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Volume 44(3); May 2011
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Special Article
Cost Effectiveness of Interventions to Promote Screening for Colorectal Cancer: A Randomized Trial
Swati Misra, David R. Lairson, Wenyaw Chan, Yu-Chia Chang, L. Kay Bartholomew, Anthony Greisinger, Amy McQueen, Sally W. Vernon
J Prev Med Public Health. 2011;44(3):101-110.   Published online May 17, 2010
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2011.44.3.101
  • 12,822 View
  • 98 Download
  • 15 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives

Screening for colorectal cancer is considered cost effective, but is underutilized in the U.S. Information on the efficiency of "tailored interventions" to promote colorectal cancer screening in primary care settings is limited. The paper reports the results of a cost effectiveness analysis that compared a survey-only control group to a Centers for Disease Control (CDC) web-based intervention (screen for life) and to a tailored interactive computer-based intervention.

Methods

A randomized controlled trial of people 50 and over, was conducted to test the interventions. The sample was 1224 partcipants 50-70 years of age, recruited from Kelsey-Seybold Clinic, a large multi-specialty clinic in Houston, Texas. Screening status was obtained by medical chart review after a 12-month follow-up period. An "intention to treat" analysis and micro costing from the patient and provider perspectives were used to estimate the costs and effects. Analysis of statistical uncertainty was conducted using nonparametric bootstrapping.

Results

The estimated cost of implementing the web-based intervention was $40 per person and the cost of the tailored intervention was $45 per person. The additional cost per person screened for the web-based intervention compared to no intervention was $2602 and the tailored intervention was no more effective than the web-based strategy.

Conclusions

The tailored intervention was less cost-effective than the web-based intervention for colorectal cancer screening promotion. The web-based intervention was less cost-effective than previous studies of in-reach colorectal cancer screening promotion. Researchers need to continue developing and evaluating the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of interventions to increase colorectal cancer screening.

Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Extending analytic methods for economic evaluation in implementation science
    Meghan C. O’Leary, Kristen Hassmiller Lich, Leah Frerichs, Jennifer Leeman, Daniel S. Reuland, Stephanie B. Wheeler
    Implementation Science.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Interventions for increasing colorectal cancer screening uptake among African-American men: A systematic review and meta-analysis
    Charles R. Rogers, Phung Matthews, Lei Xu, Kenneth Boucher, Colin Riley, Matthew Huntington, Nathan Le Duc, Kola S. Okuyemi, Margaret J. Foster, Joseph Telfair
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  • Economic Evaluation of Tailored Web versus Tailored Telephone-Based Interventions to Increase Colorectal Cancer Screening among Women
    David R. Lairson, Tong Han Chung, Danmeng Huang, Timothy E. Stump, Patrick O. Monahan, Shannon M. Christy, Susan M. Rawl, Victoria L. Champion
    Cancer Prevention Research.2020; 13(3): 309.     CrossRef
  • Economics of Multicomponent Interventions to Increase Breast, Cervical, and Colorectal Cancer Screening: A Community Guide Systematic Review
    Giridhar Mohan, Sajal K. Chattopadhyay, Donatus U. Ekwueme, Susan A. Sabatino, Devon L. Okasako-Schmucker, Yinan Peng, Shawna L. Mercer, Anilkrishna B. Thota
    American Journal of Preventive Medicine.2019; 57(4): 557.     CrossRef
  • Colorectal cancer screening interventions in 2 health care systems serving disadvantaged populations: Screening uptake and cost‐effectiveness
    Christen L. Lara, Kelly L. Means, Krystal D. Morwood, Westley R. Lighthall, Sonja Hoover, Florence K.L. Tangka, Cynthia French, Krystal D. Gayle, Amy DeGroff, Sujha Subramanian
    Cancer.2018; 124(21): 4130.     CrossRef
  • The cost of implementing two small media interventions to promote HPV vaccination
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    Preventive Medicine.2017; 99: 277.     CrossRef
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    Richard T. Meenan, Melissa L. Anderson, Jessica Chubak, Sally W. Vernon, Sharon Fuller, Ching-Yun Wang, Beverly B. Green
    American Journal of Preventive Medicine.2015; 48(6): 714.     CrossRef
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    Carlo Senore, John Inadomi, Nereo Segnan, Cristina Bellisario, Cesare Hassan
    Gut.2015; 64(7): 1158.     CrossRef
  • Get Screened: A Randomized Trial of the Incremental Benefits of Reminders, Recall, and Outreach on Cancer Screening
    Robert J. Fortuna, Amna Idris, Paul Winters, Sharon G. Humiston, Steven Scofield, Samantha Hendren, Patricia Ford, Shirley X. L. Li, Kevin Fiscella
    Journal of General Internal Medicine.2014; 29(1): 90.     CrossRef
  • Public Awareness of Colorectal Cancer Screening: Knowledge, Attitudes, and Interventions for Increasing Screening Uptake
    Antonio Z. Gimeno Garcia, Noemi Hernandez Alvarez Buylla, David Nicolas-Perez, Enrique Quintero
    ISRN Oncology.2014; 2014: 1.     CrossRef
  • Cost‐effectiveness of a standard intervention versus a navigated intervention on colorectal cancer screening use in primary care
    David R. Lairson, Melissa DiCarlo, Ashish A. Deshmuk, Heather B. Fagan, Randa Sifri, Nora Katurakes, James Cocroft, Jocelyn Sendecki, Heidi Swan, Sally W. Vernon, Ronald E. Myers
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  • Communication preference moderates the effect of a tailored intervention to increase colorectal cancer screening among African Americans
    Ken Resnicow, Yan Zhou, Sarah Hawley, Masahito Jimbo, Mack T. Ruffin, Rachel E. Davis, Deirdre Shires, Jennifer Elston Lafata
    Patient Education and Counseling.2014; 97(3): 370.     CrossRef
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    Mary Anne T Dallat, Ruth F Hunter, Mark A Tully, Karen J Cairns, Frank Kee
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Original Articles
Changes in the Distribution of Maternal Age and Parity and Increasing Trends in the Low Birth Weight Rate in Korea Between 1995 and 2005
Jisuk Bae, Jung Han Park, Yoo Keun Park, Jong-Yeon Kim, Sang-Won Lee, Soon-Woo Park
J Prev Med Public Health. 2011;44(3):111-117.   Published online May 17, 2010
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2011.44.3.111
  • 9,076 View
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  • 10 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives

This study measured the impact of shifts in maternal age and parity on the increase in the low birth weight (LBW) rate in Korea.

Methods

We obtained raw data for all 6 397 945 live births registered at the Korea National Statistical Office between 1995 and 2005. We calculated the proportion of increment in the LBW rate due to changes in the distribution of maternal age and parity (AP-dis) and the proportion due to changes in the age- and parity-specific LBW rate (AP-spe).

Results

The LBW rate increased from 3.02% in 1995 to 4.28% in 2005. The multiple birth rate increased from 1.32% to 2.19% during the same period. Of the 1.26% points increment in the LBW rate, 0.64% points occurred among singleton births and 0.62% points occurred among multiple births. Changes in the AP-dis accounted for 50% of the increase in the LBW rate among singleton births, but did not contribute to the increase in the LBW rate among multiple births. The remainder of the total increment in the LBW rate was explained by the increase in the AP-spe.

Conclusions

This study demonstrated that shifts in maternal age and parity among singleton births and increased multiple births were important contributors to the increment in the LBW rate. This study also revealed that the increase in the AP-spe was an equally important contributor as the shifts in maternal age and parity to the increment in the LBW rate among singleton births and was a major contributor among multiple births.

Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Incidence, Long-Term Visual Outcomes, and Mortality in Retinopathy of Prematurity in Korea: A Nationwide Population-Based Study
    Kun-Hoo Na, Kyoung Hoon Kim, Tae Uk Kang, Hoo Jae Hann, Hyeong Sik Ahn, Hyun Jung Kim
    Investigative Opthalmology & Visual Science.2020; 61(10): 14.     CrossRef
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    International Journal of Childbirth.2020; 10(4): 206.     CrossRef
  • Impact of Changes in Maternal Age and Parity Distribution on the Increasing Trends in the Low Birth Weight and Very Low Birth Weight Rates in South Korea, 2005-2015
    Yujin Oh, Jisuk Bae
    Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health.2019; 52(2): 123.     CrossRef
  • Factors Associated With Failure to Thrive Among Children Aged 3 to 72 Months in Jahrom, Southern Iran
    Vahid Rahmanian, Yaser Sarikhani, Keramatollah Rahmanian, Elham Mansoorian, Mahdieh Zare
    Shiraz E-Medical Journal.2018;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Sang Hwa Park, Jong Seok Kim, Dar Oh Lim
    Journal of Health Informatics and Statistics.2017; 42(3): 294.     CrossRef
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    Myunghee Jun, Vipavee Thongpriwan, Kyung Sook Choi
    Journal of Transcultural Nursing.2017; 28(6): 550.     CrossRef
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    Yi-Hao Weng, Chun-Yuh Yang, Ya-Wen Chiu, Lynette K. Rogers
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    Chia-Huang Chang, Mei-Lien Chen, Kai-Wei Liao, Yen-An Tsai, I-Fang Mao, Tzu-Hao Wang, Shiaw-Min Hwang, Yu-Jen Chang, Ming-Song Tsai
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Modifying Effect of Suicidal Ideation on the Relationship Between Asthma and Cigarette Use Behaviors Among Korean Adolescents
Jisuk Bae, Eun Young Park, Soon-Woo Park
J Prev Med Public Health. 2011;44(3):118-124.   Published online May 17, 2010
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2011.44.3.118
  • 8,048 View
  • 63 Download
  • 5 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives

Although cigarette smoking is known to be related to the exacerbation of asthma symptoms, several studies have indicated that the prevalence of cigarette smoking among asthmatic adolescents is similar to or even higher than that among non-asthmatic adolescents. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between asthma and cigarette use behaviors and whether or not the presence of suicidal ideation modifies this relationship among Korean adolescents.

Methods

We analyzed data from the 2008 Korea Youth Risk Behavior Web-based Survey, which included a nationally representative sample of middle and high school students. Multiple logistic regression models were used to calculate odd ratios and 95% confidence intervals of cigarette use behaviors among current asthmatics, former asthmatics, and non-asthmatics, after adjusting for gender, grade, school records, socioeconomic status, current alcohol use, and suicidal ideation.

Results

Of 75 238 study participants, 3.5% were current asthmatics and 4.5% were former asthmatics. Compared with non-asthmatics, asthmatics were more likely to report current cigarette use, frequent and heavy cigarette use, and cigarette use before 13 years of age. There were statistically significant interactions between asthma and suicidal ideation in cigarette use behaviors.

Conclusions

This study demonstrated that asthmatic adolescents are more likely than non-asthmatic adolescents to engage in cigarette use behaviors and the presence of suicidal ideation is an effect modifier of the relationship between asthma and cigarette use behaviors. Particular attention should be paid to the awareness of health risks of cigarette smoking and mental health problems among asthmatic adolescents.

Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Asthme et comportements suicidaires chez les adolescents: revue systématique
    M. Underner, G. Peiffer, J. Perriot, I. De Chazeron, N. Jaafari
    Revue des Maladies Respiratoires.2022; 39(4): 344.     CrossRef
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    Kevin W. Hoffman, Elina Visoki, Stirling T. Argabright, Laura M. Schultz, Grace E. Didomenico, Kate T. Tran, Joshua H. Gordon, Barbara H. Chaiyachati, Tyler M. Moore, Laura Almasy, Ran Barzilay
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    Chang Hoon Han, Jae Ho Chung
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Association Between MicroRNA196a2 rs11614913 Genotypes and the Risk of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer in Korean Population
Young-Seoub Hong, Ho-Jin Kang, Jong-Young Kwak, Byung Lae Park, Chang-Hun You, Yu-Mi Kim, Heon Kim
J Prev Med Public Health. 2011;44(3):125-130.   Published online May 17, 2010
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2011.44.3.125
  • 10,288 View
  • 103 Download
  • 33 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives

The microRNA (miRNA) miR-196a2 may play an important role in lung cancer development and survival by altering binding activity of target mRNA. In this study, we evaluated their associations with the susceptibility of non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC) by case-control study in a Korean population.

Methods

We performed genotyping analyses for miR-196a2 rs11614913 T/C at miRNA regions in a case-control study using blood samples of 406 NSCLC patient and 428 cancer-free control groups.

Results

The total C allele frequencies for miR-196a2 were 48.8% for the patients and 45.6% for the controls; and the genotype frequencies of TT, TC, and CC were 23.7%, 55.2%, and 21.1% for the patients and 31.1%, 46.35%, and 22.4% for the controls (p<0.05). Participants who possesses TC/CC genotypes showed high risk for NSCLC compared to those possessed TT genotypes (OR, 1.42; 95% CI, 1.03 to 1.96). The association was persisted in 60 and older age group, male, smokers, those without family history for cancer. However, no significant association of CC genotypes in recessive genetic model was observed.

Conclusions

In conclusion, this case-control study provides evidence that miR-196a2 rs11614913 C/T polymorphisms are associated with a significantly increased risk of NSCLC in a dominant model, indicating that common genetic polymorphisms in miR-196a2 rs11614913 are associated with NSCLC. The association of miR196a2 rs11614913 polymorphisms and NSCLC risk require confirmation through additional larger studies.

Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
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    PINGYU WANG, SHUYANG XIE, AIDONG CUI, YANXIANG ZHANG, BAOFA JIANG
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  • miR-196a2 C allele is a low-penetrant risk factor for cancer development
    Li-Xin Qiu, You Wang, Zu-Guang Xia, Bo Xi, Chen Mao, Jia-Lei Wang, Bi-Yun Wang, Fang-Fang Lv, Xiang-Hua Wu, Ling-Qing Hu
    Cytokine.2011; 56(3): 589.     CrossRef
Frequency and Related Factors of Masked Hypertension at a Worksite in Korea
Sang-Kyu Kim, Jun-Ho Bae, Dung-Young Nah, Dong-Wook Lee, Tae-Yoon Hwang, Kyeong-Soo Lee
J Prev Med Public Health. 2011;44(3):131-139.   Published online May 17, 2010
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2011.44.3.131
  • 10,025 View
  • 77 Download
  • 5 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives

Masked hypertension is associated with metabolic risks and increased risk of cardiovascular disease. The purpose of this study was to identify the frequency of and risk factors of masked hypertension in Korean workers.

Methods

The study was conducted among 121 employees at a hotel in Gyeongju, Korea, from December 2008 to February 2009. We measured blood pressure (BP) both in the clinic and using 24-hour ambulatory BP monitors for all subjects. Hypertension was defined independently by both methods, and subjects were classified into four groups: true normotension, masked hypertension, white coat hypertension, and sustained hypertension.

Results

The frequency of masked hypertension in our study group was 25.6%. Compared with true normotension, the factors related to masked hypertension were male gender (odds ratio [OR], 10.7; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.41 to 81.09), aging one year (OR, 0.88; 95% CI, 0.78 to 0.99), clinic BP 120-129/80-84 mmHg (OR, 8.42; 95% CI, 1.51 to 46.82), clinic BP 130-139 / 85-89 mmHg (OR, 12.14; 95% CI, 1.80 to 81.85), smoking (OR, 5.51; 95% CI, 1.15 to 26.54), and increase of total cholesterol 1 mg / dL (OR, 1.05; 95% CI, 1.02 to 1.08). In males only, these factors were clinic BP 120-129 / 80-84 mmHg (OR, 15.07; 95% CI, 1.55 to 146.19), clinic BP 130-139 / 85-89 mmHg (OR, 17.16; 95% CI, 1.56 to 189.45), smoking (OR, 11.61; 95% CI, 1.52 to 88.62), and increase of total cholesterol 1 mg/dL (OR, 1.05; 95% CI, 1.01 to 1.09).

Conclusions

The frequency of masked hypertension was high in our study sample. Detection and management of masked hypertension, a known strong predictor of cardiovascular risk, could improve prognosis for at-risk populations.

Summary

Citations

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JPMPH : Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health