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Volume 51(5); September 2018
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Original Articles
What Explains Socioeconomic Inequality in Health-related Quality of Life in Iran? A Blinder-Oaxaca Decomposition
Satar Rezaei, Mohammad Hajizadeh, Yahya Salimi, Ghobad Moradi, Bijan Nouri
J Prev Med Public Health. 2018;51(5):219-226.   Published online August 7, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.18.012
  • 6,277 View
  • 208 Download
  • 4 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
This study aimed to explain the health-related quality of life (HRQoL) gap between the poorest and the wealthiest quintiles in the capitals of Kermanshah and Kurdistan Provinces (Kermanshah and Sanandaj), in western Iran.
Methods
This was a cross-sectional study conducted among 1772 adults. Data on socio-demographic characteristics, socioeconomic status (SES), lifestyle factors, body mass index, and HRQoL of participants were collected using a self-administered questionnaire. The slope and relative indices of inequality (SII and RII, respectively) were employed to examine socioeconomic inequality in poor HRQoL. Blinder-Oaxaca (BO) decomposition was used to quantify the contribution of explanatory variables to the gap in the prevalence of poor HRQoL between the wealthiest and the poorest groups.
Results
The overall crude and age-adjusted prevalence of poor HRQoL among adults was 32.0 and 41.8%, respectively. The SII and RII indicated that poor HRQoL was mainly concentrated among individuals with lower SES. The absolute difference (%) in the prevalence of poor HRQoL between the highest and lowest SES groups was 28.4. The BO results indicated that 49.9% of the difference was explained by different distributions of age, smoking behavior, physical inactivity, chronic health conditions, and obesity between the highest and lowest SES groups, while the remaining half of the gap was explained by the response effect.
Conclusions
We observed a pro-rich distribution of poor HRQoL among adults in the capitals of Kermanshah and Kurdistan Provinces. Policies and strategies aimed at preventing and reducing smoking, physical inactivity, chronic health conditions, and obesity among the poor may reduce the gap in poor HRQoL between the highest and lowest SES groups in Iran.
Summary

Citations

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  • Why is there a gap in self-rated health among people with hypertension in Zambia? A decomposition of determinants and rural‒urban differences
    Chris Mweemba, Wilbroad Mutale, Felix Masiye, Peter Hangoma
    BMC Public Health.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Health-related quality of life variation by socioeconomic status: Evidence from an Iranian population-based study
    Sulmaz Ghahramani, Maryam Hadipour, Payam Peymani, Sahar Ghahramani, KamranB Lankarani
    Journal of Education and Health Promotion.2023; 12(1): 287.     CrossRef
  • What explains the large disparity in child stunting in the Philippines? A decomposition analysis
    Valerie Gilbert T Ulep, Jhanna Uy, Lyle Daryll Casas
    Public Health Nutrition.2022; 25(11): 2995.     CrossRef
  • Health-related quality of life by household income in Chile: a concentration index decomposition analysis
    Rodrigo Severino, Manuel Espinoza, Báltica Cabieses
    International Journal for Equity in Health.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
Increased Prevalence of Chronic Disease in Back Pain Patients Living in Car-dependent Neighbourhoods in Canada: A Cross-sectional Analysis
Amy Zeglinski-Spinney, Denise C. Wai, Philippe Phan, Eve C. Tsai, Alexandra Stratton, Stephen P. Kingwell, Darren M. Roffey, Eugene K. Wai
J Prev Med Public Health. 2018;51(5):227-233.   Published online August 10, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.18.038
  • 5,370 View
  • 121 Download
  • 2 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
Chronic diseases, including back pain, result in significant patient morbidity and societal burden. Overall improvement in physical fitness is recommended for prevention and treatment. Walking is a convenient modality for achieving initial gains. Our objective was to determine whether neighbourhood walkability, acting as a surrogate measure of physical fitness, was associated with the presence of chronic disease.
Methods
We conducted a cross-sectional study of prospectively collected data from a prior randomized cohort study of 227 patients referred for tertiary assessment of chronic back pain in Ottawa, ON, Canada. The Charlson Comorbidity Index (CCI) was calculated from patient-completed questionnaires and medical record review. Using patients’ postal codes, neighbourhood walkability was determined using the Walk Score, which awards points based on the distance to the closest amenities, yielding a score from 0 to 100 (0- 50: car-dependent; 50-100: walkable).
Results
Based on the Walk Score, 134 patients lived in car-dependent neighborhoods and 93 lived in walkable neighborhoods. A multivariate logistic regression model, adjusted for age, gender, rural postal code, body mass index, smoking, median household income, percent employment, pain, and disability, demonstrated an adjusted odds ratio of 2.75 (95% confidence interval, 1.16 to 6.53) times higher prevalence for having a chronic disease for patients living in a car-dependent neighborhood. There was also a significant dose-related association (p=0.01; Mantel-Haenszel chi-square=6.4) between living in car-dependent neighbourhoods and more severe CCI scores.
Conclusions
Our findings suggest that advocating for improved neighbourhood planning to permit greater walkability may help offset the burden of chronic disease.
Summary

Citations

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  • Contributions and Limitations Walk Score® in the Context of Walkability: A Scoping Review
    Jennifer Ann Brown, Kimberley D. Curtin, Mathew Thomson, Janice Y. Kung, Candace I. J. Nykiforuk
    Environment and Behavior.2023; 55(6-7): 468.     CrossRef
  • Do Walking-Friendly Built Environments Influence Frailty and Long-Term Care Insurance Service Needs?
    Seigo Mitsutake, Tatsuro Ishizaki, Yuri Yokoyama, Mariko Nishi, Mohammad Javad Koohsari, Koichiro Oka, Shohei Yano, Takumi Abe, Akihiko Kitamura
    Sustainability.2021; 13(10): 5632.     CrossRef
The Role of Social Support and the Neighborhood Environment on Physical Activity in Low-income, Mexican-American Women in South Texas
Jennifer J. Salinas, Marisol McDaniel, Deborah Parra-Medina
J Prev Med Public Health. 2018;51(5):234-241.   Published online July 25, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.18.052
  • 5,579 View
  • 148 Download
  • 9 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
To determine the relationships between physical activity (PA), the neighborhood environment support for PA, and social support for PA among Mexican-American women living in South Texas. The Enlace study was a randomized controlled trial that tested the effectiveness of a promotora-led PA intervention among low-income Mexican origin women (n=614) living in colonias.
Methods
The dependent measures included accelerometer-measured average moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA) and sedentary breaks and the Community Health Activities Model Program for Seniors PA 41-item questionnaire. The independent measures included the Physical Activity and Neighborhood Environment Scale (PANES) and the 13-item Physical Activity Social Support (PASS) scale.
Results
Enlace participants were on average 40.4 (standard deviation, 10.3) years old, born in Mexico (86.1%), and uninsured (83.1%). Adjusted linear regression results indicated that each 1-point increment in the PANES overall score was associated with 0.050 (p<0.001) unit increase in sedentary break and a −0.043 (p=0.001) unit decrease in sedentary break duration. Both PANES (β=0.296; p=0.002) and PASS scores (β=0.076; p<0.001) were associated with weekly average self-reported MVPA. Interaction effects were observed between PASS scores and accelerometer-measured frequency of sedentary breaks and sedentary time duration.
Conclusions
The findings of this study indicate that the relationships between PA and built environment and social support are measure-dependent and suggest that reducing sedentary time in this population may require a closer assessment of social support for PA.
Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • A systematic review on the associations between the built environment and adult’s physical activity in global tropical and subtropical climate regions
    Carina Nigg, Shaima A. Alothman, Abdullah F. Alghannam, Jasper Schipperijn, Reem AlAhmed, Reem F. Alsukait, Severin Rakic, Volkan Cetinkaya, Hazzaa M. Al-Hazzaa, Saleh A. Alqahtani
    International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Bridging the Built and Social Environments: A Systematic Review of Studies Investigating Influences on Physical Activity
    Tyler Prochnow, Laurel S. Curran, Christina Amo, Meg S. Patterson
    Journal of Physical Activity and Health.2023; : 1.     CrossRef
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    Jennifer J. Salinas, Roy Valenzuela, Jon Sheen, Malcolm Carlyle, Jennifer Gay, Alma Morales
    Journal of Health Psychology.2022; 27(4): 961.     CrossRef
  • Factors promoting collaboration between community sports leaders and guardians in urban areas of Japan: A cross-sectional study
    Yoshino Hosokawa, Hiroko Yako-Suketomo, Kaori Ishii, Koichiro Oka
    Frontiers in Public Health.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Long-term physical activity outcomes in the Seamos Activas II trial
    Bess H. Marcus, Britta A. Larsen, Sarah E. Linke, Sheri J. Hartman, Dori Pekmezi, Tanya Benitez, James Sallis, Andrea S. Mendoza-Vasconez, Shira I. Dunsiger
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  • Associations of Partner Support and Acculturation With Physical Activity in Mexican American Women
    Neomie C. Congello, Deborah Koniak-Griffin, Mary-Lynn Brecht, Ron D. Hays, Mary-Sue V. Heilemann, Adeline M. Nyamathi
    Hispanic Health Care International.2020; 18(2): 98.     CrossRef
  • Correlates of walking among disadvantaged groups: A systematic review
    Toni A. Hilland, Matthew Bourke, Glen Wiesner, Enrique Garcia Bengoechea, Alexandra G. Parker, Michaela Pascoe, Melinda Craike
    Health & Place.2020; 63: 102337.     CrossRef
  • Predictors of Latinx Youth Health and Emotional Well-being: Social Determinants of Health Perspective
    Mary Lehman Held, Aubrey Jones, Shandra Forrest-Bank
    Journal of Racial and Ethnic Health Disparities.2020; 7(6): 1188.     CrossRef
  • Effects of Social Support, Family Support and Repulsion Related Nursing Home Use on the Well-Dying of Elderly
    Young Ju Oh, Kyeong In Cha, Young Hee Jeon
    Korean Journal of Adult Nursing.2020; 32(3): 235.     CrossRef
Demographic and Survivorship Disparities in Non–muscle-invasive Bladder Cancer in the United States
Munseok Seo, James R. Langabeer II
J Prev Med Public Health. 2018;51(5):242-247.   Published online August 23, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.18.092
  • 6,031 View
  • 157 Download
  • 14 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
To examine survivorship disparities in demographic factors and risk status for non–muscle-invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC), which accounts for more than 75% of all urinary bladder cancers, but is highly curable with early identification and treatment. Methods: We used the US National Cancer Institute’s Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results registries over a 19-year period (1988-2006) to examine survivorship disparities in age, sex, race/ethnicity, and marital status of patients and risk status classified by histologic grade, stage, size of tumor, and number of multiple primary tumors among NMIBC patients (n=29 326). We applied Kaplan-Meier (K-M) and Cox proportional hazard methods for survival analysis. Results: Among all urinary bladder cancer patients, the majority of NMIBCs were in male (74.1%), non-Latino white (86.7%), married (67.8%), and low-risk (37.6%) to intermediate-risk (44.8%) patients. The mean age was 68 years. Survivorship (in median life years) was highest for non-Latino white (5.4 years), married (5.4 years), and low-risk (5.7 years) patients (K-M analysis, p<0.001). We found significantly lower survivorship for elderly, male (female hazard ratio [HR], 0.96), Latino (HR, 1.20), and unmarried (married HR, 0.93) patients. Conclusions: Survivorship disparities were ubiquitous across age, sex, race/ethnicity, and marital status groups. Non-white, unmarried, and elderly patients had significantly shorter survivorship. The implications of these findings include the need for a heightened focus on health policy and more organized efforts to improve access to care in order to increase the chances of survival for all patients.
Summary

Citations

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  • N6-methyladenosine-modified circ_104797 sustains cisplatin resistance in bladder cancer through acting as RNA sponges
    Congjie Xu, Jiaquan Zhou, Xiaoting Zhang, Xinli Kang, Shuan Liu, Mi Song, Cheng Chang, Youtu Lin, Yang Wang
    Cellular & Molecular Biology Letters.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Angela Estevez, Sumedh Kaul, Aaron Fleishman, Ruslan Korets, Peter Chang, Andrew Wagner, Joaquim Bellmunt, Aria F. Olumi, Heidi Rayala, Boris Gershman
    Urologic Oncology: Seminars and Original Investigations.2023; 41(5): 255.e15.     CrossRef
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    Frontiers in Oncology.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Kelly K. Bree, Yong Shan, Patrick J. Hensley, Niyati Lobo, Chengrui Hu, Douglas S. Tyler, Karim Chamie, Ashish M. Kamat, Stephen B. Williams
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    Laura Bukavina, Megan Prunty, Kirtishri Mishra, Helen Sun, David Sheyn, Britt Conroy, Amr Mahran, Gregory MacLennan, Fredrick Schumacher, Lee Ponsky, Sarah Markt
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    Shang Huang, Hanzhong Chen, Teng Li, Xiaoyong Pu, Jiumin Liu, Xuecheng Bi
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    Kuan-Wei Shih, Wei-Chieh Chen, Ching-Hsin Chang, Ting-En Tai, Jeng-Cheng Wu, Andy C. Huang, Ming-Che Liu
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    Ashis K. Das, Devi K. Mishra, Saji S. Gopalan
    The Open Urology & Nephrology Journal.2021; 14(1): 20.     CrossRef
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    Simon Cadiou, Omar Al Tabaa, Chi-Duc Nguyen, Marine Faccin, Raphaël Guillin, Matthieu Revest, Pascal Guggenbuhl, Eric Houvenagel, Edouard Pertuiset, Guillaume Coiffier
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  • Чи може бути гормонотерапія елементом комбінованого радикального лікування хворих на низькодиференційований рак сечового міхура?
    P. G. Yakovlev
    Шпитальна хірургія. Журнал імені Л. Я. Ковальчука.2019; (3): 75.     CrossRef
Effect of Uric Acid on the Development of Chronic Kidney Disease: The Korean Multi-Rural Communities Cohort Study
Kwang Ho Mun, Gyeong Im Yu, Bo Youl Choi, Mi Kyung Kim, Min-Ho Shin, Dong Hoon Shin
J Prev Med Public Health. 2018;51(5):248-256.   Published online September 7, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.18.112
  • 6,414 View
  • 173 Download
  • 10 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
Several studies have investigated the effects of serum uric acid (SUA) levels on chronic kidney disease (CKD), with discrepant results. The effect of SUA levels on CKD development was studied in the Korean rural population.
Methods
A total of 9695 participants aged ≥40 years were recruited from 3 rural communities in Korea between 2005 and 2009. Of those participants, 5577 who participated in the follow-up and did not have cerebrovascular disease, myocardial infarction, cancer, or CKD at baseline were studied. The participants, of whom 2133 were men and 3444 were women, were grouped into 5 categories according to their quintile of SUA levels. An estimated glomerular filtration rate of <60 mL/min/1.73 m2 at the time of follow-up was considered to indicate newly developed CKD. The effects of SUA levels on CKD development after adjusting for potential confounders were assessed using Cox proportional hazard models.
Results
Among the 5577 participants, 9.4 and 11.0% of men and women developed CKD. The hazard ratio (HR) of CKD was higher in the highest quintile of SUA levels than in the third quintile in men (adjusted HR, 1.60; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.02 to 2.51) and women (adjusted HR, 1.56; 95% CI, 1.14 to 2.15). Furthermore, CKD development was also more common in the lowest quintile of SUA levels than in the third quintile in men (adjusted HR, 1.83; 95% CI, 1.15 to 2.90). The effect of SUA was consistent in younger, obese, and hypertensive men.
Conclusions
Both high and low SUA levels were risk factors for CKD development in rural Korean men, while only high levels were a risk factor in their women counterparts.
Summary

Citations

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  • Serum Uric Acid Levels and Nephrosclerosis in a Population-Based Autopsy Study: The Hisayama Study
    Kenji Maki, Jun Hata, Satoko Sakata, Emi Oishi, Yoshihiko Furuta, Toshiaki Nakano, Yoshinao Oda, Takanari Kitazono, Toshiharu Ninomiya
    American Journal of Nephrology.2022; 53(1): 69.     CrossRef
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    Tommaso Mazzierli, Luigi Cirillo, Viviana Palazzo, Fiammetta Ravaglia, Francesca Becherucci
    Journal of Nephrology.2022; 36(3): 651.     CrossRef
  • U-shaped relationship between serum uric acid level and decline in renal function during a 10-year period in female subjects: BOREAS-CKD2
    Kazuma Mori, Masato Furuhashi, Marenao Tanaka, Keita Numata, Takashi Hisasue, Nagisa Hanawa, Masayuki Koyama, Arata Osanami, Yukimura Higashiura, Masafumi Inyaku, Megumi Matsumoto, Norihito Moniwa, Hirofumi Ohnishi, Tetsuji Miura
    Hypertension Research.2021; 44(1): 107.     CrossRef
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    Po-Ya Chang, Yu-Wei Chang, Yuh-Feng Lin, Hueng-Chuen Fan
    Journal of Personalized Medicine.2021; 11(5): 415.     CrossRef
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    Shingo Nakayama, Michihiro Satoh, Yukako Tatsumi, Takahisa Murakami, Tomoko Muroya, Takuo Hirose, Takayoshi Ohkubo, Takefumi Mori, Atsushi Hozawa, Hirohito Metoki
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Brief Report
National Trends in Smoking Cessation Medication Prescriptions for Smokers With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease in the United States, 2007-2012
Min Ji Kwak, Jongoh Kim, Viraj Bhise, Tong Han Chung, Gabriela Sanchez Petitto
J Prev Med Public Health. 2018;51(5):257-262.   Published online August 23, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.18.119
  • 5,355 View
  • 151 Download
  • 7 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
Smoking cessation decreases morbidity and mortality due to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Pharmacotherapy for smoking cessation is highly effective. However, the optimal prescription rate of smoking cessation medications among smokers with COPD has not been systemically studied. The purpose of this study was to estimate the national prescription rates of smoking cessation medications among smokers with COPD and to examine any disparities therein.
Methods
We conducted a retrospective study using National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey data from 2007 to 2012. We estimated the national prescription rate for any smoking cessation medication (varenicline, bupropion, and nicotine replacement therapy) each year. Multiple survey logistic regression was performed to characterize the effects of demographic variables and comorbidities on prescriptions.
Results
The average prescription rate of any smoking cessation medication over 5 years was 3.64%. The prescription rate declined each year, except for a slight increase in 2012: 9.91% in 2007, 4.47% in 2008, 2.42% in 2009, 1.88% in 2010, 1.46% in 2011, and 3.67% in 2012. Hispanic race and depression were associated with higher prescription rates (odds ratio [OR], 5.15; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.59 to 16.67 and OR, 2.64; 95% CI, 1.26 to 5.51, respectively). There were no significant differences according to insurance, location of the physician, or other comorbidities. The high OR among Hispanic population and those with depression was driven by the high prescription rate of bupropion.
Conclusions
The prescription rate of smoking cessation medications among smokers with COPD remained low throughout the study period. Further studies are necessary to identify barriers and to develop strategies to overcome them.
Summary

Citations

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Perspective
Necessity of Epigenetic Epidemiology Studies on the Carcinogenesis of Lung Cancer in Never Smokers
Jong-Myon Bae
J Prev Med Public Health. 2018;51(5):263-264.   Published online July 8, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.18.076
  • 5,126 View
  • 140 Download
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Based on epidemiological and genomic characteristics, lung cancer in never smokers (LCNS) is a different disease from lung cancer in smokers. Based on current research, the main risk factor for LCNS may be air pollution. A recent case-control study in Koreans reported that nitrogen dioxide (NO2) may be a risk factor for LCNS. Additionally, a cohort study showed that exposure to NO2 was associated with significant hypomethylation. Thus, epigenetic epidemiology studies are needed in the near future to evaluate the carcinogenesis of LCNS according to chronic exposure to air pollution and/or viral infections.
Summary

JPMPH : Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health