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Volume 46(1); January 2013
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Original Articles
Association Between Local Government Social Expenditures and Mortality Levels in Korea
Hansoo Ko, Jinseob Kim, Donggil Kim, Saerom Kim, Yukyung Park, Chang-yup Kim
J Prev Med Public Health. 2013;46(1):1-9.   Published online January 31, 2013
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2013.46.1.1
  • 8,389 View
  • 72 Download
  • 2 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives

We examined the association between social expenditures of the local government and the mortality level in Korea, 2004 to 2010.

Methods

We used social expenditure data of 230 local governments during 2004 to 2010 from the Social Expenditure Database prepared by the Korean Institute for Health and Social Affairs. Fixed effect panel data regression analysis was adopted to look for associations between social expenditures and age-standardized mortality and the premature death index.

Results

Social expenditures of local governments per capita was not significantly associated with standardized mortality but was associated with the premature death index (decline of 1.0 [for males] and 0.5 [for females] for each expenditure of 100 000 Korean won, i.e., approximately 100 US dollar). As an index of the voluntary effort of local governments, the self-managed project ratio was associated with a decline in the standardized mortality in females (decline of 0.4 for each increase of 1%). The share of health care was not significant.

Conclusions

There were associations between social expenditures of the local government and the mortality level in Korea. In particular, social expenditures per capita were significantly associated with a decline in premature death. However, the voluntary efforts of local governments were not significantly related to the decline in premature death.

Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Public health management: systemic analysis of social determinants of health in Brazilian municipalities
    Francisco Carlos Carvalho de Melo, Rodolfo Ferreira Ribeiro da Costa, Jansen Maia Del Corso
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    BMC Public Health.2018;[Epub]     CrossRef
PM10 Exposure and Non-accidental Mortality in Asian Populations: A Meta-analysis of Time-series and Case-crossover Studies
Hye Yin Park, Sanghyuk Bae, Yun-Chul Hong
J Prev Med Public Health. 2013;46(1):10-18.   Published online January 31, 2013
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2013.46.1.10
  • 9,827 View
  • 125 Download
  • 15 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives

We investigated the association between particulate matter less than 10 µm in aerodynamic diameter (PM10) exposure and non-accidental mortality in Asian populations by meta-analysis, using both time-series and case-crossover analysis.

Methods

Among the 819 published studies searched from PubMed and EMBASE using key words related to PM10 exposure and non-accidental mortality in Asian countries, 8 time-series and 4 case-crossover studies were selected for meta-analysis after exclusion by selection criteria. We obtained the relative risk (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) of non-accidental mortality per 10 µg/m3 increase of daily PM10 from each study. We used Q statistics to test the heterogeneity of the results among the different studies and evaluated for publication bias using Begg funnel plot and Egger test.

Results

Testing for heterogeneity showed significance (p<0.001); thus, we applied a random-effects model. RR (95% CI) per 10 µg/m3 increase of daily PM10 for both the time-series and case-crossover studies combined, time-series studies relative risk only, and case-crossover studies only, were 1.0047 (1.0033 to 1.0062), 1.0057 (1.0029 to 1.0086), and 1.0027 (1.0010 to 1.0043), respectively. The non-significant Egger test suggested that this analysis was not likely to have a publication bias.

Conclusions

We found a significant positive association between PM10 exposure and non-accidental mortality among Asian populations. Continued investigations are encouraged to contribute to the health impact assessment and public health management of air pollution in Asian countries.

Summary

Citations

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The Effects of Temperature on Heat-related Illness According to the Characteristics of Patients During the Summer of 2012 in the Republic of Korea
Wonwoong Na, Jae-Yeon Jang, Kyung Eun Lee, Hyunyoung Kim, Byungyool Jun, Jun-Wook Kwon, Soo-Nam Jo
J Prev Med Public Health. 2013;46(1):19-27.   Published online January 31, 2013
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2013.46.1.19
  • 11,206 View
  • 116 Download
  • 29 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives

This study was conducted to investigate the relationship between heat-related illnesses developed in the summer of 2012 and temperature.

Methods

The study analyzed data generated by a heat wave surveillance system operated by the Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention during the summer of 2012. The daily maximum temperature, average temperature, and maximum heat index were compared to identify the most suitable index for this study. A piecewise linear model was used to identify the threshold temperature and the relative risk (RR) above the threshold temperature according to patient characteristics and region.

Results

The total number of patients during the 3 months was 975. Of the three temperature indicators, the daily maximum temperature showed the best goodness of fit with the model. The RR of the total patient incidence was 1.691 (1.641 to 1.743) per 1℃ after 31.2℃. The RR above the threshold temperature of women (1.822, 1.716 to 1.934) was greater than that of men (1.643, 1.587 to 1.701). The threshold temperature was the lowest in the age group of 20 to 64 (30.4℃), and the RR was the highest in the ≥65 age group (1.863, 1.755 to 1.978). The threshold temperature of the provinces (30.5℃) was lower than that of the metropolitan cities (32.2℃). Metropolitan cities at higher latitudes had a greater RR than other cities at lower latitudes.

Conclusions

The influences of temperature on heat-related illnesses vary according to gender, age, and region. A surveillance system and public health program should reflect these factors in their implementation.

Summary

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The Relationship Between the Social Network of Community-living Elders and Their Health-related Quality of Life in Korean Province
Jun Tae Lim, Jong-Heon Park, Jin-Seok Lee, Juhwan Oh, Yoon Kim
J Prev Med Public Health. 2013;46(1):28-38.   Published online January 31, 2013
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2013.46.1.28
  • 11,625 View
  • 121 Download
  • 11 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives

This study aimed to collect information that will help enhance the social networks and improve the quality of life among elderly people by observing the relationship between their social network and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and by analyzing social network factors affecting HRQoL.

Methods

This study was based on the 2008 Community Health Survey in Yeoncheon County. Three hundred elders were included in the study population. We compared the revised Lubben Social Network Scale (LSNS-R) score and Euro quality of life-5 dimensions health status index by demographic characteristics and chronic disease prevalence. We analyzed the data using multiple regression and tobit regression by setting the HRQoL as the dependent variable and social network and other characteristics as the independent variables. We analyzed social network factors by using factor analysis.

Results

The LSNS-R score differed significantly according to age and existence of a spouse. According to the results from the hierarchical multiple regression analysis, the LSNS-R explained 0.10 of the variance and LSNS-R friends factor explained 0.10 of the variance. The tobit regression indicated that the contribution of the LSNS-R family size factor to the regression coefficient of the independent variable that affected the HRQoL was BT=2.96, that of the LSNS-R family frequency factor was BT=3.60, and that of LSNS-R friends factor was BT=5.41.

Conclusions

Social networks among elderly people had a significant effect on HRQoL and their networks of friends had a relatively higher effect than those of family members.

Summary

Citations

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Prevalence of Musculoskeletal Symptoms Related With Activities of Daily Living and Contributing Factors in Korean Adults
Kyusik Choi, Jae-Hyun Park, Hae-Kwan Cheong
J Prev Med Public Health. 2013;46(1):39-49.   Published online January 31, 2013
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2013.46.1.39
  • 10,673 View
  • 101 Download
  • 17 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives

This study aims to investigate the prevalence of musculoskeletal symptoms and factors related to daily activities in a representative Korean population.

Methods

This study was based on the questions about musculoskeletal symptoms in the Korean General Social Survey 2010. The questionnaire about musculoskeletal symptoms was adopted from Korean Occupational Safety and Health Agency guide, and it includes general characteristics, characteristics of pain, work type, work intensity and a 12-item Short Form Health Survey (SF-12). We utilized the criteria of the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health to define the prevalence of musculoskeletal symptoms. Demographic, behavioral and socioeconomic factors were analyzed using logistic regression.

Results

The prevalence of musculoskeletal symptoms was 38.3%. The prevalence was higher in females, the elderly, those without health insurance, and those with a low income, low education, and occupations with a heavy workload. The prevalence by body part was highest in the back, shoulder, and knee, in that order. The physical component summary and mental component summary of the SF-12 decreased with increasing musculoskeletal symptoms.

Conclusions

Musculoskeletal symptoms are very common in the general population, and related to various socio-demographic factors. These results suggest that active prevention and management of musculoskeletal symptoms is needed at a national level.

Summary

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Socioeconomic Status and Number of Children Among Korean Women: The Healthy Twin Study
Jinseob Kim, Joohon Sung
J Prev Med Public Health. 2013;46(1):50-60.   Published online January 31, 2013
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2013.46.1.50
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AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives

This study aimed to evaluate whether the birth rate is associated with socioeconomic status in the women of the Republic of Korea, where the birth rate is rapidly decreasing.

Methods

This study included 732 females from the Healthy Twin Study, a family-twin cohort. The participants were classified into 3 socioeconomic groups according to their average income, education, and occupation. The association between socioeconomic status and number of children was assessed using gamma regression analysis with a generalized linear mixed model, adjusting for the age group, smoking/alcohol status, and family relationships.

Results

The group with the highest education level had significantly fewer children compared with the group with the lowest education level (p=0.004). However, no significant associations were found according to household income level. The non-manual labor group had significantly fewer children compared with those working as homemakers (p=0.008).

Conclusions

This study aimed to explain the causal relationship between socioeconomic status and number of children. Associations between some socioeconomic status and number of children were found in Korea.

Summary

Citations

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JPMPH : Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health