baradaran
    PLoS ONE.2014; 9(2): e89650.     CrossRef
  • Cardiovascular Health Metrics and All-cause and Cardiovascular Disease Mortality Among Middle-aged Men in Korea: The Seoul Male Cohort Study
    Ji Young Kim, Young-Jin Ko, Chul Woo Rhee, Byung-Joo Park, Dong-Hyun Kim, Jong-Myon Bae, Myung-Hee Shin, Moo-Song Lee, Zhong Min Li, Yoon-Ok Ahn
    Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health.2013; 46(6): 319.     CrossRef
  • The combined effects of healthy lifestyle behaviors on all cause mortality: A systematic review and meta-analysis
    Martin Loef, Harald Walach
    Preventive Medicine.2012; 55(3): 163.     CrossRef
Indoor Physical Activity Reduces All-Cause and Cardiovascular Disease Mortality Among Elderly Women
Soyoung Park, Joongyub Lee, Dong Yoon Kang, Chul Woo Rhee, Byung-Joo Park
J Prev Med Public Health. 2012;45(1):21-28.   Published online January 31, 2012
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2012.45.1.21
  • 10,111 View
  • 85 Download
  • 15 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives

The aim of this study was to investigate whether a medium to high degree of total physical activity and indoor physical activity were associated with reduced all-cause and cardiovascular mortality among elderly Korean women.

Methods

A prospective cohort study was done to evaluate the association between physical activity and mortality. The cohort was made up of elderly (≥65 years of age) subjects. Baseline information was collected with a self-administered questionnaire and linked to death certificates retrieved from a database. Cox proportional hazard models were used to estimate the hazard ratios (HRs) with 95% confidence interval (CI) levels.

Results

Women who did not suffer from stroke, cancer, or ischemic heart disease were followed for a median of 8 years (n=5079). A total of 1798 all-cause deaths were recorded, of which 607 (33.8%) were due to cardiovascular disease. The group with the highest level of total physical activity and indoor physical activity was significantly associated to a reduced all-cause mortality (HR, 0.60; 95% CI, 0.51 to 0.71 and HR, 0.58; 95% CI, 0.50 to 0.67, respectively) compared to the group with the lowest level of total physical activity and indoor physical activity. Additionally, the group with the highest level of total physical activity and indoor physical activity was significantly associated to a lower cardiovascular disease mortality (HR, 0.53; 95% CI, 0.40 to 0.71 and HR, 0.51; 95% CI, 0.39 to 0.67, respectively) compared to the group with the lowest level of total physical activity and indoor physical activity.

Conclusions

Our study showed that regular indoor physical activity among elderly Korean women has healthy benefits.

Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Physical activity and odds of coronary heart disease among Lebanese women
    Fatima Ghaddar, Rouba K Zeidan, Pascale Salameh, Françoise Maupas-Schwalm
    BMC Public Health.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Contemporary and dynamic effects of socio-economic factors on physical (in)activity: Does intensity matter?
    Christian M. García-Witulski
    Frontiers in Public Health.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • An SCM-G2SFCA Model for Studying Spatial Accessibility of Urban Parks
    Zexu Zhou, Xuedong Zhang, Mengwei Li, Xuedi Wang
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2022; 20(1): 714.     CrossRef
  • Urban green space quality and older adult recreation: an international comparison
    Faysal Kabir Shuvo, Xiaoqi Feng, Thomas Astell-Burt
    Cities & Health.2021; 5(3): 329.     CrossRef
  • The Beneficial Role of Exercise Training for Myocardial Infarction Treatment in Elderly
    Ying Xing, Si-Dong Yang, Man-Man Wang, Ya-Shuo Feng, Fang Dong, Feng Zhang
    Frontiers in Physiology.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • American heart association’s cardiovascular health metrics and risk of cardiovascular disease mortality among a middle-aged male Scandinavian population
    Nzechukwu M. Isiozor, Setor K. Kunutsor, Ari Voutilainen, Sudhir Kurl, Jussi Kauhanen, Jari A. Laukkanen
    Annals of Medicine.2019; 51(5-6): 306.     CrossRef
  • Level of moderate-intensity leisure-time physical activity and reduced mortality in middle-aged and elderly Chinese
    Ying Liu, Wanqing Wen, Yu-Tang Gao, Hong-Lan Li, Gong Yang, Yong-Bing Xiang, Xiao-Ou Shu, Wei Zheng
    Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health.2018; 72(1): 13.     CrossRef
  • Association of leisure-time physical activity with total and cause-specific mortality: a pooled analysis of nearly a half million adults in the Asia Cohort Consortium
    Ying Liu, Xiao-Ou Shu, Wanqing Wen, Eiko Saito, M Shafiur Rahman, Shoichiro Tsugane, Akiko Tamakoshi, Yong-Bing Xiang, Jian-Min Yuan, Yu-Tang Gao, Ichiro Tsuji, Seiki Kanemura, Chisato Nagata, Myung-Hee Shin, Wen-Harn Pan, Woon-Puay Koh, Norie Sawada, Hui
    International Journal of Epidemiology.2018; 47(3): 771.     CrossRef
  • PROPIEDADES PSICOMÉTRICAS DEL AUTOINFORME DE BARRERAS PARA LA PRÁCTICA DEL EJERCICIO FÍSICO (ABPEF)
    J. Domínguez-Alonso, A. López-Castelo, I. Portela-Pino
    Revista Internacional de Medicina y Ciencias de la Actividad Física y del Deporte.2018; 18(72): 737.     CrossRef
  • Bénéfices de l’activité physique en endurance chez les seniors âgés de 70 ans ou plus : une revue systématique
    Walid Bouaziz, Thomas Vogel, Elise Schmitt, Georges Kaltenbach, Bernard Geny, Pierre Olivier Lang
    La Presse Médicale.2017; 46(9): 794.     CrossRef
  • Even a low-dose of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity reduces mortality by 22% in adults aged ≥60 years: a systematic review and meta-analysis
    David Hupin, Frédéric Roche, Vincent Gremeaux, Jean-Claude Chatard, Mathieu Oriol, Jean-Michel Gaspoz, Jean-Claude Barthélémy, Pascal Edouard
    British Journal of Sports Medicine.2015; 49(19): 1262.     CrossRef
  • Physical Activity in Non-Frail and Frail Older Adults
    F. Marijke Jansen, Rick G. Prins, Astrid Etman, Hidde P. van der Ploeg, Sanne I. de Vries, Frank J. van Lenthe, Frank H. Pierik, Thomas Ernst Dorner
    PLOS ONE.2015; 10(4): e0123168.     CrossRef
  • Physical activity programs for elderly persons: an evaluation of Brazilian scientific production using the RE-AIM framework
    Camila Fabiana Rossi Squarcini, Saulo Vasconcelos Rocha, Hector Luiz Rodrigues Munaro, Tânia Rosane Bertoldo Benedetti, Fabio Araujo Almeida
    Revista Brasileira de Geriatria e Gerontologia.2015; 18(4): 909.     CrossRef
  • Physical activity and risk of cardiovascular disease
    Jian Li, Adrian Loerbroks, Peter Angerer
    Current Opinion in Cardiology.2013; 28(5): 575.     CrossRef
  • The 2010 ESPEN Sir David Cuthbertson Lecture: New and old proteins: Clinical implications
    Rozalina G. McCoy, K. Sreekumaran Nair
    Clinical Nutrition.2013; 32(5): 728.     CrossRef
Social Determinants of Smoking Behavior: The Healthy Twin Study, Korea
Youn Sik Kim, Hansoo Ko, Changgyo Yoon, Dong-Hun Lee, Joohon Sung
J Prev Med Public Health. 2012;45(1):29-36.   Published online January 31, 2012
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2012.45.1.29
  • 9,893 View
  • 73 Download
  • 10 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives

The purpose of this study was to identify any influence of socioeconomic status on smoking and smoking cessation in a situation where genetic factors are controlled.

Methods

The sample for this study was 2502 members of the twins and families cohort who participated in the Korean Healthy Twins Study from 2005 to 2009. Groups of brothers or sisters, including twins and fraternal twins, were compared in terms of smoking and smoking cessation behaviors according to differences in socioeconomic status and gender.

Results

In a situation with complete control of genetic factors, results showed that the daily smoking amount, cumulative smoking amount, and dependence on nicotine decreased with higher-status occupations, and the rate of smoking and amount of cumulative smoking decreased with higher levels of education. Regarding smoking cessation behavior, a higher level of education was associated with a lower smoking cessation rate, and no significant gender differences were found.

Conclusions

Environmental factors had a stronger influence on smoking behavior than did genetic factors. Genetic factors had greater influence on smoking cessation than did environmental factors; however, this requires verification in further studies.

Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Interrogating Patterns of Cancer Disparities by Expanding the Social Determinants of Health Framework to Include Biological Pathways of Social Experiences
    Celina I. Valencia, Francine C. Gachupin, Yamilé Molina, Ken Batai
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2022; 19(4): 2455.     CrossRef
  • Prenatal Tobacco Exposure and the Risk of Tobacco Smoking and Dependence in Offspring: a Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis
    Bereket Duko, Gavin Pereira, Robert J. Tait, Sylvester Dodzi Nyadanu, Kim Betts, Rosa Alati
    Drug and Alcohol Dependence.2021; 227: 108993.     CrossRef
  • Evolución del tabaquismo según clase social en la población adulta de las Islas Canarias durante el periodo 2000-2015: seguimiento de la cohorte CDC-Canarias
    Francisco Javier Cuevas Fernández, María José Iglesias Girón, María del Cristo Rodríguez Pérez, Silvia Ortiz Simarro, Antonio Cabrera de León, Armando Aguirre-Jaime
    Atención Primaria.2020; 52(6): 381.     CrossRef
  • Socio-economic contributors to current cigarette smoking among Iranian household heads: findings from a national household survey
    Mohammad Reza Masjedi, Payam Roshanfekr, Seyran Naghdi, Peter Higgs, Bahram Armoon, Sonya Ghaffari, Hesam Ghiasvand
    Journal of Substance Use.2020; 25(2): 217.     CrossRef
  • Interaction between cytochrome P450 2A6 and Catechol-O-Methyltransferase genes and their association with smoking risk in young men
    Wei-Chih Ou, Yi-Chin Huang, Chih-Ling Huang, Min-Hsuan Lin, Yi-Chun Chen, Yi-Ju Chen, Chen-Nu Liu, Mei-Chih Chen, Ching-Shan Huang, Pei-Lain Chen
    Behavioral and Brain Functions.2017;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Effect of the Rs1051730–Rs16969968 Variant and Smoking Cessation Treatment: A Meta-Analysis
    Tiffany Leung, Andrew Bergen, Marcus Robert Munafò, Kim De Ruyck, Peter Selby, Vincenzo De Luca
    Pharmacogenomics.2015; 16(7): 713.     CrossRef
  • Race and health profiles in the United States: an examination of the social gradient through the 2009 CHIS adult survey
    A.B. Nguyen, R. Moser, W.-Y. Chou
    Public Health.2014; 128(12): 1076.     CrossRef
  • Socioeconomic status and dyslipidemia in Korean adults: The 2008–2010 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey
    Ga Eun Nam, Kyung Hwan Cho, Yong Gyu Park, Kyung Do Han, Youn Seon Choi, Seon Mee Kim, Kyung Shik Lee, Byung Joon Ko, Yang Hyun Kim, Byoung Duck Han, Do Hoon Kim
    Preventive Medicine.2013; 57(4): 304.     CrossRef
  • Smoking among Individuals with Schizophrenia in Korea: Gender Differences
    Sun S. Kim, Sangkeun Chung, Jong-Il Park, Ae-Ja Jung, David Kalman, Douglas M. Ziedonis
    Archives of Psychiatric Nursing.2013; 27(5): 241.     CrossRef
  • Environmental factors that influence smoking habits of monozygotic and dizygotic twins
    Mónika Bakkné Nagy, Dávid László Tárnoki, Ádám Domonkos Tárnoki
    Orvosi Hetilap.2013; 154(25): 978.     CrossRef
The Nonlinear Association Between Internet Using Time for Non-Educational Purposes and Adolescent Health
Jong Yeon Kim
J Prev Med Public Health. 2012;45(1):37-46.   Published online January 31, 2012
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2012.45.1.37
  • 13,520 View
  • 109 Download
  • 26 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives

This study was performed to consider the association between Internet using time for non-educational purposes and adolescent health, and to examine how health status differs between Internet users and non-users.

Methods

We analyzed 2009 data from the Korea Adolescent Risk Behavior Web-Based Survey, conducted on a nationally representative sample of students in grades 7 to 12. A total of 75 066 adolescents were categorized into four groups according to their Internet using time excluding using for educational purposes: non-Internet users (NIUs), occasional Internet users (OIUs) (<1 h/d), moderate Internet users (MIUs) (≥1 and <2 h/d), and heavy Internet users (HIUs) (≥2 h/d). Health factors included eight health risk behavior indices, four mental health indices and six physical health indices.

Results

The distribution of Internet use was as follows: NIUs 17.4%, OIUs 68.1%, MIUs 12.7%, and HIUs 1.7%. In multivariate analysis, using OIUs as a reference, U- or J-shaped associations were observed for five health risk behavior indices (current smoking, current drinking, drug abuse, sexual intercourse, sedentary behavior on weekdays) and four mental health indices (stressed, depressed, suicidal ideation, attempted suicide) in both genders. After removing confounding effects, including age, region, school type, subjective school record, subjective economic status, presence of parents, living with family, and sedentary behavior, these associations were still observed.

Conclusions

Health professionals should consider both Internet non-users (for non-educational purposes) and heavy users to be high-risk groups in terms of health status. Also, more well-designed studies are needed to clarify what factors are working in these nonlinear associations.

Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Socio-economic, health and environmental factors influencing suicide rates: A cross-country study in the Eastern Mediterranean region
    Majid Safaei Lari, Sara Emamgholipour Sefiddashti
    Journal of Forensic and Legal Medicine.2023; 93: 102463.     CrossRef
  • Association between duration of electronic screen use for non-educational purposes and depression symptoms among middle and high school students: a cross-sectional study in Zhejiang Province, China
    Hao Wang, Fiona Bragg, Yunqi Guan, Jieming Zhong, Na Li, Jin Pan, Min Yu
    Frontiers in Public Health.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Adolescents’ Online Coping: When Less Is More but None Is Worse
    Kathryn L. Modecki, Megan Duvenage, Bep Uink, Bonnie L. Barber, Caroline L. Donovan
    Clinical Psychological Science.2022; 10(3): 467.     CrossRef
  • Leisure sedentary time and suicide risk among young adolescents: Data from 54 low- and middle-income countries
    Chuanwei Ma, Zilin Li, Yuting Tong, Min Zhao, Costan G. Magnussen, Bo Xi
    Journal of Affective Disorders.2022; 298: 457.     CrossRef
  • Adolescent Social Media Use: Pitfalls and Promises in Relation to Cybervictimization, Friend Support, and Depressive Symptoms
    Stephanie S. Fredrick, Amanda B. Nickerson, Jennifer A. Livingston
    Journal of Youth and Adolescence.2022; 51(2): 361.     CrossRef
  • Digital media inhibit self-regulatory private speech use in preschool children: The “digital bubble effect”
    Vincenzo Bochicchio, Kayla Keith, Ignacio Montero, Cristiano Scandurra, Adam Winsler
    Cognitive Development.2022; 62: 101180.     CrossRef
  • Cognitive Dysfunction among U.S. High School Students and Its Association with Time Spent on Digital Devices: A Population-Based Study
    Saral Desai, Travis Satnarine, Puneet Singla, Ayushi Mistry, Salika Gadiwala, Sejal Patel, Bibhuti Das, Prerna Sharma, Muna Telsem, Robert Stuart, Meher Chahal, Abdul Bakarr, Ya-Ching Hsieh, Rana Pathrose, Urvish Patel, Tapan Parikh, Saurabhkumar Patel
    Adolescents.2022; 2(2): 286.     CrossRef
  • A Systematic Review of Systematic Reviews Exploring the Factors Related to Child and Adolescent Self-Harm
    Danielle Varley, Clare Fenton, Georgina Gargan, Olivia Taylor, Amelia Taylor, Natalie Kirby, Michael Morton, Jamie Barrow, Christopher Hatton, Barry Wright
    Adolescent Psychiatry.2022; 12(2): 79.     CrossRef
  • Associations between smartphone use and mental health and well-being among young Swiss men
    Joseph Studer, Simon Marmet, Matthias Wicki, Yasser Khazaal, Gerhard Gmel
    Journal of Psychiatric Research.2022; 156: 602.     CrossRef
  • Health Literacy and Health Behavior: Associated Factors in Surabaya High School Students, Indonesia
    Junaidi Budi Prihanto, Faridha Nurhayati, Endang Sri Wahjuni, Ryota Matsuyama, Miwako Tsunematsu, Masayuki Kakehashi
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2021; 18(15): 8111.     CrossRef
  • The relationship between screen-based sedentary behaviors and symptoms of depression and anxiety in youth: a systematic review of moderating variables
    Jennifer Zink, Britni R. Belcher, Kellie Imm, Adam M. Leventhal
    BMC Public Health.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Nonsuicidal Self-Injury: Its Associations With Pathological Internet Use and Psychopathology Among Adolescents
    Gergely Mészáros, Dora Győri, Lili Olga Horváth, Dora Szentiványi, Judit Balázs
    Frontiers in Psychiatry.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Isolating the Association of Sleep, Depressive State, and Other Independent Indicators for Suicide Ideation in United States Teenagers
    Lynn M. Whitmore, Tyler C. Smith
    Archives of Suicide Research.2019; 23(3): 471.     CrossRef
  • Association of screen time and physical activity with health-related quality of life in Iranian children and adolescents
    Nazgol Motamed-Gorji, Mostafa Qorbani, Fatemeh Nikkho, Mojgan Asadi, Mohammad Esmaeil Motlagh, Omid Safari, Tahereh Arefirad, Hamid Asayesh, Rasool Mohammadi, Morteza Mansourian, Roya Kelishadi
    Health and Quality of Life Outcomes.2019;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Depressive Symptoms, Emotional Aggression, School Adjustment, and Mobile Phone Dependency Among Adolescents with Allergic Diseases in South Korea
    Juyeon Oh, Jiwon An
    Journal of Pediatric Nursing.2019; 47: e24.     CrossRef
  • Social media, internet use and suicide attempts in adolescents
    Rosemary Sedgwick, Sophie Epstein, Rina Dutta, Dennis Ougrin
    Current Opinion in Psychiatry.2019; 32(6): 534.     CrossRef
  • Type of screen time moderates effects on outcomes in 4013 children: evidence from the Longitudinal Study of Australian Children
    Taren Sanders, Philip D. Parker, Borja del Pozo-Cruz, Michael Noetel, Chris Lonsdale
    International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity.2019;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Reciprocal Relationships between Trajectories of Depressive Symptoms and Screen Media Use during Adolescence
    Stephen Houghton, David Lawrence, Simon C. Hunter, Michael Rosenberg, Corinne Zadow, Lisa Wood, Trevor Shilton
    Journal of Youth and Adolescence.2018; 47(11): 2453.     CrossRef
  • A systematic review of the relationship between internet use, self-harm and suicidal behaviour in young people: The good, the bad and the unknown
    Amanda Marchant, Keith Hawton, Ann Stewart, Paul Montgomery, Vinod Singaravelu, Keith Lloyd, Nicola Purdy, Kate Daine, Ann John, Kim-Kwang Raymond Choo
    PLOS ONE.2017; 12(8): e0181722.     CrossRef
  • Differences by Sex in Association of Mental Health With Video Gaming or Other Nonacademic Computer Use Among US Adolescents
    Hogan H. Lee, Jung Hye Sung, Ji-Young Lee, Jae Eun Lee
    Preventing Chronic Disease.2017;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Screen Time on School Days and Risks for Psychiatric Symptoms and Self-Harm in Mainland Chinese Adolescents
    Mingli Liu, Qingsen Ming, Jinyao Yi, Xiang Wang, Shuqiao Yao
    Frontiers in Psychology.2016;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Dose–response association of screen time-based sedentary behaviour in children and adolescents and depression: a meta-analysis of observational studies
    Mingli Liu, Lang Wu, Shuqiao Yao
    British Journal of Sports Medicine.2016; 50(20): 1252.     CrossRef
  • Sedentary behavior and indicators of mental health in school-aged children and adolescents: A systematic review
    Vivien Suchert, Reiner Hanewinkel, Barbara Isensee
    Preventive Medicine.2015; 76: 48.     CrossRef
  • Sedentary behaviour and the risk of depression: a meta-analysis
    Long Zhai, Yi Zhang, Dongfeng Zhang
    British Journal of Sports Medicine.2015; 49(11): 705.     CrossRef
  • Use of Commonly Available Technologies for Diabetes Information and Self-Management Among Adolescents With Type 1 Diabetes and Their Parents: A Web-Based Survey Study
    Sarah E Vaala, Korey K Hood, Lori Laffel, Yaa A Kumah-Crystal, Cindy K Lybarger, Shelagh A Mulvaney
    interactive Journal of Medical Research.2015; 4(4): e24.     CrossRef
  • Heavy Internet use and its associations with health risk and health-promoting behaviours among Thai university students
    Karl Peltzer, Supa Pengpid, Tawatchai Apidechkul
    International Journal of Adolescent Medicine and Health.2014; 26(2): 187.     CrossRef
Changes in Dietary Behavior Among Adolescents and Their Association With Government Nutrition Policies in Korea, 2005-2009
Sang Geun Bae, Jong Yeon Kim, Keon Yeop Kim, Soon Woo Park, Jisuk Bae, Won Kee Lee
J Prev Med Public Health. 2012;45(1):47-59.   Published online January 31, 2012
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2012.45.1.47
  • 12,873 View
  • 109 Download
  • 37 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives

This study was conducted to observe recent changes in adolescents' dietary behavior and indirectly evaluate the effects of the government's nutritional policies in Korea.

Methods

We analyzed the secular trends in seven dietary behaviors using the Korea Youth Risk Behavior Web-based Survey data from 2005 to 2009. Through literature review, we included the policies implemented for the improvement of adolescents'dietary behaviors during the same periods.

Results

The significant linear trends were observed in all dietary behaviors (p<0.05). Overall, all behaviors except the fruit intake rate were desirably changed during five years but undesirable changes were observed between 2008 and 2009 in all behaviors. Within those periods, several policies were implemented including 'Ban on carbonated-beverages in school', 'Green Food Zone', etc. Despite confirmed evidence of their effects, the policies on individual behavior such as nutrition education didn't influence the prevalence of dietary behaviors because they were conducted to too limited persons. Polices on the school environmental improvement, such as ban on carbonated beverage in school, were more effective because they decreased the exposure of undesirable food environment. However, for effect of Green Food Zone improving community environment we couldn't come to a conclusion because of too short period after full implementation.

Conclusions

Among government nutrition policies conducted from 2005 to 2009, those on environmental improvement, especially in school, were more effective than those on individual behavior. Therefore, the development and implement of policies on school environmental improvement are needed in Korea.

Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Temporal trends and the association between self-rated oral health and falls in community-dwelling older adults in South Korea: a secondary analysis of survey data
    Hyun-Ju Seo, Soon-Ki Ahn, Min-Jung Choi
    BMJ Open.2024; 14(4): e081549.     CrossRef
  • Comparison of ten policy options to equitably reduce children’s exposure to unhealthy food marketing
    Ryan Gage, Wei Liu, Amber L Pearson, Moira Smith, Michelle Barr, Ashton Shortridge, Louise Signal
    Public Health Nutrition.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • The nutrition transition, food retail transformations, and policy responses to overnutrition in the East Asia region: A descriptive review
    Oliver Huse, Erica Reeve, Phillip Baker, Daniel Hunt, Colin Bell, Anna Peeters, Kathryn Backholer
    Obesity Reviews.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Water Wins, Communication Matters: School-Based Intervention to Reduce Intake of Sugar-Sweetened Beverages and Increase Intake of Water
    Tanja Kamin, Barbara Koroušić Seljak, Nataša Fidler Mis
    Nutrients.2022; 14(7): 1346.     CrossRef
  • Secular trends and related factors in leisure-time sedentary behavior among Koreans: an analysis of data from the 2011-2017 Korea Community Health Survey
    Hyun-Ju Seo, Min-Jung Choi, Soon-Ki Ahn
    Epidemiology and Health.2022; 44: e2022023.     CrossRef
  • Advertising of unhealthy foods and beverages around primary and junior high schools in Ghana's most urbanized and populous region
    Gideon Senyo Amevinya, Stefanie Vandevijvere, Bridget Kelly, Seth Kwaku Afagbedzi, Richmond Aryeetey, Akosua Pokua Adjei, Wilhemina Quarpong, Akua Tandoh, Silver Nanema, Charles Agyemang, Francis Zotor, Matilda E. Laar, Kobby Mensah, Dennis Laryea, Gershi
    Frontiers in Public Health.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Changes in retail food environments around schools over 12 years and associations with overweight and obesity among children and adolescents in Flanders, Belgium
    Vincent Smets, Stefanie Vandevijvere
    BMC Public Health.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Disparity between Subjective Health Perception and Lifestyle Practices among Korean Adolescents: A National Representative Sample
    Aniceto Echalico Braza, Jinsoo Jason Kim, Sun Hee Kim
    Journal of Lifestyle Medicine.2022; 12(3): 153.     CrossRef
  • Energy and Macronutrient Intake Among Children Aged 6−11 Years Old — China, 2016−2017
    Lahong Ju, Wei Piao, Hongyun Fang, Qiya Guo, Shuya Cai, Xiaoli Xu, Shujuan Li, Xue Cheng, Dongmei Yu, Liyun Zhao
    China CDC Weekly.2021; 3(9): 181.     CrossRef
  • Cooking Oil and Salt Intakes Among Children Aged 6−17 Years — China, 2016−2017
    Lahong Ju, Dongmei Yu, Wei Piao, Hongyun Fang, Qiya Guo, Xiaoli Xu, Shujuan Li, Xue Cheng, Shuya Cai, Liyun Zhao
    China CDC Weekly.2021; 3(31): 657.     CrossRef
  • Space-time analysis of unhealthy food advertising: New Zealand children’s exposure and health policy options
    Wei Liu, Michelle Barr, Amber L Pearson, Tim Chambers, Karin A Pfeiffer, Moira Smith, Louise Signal
    Health Promotion International.2020; 35(4): 812.     CrossRef
  • Variability in sociodemographic factors and obesity in Korean children: a cross-sectional analysis of Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination survey data (2007–2015)
    Hae Jeong Lee, Sung Hoon Kim, Mi Hyeon Jin, Ju Suk Lee
    Annals of Epidemiology.2020; 43: 51.     CrossRef
  • Consumo de frutas e verduras por adolescentes catarinenses ao longo de uma década
    Jaqueline Aragoni da Silva, Kelly Samara da Silva, Mônica Costa Silva, Pablo Magno da Silveira, Giovâni Firpo Del Duca, Jucemar Benedet, Markus Vinicius Nahas
    Ciência & Saúde Coletiva.2020; 25(2): 613.     CrossRef
  • Kids in a Candy Store: An Objective Analysis of Children’s Interactions with Food in Convenience Stores
    Christina McKerchar, Moira Smith, Ryan Gage, Jonathan Williman, Gillian Abel, Cameron Lacey, Cliona Ni Mhurchu, Louise Signal
    Nutrients.2020; 12(7): 2143.     CrossRef
  • Where we eat is who we are: a survey of food-related travel patterns to Singapore’s hawker centers, food courts and coffee shops
    Shin Bin Tan, Mariana Arcaya
    International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Why are restricted food items still sold after the implementation of the school store policy? the case of South Korea
    Seul Ki Choi, Edward A. Frongillo, Christine E. Blake, James F. Thrasher
    Food Policy.2019; 83: 161.     CrossRef
  • Environmental interventions to reduce the consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages and their effects on health
    Peter von Philipsborn, Jan M Stratil, Jacob Burns, Laura K Busert, Lisa M Pfadenhauer, Stephanie Polus, Christina Holzapfel, Hans Hauner, Eva Rehfuess
    Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews.2019;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • The effect of Public Health/Pediatric Obesity interventions on socioeconomic inequalities in childhood obesity: A scoping review
    Francesco Venturelli, Francesca Ferrari, Serena Broccoli, Laura Bonvicini, Pamela Mancuso, Annalisa Bargellini, Paolo Giorgi Rossi
    Obesity Reviews.2019; 20(12): 1720.     CrossRef
  • Korean Adolescents’ Energy Intake of Selected Foods by Eating Place from 1998 to 2012 During Implementation of Two National School Nutrition Policies
    Seul Ki Choi, Edward A. Frongillo, Christine E. Blake, James F. Thrasher
    Journal of Hunger & Environmental Nutrition.2018; 13(1): 116.     CrossRef
  • Effectiveness of school food environment policies on children’s dietary behaviors: A systematic review and meta-analysis
    Renata Micha, Dimitra Karageorgou, Ioanna Bakogianni, Eirini Trichia, Laurie P. Whitsel, Mary Story, Jose L. Peñalvo, Dariush Mozaffarian, Manuel Portero-Otin
    PLOS ONE.2018; 13(3): e0194555.     CrossRef
  • Examining community and consumer food environments for children: An urban-suburban-rural comparison in Southwestern Ontario
    Catherine M. DuBreck, Richard C. Sadler, Godwin Arku, Jason A. Gilliland
    Social Science & Medicine.2018; 209: 33.     CrossRef
  • Unhealthy food marketing around New Zealand schools: a national study
    Stefanie Vandevijvere, Janine Molloy, Naadira Hassen de Medeiros, Boyd Swinburn
    International Journal of Public Health.2018; 63(9): 1099.     CrossRef
  • Regulatory initiatives to reduce sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs) in Latin America
    Paola Bergallo, Valentina Castagnari, Alicia Fernández, Raúl Mejía, Daniel Romer
    PLOS ONE.2018; 13(10): e0205694.     CrossRef
  • The utility of the agency‐structure framework to estimate the health equity impact of universal obesity prevention policies
    K. Backholer, A. Peeters
    Obesity Reviews.2017; 18(1): 126.     CrossRef
  • Efficacy of school-based interventions aimed at decreasing sugar-sweetened beverage consumption among adolescents: a systematic review
    Lydi-Anne Vézina-Im, Dominique Beaulieu, Ariane Bélanger-Gravel, Danielle Boucher, Caroline Sirois, Marylène Dugas, Véronique Provencher
    Public Health Nutrition.2017; 20(13): 2416.     CrossRef
  • Breast milk fatty acid composition and fatty acid intake of lactating mothers in South Korea
    Hyesook Kim, Sujeong Kang, Byung-Moon Jung, Hyunju Yi, Ji A. Jung, Namsoo Chang
    British Journal of Nutrition.2017; 117(4): 556.     CrossRef
  • Neighborhood Environments: Links to Health Behaviors and Obesity Status in Vulnerable Children
    Jina Choo, Hye-Jin Kim, Sooyeon Park
    Western Journal of Nursing Research.2017; 39(8): 1169.     CrossRef
  • Adolescent Overweight and Obesity: Links to Socioeconomic Status and Fruit and Vegetable Intakes
    Jihyun You, Jina Choo
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2016; 13(3): 307.     CrossRef
  • Happiness and health behaviors in South Korean adolescents: a cross-sectional study
    Su Yeon Kye, Jeong Hyun Kwon, Keeho Park
    Epidemiology and Health.2016; 38: e2016022.     CrossRef
  • Can policy ameliorate socioeconomic inequities in obesity and obesity‐related behaviours? A systematic review of the impact of universal policies on adults and children
    D. L. Olstad, M. Teychenne, L. M. Minaker, D. R. Taber, K. D. Raine, C. I. J. Nykiforuk, K. Ball
    Obesity Reviews.2016; 17(12): 1198.     CrossRef
  • Obesogenic Retail Food Environments Around New Zealand Schools
    Stefanie Vandevijvere, Zaynel Sushil, Daniel J. Exeter, Boyd Swinburn
    American Journal of Preventive Medicine.2016; 51(3): e57.     CrossRef
  • Environmental interventions to reduce the consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages and their effects on health
    Peter von Philipsborn, Jan M Stratil, Jacob Burns, Laura K Busert, Lisa M Pfadenhauer, Stephanie Polus, Christina Holzapfel, Hans Hauner, Eva Rehfuess
    Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews.2016;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Smart food policies for obesity prevention
    Corinna Hawkes, Trenton G Smith, Jo Jewell, Jane Wardle, Ross A Hammond, Sharon Friel, Anne Marie Thow, Juliana Kain
    The Lancet.2015; 385(9985): 2410.     CrossRef
  • CVD Prevention Through Policy: a Review of Mass Media, Food/Menu Labeling, Taxation/Subsidies, Built Environment, School Procurement, Worksite Wellness, and Marketing Standards to Improve Diet
    Ashkan Afshin, Jose Penalvo, Liana Del Gobbo, Michael Kashaf, Renata Micha, Kurtis Morrish, Jonathan Pearson-Stuttard, Colin Rehm, Siyi Shangguan, Jessica D. Smith, Dariush Mozaffarian
    Current Cardiology Reports.2015;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Unexpected plateauing of childhood obesity rates in developed countries
    Martin Wabitsch, Anja Moss, Katrin Kromeyer-Hauschild
    BMC Medicine.2014;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Current Information and Asian Perspectives on Long-Chain Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids in Pregnancy, Lactation, and Infancy: Systematic Review and Practice Recommendations from an Early Nutrition Academy Workshop
    Berthold Koletzko, Christopher C.M. Boey, Cristina Campoy, Susan E. Carlson, Namsoo Chang, Maria Antonia Guillermo-Tuazon, Sadhana Joshi, Christine Prell, Seng Hock Quak, Damayanti Rusli Sjarif, Yixiang Su, Sarayut Supapannachart, Yuichiro Yamashiro, Sask
    Annals of Nutrition and Metabolism.2014; 65(1): 49.     CrossRef
  • The impact of nutritional policy on socioeconomic disparity in the unhealthy food intake among Korean adolescents
    Kirang Kim, Sun Min Park, Kyung Won Oh
    Appetite.2013; 71: 388.     CrossRef

JPMPH : Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health