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Original Articles
Multilevel Analysis of the Relationship Between Prescribing Institutions and Medication Adherence Among Patients With Hypertension and Diabetes in Korea
Haryeom Ghang, Juhyang Lee
J Prev Med Public Health. 2023;56(6):504-514.   Published online October 5, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.23.252
  • 1,076 View
  • 104 Download
AbstractAbstract AbstractSummary PDFSupplementary Material
Objectives
This study investigated the relationship between prescribing institutions and medication adherence among patients newly diagnosed with hypertension and diabetes.
Methods
This study investigated patients with new prescriptions for hypertension and diabetes in Korea in 2019 with using data collected from general health screenings. A multilevel logistic regression model was applied to explore the relationship between patients’ first prescribing institution and their medication adherence, defined as a medication possession ratio (MPR) over 80%.
Results
The overall adherence rates were 53.7% and 56.0% among patients with hypertension and diabetes, respectively. The intraclass correlation coefficients were 13.2% for hypertension and 13.8% for diabetes (p<0.001), implying that the first prescribing institution had a significant role in medication adherence. With clinics as the reference group, all other types of hospitals showed an odds ratio (OR) less than 1.00, with the lowest for tertiary hospitals (OR, 0.30 for hypertension; 0.45 for diabetes), and the next lowest in health screening specialized clinics (OR, 0.51 for hypertension; 0.46 for diabetes). Among individual-level variables, female sex, older age, higher insurance premium level, and residing in cities were positively associated with adherence in both the hypertension and diabetes samples.
Conclusions
This study showed that the prescribing institution had a significant relationship with medication adherence. When the first prescribing institution was a clinic, newly diagnosed patients were more likely to adhere to their medication. These results highlight the important role played by primary care institutions in managing mild chronic diseases.
Summary
Korean summary
2019년 일반건강검진을 통해 발견된 고혈압과 당뇨병의 신규 환자를 대상으로 복약순응도를 분석하였다. 그 결과 검진 후 첫번째 처방기관이 의원인 경우에 비해 다른 종별 의료기관인 경우 복약순응 오즈비가 모두 감소하였는데 상급종합병원이 가장 낮았고(고혈압 0.30, 당뇨병 0.45), 그 다음은 검진전문의원인 것으로 나타났다(고혈압 0.51, 당뇨병 0.46).
Key Message
This study investigated the relationship between prescribing institutions and medication adherence among patients newly diagnosed with hypertension and diabetes using general health screening data in Korea in 2019. The results showed that with clinics as the reference group, all other types of hospitals showed an odds ratio (OR) less than 1.00, with the lowest for tertiary hospitals (OR, 0.30 for hypertension; 0.45 for diabetes), and the next lowest in health screening specialized clinics (OR, 0.51 for hypertension; 0.46 for diabetes).
The Association Between PM2.5 Exposure and Diabetes Mellitus Among Thai Army Personnel
Apisorn Laorattapong, Sarun Poobunjirdkul, Thanapoom Thanapoom, Wiroj Jiamjarasrangsi
J Prev Med Public Health. 2023;56(5):449-457.   Published online September 26, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.23.292
  • 1,569 View
  • 112 Download
  • 1 Web of Science
  • 1 Crossref
AbstractAbstract AbstractSummary PDFSupplementary Material
Objectives
This study investigated the association between baseline exposures to particulate matter with a diameter < 2.5 microns (PM2.5) and subsequent temporal changes in PM2.5 exposure with the incidence of type 2 diabetes among Royal Thai Army personnel.
Methods
A retrospective cohort study was conducted using nationwide health check-up data from 21 325 Thai Army personnel between 2018 and 2021. Multilevel mixed-effects parametric survival statistics were utilized to analyze the relationship between baseline (i.e., PM2.5-baseline) and subsequent changes (i.e., PM2.5-change) in PM2.5 exposure and the occurrence of type 2 diabetes. Hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were employed to assess this association while considering covariates.
Results
There was a significant association between both PM2.5 baseline and PM2.5-change and the incidence of type 2 diabetes in a dose-response manner. Compared to quartile 1, the HRs for quartiles 2 to 4 of PM2.5-baseline were 1.11 (95% CI, 0.74 to 1.65), 1.51 (95% CI, 1.00 to 2.28), and 1.77 (95% CI, 1.07 to 2.93), respectively. Similarly, the HRs for quartiles 2 to 4 of PM2.5-change were 1.41 (95% CI, 1.14 to 1.75), 1.43 (95% CI, 1.13 to 1.81) and 2.40 (95% CI, 1.84 to 3.14), respectively.
Conclusions
Our findings contribute to existing evidence regarding the association between short-term and long-term exposure to PM2.5 and the incidence of diabetes among personnel in the Royal Thai Army.
Summary
Key Message
We simultaneously investigated the impact of the baseline and temporal variations in the exposure to particulate matter (PM) with a diameter <2.5 microns (PM2.5) on type 2 diabetes risk among the Royal Thai Army personnel. We found stronger evidence on the impact of the temporal variation in PM2.5 exposure on the disease risk than that of the baseline variation. This finding may reflect the shorter time frame between the increased PM2.5 exposure and changes in fasting plasma glucose level.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Influence of Air Pollution Exposures on Cardiometabolic Risk Factors: a Review
    Li-Hao Guo, Mohammed Zeeshan, Guo-Feng Huang, Duo-Hong Chen, Min Xie, Jun Liu, Guang-Hui Dong
    Current Environmental Health Reports.2023; 10(4): 501.     CrossRef
Health-related Quality of Life of Patients With Diabetes Mellitus Measured With the Bahasa Indonesia Version of EQ-5D in Primary Care Settings in Indonesia
Muhammad Husen Prabowo, Ratih Puspita Febrinasari, Eti Poncorini Pamungkasari, Yodi Mahendradhata, Anni-Maria Pulkki-Brännström, Ari Probandari
J Prev Med Public Health. 2023;56(5):467-474.   Published online September 26, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.23.229
  • 1,347 View
  • 94 Download
  • 1 Crossref
AbstractAbstract AbstractSummary PDF
Objectives
Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a serious public health issue that places a heavy financial, social, and health-related burden on individuals, families, and healthcare systems. Self-reported health-related quality of life (HRQoL) is extensively used for monitoring the general population’s health conditions and measuring the effectiveness of interventions. Therefore, this study investigated HRQoL and associated factors among patients with type 2 DM at a primary healthcare center in Indonesia.
Methods
A cross-sectional study was conducted in Klaten District, Central Java, Indonesia, from May 2019 to July 2019. In total, 260 patients with DM registered with National Health Insurance were interviewed. HRQoL was measured with the EuroQol Group’s validated Bahasa Indonesia version of the EuroQoL 5-Dimension 5-Level (EQ-5D-5L) with the Indonesian value set. Multivariate regression models were used to identify factors influencing HRQoL.
Results
Data from 24 patients were excluded due to incomplete information. Most participants were men (60.6%), were aged above 50 years (91.5%), had less than a senior high school education (75.0%), and were unemployed (85.6%). The most frequent health problems were reported for the pain/discomfort dimension (64.0%) followed by anxiety (28.4%), mobility (17.8%), usual activities (10.6%), and self-care (6.8%). The average EuroQoL 5-Dimension (EQ-5D) index score was 0.86 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.83 to 0.88). In the multivariate ordinal regression model, a higher education level (coefficient, 0.08; 95% CI, 0.02 to 0.14) was a significant predictor of the EQ-5D-5L utility score.
Conclusions
Patients with diabetes had poorer EQ-5D-5L utility values than the general population. DM patients experienced pain/discomfort and anxiety. There was a substantial positive relationship between education level and HRQoL.
Summary
Key Message
This study examined Health-Related Quality of Life (HRQoL) in 260 type 2 diabetes patients in Indonesia. Most were male (60.6%), over 50 (91.5%), with low education (75%) and unemployed (85.6%). Pain/discomfort was the most common issue (64%), followed by anxiety (28.4%). The average HRQoL score was 0.86. Higher education positively impacted HRQoL. Diabetes patients face lower HRQoL compared to the general population, with notable issues in pain and anxiety. Education level significantly influences HRQoL. This highlights the importance of education in improving the well-being of diabetes patients in Indonesia.

Citations

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  • Genetic CYP2A6 Polymorphism May Worsen Glycohemoglobin Levels: Study among Javanese Indonesian Smokers
    Christine Patramurti, Dita Maria Virginia
    Borneo Journal of Pharmacy.2024; 7(1): 29.     CrossRef
Perspective
A Lifestyle Communication Tool: Association of E-cigarette Use and Pre-diabetes
Nilanga Aki Bandara, Tanisha Vallani, Xuan Randy Zhou, Senara Hansini Palihawadane, Rochelle Gamage, Miles Mannas, Jay Herath
J Prev Med Public Health. 2023;56(4):384-387.   Published online July 31, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.23.086
  • 1,483 View
  • 92 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
The aim of this study was to present a framework for clinicians to use when discussing electronic cigarette (e-cigarette) use and its association with pre-diabetes. A communication tool was designed using evidence-based strategies from the academic literature. A four-step framework is presented, which includes: step (1) helping patients to understand the association between e-cigarette use and pre-diabetes; step (2) the synergistic health impacts of e-cigarette use and pre-diabetes; step (3) management of diabetes-related lifestyle factors; and step (4) stages of change assessment related to e-cigarette reduction. This communication tool provides support for clinicians to discuss the risk of pre-diabetes associated with e-cigarette use. Moving forward, implementation and evaluation of this model are needed.
Summary
Brief Report
How Well Do U.S. Primary Care and Obstetrics and Gynecology Clinicians Screen for Pregnancy Complications at Well Woman Visits? A Retrospective Cohort Study
Eli D. Medvescek, Sorana Raiciulescu, Andrew S. Thagard, Katerina Shvartsman
J Prev Med Public Health. 2023;56(2):190-195.   Published online March 15, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.22.492
  • 1,555 View
  • 68 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
Pregnancy complications, including pre-eclampsia, gestational diabetes (GDM), and perinatal mood and anxiety disorders (PMADs), impact long-term health. We compared the frequency of screening documentation for pregnancy complications versus a general medical history at well woman visits between providers in primary care and obstetrics and gynecology.
Methods
We conducted a retrospective cohort study of subjects with at least 1 prior birth who presented for a well woman visit in 2019-2020. Charts were reviewed for documentation of a general medical history (hypertension, diabetes, and mood disorders) versus screening for comparable obstetric complications (pre-eclampsia, GDM, and PMADs). The results were compared using the McNemar and chi-square tests as appropriate.
Results
In total, 472 encounters were identified, and 137 met the inclusion criteria. Across specialties, clinicians were significantly more likely to document general medical conditions than pregnancy complications, including hypertensive disorders (odds ratio [OR], 2.45; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.18 to 5.48), diabetes (OR, 7.67; 95% CI, 3.27 to 22.0), and mood disorders (OR, 10.5; 95% CI, 3.81 to 40.3). Obstetrics and gynecology providers were more likely to document any pregnancy history (OR, 4.50; 95% CI, 1.24 to 16.27); however, they were not significantly more likely to screen for relevant obstetric complications (OR, 2.49; 95% CI, 0.90 to 6.89). Overall, the rate of pregnancy complication documentation was low in primary care and obstetrics and gynecology clinics (8.8 and 19.0%, respectively).
Conclusions
Obstetrics and gynecology providers more frequently documented a pregnancy history than those in primary care; however, the rate was low across specialties, and providers reported screening for clinically relevant complications less frequently than for general medical conditions.
Summary
Original Article
Health-related Quality of Life Instrument With 8 Items for Use in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: A Validation Study in Korea
Juyoung Kim, Hyeon-Jeong Lee, Min-Woo Jo
J Prev Med Public Health. 2022;55(3):234-242.   Published online May 12, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.22.020
  • 3,451 View
  • 150 Download
  • 7 Web of Science
  • 7 Crossref
AbstractAbstract AbstractSummary PDFSupplementary Material
Objectives
This study assessed the validity and reliability of the Health-related Quality of Life Instrument with 8 Items (HINT-8) in patients with diabetes. HINT-8 is a newly-developed, generic health-related quality of life (HRQoL) instrument.
Methods
Three HRQoL instruments—HINT-8, EuroQoL 5-Dimension 5-Level (EQ-5D-5L), and Short Form Health Survey version 2.0 (SF-36v2)—were provided to 300 patients with diabetes visiting a tertiary hospital for follow-up visits in Korea. The HRQoL scores obtained using the HINT-8 were evaluated for subgroups with known differences based on demographics and diabetes-related characteristics (known-group validity). The mean scores of the instruments were compared between groups segmented by their responses to the HINT-8 (discriminatory ability). Correlation coefficients of the HINT-8 with other instruments were calculated (convergent and divergent validity). The Cohen kappa and intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) were also evaluated (test-retest reliability).
Results
The average HINT-8 indexes were lower among women, older, and less-educated subjects. Subjects who did not list any problems on the HINT-8 had significantly higher HRQoL scores than those who did. The correlation coefficients of the HINT-8 with the EQ-5D-5L index and EuroQoL visual analogue scale were 0.715 (p<0.001) and 0.517 (p<0.001), respectively. The correlation coefficients between the HINT-8 index and the scores of 8 domains of the SF-36v2 ranged from 0.478 (p<0.001) to 0.669 (p<0.001). The Cohen kappa values for the HINT-8 ranged from 0.268 to 0.601, and the ICC of the HINT-8 index was 0.800 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.720 to 0.860).
Conclusions
This study showed that the HINT-8 is a valid and reliable HRQoL instrument for patients with diabetes.
Summary
Korean summary
이 연구는 한국인의 사회문화적 특성을 반영하여 개발된 건강관련 삶의 질 도구인 HINT-8의 타당도 및 신뢰도를 대표적인 만성 질환인 제2형 당뇨 환자를 대상으로 검증하였다. 연구결과는 제2형 당뇨 환자에서 HINT-8의 활용 가능성을 보여주었을 뿐만 아니라 일반적 건강관련 삶의 질 도구 중 가장 널리 사용되고 있는 EQ-5D-5L보다 HINT-8이 삶의 질 상태를 더욱 정교하게 구분하고 있음을 보여주었다.

Citations

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  • Smartphone application-based rehabilitation in patients with chronic respiratory and cardiovascular diseases
    Chiwook Chung, Ah-Ram Kim, Dongbum Kim, Hee Kwon, Seong Ho Lee, Il-Young Jang, Min-Woo Jo, Do-Yoon Kang, Sei Won Lee
    Scientific Reports.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Chronic Disease Patterns and Their Relationship With Health-Related Quality of Life in South Korean Older Adults With the 2021 Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey: Latent Class Analysis
    Mi-Sun Lee, Hooyeon Lee
    JMIR Public Health and Surveillance.2024; 10: e49433.     CrossRef
  • Health‐related quality of life instrument with 8 items to measure health‐related quality of life among family caregivers of people with dementia: A pilot validation study
    Eunjeong Choi, Hyun‐Ju Seo, IL Han Choo, Seong Min Kim, Jeong Min Park, Yu Mi Choi
    Public Health Nursing.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Willingness to pay for integrative healthcare services to treat sleep disturbances: Evidence from a nationwide survey
    Min Kyung Hyun
    European Journal of Integrative Medicine.2023; 58: 102223.     CrossRef
  • Internal Structure of the Health-Related Quality of Life Instrument with 8-Items in a Nationally Representative Population
    Eun-Hyun Lee
    Journal of Korean Academy of Nursing.2023; 53(3): 359.     CrossRef
  • Obstructive sleep apnea related to mental health, health-related quality of life and multimorbidity: A nationwide survey of a representative sample in Republic of Korea
    Mee-Ri Lee, Sung Min Jung, Frances Chung
    PLOS ONE.2023; 18(6): e0287182.     CrossRef
  • Smartphone application-based rehabilitation in patients with chronic respiratory and cardiovascular diseases: a randomised controlled trial study protocol
    Chiwook Chung, Ah-Ram Kim, Il-Young Jang, Min-Woo Jo, Seongho Lee, Dongbum Kim, Hee Kwon, Do-Yoon Kang, Sei Won Lee
    BMJ Open.2023; 13(9): e072698.     CrossRef
Systematic Review
Low Social Support and Risk for Depression in People With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis
Akhmad Azmiardi, Bhisma Murti, Ratih Puspita Febrinasari, Didik Gunawan Tamtomo
J Prev Med Public Health. 2022;55(1):37-48.   Published online January 10, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.21.490
  • 5,111 View
  • 203 Download
  • 9 Web of Science
  • 11 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
Depression is a frequent complication of type 2 diabetes mellitus. This study aimed to investigate the relationship between low social support and risk for depression in people with type 2 diabetes through a meta-analysis.
Methods
PubMed, ProQuest, SpringerLink, ScienceDirect, Scopus, the Cochrane Library, Embase, and Google Scholar were searched for English-language articles published up to 2021. Pooled adjusted odds ratios (aORs) were calculated using a random-effect model with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Heterogeneity was evaluated by using the Cochrane Q test and I2 statistics. The risk of publication bias was estimated using a funnel plot, the Egger test, and the Begg test. The Joanna Briggs Institute Critical Appraisal Tools were used to assess the quality of evidence and the risk of bias.
Results
Eleven studies were included in this meta-analysis, containing a total of 3151 people with type 2 diabetes mellitus. The pooled analysis showed that people with type 2 diabetes mellitus who had low social support had twice as high a risk of depression as those with high social support (aOR, 2.02; 95% CI, 1.51 to 2.70; p<0.001). A random-effect model was used because the heterogeneity was high (I2= 87%).
Conclusions
Low social support was found to increase the risk of depression among people with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Further investigation into factors that may moderate this relationship is required.
Summary

Citations

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  • Staying connected: An umbrella review of meta-analyses on the push-and-pull of social connection in depression
    Luisa De Risio, Mauro Pettorruso, Rebecca Collevecchio, Barbara Collacchi, Marta Boffa, Mario Santorelli, Massimo Clerici, Giovanni Martinotti, Francesca Zoratto, Marta Borgi
    Journal of Affective Disorders.2024; 345: 358.     CrossRef
  • The risk factors for mental health disorders in patients with type 2 diabetes: An umbrella review of systematic reviews with and without meta-analysis
    Amani Busili, Kanta Kumar, Laura Kudrna, Idris Busaily
    Heliyon.2024; 10(7): e28782.     CrossRef
  • Distress and Coping Strategy among Indonesian Men with Type-2 Diabetes Mellitus
    Fajar Ari Nugroho, Rico Budhiarta Chandra, Nike Laila, Sera Rukia, Inggita Kusumastuty, Anggun Rindang Cempaka, Lola Ayu Istifiani, Atifa Nafia Hasantie Latif
    Nurse Media Journal of Nursing.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Effectiveness of social support-based interventions in preventing depression in people without clinical depression: A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials
    Henar Campos-Paíno, Patricia Moreno-Peral, Irene Gómez-Gómez, Sonia Conejo-Cerón, Santiago Galán, Sara Reyes-Martín, Juan Ángel Bellón
    International Journal of Social Psychiatry.2023; 69(2): 253.     CrossRef
  • Individuelle Behandlung bei Glaukompatienten mit einem Diabetes mellitus
    Jan Luebke
    Klinische Monatsblätter für Augenheilkunde.2023; 240(02): 142.     CrossRef
  • Prevalence of comorbid depression and associated factors among hospitalized patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus in Hunan, China
    Rehanguli Maimaitituerxun, Wenhang Chen, Jingsha Xiang, Atipatsa C. Kaminga, Xin Yin Wu, Letao Chen, Jianzhou Yang, Aizhong Liu, Wenjie Dai
    BMC Psychiatry.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • The prevalence and predictors of depression and disability in older adults and elderly patients with Diabetes in India: Cross-sectional analysis from the Longitudinal Study on Ageing
    Baani Sodhi, Mansi Malik, Paras Agarwal, Saurav Basu
    Diabetes & Metabolic Syndrome: Clinical Research & Reviews.2023; 17(4): 102765.     CrossRef
  • Depression and determinants among diabetes mellitus patients in Ethiopia, a systematic review and meta-analysis
    Kirubel Dagnaw Tegegne, Natnael Atnafu Gebeyehu, Mesfin Wudu Kassaw
    BMC Psychiatry.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Individuelle Behandlung bei Glaukompatienten mit einem Diabetes mellitus
    Jan Lübke
    Diabetes aktuell.2023; 21(02): 68.     CrossRef
  • Diabetes and Mental Health
    David J. Robinson, Kimberley Hanson, Akshay B. Jain, Jessica C. Kichler, Gaurav Mehta, Osnat C. Melamed, Michael Vallis, Harpreet S. Bajaj, Tracy Barnes, Jeremy Gilbert, Kristin Honshorst, Robyn Houlden, James Kim, Joanne Lewis, Barbara MacDonald, Dylan M
    Canadian Journal of Diabetes.2023; 47(4): 308.     CrossRef
  • The association between screen time and depression symptoms severity among adults with diabetes: A cross-sectional study
    Layan Sukik, Bushra Hoque, Linda Boutefnouchet, Mohamed Elhadary, Hiba Bawadi, Mujahed Shraim
    Primary Care Diabetes.2023; 17(6): 619.     CrossRef
Original Articles
Socioeconomic Predictors of Diabetes Mortality in Japan: An Ecological Study Using Municipality-specific Data
Tasuku Okui
J Prev Med Public Health. 2021;54(5):352-359.   Published online August 14, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.21.215
  • 3,821 View
  • 150 Download
  • 3 Web of Science
  • 3 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Objectives
The aim of this study was to examine the geographic distribution of diabetes mortality in Japan and identify socioeconomic factors affecting differences in municipality-specific diabetes mortality.
Methods
Diabetes mortality data by year and municipality from 2013 to 2017 were extracted from Japanese Vital Statistics, and the socioeconomic characteristics of municipalities were obtained from government statistics. We calculated the standardized mortality ratio (SMR) of diabetes for each municipality using the empirical Bayes method and represented geographic differences in SMRs in a map of Japan. Multiple linear regression was conducted to identify the socioeconomic factors affecting differences in SMR. Statistically significant socioeconomic factors were further assessed by calculating the relative risk of mortality of quintiles of municipalities classified according to the degree of each socioeconomic factor using Poisson regression analysis.
Results
The geographic distribution of diabetes mortality differed by gender. Of the municipality-specific socioeconomic factors, high rates of single-person households and unemployment and a high number of hospital beds were associated with a high SMR for men. High rates of fatherless households and blue-collar workers were associated with a high SMR for women, while high taxable income per-capita income and total population were associated with low SMR for women. Quintile analysis revealed a complex relationship between taxable income and mortality for women. The mortality risk of quintiles with the highest and lowest taxable per-capita income was significantly lower than that of the middle-income quintile.
Conclusions
Socioeconomic factors of municipalities in Japan were found to affect geographic differences in diabetes mortality.
Summary

Citations

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  • Worldwide burden and trends of diabetes among people aged 70 years and older, 1990–2019: A systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2019
    Shimin Jiang, Tianyu Yu, Dingxin Di, Ying Wang, Wenge Li
    Diabetes/Metabolism Research and Reviews.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • The Effect of Neighborhood Deprivation on Mortality in Newly Diagnosed Diabetes Patients: A Countrywide Population-Based Korean Retrospective Cohort Study, 2002–2013
    Kyoung-Hee Cho, Juyeong Kim, Young Choi, Tae-Hyun Kim
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2022; 19(7): 4324.     CrossRef
  • Depression, cognitive dysfunction and other factors associated with 5-year overall mortality in type 2 diabetes mellitus: a pilot prospective observational study
    E. G. Starostina, M. N. Volodina, I. V. Starostin
    Diabetes mellitus.2022; 25(4): 327.     CrossRef
Determinants of Adherence to Diabetes Screening in Iranian Adults With a Positive Family History of Diabetes
Narges Malih, Mohammad-Reza Sohrabi, Alireza Abadi, Shahnam Arshi
J Prev Med Public Health. 2021;54(3):190-198.   Published online April 7, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.20.496
  • 3,308 View
  • 167 Download
  • 2 Web of Science
  • 5 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Objectives
Insufficient evidence exists regarding factors that affect screening adherence among people with a family history of diabetes, who comprise roughly half of all patients with diabetes. Therefore, we aimed to identify the determinants of diabetes screening adherence in adults with a family history of diabetes who had not yet been diagnosed with diabetes.
Methods
This cross-sectional study was conducted at selected urban primary healthcare facilities in Tehran, Iran. The study population was clinically non-diabetic adults above 20 years of age with a family history of diabetes in at least 1 first-degree relative. All eligible people identified on randomly-selected days of the month were invited to join the study.
Results
Among 408 participants, 128 (31.4%) had received a fasting blood glucose check during the last year. Using binary logistic regression, the independent predictors of screening adherence were knowledge of adverse effects of diabetes such as sexual disorders (odds ratio [OR], 3.05) and renal failure (OR, 2.73), the impact of family members’ advice on receiving diabetes screening (OR, 2.03), recommendation from a healthcare provider to have a fasting blood glucose check (OR, 2.61), and intention to have a fasting blood glucose check within the next 6 months (OR, 2.85). Other variables that predicted screening adherence were age (OR, 1.05), job (being a housekeeper; OR, 3.39), and having a college degree (OR, 3.55).
Conclusions
Knowledge of the adverse effects of diabetes, physicians’ and healthcare providers’ advice about the benefits of early disease detection, and family members’ advice were independent predictors of screening adherence.
Summary

Citations

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  • The association between sociodemographic characteristics, clinical indicators and body mass index in a population at risk of type 2 diabetes: A cross-sectional study in two Colombian cities
    Yenifer Diaz Montes, Tania Acosta Vergara, Rafael Tuesca Molina, Gillian Martinez Guerrero, Luis A. Anillo Arrieta, Pablo Aschner, Jorge Acosta-Reyes, Victor Florez-Garcia, Edgar Navarro Lechuga, Noël C. Barengo
    Primary Care Diabetes.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Socio-personal factors affecting adherence to treatment in patients with type 2 diabetes: A systematic review and meta-analysis
    Nahid Shahabi, Yadolah Fakhri, Teamur Aghamolaei, Zahra Hosseini, Atefeh Homayuni
    Primary Care Diabetes.2023; 17(3): 205.     CrossRef
  • Clinical traits and systemic risks of familial diabetes mellitus according to age of onset and quantity: an analysis of data from the community-based KoGES cohort study
    Ju-Yeun Lee, Kyungsik Kim, Sangjun Lee, Woo Ju An, Sue K. Park
    Epidemiology and Health.2023; 45: e2023029.     CrossRef
  • BİR ÜNİVERSİTE AKADEMİSYENLERİNİN SAĞLIK DAVRANIŞLARINA VE TARAMA PROGRAMLARINA UYUMU: KESİTSEL BİR ÇALIŞMA
    Hatice İKİIŞIK, Sibel SAKARYA
    ESTÜDAM Halk Sağlığı Dergisi.2022; 7(1): 98.     CrossRef
  • Association between a family history of diabetes and carotid artery atherosclerosis in Korean adults
    Sun Young Shim, Ga Bin Lee, Jee-Seon Shim, Sun Jae Jung, Hyeon Chang Kim
    Epidemiology and Health.2021; 43: e2021049.     CrossRef
Thirst for Information and Needs Reflections of Type 2 Diabetes Patients Receiving Insulin Treatment in North-East Ethiopia: A Qualitative Exploration
Ewunetie Mekashaw Bayked, Birhanu Demeke Workneh, Mesfin Haile Kahissay
J Prev Med Public Health. 2021;54(2):119-128.   Published online March 1, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.20.510
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AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Objectives
Ongoing, proactive, planned, and patient-centered diabetes education is the cornerstone of care for all persons with diabetes. Thus, the aim of this study was to explore the information needs of type 2 diabetes mellitus patients receiving insulin treatment in North-East Ethiopia.
Methods
The study was conducted from July 2019 to January 2020 using a qualitative enquiry (phenomenological approach) with purposive sampling. Face-to-face in-depth interviews were used to collect data until reaching theoretical saturation. The participants were type 2 diabetes patients receiving insulin treatment. They were identified from the diabetes patients’ registration book at the diabetes clinic and interviewed at their appointment time, and were selected to include wide variations in terms of socio-demographic characteristics. Twenty-four participants (11 men and 13 women), with a median age of 57 years, were interviewed. The data were organized using QDA Miner Lite version 2.0.7 and analyzed thematically using narrative strategies.
Results
Most participants had not heard of diabetes before their diagnosis. They had limited knowledge of diabetes, but ascribed different connotations for it in the local language (Amharic). The needs reflections of patients were categorized into diabetes education and participants’ recommendations. Diabetes education was totally absent at hospitals, and patients received education primarily from the Ethiopian Diabetes Association and broadcast and digital media. Thus, the major concern of patients was the availability of diabetes education programs at health institutions.
Conclusions
Patients’ main concern was the absence of routine diabetes education, which necessitates urgent action to implement diabetes education programs, especially at health institutions.
Summary

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Objectively Measured Physical Activity of Vietnamese Adults With Type 2 Diabetes: Opportunities to Intervene
Vuong Van Do, Jonine Jancey, Ngoc Minh Pham, Chung Thanh Nguyen, Minh Van Hoang, Andy H. Lee
J Prev Med Public Health. 2019;52(2):101-108.   Published online February 22, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.18.213
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AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
To objectively determine and compare the physical activity (PA) levels of adults newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes (T2D) and adults without T2D in Vietnam using an accelerometer.
Methods
A total of 120 participants with newly diagnosed T2D and 120 adults without T2D were recruited from a large hospital in Hanoi, the capital city of Vietnam. All participants wore an ActiGraph GT3X accelerometer for at least 5 days, including 1 weekend day. Freedson cut-off points were used to estimate different intensities of PA. In addition, comparisons between groups were made with respect to achieving the World Health Organization (WHO) and International Diabetes Federation (IDF) recommended PA guidelines.
Results
Men with T2D had significantly lower levels of PA than men without T2D. The respective multivariable-adjusted mean values of daily step count, daily light-intensity, moderate-intensity, and moderate-to-vigorous-intensity PA were approximately 14%, 19%, and 22% lower in the men with T2D than in their non-T2D counterparts. However, women with T2D accumulated a greater number of steps per day than women without T2D. Only 59.2% of the adults with T2D met the minimum recommended level of PA (WHO and IDF), compared to 74.2% of adults without T2D (p<0.05). After adjusting for potential confounders, participants with T2D experienced 50.0% significantly lower odds of achieving PA recommendations.
Conclusions
Vietnamese men with T2D were less physically active than those without T2D, and adults with T2D were less likely to meet PA guidelines. The results suggest a need for integrating PA into the self-management of this chronic condition.
Summary

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Perspective
The Big Vitamin D Mistake
Dimitrios T. Papadimitriou
J Prev Med Public Health. 2017;50(4):278-281.   Published online May 10, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.16.111
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AbstractAbstract PDF
Since 2006, type 1 diabetes in Finland has plateaued and then decreased after the authorities’ decision to fortify dietary milk products with cholecalciferol. The role of vitamin D in innate and adaptive immunity is critical. A statistical error in the estimation of the recommended dietary allowance (RDA) for vitamin D was recently discovered; in a correct analysis of the data used by the Institute of Medicine, it was found that 8895 IU/d was needed for 97.5% of individuals to achieve values ≥50 nmol/L. Another study confirmed that 6201 IU/d was needed to achieve 75 nmol/L and 9122 IU/d was needed to reach 100 nmol/L. The largest meta-analysis ever conducted of studies published between 1966 and 2013 showed that 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels <75 nmol/L may be too low for safety and associated with higher all-cause mortality, demolishing the previously presumed U-shape curve of mortality associated with vitamin D levels. Since all-disease mortality is reduced to 1.0 with serum vitamin D levels ≥100 nmol/L, we call public health authorities to consider designating as the RDA at least three-fourths of the levels proposed by the Endocrine Society Expert Committee as safe upper tolerable daily intake doses. This could lead to a recommendation of 1000 IU for children <1 year on enriched formula and 1500 IU for breastfed children older than 6 months, 3000 IU for children >1 year of age, and around 8000 IU for young adults and thereafter. Actions are urgently needed to protect the global population from vitamin D deficiency.
Summary

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Original Articles
The Association Between Smoking Tobacco After a Diagnosis of Diabetes and the Prevalence of Diabetic Nephropathy in the Korean Male Population
Hyungseon Yeom, Jung Hyun Lee, Hyeon Chang Kim, Il Suh
J Prev Med Public Health. 2016;49(2):108-117.   Published online March 23, 2016
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.15.062
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AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Objectives
Smoking is known to be associated with nephropathy in patients with diabetes. The distinct effects of smoking before and after diabetes has been diagnosed, however, are not well characterized. We evaluated the association of cigarette smoking before and after a diagnosis of diabetes with the presence of diabetic nephropathy.
Methods
We analyzed data from the 2011-2013 editions of the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. A total of 629 male patients diagnosed with diabetes were classified as non-smokers (90 patients), former smokers (225 patients), or continuing smokers (314 patients). A “former smoker” was a patient who smoked only before receiving his diagnosis of diabetes. A “continuing smoker” was a patient who smoked at any time after his diabetes had been diagnosed. Diabetic nephropathy was defined as the presence of albuminuria (spot urine albumin/creatinine ratio ≥30 mg/g) or low estimated glomerular filtration rate (<60 mL/min/1.73 m2). Multiple logistic regression models were used to assess the independent association after adjusting for age, duration of diabetes, hemoglobin A1c, body mass index, systolic blood pressure, medication for hypertension, and medication for dyslipidemia. Female patients were excluded from the study due to the small proportion of females in the survey who smoked.
Results
Compared to non-smokers, continuing smokers had significantly higher odds ratio ([OR], 2.17; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.23 to 3.83) of suffering from diabetic nephropathy. The corresponding OR (95% CI) for former smokers was 1.26 (0.70 to 2.29).
Conclusions
Smoking after diagnosis of diabetes is significantly associated with the presence of diabetic nephropathy in the Korean male population.
Summary

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Diabetes Mellitus and Site-specific Colorectal Cancer Risk in Korea: A Case-control Study
Hyeongtaek Woo, Jeeyoo Lee, Jeonghee Lee, Ji Won Park, Sungchan Park, Jeongseon Kim, Jae Hwan Oh, Aesun Shin
J Prev Med Public Health. 2016;49(1):45-52.   Published online December 22, 2015
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.15.029
  • 9,791 View
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AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
Previous large-scale cohort studies conducted in Korea have found a positive association between diabetes mellitus (DM) and colorectal cancer (CRC) in men only, in contrast to studies of other populations that have found significant associations in both men and women.
Methods
A total of 1070 CRC cases and 2775 controls were recruited from the National Cancer Center, Korea between August 2010 and June 2013. Self-reported DM history and the duration of DM were compared between cases and controls. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated by binary and polytomous logistic regression models.
Results
DM was associated with an elevated risk of CRC in both men (OR, 1.47; 95% CI, 1.13 to 1.90) and women (OR, 1.92; 95% CI, 1.24 to 2.98). This association remained when we controlled for age, body mass index, alcohol consumption, and physical activity level. In sub-site analyses, DM was associated with distal colon cancer risk in both men (multivariate OR, 2.04; 95% CI, 1.39 to 3.00) and women (multivariate ORs, 1.99; 95% CI, 1.05 to 3.79), while DM was only associated with rectal cancer risk in women (multivariate OR, 2.05; 95% CI, 1.10 to 3.82). No significant association was found between DM and proximal colon cancer risk in either men (multivariate OR, 1.45; 95% CI, 0.88 to 2.41) or women (multivariate OR, 1.79; 95% CI, 0.78 to 4.08).
Conclusions
Overall, DM was associated with an increased risk of CRC in Koreans. However, potential over-estimation of the ORs should be considered due to potential biases from the case-control design.
Summary

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Determinants of Poor Self-rated Health in Korean Adults With Diabetes
Hwi-Won Lee, Minkyo Song, Jae Jeong Yang, Daehee Kang
J Prev Med Public Health. 2015;48(6):287-300.   Published online October 23, 2015
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.15.048
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AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Objectives
Self-rated health is a measure of perceived health widely used in epidemiological studies. Our study investigated the determinants of poor self-rated health in middle-aged Korean adults with diabetes.
Methods
A cross-sectional study was conducted based on the Health Examinees Study. A total of 9759 adults aged 40 to 69 years who reported having physician-diagnosed diabetes were analyzed with regard to a range of health determinants, including sociodemographic, lifestyle, psychosocial, and physical variables, in association with self-rated health status using multivariate logistic regression models. A p-value <0.05 was considered to indicate statistical significance.
Results
We found that negative psychosocial conditions, including frequent stress events and severe distress according to the psychosocial well-being index, were most strongly associated with poor self-rated health (odds ratio [OR]Frequent stress events, 5.40; 95% confidence interval [CI], 4.63 to 6.29; ORSevere distress, 11.08; 95% CI, 8.77 to 14.00). Moreover, younger age and being underweight or obese were shown to be associated with poor self-rated health. Physical factors relating to participants’ medical history of diabetes, such as a younger age at diagnosis, a longer duration of diabetes, insulin therapy, hemoglobin A1c levels of 6.5% or more, and comorbidities, were other correlates of poor reported health.
Conclusions
Our findings suggest that, in addition to medical variables, unfavorable socioeconomic factors, and adverse lifestyle behaviors, younger age, being underweight or obese, and psychosocial stress could be distinc factors in predicting negative perceived health status in Korean adults with diabetes.
Summary

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