Skip Navigation
Skip to contents

JPMPH : Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health

OPEN ACCESS
SEARCH
Search

Previous issues

Page Path
HOME > Browse Articles > Previous issues
8 Previous issues
Filter
Filter
Article category
Keywords
Authors
Volume 45(4); July 2012
Prev issue Next issue
Original Articles
Differences in Obesity Rates Between People With and Without Disabilities and the Association of Disability and Obesity: A Nationwide Population Study in South Korea
Moo-Kyung Oh, Hyeongap Jang, Yong-Ik Kim, Belong Jo, Yoon Kim, Jong-Heon Park, Jin-Seok Lee
J Prev Med Public Health. 2012;45(4):211-218.   Published online July 31, 2012
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2012.45.4.211
  • 9,224 View
  • 70 Download
  • 14 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives

The objective of this study was to identify the differences in obesity rates among people with and without disabilities, and evaluate the relationship between obesity rates and the existence of disabilities or characteristics of disabilities.

Methods

Mass screening data from 2008 from the National Disability Registry and National Health Insurance (NHI) are used. For analysis, we classified physical disability into three subtypes: upper limb disability, lower limb disability, and spinal cord injury. For a control group, we extracted people without disabilities by each subtype. To adjust for the participation rate in the NHI mass screening, we calculated and adopted the weight stratified by sex, age, and grade of disability. Differences in obesity rates between people with and without disabilities were examined by a chi-squared test. In addition, the effect of the existence of disabilities and grade of disabilities on obesity was examined by multiple logistic regression analysis.

Results

People with disabilities were found to have a higher obesity rate than those without disabilities. The obesity rates were 35.2% and 35.0% (people with disabilities vs. without disabilities) in the upper limb disability, 44.5% and 34.8% in the lower limb disability, 43.4% and 34.6% in the spinal cord injury. The odds for existence of physical disability and grade of disability are higher than the non-disabilities.

Conclusions

These results show that people with physical disability have a higher vulnerability to obesity.

Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Weight history of individuals with and without physical disability in the International Weight Control Registry
    Julianne G. Clina, R. Drew Sayer, Anna M. Gorczyca, Sai Krupa Das, James E. Friedman, Tsz Kiu Chui, Susan B. Roberts, James O. Hill
    Obesity Science & Practice.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Health-related Physical Fitness, Blood Pressure, and Body Mass Index among People with Intellectual Disability, Visual Impairment, and Hearing Impairment
    Young Hoon Kim, Su Hyun Kim, Taegyu Kim, Rui Ma
    Exercise Science.2024; 33(1): 93.     CrossRef
  • Pilot evaluation of a behavioral weight loss program for adults with physical disabilities: State of Slim Everybody usability and feasibility
    Julianne G. Clina, Holly R. Wyatt, James O. Hill, Christine C. Ferguson, Hui‐Ju Young, James H. Rimmer
    Obesity Science & Practice.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Adapting an evidence-based physical activity questionnaire for people with physical disabilities: A methodological process
    Julianne G. Clina, Cassandra Herman, Christine C. Ferguson, James H. Rimmer
    Disability and Health Journal.2023; 16(3): 101447.     CrossRef
  • Investigation of the Relationship Between Psychiatry Visit and Suicide After Deliberate Self-harm: Longitudinal National Cohort Study
    Hye Hyeon Kim, Chanyoung Ko, Ji Ae Park, In Han Song, Yu Rang Park
    JMIR Public Health and Surveillance.2023; 9: e41261.     CrossRef
  • A cross‐sectional study on the use of big data for the past H1N1 influenza epidemic in obesity after COVID‐19: Focused on the body slimming cream and leptin via DTC gene test
    Jinkyung Lee, Ki Han Kwon
    Journal of Cosmetic Dermatology.2022; 21(11): 5321.     CrossRef
  • A Study on the Research Trends on Obese People with Disabilities: Focused on Domestic Journal
    Jung-Sik Park, Yun-Kyung Song
    Journal of Korean Medicine for Obesity Research.2019; 19(1): 68.     CrossRef
  • Association of employment status and income with self-rated health among waged workers with disabilities in South Korea: population-based panel study
    Jae Woo Choi, Juyeong Kim, Euna Han, Tae Hyun Kim
    BMJ Open.2019; 9(11): e032174.     CrossRef
  • The complexity of reaching and maintaining a healthy body weight – the experience from adults with a mobility disability
    Marianne Holmgren, Magnus Sandberg, Gerd Ahlström
    BMC Obesity.2018;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • The bidirectional association between body weight and mobility disability: A population-based cohort
    Jeroen S. de Munter, Per Tynelius, Gerd Ahlström, Finn Rasmussen
    Disability and Health Journal.2016; 9(4): 632.     CrossRef
  • Effects of a walking exercise program for obese individuals with intellectual disability staying in a residential care facility
    Sungmin Son, Byoungjin Jeon, Heejung Kim
    Journal of Physical Therapy Science.2016; 28(3): 788.     CrossRef
  • Impacts of mobility disability and high and increasing body mass index on health-related quality of life and participation in society: a population-based cohort study from Sweden
    Marianne Holmgren, Anna Lindgren, Jeroen de Munter, Finn Rasmussen, Gerd Ahlström
    BMC Public Health.2014;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Comparison of sarcopenic status between elderly leprosy survivors and general population
    Won Kim, Hee Won Park, Byung Kwan Hwang, Soon Ook Bae, In Kwon Kim, Sun G. Chung
    Archives of Gerontology and Geriatrics.2014; 58(1): 134.     CrossRef
  • Recent Developments in Obesity Research: Linkages between Obesity, Disability, and Physical Functioning
    Sandra L. Reynolds
    Current Obesity Reports.2013; 2(3): 267.     CrossRef
Zolpidem Use and Risk of Fracture in Elderly Insomnia Patients
Dong-Yoon Kang, Soyoung Park, Chul-Woo Rhee, Ye-Jee Kim, Nam-Kyong Choi, Joongyub Lee, Byung-Joo Park
J Prev Med Public Health. 2012;45(4):219-226.   Published online July 31, 2012
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2012.45.4.219
  • 16,867 View
  • 174 Download
  • 79 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives

To evaluate the risk of fractures related with zolpidem in elderly insomnia patients.

Methods

Health claims data on the entire South Korean elderly population from January 2005 to June 2006 were extracted from the Health Insurance Review and Assessment Service database. We applied a case-crossover design. Cases were defined as insomnia patients who had a fracture diagnosis. We set the hazard period of 1 day length prior to the fracture date and four control periods of the same length at 5, 10, 15, and 20 weeks prior to the fracture date. Time independent confounding factors such as age, gender, lifestyle, cognitive function level, mobility, socioeconomic status, residential environment, and comorbidity could be controlled using the casecrossover design. Time dependent confounding factors, especially co-medication of patients during the study period, were adjusted by conditional logistic regression analysis. The odds ratios and their 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated for the risk of fracture related to zolpidem.

Results

One thousand five hundred and eight cases of fracture were detected in insomnia patients during the study period. In our data, the use of zolpidem increased the risk of fracture significantly (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 1.72; 95% CI, 1.37 to 2.16). However, the association between benzodiazepine hypnotics and the risk of fracture was not statistically significant (aOR, 1.00; 95% CI, 0.83 to 1.21). Likewise, the results were not statistically significant in stratified analysis with each benzodiazepine generic subgroup.

Conclusions

Zolpidem could increase the risk of fracture in elderly insomnia patients. Therefore zolpidem should be prescribed carefully and the elderly should be provided with sufficient patient education.

Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Sedative-hypnotics and osteoporotic fractures: A systematic review of observational studies with over six million individuals
    Chong Xu, Janice Ching Nam Leung, Jiaying Shi, Dawn Hei Lum, Francisco Tsz Tsun Lai
    Sleep Medicine Reviews.2024; 73: 101866.     CrossRef
  • Burden of narcolepsy in Japan: A health claims database study evaluating direct medical costs and comorbidities
    Yuta Kamada, Aya Imanishi, Shih-Wei Chiu, Takuhiro Yamaguchi
    Sleep Medicine.2024; 114: 119.     CrossRef
  • Analysis of Drugs Prescribed to Elderly Patients in a Tertiary Health Care Center in Raipur, Central India: An Observational Study
    Yogendra Keche, Nitin R Gaikwad, Preetam N Wasnik, Keshao Nagpure, Md Sabah Siddiqui, Apoorva Joshi, Suryaprakash Dhaneria, Gevesh Dewangan, Jhasaketan Meher, Pranita Das
    Cureus.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Professionals' treatment goals for long-term benzodiazepine and Z-drugs management: a qualitative study
    Pauline Van Ngoc, Melissa Ceuterick, Jean-Luc Belche, Beatrice Scholtes
    BJGP Open.2024; 8(1): BJGPO.2023.0034.     CrossRef
  • Nurses' attitudes, beliefs and knowledge of sleep health in residential aged care: An integrative literature review
    Christopher J. Gordon, Tracee Fernandez, Emily Chen, Mariam Basheti, Matthew Rahimi, Bandana Saini
    Journal of Advanced Nursing.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Comparative risk of fracture in community‐dwelling older adults initiating suvorexant versus Z‐drugs: Results from LIFE study
    Motohiko Adomi, Megumi Maeda, Fumiko Murata, Haruhisa Fukuda
    Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.2023; 71(1): 109.     CrossRef
  • Analysis of the prescription trends of potentially inappropriate medications in Korean older outpatients by sex: A retrospective study using data from the health insurance review and assessment service
    Jae-Yong Dong, Jin-Han Ju, Young-Mo Yang
    Medicine.2023; 102(34): e34818.     CrossRef
  • Effectiveness of suvorexant versus benzodiazepine receptor agonist sleep drugs in reducing the risk of hip fracture: Findings from a regional population-based cohort study
    Ryozo Yoshioka, Seiichiro Yamamoto, Eiji Nakatani, Norio Yasui-Furukori
    PLOS ONE.2023; 18(4): e0284726.     CrossRef
  • The epidemiology of new persistent hypnotic/sedative use after surgical procedures: a retrospective cohort study
    D. H. Magnusson, T. I. Albertsson, F. Jonsdottir, M. I. Sigurdsson
    Anaesthesia.2023; 78(8): 995.     CrossRef
  • Zolpidem as a high risk factor for elderly suicide in South Korea
    Eun Kim, Jae Hee Lee, Duk Hee Lee
    Archives of Suicide Research.2022; 26(2): 831.     CrossRef
  • Reducing Sedative-Hypnotics Among Hospitalized Patients: a Multi-centered Study
    Christine Soong, Cheryl Ethier, Yuna Lee, Dalia Othman, Lisa Burry, Peter E. Wu, Karen A. Ng, John Matelski, Barbara Liu
    Journal of General Internal Medicine.2022; 37(10): 2345.     CrossRef
  • Very long-term outcome of cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia: one- and ten-year follow-up of a randomized controlled trial
    Susanna Jernelöv, Kerstin Blom, Nils Hentati Isacsson, Pontus Bjurner, Ann Rosén, Martin Kraepelien, Erik Forsell, Viktor Kaldo
    Cognitive Behaviour Therapy.2022; 51(1): 72.     CrossRef
  • Efficacy and safety of Z-substances in the management of insomnia in older adults: a systematic review for the development of recommendations to reduce potentially inappropriate prescribing
    Vincenz Scharner, Lukas Hasieber, Andreas Sönnichsen, Eva Mann
    BMC Geriatrics.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Insomnia Diagnosis, Prescribed Hypnotic Medication Use, and Risk for Serious Fall Injuries in the Reasons for Geographic and Racial Differences in Stroke (REGARDS) Study
    S Justin Thomas, Swati Sakhuja, Lisandro D Colantonio, Mei Li, Paul Muntner, Kristi Reynolds, C Barrett Bowling
    Sleep.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Potentially Inappropriate Medication Use in Patients with Dementia
    Kyungwon Yoon, Jung-Tae Kim, Won-Gun Kwack, Donghyun Kim, Kyung-Tae Lee, Seungwon Yang, Sangmin Lee, Yeo-Jin Choi, Eun-Kyoung Chung
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2022; 19(18): 11426.     CrossRef
  • Z-drugs and falls in nursing home patients: data from the INCUR study
    Sarah Damanti, Moreno Tresoldi, Philipe de Souto Barreto, Yves Rolland, Matteo Cesari
    Aging Clinical and Experimental Research.2022; 34(12): 3145.     CrossRef
  • Efficacy and Safety of Daridorexant in Older and Younger Adults with Insomnia Disorder: A Secondary Analysis of a Randomised Placebo-Controlled Trial
    Ingo Fietze, Claudio L. A. Bassetti, David W. Mayleben, Scott Pain, Dalma Seboek Kinter, William V. McCall
    Drugs & Aging.2022; 39(10): 795.     CrossRef
  • Reacciones adversas medicamentosas de los hipnóticos más utilizados en España
    A.J. Pardo-Cabello, V. Manzano-Gamero, J.D. Luna-del Castillo
    Revista Clínica Española.2021; 221(2): 128.     CrossRef
  • Adverse drug reactions among the most used hypnotic drugs in Spain
    A.J. Pardo-Cabello, V. Manzano-Gamero, J.D. Luna-Del Castillo
    Revista Clínica Española (English Edition).2021; 221(2): 128.     CrossRef
  • Non-benzodiazepine hypnotic use for sleep disturbance in people aged over 55 years living with dementia: a series of cohort studies
    Kathryn Richardson, George M Savva, Penelope J Boyd, Clare Aldus, Ian Maidment, Eduwin Pakpahan, Yoon K Loke, Antony Arthur, Nicholas Steel, Clive Ballard, Robert Howard, Chris Fox
    Health Technology Assessment.2021; 25(1): 1.     CrossRef
  • Sleep Disturbance, Sleep Disorders and Co-Morbidities in the Care of the Older Person
    Christine E. Mc Carthy
    Medical Sciences.2021; 9(2): 31.     CrossRef
  • Effectiveness of App-Based Yoga of Immortals (YOI) Intervention for Insomnia in Asian Population during Pandemic Restrictions
    Renuka Tunuguntla, Hari Siva Gurunadha Rao Tunuguntla, Himanshu Kathuria, Sadhna Verma
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2021; 18(11): 5706.     CrossRef
  • Effects of anticholinergic and sedative medication use on fractures: A self‐controlled design study
    Shahar Shmuel, Virginia Pate, Marc J. Pepin, Janine C. Bailey, Yvonne M. Golightly, Laura C. Hanson, Til Stürmer, Rebecca B. Naumann, Danijela Gnjidic, Jennifer L. Lund
    Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.2021; 69(11): 3212.     CrossRef
  • Effect of Multimorbidity on Fragility Fractures in Community-Dwelling Older Adults: Shimane CoHRE Study
    Garu A, Shozo Yano, Abdullah Md Sheik, Aorigele Yu, Kenta Okuyama, Miwako Takeda, Kunie Kohno, Masayuki Yamasaki, Minoru Isomura, Toru Nabika, Atsushi Nagai
    Journal of Clinical Medicine.2021; 10(15): 3225.     CrossRef
  • Clinical consequences of abuse and misuse of hypnotics and analgesics in geriatric population
    Paulina Trawka, Jakub Husejko, Kornelia Kędziora-Kornatowska
    BÓL.2021; 22(2): 1.     CrossRef
  • Exploring the Mechanisms Underlying Drug-Induced Fractures Using the Japanese Adverse Drug Event Reporting Database
    Shinya Toriumi, Akinobu Kobayashi, Hitoshi Sueki, Munehiro Yamamoto, Yoshihiro Uesawa
    Pharmaceuticals.2021; 14(12): 1299.     CrossRef
  • Efficacy and safety of non-benzodiazepine and non-Z-drug hypnotic medication for insomnia in older people: a systematic literature review
    Judith Sys, Simon Van Cleynenbreugel, Mieke Deschodt, Lorenz Van der Linden, Jos Tournoy
    European Journal of Clinical Pharmacology.2020; 76(3): 363.     CrossRef
  • Association between benzodiazepines use and risk of hip fracture in the elderly people: A meta-analysis of observational studies
    Tahmina Nasrin Poly, Md. Mohaimenul Islam, Hsuan-Chia Yang, Yu-Chuan (Jack) Li
    Joint Bone Spine.2020; 87(3): 241.     CrossRef
  • Association entre prise de benzodiazépines et risque de fracture de la hanche chez la personne âgée : méta-analyse d’études observationnelles
    Tahmina Nasrin Poly, Md. Mohaimenul Islam, Hsuan-Chia Yang, Yu-Chuan (Jack) Li
    Revue du Rhumatisme.2020; 87(3): 210.     CrossRef
  • Acute cognitive effects of the hypocretin receptor antagonist almorexant relative to zolpidem and placebo: a randomized clinical trial
    Thomas C Neylan, Anne Richards, Thomas J Metzler, Leslie M Ruoff, Jonathan Varbel, Aoife O’Donovan, Melinda Sivasubramanian, Terri Motraghi, Jennifer Hlavin, Steven L Batki, Sabra S Inslicht, Kristin Samuelson, Stephen R Morairty, Thomas S Kilduff
    Sleep.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • More than a quarter century of the most prescribed sleeping pill: Systematic review of zolpidem use by older adults
    Flávio V. Machado, Luciana L. Louzada, Nathan E. Cross, Einstein F. Camargos, Thien Thanh Dang-Vu, Otávio T. Nóbrega
    Experimental Gerontology.2020; 136: 110962.     CrossRef
  • Association of Hypnotic Drug Use with Fall Incidents in Hospitalized Elderly Patients: A Case-Crossover Study
    Haruki Torii, Motozumi Ando, Hideaki Tomita, Tomoko Kobaru, Mahoko Tanaka, Kazuhide Fujimoto, Rumiko Shimizu, Hiroaki Ikesue, Satoshi Okusada, Tohru Hashida, Noriaki Kume
    Biological and Pharmaceutical Bulletin.2020; 43(6): 925.     CrossRef
  • Treatment of Sleep Disturbance May Reduce the Risk of Future Probable Alzheimer’s Disease
    Shanna L. Burke, Tianyan Hu, Christine E. Spadola, Aaron Burgess, Tan Li, Tamara Cadet
    Journal of Aging and Health.2019; 31(2): 322.     CrossRef
  • Twelve-year trend in the use of zolpidem and physicians’ non-compliance with recommended duration: a Korean national health insurance database study
    Yunjeung Jang, Inmyung Song, In-Sun Oh, Ju-Young Shin
    European Journal of Clinical Pharmacology.2019; 75(1): 109.     CrossRef
  • Association between Elimination Half-life of Benzodiazepines and Falls in the Elderly: A Meta-analysis of Observational Studies
    Chikako Masudo, Yukari Ogawa, Naomi Yamashita, Kiyoshi Mihara
    YAKUGAKU ZASSHI.2019; 139(1): 113.     CrossRef
  • Effectiveness and safety of fire-needle moxibustion on insomnia
    Cuiling Liu, Zhiqiang Chen, Ting Li, Zhihua Yang, Qingsong Zhang, Jianping Yin, Peng Zhou, Wei Fu, BaiShu Chen
    Medicine.2019; 98(7): e14509.     CrossRef
  • Treatment of sleep disturbance in older adults
    Amy C. Reynolds, Robert J. Adams
    Journal of Pharmacy Practice and Research.2019; 49(3): 296.     CrossRef
  • An Implementation Guide to Promote Sleep and Reduce Sedative-Hypnotic Initiation for Noncritically Ill Inpatients
    Christine Soong, Lisa Burry, Hyung J. Cho, Evelyn Gathecha, Flora Kisuule, Cara Tannenbaum, Abi Vijenthira, Timothy Morgenthaler
    JAMA Internal Medicine.2019; 179(7): 965.     CrossRef
  • Evaluation of Dissolution Profile between Original and Generic Products of Zolpidem Tartrate by Microdialysis-HPLC
    Kazunori Inaba, Toshiharu Oie, Hiroko Otake, Takeshi Kotake, Noriaki Nagai
    Chemical and Pharmaceutical Bulletin.2019; 67(2): 120.     CrossRef
  • Insomnia, Benzodiazepine Use, and Falls among Residents in Long-term Care Facilities
    Yu Jiang, Qinghua Xia, Jie Wang, Peng Zhou, Shuo Jiang, Vinod K. Diwan, Biao Xu
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2019; 16(23): 4623.     CrossRef
  • Association Between Sleep Medications and Falls and Fall-related Worries in Community-Dwelling Older Adults in the United States
    Kathy Nguyen, Jonathan Watanabe
    Journal of Contemporary Pharmacy Practice.2019; 66(3): 23.     CrossRef
  • Z-drugs and risk for falls and fractures in older adults—a systematic review and meta-analysis
    Nir Treves, Amichai Perlman, Lital Kolenberg Geron, Angham Asaly, Ilan Matok
    Age and Ageing.2018; 47(2): 201.     CrossRef
  • Age, Sex, and Dose Effects of Nonbenzodiazepine Hypnotics on Hip Fracture in Nursing Home Residents
    David D. Dore, Andrew R. Zullo, Vincent Mor, Yoojin Lee, Sarah D. Berry
    Journal of the American Medical Directors Association.2018; 19(4): 328.     CrossRef
  • Cognitive Enhancers Associated with Decreased Risk of Injury in Patients with Dementia: A Nationwide Cohort Study in Taiwan
    Pei-Chun Chao, Wu-Chien Chien, Chi-Hsiang Chung, Ching-Wen Chu, Chin-Bin Yeh, San-Yuan Huang, Ru-Band Lu, Hsin-An Chang, Yu-Chen Kao, Hui-Wen Yeh, Wei-Shan Chiang, Yu-Ching Chou, Nian-Sheng Tzeng
    Journal of Investigative Medicine.2018; 66(3): 684.     CrossRef
  • Insomnia in Elderly Patients: Recommendations for Pharmacological Management
    Vivien C. Abad, Christian Guilleminault
    Drugs & Aging.2018; 35(9): 791.     CrossRef
  • Mild cognitive impairment: associations with sleep disturbance, apolipoprotein e4, and sleep medications
    Shanna L. Burke, Tianyan Hu, Christine E. Spadola, Tan Li, Mitra Naseh, Aaron Burgess, Tamara Cadet
    Sleep Medicine.2018; 52: 168.     CrossRef
  • An effectiveness comparison of acupuncture treatments for insomnia disorder
    Jing Chen, Liming Lu, Nenggui Xu, Jun Chen, Yupeng Fan, Fen Feng, Xiaolan Qin, Yu Kui
    Medicine.2018; 97(35): e12060.     CrossRef
  • Zolpidem-Induced Acute Altered Level of Consciousness: A Report of Two Cases
    Abdolhamid Parsa, Seyyed Ali Tabaeian, Sadra Einizadeh, Mohammad Babaeian
    Iranian Journal of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences.2018;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Hypnotic drug risks of mortality, infection, depression, and cancer: but lack of benefit
    Daniel F. Kripke
    F1000Research.2018; 5: 918.     CrossRef
  • Effects of Ramelteon and Other Sleep-Promoting Drugs on Serum Low-Density Lipoprotein and Non-high-density Lipoprotein Cholesterol: A Retrospective Comparative Pilot Study
    Haruki Torii, Rumiko Shimizu, Yuriko Tanizaki, Yurina Omiya, Miwa Yamamoto, Sayaka Kamiike, Daisuke Yasuda, Yoshinori Hiraoka, Tohru Hashida, Noriaki Kume
    Biological and Pharmaceutical Bulletin.2018; 41(12): 1778.     CrossRef
  • Zopiclone Use and Risk of Fractures in Older People: Population-Based Study
    Prasad S. Nishtala, Te-yuan Chyou
    Journal of the American Medical Directors Association.2017; 18(4): 368.e1.     CrossRef
  • Hypnotic drug risks of mortality, infection, depression, and cancer: but lack of benefit
    Daniel F. Kripke
    F1000Research.2017; 5: 918.     CrossRef
  • Benzodiazepines, Z-drugs and the risk of hip fracture: A systematic review and meta-analysis
    Karen Donnelly, Robert Bracchi, Jonathan Hewitt, Philip A. Routledge, Ben Carter, Tuan Van Nguyen
    PLOS ONE.2017; 12(4): e0174730.     CrossRef
  • Benzodiazepines and Z-Drugs: An Updated Review of Major Adverse Outcomes Reported on in Epidemiologic Research
    Jaden Brandt, Christine Leong
    Drugs in R&D.2017; 17(4): 493.     CrossRef
  • Sleep in the Elderly
    Steven H. Feinsilver, Adam B. Hernandez
    Clinics in Geriatric Medicine.2017; 33(4): 579.     CrossRef
  • A Greater Extent of Insomnia Symptoms and Physician-Recommended Sleep Medication Use Predict Fall Risk in Community-Dwelling Older Adults
    Tuo-Yu Chen, Soomi Lee, Orfeu M Buxton
    Sleep.2017;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • High Prevalence of Inappropriate Benzodiazepine and Sedative Hypnotic Prescriptions among Hospitalized Older Adults
    Elisabeth Anna Pek, Andrew Remfry, Ciara Pendrith, Chris Fan‐Lun, R. Sacha Bhatia, Christine Soong
    Journal of Hospital Medicine.2017; 12(5): 310.     CrossRef
  • Zolpidem use and risk of fractures: a systematic review and meta-analysis
    S. M. Park, J. Ryu, D. R. Lee, D. Shin, J. M. Yun, J. Lee
    Osteoporosis International.2016; 27(10): 2935.     CrossRef
  • Melatonin, hypnotics and their association with fracture: a matched cohort study
    Martin Frisher, Nicholas Gibbons, James Bashford, Steve Chapman, Scott Weich
    Age and Ageing.2016; 45(6): 801.     CrossRef
  • Characteristics and Trends in Hypnotics Consumption in the Largest Health Care System in Israel
    O. Marom, G. Rennert, N. Stein, K. Landsman, G. Pillar
    Sleep Disorders.2016; 2016: 1.     CrossRef
  • Screening Tool for Older Persons’ Appropriate Prescriptions for Japanese: Report of the Japan Geriatrics Society Working Group on “Guidelines for medical treatment and its safety in the elderly”
    Taro Kojima, Katsuyoshi Mizukami, Naoki Tomita, Hiroyuki Arai, Takashi Ohrui, Masato Eto, Yasushi Takeya, Yoshitaka Isaka, Hiromi Rakugi, Noriko Sudo, Hidenori Arai, Hiroaki Aoki, Shigeo Horie, Shinya Ishii, Koh Iwasaki, Shin Takayama, Yusuke Suzuki, Tosh
    Geriatrics & Gerontology International.2016; 16(9): 983.     CrossRef
  • Review of Safety and Efficacy of Sleep Medicines in Older Adults
    Jennifer L. Schroeck, James Ford, Erin L. Conway, Kari E. Kurtzhalts, Megan E. Gee, Krista A. Vollmer, Kari A. Mergenhagen
    Clinical Therapeutics.2016; 38(11): 2340.     CrossRef
  • Nonbenzodiazepine Sedative Hypnotics and Risk of Fall-Related Injury
    Sarah E. Tom, Emerson M. Wickwire, Yujin Park, Jennifer S. Albrecht
    Sleep.2016; 39(5): 1009.     CrossRef
  • Hypnotic drug risks of mortality, infection, depression, and cancer: but lack of benefit
    Daniel F. Kripke
    F1000Research.2016; 5: 918.     CrossRef
  • Dependence, misuse, and beliefs regarding use of hypnotics by elderly psychiatric patients taking zolpidem, estazolam, or flunitrazepam
    Cheng-Fang Yen, Chih-Hung Ko, Yu-Ping Chang, Cheng-Ying Yu, Mei-Feng Huang, Yi-Chun Yeh, Jin-Jia Lin, Cheng-Sheng Chen
    Asia-Pacific Psychiatry.2015; 7(3): 298.     CrossRef
  • An Increased Risk of Reversible Dementia May Occur After Zolpidem Derivative Use in the Elderly Population
    Hsin-I Shih, Che-Chen Lin, Yi-Fang Tu, Chia-Ming Chang, Hsiang-Chin Hsu, Chih-Hsien Chi, Chia-Hung Kao
    Medicine.2015; 94(17): e809.     CrossRef
  • The Use of Hypnotics to Treat Sleep Problems in the Elderly
    Catherine McCall, John W. Winkelman
    Psychiatric Annals.2015;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Risk of Type 2 Diabetes in Patients With Nonapnea Sleep Disorders in Using Different Types of Hypnotics
    Chia-Ling Lin, Mei-Chang Yeh, Tomor Harnod, Cheng-Li Lin, Chia-Hung Kao
    Medicine.2015; 94(38): e1621.     CrossRef
  • Care Needs and Clinical Outcomes of Older People with Dementia: A Population-Based Propensity Score-Matched Cohort Study
    Fei-Yuan Hsiao, Li-Ning Peng, Yu-Wen Wen, Chih-Kuang Liang, Pei-Ning Wang, Liang-Kung Chen, Alessandra Marengoni
    PLOS ONE.2015; 10(5): e0124973.     CrossRef
  • Is Zolpidem Associated with Increased Risk of Fractures in the Elderly with Sleep Disorders? A Nationwide Case Cross-Over Study in Taiwan
    Yih-Jing Tang, Shinn-Ying Ho, Fang-Ying Chu, Hung-An Chen, Yun-Ju Yin, Hua-Chin Lee, William Cheng-Chung Chu, Hui-Wen Yeh, Wei-Shan Chiang, Chia-Lun Yeh, Hui-Ling Huang, Nian-Sheng Tzeng, Uwe Rudolph
    PLOS ONE.2015; 10(12): e0146030.     CrossRef
  • Evaluation of risk factors for fractures in postmenopausal women with osteoporosis
    Viktória Ferencz, Csaba Horváth, Sándor Huszár, Katalin Bors
    Orvosi Hetilap.2015; 156(4): 146.     CrossRef
  • Association between use of benzodiazepines and risk of fractures: a meta-analysis
    D. Xing, X. L. Ma, J. X. Ma, J. Wang, Y. Yang, Y. Chen
    Osteoporosis International.2014; 25(1): 105.     CrossRef
  • Non-benzodiazepine hypnotics and older adults: what are we learning about zolpidem?
    Hedva B Levy
    Expert Review of Clinical Pharmacology.2014; 7(1): 5.     CrossRef
  • Long-Term Use of Zolpidem Increases the Risk of Major Injury: A Population-Based Cohort Study
    Ming-May Lai, Cheng-Chieh Lin, Che-Chen Lin, Chiu-Shong Liu, Tsai-Chung Li, Chia-Hung Kao
    Mayo Clinic Proceedings.2014; 89(5): 589.     CrossRef
  • Risk of hip fracture among older people using anxiolytic and hypnotic drugs: a nationwide prospective cohort study
    Marit Stordal Bakken, Anders Engeland, Lars B. Engesæter, Anette Hylen Ranhoff, Steinar Hunskaar, Sabine Ruths
    European Journal of Clinical Pharmacology.2014; 70(7): 873.     CrossRef
  • Treatment of Insomnia in Older Adults: Re-Evaluating the Benefits and Risks of Sedative Hypnotic Agents
    Nicole J. Brandt, Jennifer M. Piechocki
    Journal of Gerontological Nursing.2013; 39(4): 48.     CrossRef
  • In the Zzz Zone: The Effects of Z-Drugs on Human Performance and Driving
    Naren Gunja
    Journal of Medical Toxicology.2013; 9(2): 163.     CrossRef
  • Ten-year trend in prescriptions of z-hypnotics among the elderly: A nationwide, cross-sectional study in Taiwan
    Fei-Yuan Hsiao, Pei-Hua Hsieh, Churn-Shiouh Gau
    Journal of Clinical Gerontology and Geriatrics.2013; 4(2): 37.     CrossRef
  • Zolpidem, Is it a Safe Drug for Insomnia Management?
    Kyung Hee Park, Jae-Hyun Lee
    Korean Journal of Medicine.2013; 84(6): 802.     CrossRef
Relationship Between Body Mass Index and Early Menarche of Adolescent Girls in Seoul
Chang-Mo Oh, In-Hwan Oh, Kyung-Sik Choi, Bong-Keun Choe, Tai-Young Yoon, Joong-Myung Choi
J Prev Med Public Health. 2012;45(4):227-234.   Published online July 31, 2012
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2012.45.4.227
  • 11,659 View
  • 144 Download
  • 26 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives

The object of this study was to determine the relationship between body mass index (BMI) and early menarche in adolescent girls in Seoul.

Methods

A retrospective study was conducted with 144 middle school students in Seoul who provided informed consent. We measured their body composition, and used the questionnaire survey method for data collection from November to December 2008. Past elemental body composition data were collected from elementary school health records of first year of middle school.

Results

The early menarcheal group was taller and heavier than the late menarcheal group (p<0.05 from 8-12 years old). The body fat percentage (%), BMI were higher in the early menarcheal girls than the late-menarcheal girls (p<0.05, age at 13). In the result of multiple logistic regression, the BMI at the age of 8 and 9 was associated with early menarche after adjusting for birth weight, breast feeding and age at menarche of the mother (BMI at the age of 8: p for trend=0.01, BMI at the age of 9: p for trend=0.04). An increase in BMI from 7 to 8 year was associated with early menarche after adjusting for birth weight, breast feeding, age at menarche of the mother (p for trend=0.048).

Conclusions

The BMI at the age of 8 and 9 was associated with the early menarche of girls and increase in BMI from 7 to 8 year was associated with the early menarche of girls. These results suggest that BMI and increase in BMI before menarche cause early menarche. Although this study does not represent all Korean adolescent girls, it is one of the few studies that have investigated the temporal relationship between BMI and early menarche.

Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Association of early menarche with elevated BMI, lower body height and relative leg length among 14- to 16-year-old post-menarcheal girls from a Maya community in Yucatan, Mexico
    Sudip Datta Banik
    Anthropological Review.2022; 85(1): 85.     CrossRef
  • Prepubertal BMI, pubertal growth patterns, and long-term BMI: Results from a longitudinal analysis in Chinese children and adolescents from 2005 to 2016
    Yanhui Li, Di Gao, Jieyu Liu, Zhaogeng Yang, Bo Wen, Li Chen, Manman Chen, Ying Ma, Tao Ma, Bin Dong, Yi Song, Sizhe Huang, Yanhui Dong, Jun Ma
    European Journal of Clinical Nutrition.2022; 76(10): 1432.     CrossRef
  • Age at Menarche, Growth Velocity, and Adiposity Indices in Italian Girls Aged 10 to 14
    Emanuela Gualdi-Russo, Natascia Rinaldo, Gianni Mazzoni, Simona Mandini, Sabrina Masotti, Stefania Toselli, Luciana Zaccagni
    Children.2022; 9(12): 1928.     CrossRef
  • Indicators of nutritional status and physical activity level as factors associated with the onset of menarche of ten year old girls from Zadar county, Croatia
    Donata Vidaković Samaržija, Marjeta Mišigoj-Duraković, Lara Pavelić Karamatić
    International Journal of Adolescent Medicine and Health.2021; 33(3): 219.     CrossRef
  • Marginal Food Security Predicts Earlier Age at Menarche Among Girls From the 2009-2014 National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys
    Mecca E. Burris, Andrea S. Wiley
    Journal of Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology.2021; 34(4): 462.     CrossRef
  • Factors associated with the prevalence of HIV, HSV-2, pregnancy, and reported sexual activity among adolescent girls in rural western Kenya: A cross-sectional analysis of baseline data in a cluster randomized controlled trial
    Garazi Zulaika, Elizabeth Nyothach, Anna Maria van Eijk, David Obor, Linda Mason, Duolao Wang, Tao Chen, Emily Kerubo, Valarie Opollo, Isaac Ngere, Samuel Omondi Owino, Boaz Oyaro, Feiko O. ter Kuile, Daniel Kwaro, Penelope Phillips-Howard, Kathryn Mary Y
    PLOS Medicine.2021; 18(9): e1003756.     CrossRef
  • The relationship between short stature and menstrual pattern in a large cohort of Iranian girls
    Seyed Kazem Farahmand, Maryam Emadzadeh, Golnaz Ghayyem Hassankhani, Mahsa Mirbirjandian, Taraneh Rafiezadeh, Zahra Abasalti, Sayyed Saeid Khayyatzadeh, Afsane Bahrami, Seyed-Amir Tabatabaeizadeh, Maryam Tayefi, Gordon A. Ferns, Kayhan Gonoodi, Alireza Mo
    Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology.2020; 40(2): 228.     CrossRef
  • Age at menarche, menstrual characteristics, and its associated morbidities among secondary school students in Abakaliki, southeast Nigeria
    Chidebe C. Anikwe, Johnbosco E. Mamah, Bartholomew C. Okorochukwu, Ugochukwu U. Nnadozie, Chukwuemeka H. Obarezi, Kenneth C. Ekwedigwe
    Heliyon.2020; 6(5): e04018.     CrossRef
  • Knowledge of peri-menarcheal changes and a comparative analysis of the age at menarche among young adolescent school girls in urban and rural Cameroon
    Atem Bethel Ajong, Nkengazem Nerry Tankala, Martin Ndinakie Yakum, Ikei Solange Azenoi, Bruno Kenfack
    BMC Public Health.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Prevalence of breast cancer-related risk factors in underweight premenopausal women: the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey IV–VI
    Joo Heung Kim, Kwang Hyun Yoon, Ho Hur, Seho Park, Jee Ye Kim, Hyung Seok Park, Seung II Kim, Young Up Cho, Byeong-Woo Park
    Breast Cancer Research and Treatment.2019; 174(2): 515.     CrossRef
  • Time Trends in Age at Menarche and Related Non-Communicable Disease Risk during the 20th Century in Mexico
    Inga Petersohn, Arli G. Zarate-Ortiz, Ana C. Cepeda-Lopez, Alida Melse-Boonstra
    Nutrients.2019; 11(2): 394.     CrossRef
  • Age at Menarche and Its Related Factors Among Students of Qaen, Eastern Iran: A School-Based Cross-Sectional Study
    Asma Tiyuri, Malaknaz Ghannadkafi, Amir Tiyuri, Najmeh Bahramian
    Journal of Comprehensive Pediatrics.2019;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Lifestyle and prevalence of dysmenorrhea among Spanish female university students
    Elia Fernández-Martínez, María Dolores Onieva-Zafra, María Laura Parra-Fernández, Antonio Palazón-Bru
    PLOS ONE.2018; 13(8): e0201894.     CrossRef
  • Detrimental Effects of Higher Body Mass Index and Smoking Habits on Menstrual Cycles in Korean Women
    An Na Jung, Ju Hwan Park, Jihyun Kim, Seok Hyun Kim, Byung Chul Jee, Byung Heun Cha, Jae Woong Sull, Jin Hyun Jun
    Journal of Women's Health.2017; 26(1): 83.     CrossRef
  • Earlier age at menarche in girls with rapid early life growth: cohort and within sibling analyses
    Julie D. Flom, Barbara A. Cohn, Parisa Tehranifar, Lauren C. Houghton, Ying Wei, Angeline Protacio, Piera Cirillo, Karin B. Michels, Mary Beth Terry
    Annals of Epidemiology.2017; 27(3): 187.     CrossRef
  • Association between Obesity and Puberty Timing: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis
    Wenyan Li, Qin Liu, Xu Deng, Yiwen Chen, Shudan Liu, Mary Story
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2017; 14(10): 1266.     CrossRef
  • Pattern of teen menstruation among secondary school girls in south east Nigeria
    Ada R.C. Nwokocha, Josephat M. Chinawa, Agozie C. Ubesie, Vivian I. Onukwuli, Pius C. Manyike
    Journal of Pediatric Endocrinology and Metabolism.2016;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Age related changes in pelvis size among adolescent and adult females with reference to parturition from Naraingarh, Haryana (India)
    Krishan Sharma, Puneet Gupta, Shailza Shandilya
    HOMO.2016; 67(4): 273.     CrossRef
  • Early menarche in normal-weight girls and its association with excess weight, abdominal obesity and metabolic changes at the end of sexual maturation
    M L D Araújo, P C Cabral, I K G de Arruda, A Silva Diniz, M da Conceição Chaves de Lemos, G Q Morais
    European Journal of Clinical Nutrition.2016; 70(11): 1278.     CrossRef
  • Secular Trends and Influencing Factors for the Early Menarche among Korean Middle and High School Girls
    Dallong Han, Jongeun Lee, Seonho Kim
    The Journal of the Korea Contents Association.2016; 16(3): 319.     CrossRef
  • Earlier menarcheal age in Spanish girls is related with an increase in body mass index between pre‐pubertal school age and adolescence
    T. Gavela‐Pérez, C. Garcés, P. Navarro‐Sánchez, L. López Villanueva, L. Soriano‐Guillén
    Pediatric Obesity.2015; 10(6): 410.     CrossRef
  • Determinants of age at menarche in Korean elementary school girls
    Mi-Kyoung Kwon, Eun Min Seo, Kyong Park
    Journal of Nutrition and Health.2015; 48(4): 344.     CrossRef
  • Height Growth and Percentage of Body Fat in Relation to Early Menarche in Girls from Merida, Yucatan, Mexico
    Sudip Datta Banik, Nina Mendez, Federico Dickinson
    Ecology of Food and Nutrition.2015; 54(6): 644.     CrossRef
  • A Significant Increase in the Incidence of Central Precocious Puberty among Korean Girls from 2004 to 2010
    Shin Hye Kim, Kyoung Huh, Sungho Won, Kuk-Wha Lee, Mi-Jung Park, Antonio Gonzalez-Bulnes
    PLOS ONE.2015; 10(11): e0141844.     CrossRef
  • Relationship of age at menarche on anthropometric index and menstrual irregularity in late adolescent girls in Seoul
    Seung Eun Lee, Joo Yun Yang, Ji Hyun Lee, Han Wool Kim, Hae Soon Kim, Hye Jin Lee, Ji Young Oh, Yeon Ah Sung
    Annals of Pediatric Endocrinology & Metabolism.2013; 18(3): 116.     CrossRef
  • Overview of Noncommunicable Diseases in Korean Children and Adolescents: Focus on Obesity and Its Effect on Metabolic Syndrome
    Hye Ah Lee, Hyesook Park
    Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health.2013; 46(4): 173.     CrossRef
Nail DNA and Possible Biomarkers: A Pilot Study
Joshua Park, Debbie Liang, Jung Woo Kim, Yongjun Luo, Taesheng Huang, Soo-Young Kim, Seong-Sil Chang
J Prev Med Public Health. 2012;45(4):235-243.   Published online July 31, 2012
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2012.45.4.235
  • 28,544 View
  • 83 Download
  • 6 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives

Nail has been a substitute DNA source for genotyping. To investigate the integrity and consistency of nail DNA amplification for biomarker study, nail clippings from 12 subjects were collected at monthly intervals. The possibility of longer amplification and existence of GAPDH RNA/protein, were also investigated with three nail samples.

Methods

Three primer sets were designed for quantitative amplification of nuclear and mitochondrial genes and analysis of their consistency. The mean threshold cycles in amplification of the target genes were compared to test the consistency of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) performance among individual factors including age groups, sex, family, the nail source, and by the size of the amplification segments.

Results

The amplification of the target genes from nail DNA showed similar integrity and consistency between the nail sources, and among the serial collections. However, nail DNA from those in their forties showed earlier threshold cycles in amplification than those in their teens or seventies. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) showed better DNA integrity and consistency in amplification of all three targets than did nuclear DNA (nucDNA). Over 9 kb of mtDNA was successfully amplified, and nested quantitative PCR showed reliable copy numbers (%) between the two loci. Reverse transcription PCR for mRNA and immunoblotting for GAPDH protein successfully reflected their corresponding amounts. Regarding the existence of RNA and protein in nails, more effective extraction and detection methods need to be set up to validate the feasibility in biomarker study.

Conclusions

Nail DNA might be a feasible intra-individual monitoring biomarker. Considering integrity and consistency in target amplification, mtDNA would be a better target for biomarker research than nucDNA.

Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • An Investigation for Heavy Metals’ Contamination in Farmers’ Fingernails: Case Study in Libya
    Aiman M. Bobaker, Intisar Alakili, Elrashied E. Elkhidir, Sukiman B. Sarmani, Zaher Mundher Yaseen, Mahmood Ahmed
    Journal of Chemistry.2022; 2022: 1.     CrossRef
  • Biobanking in Molecular Biomarker Research for the Early Detection of Cancer
    Kim Lommen, Selena Odeh, Chiel C. de Theije, Kim M. Smits
    Cancers.2020; 12(4): 776.     CrossRef
  • Toenail as Non-invasive Biomarker in Metal Toxicity Measurement of Welding Fumes Exposure - A Review
    S F Z Bakri, A Hariri, N F Ma’arop, N S A W Hussin
    IOP Conference Series: Materials Science and Engineering.2017; 165(1): 012019.     CrossRef
  • High-Quality DNA from Fingernails for Genetic Analysis
    Sandra Preuner, Martin Danzer, Johannes Pröll, Ulrike Pötschger, Anita Lawitschka, Christian Gabriel, Thomas Lion
    The Journal of Molecular Diagnostics.2014; 16(4): 459.     CrossRef
  • Detection of short tandem repeat polymorphisms from human nails using direct polymerase chain reaction method
    Jian Tie, Seisaku Uchigasaki
    ELECTROPHORESIS.2014; 35(21-22): 3188.     CrossRef
  • DNA from Nails for Genetic Analyses in Large-Scale Epidemiologic Studies
    Janneke G.F. Hogervorst, Roger W.L. Godschalk, Piet A. van den Brandt, Matty P. Weijenberg, Bas A.J. Verhage, Leonie Jonkers, Joy Goessens, Colinda C.J.M. Simons, Joris R. Vermeesch, Frederik J. van Schooten, Leo J. Schouten
    Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention.2014; 23(12): 2703.     CrossRef
Psychological, Social, and Environmental Factors Associated With Utilization of Senior Centers Among Older Adults in Korea
Hyun-Shik Kim, Masashi Miyashita, Kazuhiro Harada, Jong-Hwan Park, Jae-Moo So, Yoshio Nakamura
J Prev Med Public Health. 2012;45(4):244-250.   Published online July 31, 2012
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2012.45.4.244
  • 8,277 View
  • 86 Download
  • 3 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives

The purpose of the study was to examine the relationships among the psychological, social, and environmental factors influencing the utilization of senior centers among older adults in Korea.

Methods

A questionnaire survey was administered to two types of older adults who lived in Seoul, Korea: 262 older adults who used senior centers (3 places) and 156 older adults who did not use senior centers.

Results

Our results showed clearly that the utilization of the senior centers in Korea is affected by higher self-efficacy (odds ratio [OR], 6.08; 95% confidence interval [CI], 3.31 to 12.32), higher perceived benefits (OR, 1.71; 95% CI, 1.16 to 4.36), lower perceived barriers (OR, 6.43; 95% CI, 3.07 to 11.45), higher family support (OR, 4.21; 95% CI, 2.02 to 8.77), and higher support from friends (OR, 4.08; 95% CI, 2.38 to 7.81). The results also showed that participants whose total travel time was 15 to 29 minutes (OR, 2.84; 95% CI, 1.21 to 3.64) or less than 14 minutes (OR, 4.68; 95% CI, 3.41 to 8.41) were more likely to use a senior center than those who had to travel more than 30 minutes.

Conclusions

This study showed that the utilization of senior centers in Korea is affected by psychological, social, and environmental factors, specifically by self-efficacy, perceived benefits, perceived barriers, social support, convenience of transportation, and total travel time to the senior centers. The effects of longer-term utilization of the senior centers by non-users on health-related outcomes in a large population warrant attention.

Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Kaleidoscopic associations between life outside home and the technological environment that shape occupational injustice as revealed through cross-sectional statistical modelling
    Sarah Wallcook, Louise Nygård, Anders Kottorp, Sophie Gaber, Georgina Charlesworth, Camilla Malinowsky
    Journal of Occupational Science.2021; 28(1): 42.     CrossRef
  • How Does the Built Environment in Compact Metropolitan Cities Affect Health? A Systematic Review of Korean Studies
    Dong Ha Kim, Seunghyun Yoo
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2019; 16(16): 2921.     CrossRef
  • Older Adults’ Social Relationships and Health Care Utilization: A Systematic Review
    Nicole K. Valtorta, Danielle Collingridge Moore, Lynn Barron, Daniel Stow, Barbara Hanratty
    American Journal of Public Health.2018; 108(4): e1.     CrossRef
Quantitative Analysis of Cancer-associated Gene Methylation Connected to Risk Factors in Korean Colorectal Cancer Patients
Ho-Jin Kang, Eun-Jeong Kim, Byoung-Gwon Kim, Chang-Hun You, Sang-Yong Lee, Dong-Il Kim, Young-Seoub Hong
J Prev Med Public Health. 2012;45(4):251-258.   Published online July 31, 2012
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2012.45.4.251
Correction in: J Prev Med Public Health 2012;45(5):333
  • 9,445 View
  • 69 Download
  • 11 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives

The purpose of this paper was to elucidate the potential methylation levels of adjacent normal and cancer tissues by comparing them with normal colorectal tissues, and to describe the correlations between the methylation and clinical parameters in Korean colorectal cancer (CRC) patients.

Methods

Hypermethylation profiles of nine genes (RASSF1, APC, p16INK4a, Twist1, E-cadherin, TIMP3, Smad4, COX2, and ABCB1) were examined with 100 sets of cancer tissues and 14 normal colorectal tissues. We determined the hypermethylation at a given level by a percent of methylation ratio value of 10 using quantitative methylation real-time polymerase chain reaction.

Results

Nine genes' hypermethylation levels in Korean CRC patient tissues were increased more higher than normal colorectal tissues. However, the amounts of p16INK4a and E-cadherin gene hypermethylation in normal and CRC tissues were not significantly different nor did TIMP3 gene hypermethylation in adjacent normal and cancer tissues differ significantly. The hypermethylation of TIMP3, E-cadherin, ABCB1, and COX2 genes among other genes were abundantly found in normal colorectal tissues. The hypermethylation of nine genes' methylation in cancer tissues was not significantly associated with any clinical parameters. In Cohen's kappa test, it was moderately observed that RASSF1 was related with E-cadherin, and Smad4 with ABCB1 and COX2.

Conclusions

This study provides evidence for different hypermethylation patterns of cancer-associated genes in normal and CRC tissues, which may serve as useful information on CRC cancer progression.

Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Relevance of gene mutations and methylation to the growth of pancreatic intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms based on pyrosequencing
    Go Asano, Katsuyuki Miyabe, Hiroyuki Kato, Michihiro Yoshida, Takeshi Sawada, Yasuyuki Okamoto, Hidenori Sahashi, Naoki Atsuta, Kenta Kachi, Akihisa Kato, Naruomi Jinno, Makoto Natsume, Yasuki Hori, Itaru Naitoh, Kazuki Hayashi, Yoichi Matsuo, Satoru Taka
    Scientific Reports.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Potential of RASSF1A promoter methylation as a biomarker for colorectal cancer: Meta-analysis and TCGA analysis
    Fei Hu, Li Chen, Ming-Yu Bi, Ling Zheng, Ji-Xiang He, Ying-Ze Huang, Yu Zhang, Xue-Lian Zhang, Qiang Guo, Ying Luo, Wen-Ru Tang, Miao-Miao Sheng
    Pathology - Research and Practice.2020; 216(8): 153009.     CrossRef
  • KLHL22 Regulates the EMT and Proliferation in Colorectal Cancer Cells in Part via the Wnt/β-Catenin Signaling Pathway


    Yi Song, Huiping Yuan, Jia Wang, Yuhe Wu, Yuhong Xiao, Shengxun Mao
    Cancer Management and Research.2020; Volume 12: 3981.     CrossRef
  • RHBDF1 regulates APC-mediated stimulation of the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition and proliferation of colorectal cancer cells in part via the Wnt/β-catenin signalling pathway
    Huiping Yuan, Ran Wei, Yuhong Xiao, Yi Song, Jia Wang, Huihuan Yu, Ting Fang, Wei Xu, Shengxun Mao
    Experimental Cell Research.2018; 368(1): 24.     CrossRef
  • Smoking induces coordinated DNA methylation and gene expression changes in adipose tissue with consequences for metabolic health
    Pei-Chien Tsai, Craig A. Glastonbury, Melissa N. Eliot, Sailalitha Bollepalli, Idil Yet, Juan E. Castillo-Fernandez, Elena Carnero-Montoro, Thomas Hardiman, Tiphaine C. Martin, Alice Vickers, Massimo Mangino, Kirsten Ward, Kirsi H. Pietiläinen, Panos Delo
    Clinical Epigenetics.2018;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • A Novel Discriminating Colorectal Cancer Model for Differentiating Normal and Tumor Tissues
    Xiaohui Sun, Yiping Tian, Qianqian Zheng, Ruizhi Zheng, Aifen Lin, Tianhui Chen, Yimin Zhu, Maode Lai
    Epigenomics.2018; 10(11): 1463.     CrossRef
  • APC hypermethylation for early diagnosis of colorectal cancer: a meta-analysis and literature review
    Tie-Jun Liang, Hong-Xu Wang, Yan-Yan Zheng, Ying-Qing Cao, Xiaoyu Wu, Xin Zhou, Shu-Xiao Dong
    Oncotarget.2017; 8(28): 46468.     CrossRef
  • RETRACTED ARTICLE: Aberrant promoter methylation of RASSF1A gene may be correlated with colorectal carcinogenesis: a meta-analysis
    He-Ling Wang, Yu Zhang, Peng Liu, Ping-Yi Zhou
    Molecular Biology Reports.2014; 41(6): 3991.     CrossRef
  • Role of CDH1 Promoter Methylation in Colorectal Carcinogenesis: A Meta-Analysis
    Yu-Xi Li, Yao Lu, Chun-Yu Li, Peng Yuan, Shu-Sen Lin
    DNA and Cell Biology.2014; 33(7): 455.     CrossRef
  • Retracted: Promoter Methylation of theRASSF1AGene may Contribute to Colorectal Cancer Susceptibility: A Meta-Analysis of Cohort Studies
    He-Ling Wang, Peng Liu, Ping-Yi Zhou, Yu Zhang
    Annals of Human Genetics.2014; 78(3): 208.     CrossRef
  • Hypermethylation ofTWIST1andNID2in Tumor Tissues and Voided Urine in Urinary Bladder Cancer Patients
    Zeynep Yegin, Sezgin Gunes, Recep Buyukalpelli
    DNA and Cell Biology.2013; 32(7): 386.     CrossRef
Selecting the Best Prediction Model for Readmission
Eun Whan Lee
J Prev Med Public Health. 2012;45(4):259-266.   Published online July 31, 2012
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2012.45.4.259
  • 12,336 View
  • 104 Download
  • 35 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives

This study aims to determine the risk factors predicting rehospitalization by comparing three models and selecting the most successful model.

Methods

In order to predict the risk of rehospitalization within 28 days after discharge, 11 951 inpatients were recruited into this study between January and December 2009. Predictive models were constructed with three methods, logistic regression analysis, a decision tree, and a neural network, and the models were compared and evaluated in light of their misclassification rate, root asymptotic standard error, lift chart, and receiver operating characteristic curve.

Results

The decision tree was selected as the final model. The risk of rehospitalization was higher when the length of stay (LOS) was less than 2 days, route of admission was through the out-patient department (OPD), medical department was in internal medicine, 10th revision of the International Classification of Diseases code was neoplasm, LOS was relatively shorter, and the frequency of OPD visit was greater.

Conclusions

When a patient is to be discharged within 2 days, the appropriateness of discharge should be considered, with special concern of undiscovered complications and co-morbidities. In particular, if the patient is admitted through the OPD, any suspected disease should be appropriately examined and prompt outcomes of tests should be secured. Moreover, for patients of internal medicine practitioners, co-morbidity and complications caused by chronic illness should be given greater attention.

Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Interpretable machine learning models for hospital readmission prediction: a two-step extracted regression tree approach
    Xiaoquan Gao, Sabriya Alam, Pengyi Shi, Franklin Dexter, Nan Kong
    BMC Medical Informatics and Decision Making.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Burden and patient characteristics associated with repeat consultation for unscheduled care within 30 days in primary care: a retrospective case control study with implications for aging and public health
    Valentin Richard, Leila Bouazzi, Clément Richard, Stéphane Sanchez
    Frontiers in Public Health.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Machine learning for predicting readmission risk among the frail: Explainable AI for healthcare
    Somya D. Mohanty, Deborah Lekan, Thomas P. McCoy, Marjorie Jenkins, Prashanti Manda
    Patterns.2022; 3(1): 100395.     CrossRef
  • AI Models for Predicting Readmission of Pneumonia Patients within 30 Days after Discharge
    Jiin-Chyr Hsu, Fu-Hsing Wu, Hsuan-Hung Lin, Dah-Jye Lee, Yung-Fu Chen, Chih-Sheng Lin
    Electronics.2022; 11(5): 673.     CrossRef
  • An AI-driven clinical care pathway to reduce 30-day readmission for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients
    Lin Wang, Guihua Li, Chika F. Ezeana, Richard Ogunti, Mamta Puppala, Tiancheng He, Xiaohui Yu, Solomon S. Y. Wong, Zheng Yin, Aaron W. Roberts, Aryan Nezamabadi, Pingyi Xu, Adaani Frost, Robert E. Jackson, Stephen T. C. Wong
    Scientific Reports.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Medicare cost reduction in the US: A case study of hospital readmissions and value-based purchasing
    Mehmet C. Kocakulah, David Austill, Eric Henderson
    International Journal of Healthcare Management.2021; 14(1): 203.     CrossRef
  • Published models that predict hospital readmission: a critical appraisal
    Lisa Grossman Liu, James R Rogers, Rollin Reeder, Colin G Walsh, Devan Kansagara, David K Vawdrey, Hojjat Salmasian
    BMJ Open.2021; 11(8): e044964.     CrossRef
  • Predictive modelling of hospital readmission: Evaluation of different preprocessing techniques on machine learning classifiers
    Nor Hamizah Miswan, Chee Seng Chan, Chong Guan Ng
    Intelligent Data Analysis.2021; 25(5): 1073.     CrossRef
  • Designing a clinical decision support system to predict readmissions for patients admitted with all-cause conditions
    Huey-Jen Lai, Tan-Hsu Tan, Chih-Sheng Lin, Yung-Fu Chen, Hsuan-Hung Lin
    Journal of Ambient Intelligence and Humanized Computing.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Implementation of Artificial Intelligence-Based Clinical Decision Support to Reduce Hospital Readmissions at a Regional Hospital
    Santiago Romero-Brufau, Kirk D. Wyatt, Patricia Boyum, Mindy Mickelson, Matthew Moore, Cheristi Cognetta-Rieke
    Applied Clinical Informatics.2020; 11(04): 570.     CrossRef
  • Independent prospective validation of a medication‐based 15‐day readmission risk stratification algorithm in a tertiary acute care hospital
    Denise Yeo, T. W. Chew, Y. F. Lai
    JACCP: JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN COLLEGE OF CLINICAL PHARMACY.2019; 2(1): 40.     CrossRef
  • Risk Assessment of Acute, All-Cause 30-Day Readmission in Patients Aged 65+: a Nationwide, Register-Based Cohort Study
    Mona K. Pedersen, Gunnar L. Nielsen, Lisbeth Uhrenfeldt, Søren Lundbye-Christensen
    Journal of General Internal Medicine.2019; 34(2): 226.     CrossRef
  • A machine learning model for predicting ICU readmissions and key risk factors: analysis from a longitudinal health records
    Alvaro Ribeiro Botelho Junqueira, Farhaan Mirza, Mirza Mansoor Baig
    Health and Technology.2019; 9(3): 297.     CrossRef
  • Development of a predictive score for potentially avoidable hospital readmissions for general internal medicine patients
    Anne-Laure Blanc, Thierry Fumeaux, Jérôme Stirnemann, Elise Dupuis Lozeron, Aimad Ourhamoune, Jules Desmeules, Pierre Chopard, Arnaud Perrier, Nicolas Schaad, Pascal Bonnabry, Enrico Mossello
    PLOS ONE.2019; 14(7): e0219348.     CrossRef
  • An integrated machine learning framework for hospital readmission prediction
    Shancheng Jiang, Kwai-Sang Chin, Gang Qu, Kwok L. Tsui
    Knowledge-Based Systems.2018; 146: 73.     CrossRef
  • Development and prospective validation of a model estimating risk of readmission in cancer patients
    Carl R. Schmidt, Jennifer Hefner, Ann S. McAlearney, Lisa Graham, Kristen Johnson, Susan Moffatt‐Bruce, Timothy Huerta, Timothy M. Pawlik, Susan White
    Journal of Surgical Oncology.2018; 117(6): 1113.     CrossRef
  • Characterization, Categorization, and 5-Year Mortality of Medicine High Utilizer Inpatients
    Joyeeta G. Dastidar, Min Jiang
    Journal of Palliative Care.2018; 33(3): 167.     CrossRef
  • Predicting Hospital Readmission via Cost-Sensitive Deep Learning
    Haishuai Wang, Zhicheng Cui, Yixin Chen, Michael Avidan, Arbi Ben Abdallah, Alexander Kronzer
    IEEE/ACM Transactions on Computational Biology and Bioinformatics.2018; 15(6): 1968.     CrossRef
  • Using decision trees to explore the association between the length of stay and potentially avoidable readmissions: A retrospective cohort study
    Mohammad S. Alyahya, Heba H. Hijazi, Hussam A. Alshraideh, Amjad D. Al-Nasser
    Informatics for Health and Social Care.2017; 42(4): 361.     CrossRef
  • Identifying Potentially Avoidable Readmissions: A Medication‐Based 15‐Day Readmission Risk Stratification Algorithm
    Sreemanee Raaj Dorajoo, Vincent See, Chen Teng Chan, Joyce Zhenyin Tan, Doreen Su Yin Tan, Siti Maryam Binte Abdul Razak, Ting Ting Ong, Narendran Koomanan, Chun Wei Yap, Alexandre Chan
    Pharmacotherapy: The Journal of Human Pharmacology and Drug Therapy.2017; 37(3): 268.     CrossRef
  • The association between number of doctors per bed and readmission of elderly patients with pneumonia in South Korea
    Joo Eun Lee, Tae Hyun Kim, Kyoung Hee Cho, Kyu-Tae Han, Eun-Cheol Park
    BMC Health Services Research.2017;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Preventing hospital readmissions: the importance of considering ‘impactibility,’ not just predicted risk
    Adam Steventon, John Billings
    BMJ Quality & Safety.2017; 26(10): 782.     CrossRef
  • Assessing risk of hospital readmissions for improving medical practice
    Parimal Kulkarni, L. Douglas Smith, Keith F. Woeltje
    Health Care Management Science.2016; 19(3): 291.     CrossRef
  • Comparison of Clinical Risk Factors Among Pediatric Patients With Single Admission, Multiple Admissions (Without Any 7-Day Readmissions), and 7-Day Readmission
    Jeffrey C. Winer, Elena Aragona, Alan I. Fields, David C. Stockwell
    Hospital Pediatrics.2016; 6(3): 119.     CrossRef
  • An ontology-based system to predict hospital readmission within 30 days
    Huda Al Ghamdi, Riyad Alshammari, Muhammad Imran Razzak
    International Journal of Healthcare Management.2016; 9(4): 236.     CrossRef
  • Impact of selected pre-processing techniques on prediction of risk of early readmission for diabetic patients in India
    Reena Duggal, Suren Shukla, Sarika Chandra, Balvinder Shukla, Sunil Kumar Khatri
    International Journal of Diabetes in Developing Countries.2016; 36(4): 469.     CrossRef
  • Predicting Patients at Risk for 3-Day Postdischarge Readmissions, ED Visits, and Deaths
    Deepak Agrawal, Cheng-Bang Chen, Ronald W. Dravenstott, Christopher T. B. Strömblad, John Andrew Schmid, Jonathan D. Darer, Priyantha Devapriya, Soundar Kumara
    Medical Care.2016; 54(11): 1017.     CrossRef
  • Utility of models to predict 28-day or 30-day unplanned hospital readmissions: an updated systematic review
    Huaqiong Zhou, Phillip R Della, Pamela Roberts, Louise Goh, Satvinder S Dhaliwal
    BMJ Open.2016; 6(6): e011060.     CrossRef
  • Multimorbidity in risk stratification tools to predict negative outcomes in adult population
    Edurne Alonso-Morán, Roberto Nuño-Solinis, Graziano Onder, Giuseppe Tonnara
    European Journal of Internal Medicine.2015; 26(3): 182.     CrossRef
  • Predicting 30-day Hospital Readmission with Publicly Available Administrative Database
    K. Zhu, Z. Lou, J. Zhou, N. Ballester, N. Kong, P. Parikh
    Methods of Information in Medicine.2015; 54(06): 560.     CrossRef
  • Emergency Department Non-Urgent Visits and Hospital Readmissions Are Associated with Different Socio-Economic Variables in Italy
    Pamela Barbadoro, Elena Di Tondo, Vincenzo Giannicola Menditto, Lucia Pennacchietti, Februa Regnicoli, Francesco Di Stanislao, Marcello Mario D’Errico, Emilia Prospero, Chiara Lazzeri
    PLOS ONE.2015; 10(6): e0127823.     CrossRef
  • Using Decision Trees to Manage Hospital Readmission Risk for Acute Myocardial Infarction, Heart Failure, and Pneumonia
    John P. Hilbert, Scott Zasadil, Donna J. Keyser, Pamela B. Peele
    Applied Health Economics and Health Policy.2014; 12(6): 573.     CrossRef
  • A three-step approach for the derivation and validation of high-performing predictive models using an operational dataset: congestive heart failure readmission case study
    Samir E AbdelRahman, Mingyuan Zhang, Bruce E Bray, Kensaku Kawamoto
    BMC Medical Informatics and Decision Making.2014;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Nationwide prospective study on readmission after umbilical or epigastric hernia repair
    F. Helgstrand, L. N. Jørgensen, J. Rosenberg, H. Kehlet, T. Bisgaard
    Hernia.2013; 17(4): 487.     CrossRef
  • Data Mining Application in Customer Relationship Management for Hospital Inpatients
    Eun Whan Lee
    Healthcare Informatics Research.2012; 18(3): 178.     CrossRef
Health Impact Assessment of Free Immunization Program in Jinju City, Korea
Keon Yeop Kim, So Youn Jeon, Man Joong Jeon, Kwon Ho Lee, Sok Goo Lee, Dongjin Kim, Eunjeong Kang, Sang Geun Bae, Jinhee Kim
J Prev Med Public Health. 2012;45(4):267-275.   Published online July 31, 2012
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2012.45.4.267
  • 8,062 View
  • 57 Download
  • 3 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives

This study was conducted to assess the potential health impacts and improve the quality of the free immunization program in Jinju City by maximizing the predicted positive health gains and minimizing the negative health risks.

Methods

A steering committee was established in September 2010 to carry out the health impact assessment (HIA) and began the screening and scoping stages. In the appraisal stage, analysis of secondary data, a literature review, case studies, geographic information systems analysis, a questionnaire, and expert consultations were used. The results of the data collection and analyses were discussed during a workshop, after which recommendations were finalized in a written report.

Results

Increased access to immunization, comprehensive services provided by physicians, the strengthened role of the public health center in increasing immunization rates and services, and the ripple effect to other neighboring communities were identified as potential positive impacts. On the other hand, the program might be inaccessible to rural regions with no private clinics where there are more at-risk children, vaccine management and quality control at the clinics may be poor, and vaccines may be misused. Recommendations to maximize health gains and minimize risks were separately developed for the public health center and private clinics.

Conclusions

The HIA provided an opportunity for stakeholders to comprehensively overview the potential positive and negative impacts of the program before it was implemented. An HIA is a powerful tool that should be used when developing and implementing diverse health-related policies and programs in the community.

Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Cross-Sectional Study of Varicella Zoster Virus Immunity in Healthy Korean Children Assessed by Glycoprotein Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay and Fluorescent Antibody to Membrane Antigen Test
    Yunhwa Kim, Ji-Young Hwang, Kyung-Min Lee, Eunsil Lee, Hosun Park
    Vaccines.2021; 9(5): 492.     CrossRef
  • Health Impact Assessments of Health Sector Proposals: An Audit and Narrative Synthesis
    Nelius Wanjiku Wanjohi, Reema Harrison, Ben Harris-Roxas
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2021; 18(21): 11466.     CrossRef
  • Epidemiological Impact of the Korean National Immunization Program on Varicella Incidence
    Jaehun Jung, Young-Jin Ko, Young-Eun Kim, Kyungmin Huh, Byung-Joo Park, Seok-Jun Yoon
    Journal of Korean Medical Science.2019;[Epub]     CrossRef

JPMPH : Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health