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Original Articles
The Association Between the Basic Old-Age Pension and Depression of the Older Adults in Korea
Jaewon Kim, Tae-Jin Lee, Cheong-Seok Kim
J Prev Med Public Health. 2020;53(5):332-341.   Published online July 13, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.20.024
  • 7,817 View
  • 220 Download
  • 3 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Objectives
The purpose of this study was to investigate the association between the Basic Old-Age Pension (BOP), which is a noncontributory pension, and depression in BOP beneficiaries in Korea.
Methods
We used the second and third waves (2007-2008) of the Korea Welfare Panel Study to identify the effect of the BOP on mental health in the year of its introduction. The Center for Epidemiological Studies-Depression Scale, applied in a Korean context, was used to evaluate mental health. To analyze the effect of the BOP, a difference-in-difference approach was used in analyses of all subjects and subgroups.
Results
For this study population of 760 adults, the BOP did not have a statistically significant relationship with depression in its beneficiaries. After controlling for type of household, the BOP was still not associated with lower reporting of depression, either in singlebeneficiary or double-beneficiary households, in the year of the benefit.
Conclusions
The BOP policy had no significant relationship with the level of depression among recipients. However, this should not be interpreted as implying that income subsidy programs for older adults, such as the BOP, do not affect mental health, considering the importance of economic hardship in this population and the program’s socioeconomic effects.
Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Association of the Type of Public Pension With Mental Health Among South Korean Older Adults: Longitudinal Observational Study
    Seung Hoon Kim, Hyunkyu Kim, Sung Hoon Jeong, Eun-Cheol Park
    JMIR Public Health and Surveillance.2024; 10: e49129.     CrossRef
  • Factors Associated with Aging in Place among Community-Dwelling Older Adults in Korea: Findings from a National Survey
    Myong Sun Cho, Mi Young Kwon
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2023; 20(3): 2740.     CrossRef
  • Comparing the mental health effects of different social assistance programmes in Hong Kong
    Chenhong Peng, Paul S. F. Yip
    Journal of Asian Public Policy.2022; : 1.     CrossRef
Determinants of Health Care Expenditures and the Contribution of Associated Factors: 16 Cities and Provinces in Korea, 2003-2010
Kimyoung Han, Minho Cho, Kihong Chun
J Prev Med Public Health. 2013;46(6):300-308.   Published online November 28, 2013
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2013.46.6.300
  • 10,825 View
  • 119 Download
  • 19 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives

The purpose of this study was to classify determinants of cost increases into two categories, negotiable factors and non-negotiable factors, in order to identify the determinants of health care expenditure increases and to clarify the contribution of associated factors selected based on a literature review.

Methods

The data in this analysis was from the statistical yearbooks of National Health Insurance Service, the Economic Index from Statistics Korea and regional statistical yearbooks. The unit of analysis was the annual growth rate of variables of 16 cities and provinces from 2003 to 2010. First, multiple regression was used to identify the determinants of health care expenditures. We then used hierarchical multiple regression to calculate the contribution of associated factors. The changes of coefficients (R2) of predictors, which were entered into this analysis step by step based on the empirical evidence of the investigator could explain the contribution of predictors to increased medical cost.

Results

Health spending was mainly associated with the proportion of the elderly population, but the Medicare Economic Index (MEI) showed an inverse association. The contribution of predictors was as follows: the proportion of elderly in the population (22.4%), gross domestic product (GDP) per capita (4.5%), MEI (-12%), and other predictors (less than 1%).

Conclusions

As Baby Boomers enter retirement, an increasing proportion of the population aged 65 and over and the GDP will continue to increase, thus accelerating the inflation of health care expenditures and precipitating a crisis in the health insurance system. Policy makers should consider providing comprehensive health services by an accountable care organization to achieve cost savings while ensuring high-quality care.

Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • The Impact of Public Housing Investments on the Economic Development of Provinces: The Case of Turkey (TOKI)
    Banu Tantan, Sevkiye Sence Turk
    Journal of Urban Planning and Development.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Yenilenebilir Enerji Tüketimi Sağlık Harcamaları Üzerinde Etkili Mi? AB Ülkeleri Örneği
    Dilek Atılgan, Enver Günay
    Hitit Sosyal Bilimler Dergisi.2024; 17(1): 39.     CrossRef
  • SAĞLIK HARCAMALARININ BELİRLENMESİNDE SOSYO-EKONOMİK UNSURLARIN ETKİLERİ: TÜRKİYE VE SEÇİLMİŞ AB ÜLKELERİ ÜZERİNE PANEL VERİ ANALİZİ
    Seyhan TAŞ, Dilek ATILGAN
    Journal of Economics and Research.2023; 4(2): 47.     CrossRef
  • The Granger Causality Between Health Expenditure and Gross Domestic Product in OECD Countries
    Gülnur İlgün, Murat Konca, Seda Sönmez
    Journal of Health Management.2022; 24(3): 356.     CrossRef
  • Health expenditures, environmental quality, and economic development: State-of-the-art review and findings in the context of COP26
    Zhenjiang Xing, Xia Liu
    Frontiers in Public Health.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Systematic review of factors determining health care expenditures
    Mohammad Meskarpour Amiri, Mahmood Kazemian, Zahra Motaghed, Zhaleh Abdi
    Health Policy and Technology.2021; 10(2): 100498.     CrossRef
  • Determinants of health expenditure from global perspective: A panel data analysis
    Muhammad Awais, Alam Khan, Muhammad Salman Ahmad
    Liberal Arts and Social Sciences International Journal (LASSIJ).2021; 5(1): 481.     CrossRef
  • An empirical study on the determinants of health care expenses in emerging economies
    Lulin Zhou, Sabina Ampon-Wireko, Henry Asante Antwi, Xinglong Xu, Muhammad Salman, Maxwell Opuni Antwi, Tordzro Mary Norvienyo Afua
    BMC Health Services Research.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Association between Primary Healthcare and Medical Expenditures in a Context of Hospital-Oriented Healthcare System in China: A National Panel Dataset, 2012–2016
    Mengping Zhou, Jingyi Liao, Nan Hu, Li Kuang
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2020; 17(18): 6917.     CrossRef
  • Differentiation in Healthcare Financing in EU Countries
    Tomasz Rokicki, Aleksandra Perkowska, Marcin Ratajczak
    Sustainability.2020; 13(1): 251.     CrossRef
  • GDP Growth and Health Care Expenditures Worldwide
    Milos Stepovic
    The Open Pharmacoeconomics & Health Economics Journal.2019; 7(1): 9.     CrossRef
  • GDP Growth and Health Care Expenditures Worldwide
    Milos Stepovic
    The Open Pharmacoeconomics & Health Economics Journal.2019; 7(1): 21.     CrossRef
  • Effect of Work on Medical Expenditures by Elderly: Findings From the Korean Health Panel 2008–2013
    Min Kyung Hyun
    Safety and Health at Work.2018; 9(4): 462.     CrossRef
  • Towards Actualizing the Value Potential of Korea Health Insurance Review and Assessment (HIRA) Data as a Resource for Health Research: Strengths, Limitations, Applications, and Strategies for Optimal Use of HIRA Data
    Jee-Ae Kim, Seokjun Yoon, Log-Young Kim, Dong-Sook Kim
    Journal of Korean Medical Science.2017; 32(5): 718.     CrossRef
  • Population Aging and Healthcare Expenditure in Korea
    Kyung‐Rae Hyun, Sungwook Kang, Sunmi Lee
    Health Economics.2016; 25(10): 1239.     CrossRef
  • Do health care workforce, population, and service provision significantly contribute to the total health expenditure? An econometric analysis of Serbia
    M. Santric-Milicevic, V. Vasic, Z. Terzic-Supic
    Human Resources for Health.2016;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • The failure of gastroenterologists to apply intestinal ultrasound in inflammatory bowel disease in the Asia‐Pacific: A need for action
    Anil Kumar Asthana, Antony B Friedman, Giovanni Maconi, Christian Maaser, Torsten Kucharzik, Mamoru Watanabe, Peter R Gibson
    Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology.2015; 30(3): 446.     CrossRef
  • Economic Burden of Diabetes Mellitus on Patients with Respiratory Failure Requiring Mechanical Ventilation during Hospitalizations
    Wei-Erh Cheng, Li-Ting Su, Shuo-Chueh Chen, Tsai-Chung Li, Hsiang-Wen Lin
    Value in Health Regional Issues.2014; 3: 33.     CrossRef
  • Changes in the epidemiology and burden of community-acquired pneumonia in Korea
    Hyoung Kyu Yoon
    The Korean Journal of Internal Medicine.2014; 29(6): 735.     CrossRef
Health Impact Assessment as a Strategy for Intersectoral Collaboration
Eunjeong Kang, Hyun Jin Park, Ji Eun Kim
J Prev Med Public Health. 2011;44(5):201-209.   Published online September 28, 2010
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2011.44.5.201
  • 9,464 View
  • 97 Download
  • 15 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives

This study examined the use of health impact assessment (HIA) as a tool for intersectoral collaboration using the case of an HIA project conducted in Gwang Myeong City, Korea.

Methods

A typical procedure for rapid HIA was used. In the screening step, the Aegi-Neung Waterside Park Plan was chosen as the target of the HIA. In the scoping step, the specific methods and tools to assess potential health impacts were chosen. A participatory workshop was held in the assessment step. Various interest groups, including the Department of Parks and Greenspace, the Department of Culture and Sports, the Department of Environment and Cleansing, civil societies, and residents, discussed previously reviewed literature on the potential health impacts of the Aegi-Neung Waterside Park Plan.

Results

Potential health impacts and inequality issues were elicited from the workshop, and measures to maximize positive health impacts and minimize negative health impacts were recommended. The priorities among the recommendations were decided by voting. A report on the HIA was submitted to the Department of Parks and Greenspace for their consideration.

Conclusions

Although this study examined only one case, it shows the potential usefulness of HIA as a tool for enhancing intersectoral collaboration. Some strategies to formally implement HIA are discussed.

Summary

Citations

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  • Implementation of Health Impact Assessment in the Healthcare System of the Republic of Kazakhstan
    Zhan S. Kalel, Gabriel Gulis, Altyn M. Aringazina
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2023; 20(3): 2335.     CrossRef
  • Health Impact Assessment in protected areas: a proposal for urban contexts in Brazil
    Ana Schramm, Sandra de Souza Hacon, Andre Reynaldo Santos Périssé
    Cadernos de Saúde Pública.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • The use of health impact assessments performed in Quebec City (Canada) – 2013–2019: Stakeholders and participants' appreciation
    Stéphanie Gamache, Thierno Diallo, Alexandre Lebel
    Environmental Impact Assessment Review.2022; 92: 106693.     CrossRef
  • Exploring the patterns of multisectoral approach in fighting COVID-19 Pandemic in SNNPR, Ethiopia: A qualitative case study approach
    Abraham A. Ali, Akmel M. Usman, Fekadeselassie B. Badebo, Solomon H. Tilahun, Ashraf Dewan
    PLOS ONE.2022; 17(2): e0263667.     CrossRef
  • Multisectoral action for health in low-income and middle-income settings: how can insights from social science theories inform intragovernmental coordination efforts?
    Aloysius Ssennyonjo, Sara Van Belle, Kristof Titeca, Bart Criel, Freddie Ssengooba
    BMJ Global Health.2021; 6(5): e004064.     CrossRef
  • Investment case approach for equitable access to maternal neonatal and child health services: Stakeholders’ perspective in Nepal
    Janak Kumar Thapa, Doris Stöckl, Raj Kumar Sangroula, Asha Pun, Meena Thapa, Mahesh Kumar Maskey, Maria Delius, Bidhubhusan Mahapatra
    PLOS ONE.2021; 16(10): e0255231.     CrossRef
  • Effects of the Health Promotion Programs on Happiness
    Munjae Lee, Kichan Yoon
    Sustainability.2020; 12(2): 528.     CrossRef
  • The urgent need for health impact assessment: proposing a transdisciplinary approach to the e-waste crisis in sub-Saharan Africa
    Dinah Tetteh, Lara Lengel
    Global Health Promotion.2017; 24(2): 35.     CrossRef
  • Intersectoral collaboration for physical activity in Korean Healthy Cities
    Eunjeong Kang
    Health Promotion International.2016; 31(3): 551.     CrossRef
  • Development of Guidelines for Health Impact Assessment in Southern Italy
    Fabrizio Bert, Maria Rosaria Gualano, Francesco Di Stanislao, Roberta Siliquini, Quinto Tozzi, Renato Pizzuti, Liliana Rizzo, Salvatore Scondotto, Francesco Bux
    Journal of Public Health Management and Practice.2016; 22(4): 395.     CrossRef
  • Empowerment for Healthy Cities and Communities in Korea
    Ji Young Moon, Eun Woo Nam, Sarita Dhakal
    Journal of Urban Health.2014; 91(5): 886.     CrossRef
  • Using Health Impact Assessment to Integrate Environmental Justice into Federal Environmental Regulatory Analysis
    Tina K. Yuen, Devon C. Payne-Sturges
    NEW SOLUTIONS: A Journal of Environmental and Occupational Health Policy.2013; 23(3): 439.     CrossRef
  • Understanding Intersectoral Collaboration in Health Promotion
    Eunjeong Kang
    Korean Journal of Health Education and Promotion.2013; 30(4): 17.     CrossRef
  • Health Impact Assessment of Free Immunization Program in Jinju City, Korea
    Keon Yeop Kim, So Youn Jeon, Man Joong Jeon, Kwon Ho Lee, Sok Goo Lee, Dongjin Kim, Eunjeong Kang, Sang Geun Bae, Jinhee Kim
    Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health.2012; 45(4): 267.     CrossRef
  • Health impact assessment: the state of the art
    Ben Harris-Roxas, Francesca Viliani, Alan Bond, Ben Cave, Mark Divall, Peter Furu, Patrick Harris, Matthew Soeberg, Aaron Wernham, Mirko Winkler
    Impact Assessment and Project Appraisal.2012; 30(1): 43.     CrossRef
Mathematical Modeling of the Novel Influenza A (H1N1) Virus and Evaluation of the Epidemic Response Strategies in the Republic of Korea.
Mina Suh, Jeehyun Lee, Hye Jin Chi, Young Keun Kim, Dae Yong Kang, Nam Wook Hur, Kyung Hwa Ha, Dong Han Lee, Chang Soo Kim
J Prev Med Public Health. 2010;43(2):109-116.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2010.43.2.109
  • 15,694 View
  • 224 Download
  • 11 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
The pandemic of novel influenza A (H1N1) virus has required decision-makers to act in the face of the substantial uncertainties. In this study, we evaluated the potential impact of the pandemic response strategies in the Republic of Korea using a mathematical model. METHODS: We developed a deterministic model of a pandemic (H1N1) 2009 in a structured population using the demographic data from the Korean population and the epidemiological feature of the pandemic (H1N1) 2009. To estimate the parameter values for the deterministic model, we used the available data from the previous studies on pandemic influenza. The pandemic response strategies of the Republic of Korea for novel influenza A (H1N1) virus such as school closure, mass vaccination (70% of population in 30 days), and a policy for anti-viral drug (treatment or prophylaxis) were applied to the deterministic model. RESULTS: The effect of two-week school closure on the attack rate was low regardless of the timing of the intervention. The earlier vaccination showed the effect of greater delays in reaching the peak of outbreaks. When it was no vaccination, vaccination at initiation of outbreak, vaccination 90 days after the initiation of outbreak and vaccination at the epidemic peak point, the total number of clinical cases for 400 days were 20.8 million, 4.4 million, 4.7 million and 12.6 million, respectively. The pandemic response strategies of the Republic of Korea delayed the peak of outbreaks (about 40 days) and decreased the number of cumulative clinical cases (8 million). CONCLUSIONS: Rapid vaccination was the most important factor to control the spread of pandemic influenza, and the response strategies of the Republic of Korea were shown to delay the spread of pandemic influenza in this deterministic model.
Summary

Citations

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    Journal of Infection and Public Health.2022; 15(7): 720.     CrossRef
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English Abstract
Health Policy and Social Epidemiology.
Young Jeon Shin
J Prev Med Public Health. 2005;38(3):252-258.
  • 2,351 View
  • 47 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Major approaches of Social epidemiology; 1) holistic, ecological approach, 2) population based approach, 3) development and life-course approach, 4) contextual multi-level approach, have stressed the importance of not only social context of health and illness, but also the population based strategy in the health interventions. Ultimately, it provides the conceptual guidelines and methodological tools to lead toward the healthy public policies; integrated efforts to improve condition which people live: secure, safe, adequate, and sustainable livelihoods, lifestyles, and environments, including housing, education, nutrition, information exchange, child care, transportation, and necessary community and personal social and health services.
Summary

JPMPH : Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health