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Jin-Seok Lee 6 Articles
Factors Associated With Subjective Life Expectancy: Comparison With Actuarial Life Expectancy
Jaekyoung Bae, Yeon-Yong Kim, Jin-Seok Lee
J Prev Med Public Health. 2017;50(4):240-250.   Published online June 27, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.17.036
  • 8,011 View
  • 167 Download
  • 13 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
Subjective life expectancy (SLE) has been found to show a significant association with mortality. In this study, we aimed to investigate the major factors affecting SLE. We also examined whether any differences existed between SLE and actuarial life expectancy (LE) in Korea. Methods: A cross-sectional survey of 1000 individuals in Korea aged 20-59 was conducted. Participants were asked about SLE via a self-reported questionnaire. LE from the National Health Insurance database in Korea was used to evaluate differences between SLE and actuarial LE. Age-adjusted least-squares means, correlations, and regression analyses were used to test the relationship of SLE with four categories of predictors: demographic factors, socioeconomic factors, health behaviors, and psychosocial factors. Results: Among the 1000 participants, women (mean SLE, 83.43 years; 95% confidence interval, 82.41 to 84.46 years; 48% of the total sample) had an expected LE 1.59 years longer than that of men. The socioeconomic factors of household income and housing arrangements were related to SLE. Among the health behaviors, smoking status, alcohol status, and physical activity were associated with SLE. Among the psychosocial factors, stress, self-rated health, and social connectedness were related to SLE. SLE had a positive correlation with actuarial estimates (r=0.61, p<0.001). Gender, household income, history of smoking, and distress were related to the presence of a gap between SLE and actuarial LE. Conclusions: Demographic factors, socioeconomic factors, health behaviors, and psychosocial factors showed significant associations with SLE, in the expected directions. Further studies are needed to determine the reasons for these results.
Summary

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Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Sleep duration and all-cause mortality among stroke survivors
    Wendemi Sawadogo, Tilahun Adera, James B. Burch, Maha Alattar, Robert Perera, Virginia J. Howard
    Journal of Stroke and Cerebrovascular Diseases.2024; 33(4): 107615.     CrossRef
  • Interaction between self-perceived disease control and self-management behaviours among Chinese middle-aged and older hypertensive patients: the role of subjective life expectancy
    Jiao Lu, Linhui Liu, Jiaming Zheng, Zhongliang Zhou
    BMC Public Health.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Associations between existing and newly diagnosed chronic health conditions and change in subjective life expectancy: Results from a panel study
    Anushiya Vanajan, Catalin Gherdan
    SSM - Population Health.2022; 20: 101271.     CrossRef
  • Segmentation and estimation of claim severity in motor third-party liability insurance through contrast analysis
    Marian Reiff, Erik Šoltés, Silvia Komara, Tatiana Šoltésová, Silvia Zelinová
    Equilibrium. Quarterly Journal of Economics and Economic Policy.2022; 17(3): 803.     CrossRef
  • Accelerated senescence as a cost of reproduction: Testing associations between oxidative stress and reproductive effort in rural and urban women
    Amelia Sancilio, Grazyna Jasienska, Catherine Panter‐Brick, Anna Ziomkiewicz, Ilona Nenko, Richard G. Bribiescas
    American Journal of Human Biology.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Subjective life expectancy in transition: a longitudinal study of Korean baby boomers
    Jeong-Hwa Ho
    Asian Population Studies.2021; 17(2): 148.     CrossRef
  • Sex, rurality and socioeconomical status in Spanish centennial population (2017)
    Pedro Fuentes, Sandra Amador, Ana Maria Lucas-Ochoa, Lorena Cuenca-Bermejo, Emiliano Fernández-Villalba, Valeria Raparelli, Colleen Norris, Alexandra Kautzky-Willer, Karolina Kublickiene, Louise Pilote, María Trinidad Herrero
    Aging.2021; 13(18): 22059.     CrossRef
  • Stress and subjective life expectancy: Cross‐sectional and longitudinal associations in early adolescence
    Michael T. McKay, James R. Andretta, Noah R. Padgett, Jon C. Cole
    International Journal of Psychology.2020; 55(6): 901.     CrossRef
  • Endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair in a centenarian
    Kirthi S. Bellamkonda, Tanner Kim, Ronnie Rosenthal, Alan Dardik, Naiem Nassiri
    Journal of Vascular Surgery Cases, Innovations and Techniques.2020; 6(3): 361.     CrossRef
  • Self-assessed life expectancy among older adults in Côte d’Ivoire
    Richard K. Moussa, Vakaramoko Diaby
    BMC Public Health.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Aging and immunotherapies: New horizons for the golden ages
    Jamie A.G. Hamilton, Curtis J. Henry
    Aging and Cancer.2020; 1(1-4): 30.     CrossRef
  • Establishment of Normative Self-Rated Health Status Data and Association between Ideal Life Expectancy and Social Wellness of General Population in Korea
    Jihye Lee, Jin-Ah Sim, Ji-Won Kim, Young Ho Yun
    Asian Nursing Research.2019; 13(2): 99.     CrossRef
  • Levels of Health and Subjective Life Expectancy among Community-dwelling Elders in Korea
    Ji Yeon An
    Journal of Korean Gerontological Nursing.2018; 20(1): 22.     CrossRef
Factors Affecting the Downward Mobility of Psychiatric Patients: A Korean Study of National Health Insurance Beneficiaries
Un-Na Kim, Yeon-Yong Kim, Jin-Seok Lee
J Prev Med Public Health. 2016;49(1):53-60.   Published online December 22, 2015
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.15.052
  • 8,440 View
  • 104 Download
  • 10 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
The purpose of this study is to examine the magnitude of and the factors associated with the downward mobility of first-episode psychiatric patients.
Methods
This study used the claims data from the Korean Health Insurance Review and Assessment Service. The study population included 19 293 first-episode psychiatric inpatients diagnosed with alcohol use disorder (International Classification of Diseases, 10th revision [ICD-10] code F10), schizophrenia and related disorders (ICD-10 codes F20-F29), and mood disorders (ICD-10 codes F30-F33) in the first half of 2005. This study included only National Health Insurance beneficiaries in 2005. The dependent variable was the occurrence of downward mobility, which was defined as a health insurance status change from National Health Insurance to Medical Aid. Logistic regression analysis was used to assess factors associated with downward drift of first-episode psychiatric patients.
Results
About 10% of the study population who were National Health Insurance beneficiaries in 2005 became Medical Aid recipients in 2007. The logistic regression analysis showed that age, gender, primary diagnosis, type of hospital at first admission, regular use of outpatient clinic, and long-term hospitalization are significant predictors in determining downward drift in newly diagnosed psychiatric patients.
Conclusions
This research showed that the downward mobility of psychiatric patients is affected by long-term hospitalization and medical care utilization. The findings suggest that early intensive intervention might reduce long-term hospitalization and the downward mobility of psychiatric patients.
Summary

Citations

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    European Neuropsychopharmacology.2019; 29(9): 1051.     CrossRef
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    Nae-Yun Heo
    The Korean Journal of Gastroenterology.2019; 74(3): 130.     CrossRef
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    Zoonoses and Public Health.2017; 64(8): 662.     CrossRef
  • The Relationship between Internet Use and Health Behaviors among Adolescents
    Eun Gyeong Kim
    Journal of Korean Academy of Community Health Nursing.2015; 26(1): 52.     CrossRef
  • Cross-lagged relationships between problematic Internet use and lifestyle changes
    Chih-Hung Lin, Ssu-Kuang Chen, Shan-Mei Chang, Sunny S.J. Lin
    Computers in Human Behavior.2013; 29(6): 2615.     CrossRef
  • Análisis de las propiedades psicométricas de la versión en español del Internet Addiction Test
    D.X. Puerta-Cortés, X. Carbonell, A. Chamarro
    Trastornos Adictivos.2012; 14(4): 99.     CrossRef
The Effect of Sleep Duration on the Risk of Unintentional Injury in Korean Adults
Yeon-Yong Kim, Un-Na Kim, Jin-Seok Lee, Jong-Heon Park
J Prev Med Public Health. 2014;47(3):150-157.   Published online May 30, 2014
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2014.47.3.150
  • 11,298 View
  • 91 Download
  • 6 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives

The decrease or increase in sleep duration has recently been recognized as a risk factor for several diseases, including hypertension and obesity. Many studies have explored the relationship of decreased sleep durations and injuries, but few have examined the relationship between increased sleep duration and injury. The objective of this research is to identify the risk for injury associated with both decreased and increased sleep durations.

Methods

Data from the 2010 Community Health Survey were used in this study. We conducted logistic regression with average sleep duration as the independent variable, injury as a dependent variable, and controlling for age, sex, occupation, education, region (cities and provinces), smoking, alcohol use, body mass index, hypertension, diabetes, arthritis, and depression. Seven categories of sleep duration were established: ≤4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, and ≥10 hours.

Results

Using 7 hours of sleep as the reference, the adjusted injury risk (odds ratio) for those sleeping a total of ≤4 h/d was 1.53; 1.28 for 5 hours, for 1.11 for 6 hours, 0.98 for 8 hours, 1.12 for 9 hours, and 1.48 for ≥10 hours. The difference in risk was statistically significant for each category except for the 8 and 9 hours. In this study, risk increased as the sleep duration decreased or increased, except for the 8 and 9 hours.

Conclusions

This research found that either a decrease or increase in sleep duration was associated with an increased risk for injury. The concept of proper sleep duration can be evaluated by its associated injury risk.

Summary

Citations

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  • Musculoskeletal injuries in UK Service Personnel and the impact of in-theatre rehabilitation during Cold Weather Warfare training: Exercise CETUS 2020
    David H Ferraby, D Hayhurst, R Strachan, H Knapman, S Wood, J L Fallowfield
    BMJ Military Health.2023; 169(6): 517.     CrossRef
  • Prevalence and behavioural associations of unintentional injuries among Chinese college students: a 50-University population-based study
    Dan Wu, Tingzhong Yang, Randall R Cottrell, Huan Zhou, Xueying Feng
    Injury Prevention.2019; 25(1): 52.     CrossRef
  • Association of physical activity, sedentary time, and sleep duration on the health-related quality of life of college students in Northeast China
    Yinjian Ge, Shimeng Xin, Dechun Luan, Zhili Zou, Mengting Liu, Xue Bai, Qian Gao
    Health and Quality of Life Outcomes.2019;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Hongping Zhang, Feng Wei, Mo Han, Jianquan Chen, Songxu Peng, Yukai Du
    Scientific Reports.2017;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Ching-I Hung, Chia-Yih Liu, Ching-Hui Yang, Yinglin Xia
    PLOS ONE.2016; 11(12): e0168202.     CrossRef
  • The Effect of Sleep Duration and Relief of Fatigue after Sleep on the Risk of Injury at School among Korean Adolescents
    Jungok Yu, Jungsoon Kim
    Journal of Korean Academy of Community Health Nursing.2015; 26(2): 100.     CrossRef
The Relationship Between the Social Network of Community-living Elders and Their Health-related Quality of Life in Korean Province
Jun Tae Lim, Jong-Heon Park, Jin-Seok Lee, Juhwan Oh, Yoon Kim
J Prev Med Public Health. 2013;46(1):28-38.   Published online January 31, 2013
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2013.46.1.28
  • 11,640 View
  • 121 Download
  • 11 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives

This study aimed to collect information that will help enhance the social networks and improve the quality of life among elderly people by observing the relationship between their social network and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and by analyzing social network factors affecting HRQoL.

Methods

This study was based on the 2008 Community Health Survey in Yeoncheon County. Three hundred elders were included in the study population. We compared the revised Lubben Social Network Scale (LSNS-R) score and Euro quality of life-5 dimensions health status index by demographic characteristics and chronic disease prevalence. We analyzed the data using multiple regression and tobit regression by setting the HRQoL as the dependent variable and social network and other characteristics as the independent variables. We analyzed social network factors by using factor analysis.

Results

The LSNS-R score differed significantly according to age and existence of a spouse. According to the results from the hierarchical multiple regression analysis, the LSNS-R explained 0.10 of the variance and LSNS-R friends factor explained 0.10 of the variance. The tobit regression indicated that the contribution of the LSNS-R family size factor to the regression coefficient of the independent variable that affected the HRQoL was BT=2.96, that of the LSNS-R family frequency factor was BT=3.60, and that of LSNS-R friends factor was BT=5.41.

Conclusions

Social networks among elderly people had a significant effect on HRQoL and their networks of friends had a relatively higher effect than those of family members.

Summary

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    Jung Sim Jun, Kyoung Hag Lee, Joyce Baptist, Arely Yanez, April Zimmermann
    Social Work in Mental Health.2024; 22(3): 356.     CrossRef
  • Quality of Life and Multilevel Contact Network Structures Among Healthy Adults in Taiwan: Online Participatory Cohort Study
    Tso-Jung Yen, Ta-Chien Chan, Yang-Chih Fu, Jing-Shiang Hwang
    Journal of Medical Internet Research.2022; 24(1): e23762.     CrossRef
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    Journal of Personalized Medicine.2022; 12(4): 516.     CrossRef
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    Nilgün Kuru Alici, Bilge Kalanlar
    Current Psychology.2021; 40(1): 21.     CrossRef
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    Jung Sim Jun, Colleen Galambos, Kyoung Hag Lee
    Journal of Social Service Research.2021; 47(4): 537.     CrossRef
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    The Journals of Gerontology: Series B.2020; 75(9): 2040.     CrossRef
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Differences in Obesity Rates Between People With and Without Disabilities and the Association of Disability and Obesity: A Nationwide Population Study in South Korea
Moo-Kyung Oh, Hyeongap Jang, Yong-Ik Kim, Belong Jo, Yoon Kim, Jong-Heon Park, Jin-Seok Lee
J Prev Med Public Health. 2012;45(4):211-218.   Published online July 31, 2012
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2012.45.4.211
  • 9,102 View
  • 70 Download
  • 14 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives

The objective of this study was to identify the differences in obesity rates among people with and without disabilities, and evaluate the relationship between obesity rates and the existence of disabilities or characteristics of disabilities.

Methods

Mass screening data from 2008 from the National Disability Registry and National Health Insurance (NHI) are used. For analysis, we classified physical disability into three subtypes: upper limb disability, lower limb disability, and spinal cord injury. For a control group, we extracted people without disabilities by each subtype. To adjust for the participation rate in the NHI mass screening, we calculated and adopted the weight stratified by sex, age, and grade of disability. Differences in obesity rates between people with and without disabilities were examined by a chi-squared test. In addition, the effect of the existence of disabilities and grade of disabilities on obesity was examined by multiple logistic regression analysis.

Results

People with disabilities were found to have a higher obesity rate than those without disabilities. The obesity rates were 35.2% and 35.0% (people with disabilities vs. without disabilities) in the upper limb disability, 44.5% and 34.8% in the lower limb disability, 43.4% and 34.6% in the spinal cord injury. The odds for existence of physical disability and grade of disability are higher than the non-disabilities.

Conclusions

These results show that people with physical disability have a higher vulnerability to obesity.

Summary

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Factors Affecting Public Prejudice and Social Distance on Mental Illness: Analysis of Contextual Effect by Multi-level Analysis
Hyeongap Jang, Jun-Tae Lim, Juhwan Oh, Seon-Young Lee, Yong-Ik Kim, Jin-Seok Lee
J Prev Med Public Health. 2012;45(2):90-97.   Published online March 31, 2012
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2012.45.2.90
  • 9,939 View
  • 136 Download
  • 13 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives

While there have been many quantitative studies on the public's attitude towards mental illnesses, it is hard to find quantitative study which focused on the contextual effect on the public's attitude. The purpose of this study was to identify factors that affect the public's beliefs and attitudes including contextual effects.

Methods

We analyzed survey on the public's beliefs and attitudes towards mental illness in Korea with multi-level analysis. We analyzed the public's beliefs and attitudes in terms of prejudice as an intermediate outcome and social distance as a final outcome. Then, we focused on the associations of factors, which were individual and regional socio-economic factors, familiarity, and knowledge based on the comparison of the intermediate and final outcomes.

Results

Prejudice was not explained by regional variables but was only correlated with individual factors. Prejudice increased with age and decreased by high education level. However, social distance controlling for prejudice increased in females, in people with a high education level, and in regions with a high education level and a high proportion of the old. Therefore, social distance without controlling for prejudice increased in females, in the elderly, in highly educated people, and in regions with a high education and aged community.

Conclusions

The result of the multi-level analysis for the regional variables suggests that social distance for mental illness are not only determined by individual factors but also influenced by the surroundings so that it could be tackled sufficiently with appropriate considering of the relevant regional context with individual characteristics.

Summary

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    Lasers in Medical Science.2016; 31(9): 1775.     CrossRef
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    Shashwath Sathyanath, Rohan Dilip Mendonsa, Anitha Maria Thattil, Varikkara Mohan Chandran, Ravichandra S Karkal
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JPMPH : Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health