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Original Articles
The Effect of an Educational Intervention on Health Literacy and the Adoption of Nutritional Preventive Behaviors Related to Osteoporosis Among Iranian Health Volunteers
Leila Dehghankar, Rahman Panahi, Elham Hasannia, Fatemeh Hemmati, Fatemeh Samiei Siboni
J Prev Med Public Health. 2021;54(6):404-411.   Published online October 22, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.21.183
  • 3,537 View
  • 158 Download
  • 2 Web of Science
  • 2 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
Given the increase in osteoporosis among health volunteers and the effect of health literacy on the adoption of nutritional preventive behaviors, this study aimed to determine the effects of an educational intervention on health literacy and the adoption of nutritional preventive behaviors related to osteoporosis among health volunteers.
Methods
This was a quasi-experimental, interventional study of health volunteers conducted in 2020. In this study, 140 subjects (70 in both intervention and control groups) were selected using the random multi-stage sampling method. An educational intervention was conducted using the Telegram application, and educational messages were sent to the health volunteers in the intervention group across 6 sessions. Data were collected via a demographic questionnaire, the Health Literacy for Iranian Adults survey, and a nutritional performance questionnaire, which were completed before and 3 months after the intervention. The data were collected and analyzed using SPSS version 23.
Results
Before the intervention, there were no significant differences in the mean scores for health literacy variables and the adoption of nutritional preventive behaviors between the intervention and control groups (p>0.05). After the intervention, there was a significant change in the mean scores for health literacy and the adoption of preventive behaviors in the intervention group (p<0.05) as opposed to the control group.
Conclusions
Interventions aimed at increasing health literacy are effective for promoting the adoption of preventive and healthy nutritional behaviors related to osteoporosis.
Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Factors related with nursing students’ health literacy: a cross sectional study
    Enrique Ramón-Arbués, José Manuel Granada-López, Isabel Antón-Solanas, Ana Cobos-Rincón, Antonio Rodríguez-Calvo, Vicente Gea-Caballero, Clara Isabel Tejada-Garrido, Raúl Juárez-Vela, Emmanuel Echániz-Serrano
    Frontiers in Public Health.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Health literacy interventions among patients with chronic diseases: A meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials
    Yingshan Shao, Huaqin Hu, Yaxin Liang, Yangyang Hong, Yiqing Yu, Chenxi Liu, Yihua Xu
    Patient Education and Counseling.2023; 114: 107829.     CrossRef
Effects of Socio-demographic Factors on the Decreasing Trend in the Sex Ratio at Birth in Korea, 1997-2017
Jisuk Bae
J Prev Med Public Health. 2020;53(5):371-380.   Published online August 7, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.20.282
  • 3,100 View
  • 100 Download
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Objectives
This study investigated the effects of socio-demographic factors on the decreasing trend in the sex ratio at birth from 1997 to 2017 in Korea.
Methods
Data from 10 349 602 live births registered with Statistics Korea from 1997 to 2017 were analyzed. The secondary sex ratio (SSR), defined as the ratio of male to female live births, during the study period (1997-1999 [phase I], 2000-2002 [phase II], 2003-2005 [phase III], 2006-2008 [phase IV], 2009-2011 [phase V], 2012-2014 [phase VI], and 2015-2017 [phase VII]) was calculated according to selected socio-demographic factors, such as parental age, education, occupation, and birth order. Logistic regression models were used to estimate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals for a male birth after adjusting for potential confounders.
Results
The SSR gradually decreased from 1.10 (in 1998-2000 and 2002) to 1.05 (in 2013-2016). While a decreasing trend in the SSR was not noted among first births, male-biased sex ratios were prominent among third and higher-order births, for which the highest SSR was 1.46 in 1998. Higher birth order was significantly associated with an excess of male births in phases I-VI (≥third vs. first, OR range, 1.03 to 1.35). Advanced maternal age was significantly associated with an excess of female births in phases II, III, and V (≥40 vs. 20-24 years, OR range, 0.92 to 0.95).
Conclusions
This study demonstrated that advanced maternal age and reduction of the artificially-biased SSR among third and higher-order births may partially explain the decreasing trend in the SSR from 1997 to 2017 in Korea.
Summary
The Impact of Educational Status on 10-Year (2004-2014) Cardiovascular Disease Prognosis and All-cause Mortality Among Acute Coronary Syndrome Patients in the Greek Acute Coronary Syndrome (GREECS) Longitudinal Study
Venetia Notara, Demosthenes B. Panagiotakos, Yannis Kogias, Petros Stravopodis, Antonis Antonoulas, Spyros Zombolos, Yannis Mantas, Christos Pitsavos
J Prev Med Public Health. 2016;49(4):220-229.   Published online June 24, 2016
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.16.005
  • 9,212 View
  • 130 Download
  • 15 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
The association between educational status and 10-year risk for acute coronary syndrome (ACS) and all-cause mortality was evaluated.
Methods
From October 2003 to September 2004, 2172 consecutive ACS patients from six Greek hospitals were enrolled. In 2013 to 2014, a 10-year follow-up (2004-2014) assessment was performed for 1918 participants (participation rate, 88%). Each patient’s educational status was classified as low (<9 years of school), intermediate (9 to 14 years), or high (>14 years).
Results
Overall all-cause mortality was almost twofold higher in the low-education group than in the intermediate-education and high-education groups (40% vs. 22% and 19%, respectively, p<0.001). Additionally, 10-year recurrent ACS events (fatal and non-fatal) were more common in the low-education group than in the intermediate-education and high-education groups (42% vs. 30% and 35%, p<0.001), and no interactions between sex and education on the investigated outcomes were observed. Moreover, patients in the high-education group were more physically active, had a better financial status, and were less likely to have hypertension, diabetes, or ACS than the participants with the least education (p<0.001); however, when those characteristics and lifestyle habits were accounted for, no moderating effects regarding the relationship of educational status with all-cause mortality and ACS events were observed.
Conclusions
A U-shaped association may be proposed for the relationship between ACS prognosis and educational status, with participants in the low-education and high-education groups being negatively affected by other factors (e.g., job stress, depression, or loneliness). Public health policies should be aimed at specific social groups to reduce the overall burden of cardiovascular disease morbidity.
Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Temporal trends in socioeconomic disparity in clinical outcomes for patients with acute coronary syndrome
    Amalie H. Simoni, Jan B. Valentin, Kristian H. Kragholm, Henrik Bøggild, Svend E. Jensen, Søren P. Johnsen
    Cardiovascular Revascularization Medicine.2023; 56: 64.     CrossRef
  • Associations of Recreational and Nonrecreational Physical Activity and Body Weight Change on Cardiovascular Disease Mortality During the Obesogenic Transition in the United States: National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey Follow-up Study
    Birinder S. Cheema, Zumin Shi, Rhiannon L. White, Evan Atlantis
    Journal of Physical Activity and Health.2023; 20(10): 971.     CrossRef
  • Socioeconomic inequity in incidence, outcomes and care for acute coronary syndrome: A systematic review
    Amalie H. Simoni, Juliane Frydenlund, Kristian H. Kragholm, Henrik Bøggild, Svend E. Jensen, Søren P. Johnsen
    International Journal of Cardiology.2022; 356: 19.     CrossRef
  • Low educational status correlates with a high incidence of mortality among hypertensive subjects from Northeast Rural China
    Shasha Yu, Xiaofan Guo, GuangXiao Li, Hongmei Yang, Liqiang Zheng, Yingxian Sun
    Frontiers in Public Health.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Adherence to the Mediterranean diet according to occupation-based social classifications and gender
    Carlos Álvarez-Fernández, Manuel Romero-Saldaña, Álvaro Álvarez-López, Rafael Molina-Luque, Guillermo Molina-Recio, Manuel Vaquero-Abellán
    Archives of Environmental & Occupational Health.2021; 76(5): 275.     CrossRef
  • Irrational beliefs trigger depression and anxiety symptoms, and associated with increased inflammation and oxidative stress markers in the 10-year diabetes mellitus risk: the ATTICA epidemiological study
    Christina Vassou, Ekavi N. Georgousopoulou, Christina Chrysohoou, Mary Yannakoulia, Christos Pitsavos, Mark Cropley, Demosthenes B. Panagiotakos
    Journal of Diabetes & Metabolic Disorders.2021; 20(1): 727.     CrossRef
  • Association between Educational Level and Physical Activity in Chronic Disease Patients of Eastern Slovakia
    Alena Buková, Erika Chovanová, Zuzana Küchelová, Jan Junger, Agata Horbacz, Mária Majherová, Silvia Duranková
    Healthcare.2021; 9(11): 1447.     CrossRef
  • Trajectories of Outpatient Service Utilisation of Hypertensive Patients in Tertiary Hospitals in China
    Zijing Pan, Wanchun Xu, Zhong Li, Chengzhong Xu, Fangfang Lu, Pei Zhang, Liang Zhang, Ting Ye
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2020; 17(3): 852.     CrossRef
  • Positive Association of Cardiovascular Disease (CVD) with Chronic Exposure to Drinking Water Arsenic (As) at Concentrations below the WHO Provisional Guideline Value: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis
    Lingqian Xu, Debapriya Mondal, David A. Polya
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2020; 17(7): 2536.     CrossRef
  • Association of low-level inorganic arsenic exposure from rice with age-standardized mortality risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in England and Wales
    Lingqian Xu, David A. Polya, Qian Li, Debapriya Mondal
    Science of The Total Environment.2020; 743: 140534.     CrossRef
  • Relevant problems of participation and education of patients in cardiac rehabilitation and secondary prevention programs
    M. G. Bubnova
    Cardiovascular Therapy and Prevention.2020; 19(6): 2649.     CrossRef
  • Study of awareness of risk factors and attitudes towards health in patients with coronary heart disease. New rehabilitation counseling technology: the first experience
    M. G. Bubnova, D. M. Aronov, N. K. Novikova, E. M. Rodzinskaya, A. L. Persiyanova-Dubrova
    Profilakticheskaya meditsina.2019; 22(4): 114.     CrossRef
  • Association between educational level and total and cause-specific mortality: a pooled analysis of over 694 000 individuals in the Asia Cohort Consortium
    Keming Yang, Ying Zhang, Eiko Saito, Md Shafiur Rahman, Prakash Chandra Gupta, Norie Sawada, Akiko Tamakoshi, Yu-Tang Gao, Woon-Puay Koh, Xiao-Ou Shu, Ichiro Tsuji, Atsuko Sadakane, Chisato Nagata, San-Lin You, Jian-Min Yuan, Myung-Hee Shin, Yu Chen, Wen-
    BMJ Open.2019; 9(8): e026225.     CrossRef
  • Prevalence and risk factors for prehypertension and hypertension among adults in Central China from 2000-2011
    Chaoying Chen, Zhanpeng Yuan
    Clinical and Experimental Hypertension.2018; 40(8): 734.     CrossRef
  • The risk factors of 9-year follow-up on hypertension in middle-aged people in Tujia-Nationality settlement of China
    X Liu, C Liu, H Schenck, X Yi, H Wang, X Shi
    Journal of Human Hypertension.2017; 31(12): 838.     CrossRef
English Abstracts
Educational Differences in Health Care Utilization in the Last Year of Life among South Korean Cancer Patients.
Soo Young Choo, Sang Yi Lee, Chul Woung Kim, Su Young Kim, Tae Ho Yoon, Hai Rim Shin, Ok Ryun Moon
J Prev Med Public Health. 2007;40(1):36-44.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2007.40.1.36
  • 4,841 View
  • 42 Download
  • 10 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
There have been few studies examining the differences in health care utilization across social classes during the last year of life. Therefore, in this study we analyzed the quantitative and qualitative differences in health care utilization among cancer patients across educational classes in their last year of life, and derived from it implications for policy. METHODS: To evaluate health care utilization by cancer patients in the last year of life, Death certificate data from 2004 were merged with National Health Insurance data (n=60,088). In order to use educational level as a social class index, we selected the individuals aged 40 and over as study subjects (n=57,484). We analyzed the differences in the medical expenditures, admission days, and rates of admission experience across educational classes descriptively. Multiple regression analysis was conducted to evaluate the association between medical expenditures and independent variables such as sex, age, education class, site of death and type of cancer. RESULTS: The upper educational class spent much more on medical expenditures in the last one year of life, particularly during the last month of life, than the lower educational class did. The ratio of monthly medical expenditures per capita between the college class and no education class was 2.5 in the last 6-12 months of life, but the ratio was 1.6 in the last 1 month. Also, the lower the educational class, the higher the proportion of medical expenditures during the last one month of life, compared to total medical expenditures in the last one year of life. The college educational class had a much higher rate of admission experiences in tertiary hospitals within Seoul than the other education classes did. CONCLUSIONS: This study shows that the lower educational classes had qualitative and quantitative disadvantages in utilizing health care services for cancer in the last year of life.
Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Cross-national differences in wealth inequality in health services and caregiving used near the end of life
    Jennifer A. Ailshire, Cristian A. Herrera, Eunyoung Choi, Margarita Osuna, Elina Suzuki
    eClinicalMedicine.2023; 58: 101911.     CrossRef
  • Socioeconomic differences in the perception of inequalities in healthcare utilization and health in South Korea
    Nayeon Kim, Hye-won Yun, Juwon Park, Fatima Nari, Hee Jin Wang, Jae Kwan Jun, Kui Son Choi, Mina Suh
    Preventive Medicine Reports.2023; 36: 102445.     CrossRef
  • Cross-National Differences in Wealth Inequality in Health Services and Caregiving Used Near the End of Life
    Jennifer A. Ailshire, Cristian A. Herrera, Eunyoung Choi, Margarita Osuna, Elina M. Suzuki
    SSRN Electronic Journal .2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Socioeconomic position and use of healthcare in the last year of life: A systematic review and meta-analysis
    Joanna M. Davies, Katherine E. Sleeman, Javiera Leniz, Rebecca Wilson, Irene J. Higginson, Julia Verne, Matthew Maddocks, Fliss E. M. Murtagh, Holly Gwen Prigerson
    PLOS Medicine.2019; 16(4): e1002782.     CrossRef
  • Joint Symposium of Korean Cancer Association & UICC-ARO—Cross-boundary cancer studies: cancer and Universal Health Coverage (UHC) in Asia
    Eun-Cheol Park, Norie Kawahara, Shinjiro Nozaki, Hasbullah Thabrany, Shunya Yoshimi, Sohee Park, Duk Hyoung Lee, Hideyuki Akaza, Jae Kyung Roh
    Japanese Journal of Clinical Oncology.2017; 47(9): 889.     CrossRef
  • Medical Costs and Healthcare Utilization among Cancer Decedents in the Last Year of Life in 2009
    Inuk Hwang, Dong Wook Shin, Kyoung Hee Kang, Hyung Kook Yang, So Young Kim, Jong-Hyock Park
    Cancer Research and Treatment.2016; 48(1): 365.     CrossRef
  • Barriers to Cancer Care, Perceived Social Support, and Patient Navigation Services for Korean Breast Cancer Patients
    Jung-won Lim
    Social Work in Health Care.2015; 54(1): 47.     CrossRef
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    Hong-Jun Cho
    Journal of the Korean Medical Association.2013; 56(3): 184.     CrossRef
  • Inequalities in Medical Care Utilization by South Korean Cancer Patients According to Income: A Retrospective Cohort Study
    Tae Ho Yoon, Sang-Yi Lee, Chul-Woung Kim, Su Young Kim, Baek-Geun Jeong, Hyeung-Keun Park
    International Journal of Health Services.2011; 41(1): 51.     CrossRef
  • Factors Influencing Utilization of Medical Care Among Osteoarthritis Patients in Korea: Using 2005 Korean National Health and Nutrition Survey Data
    Min Young Kim, Jong Ku Park, Sang Baek Koh, Chun-Bae Kim
    Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health.2010; 43(6): 513.     CrossRef
Future of Preventive Medicine Education in Korea: Hopes and Challenges.
Kwang Ho Meng
J Prev Med Public Health. 2006;39(1):7-12.
  • 2,020 View
  • 35 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Throughout the century, based on the precedent set by Flexner in the United States, almost every subsequent report on the reform of medical education has pointed out the need for more prevention-oriented teaching in the curriculum. This has been particularly so in countries like Korea where the basic public health services have been so important for the improvement of health of the people. And, in fact, preventive medicine and public health have contributed a great deal to the prevention of communicable diseases and prolongation of life expectancy. Recently, however, along with the educational reform that emphasizing the interdisciplinary teaching, integration of basic science and clinical education, and centralization of responsibility for the medical education curriculum, concerns are being voiced by preventive medicine educators. These concerns are primarily centered around the fear that the implementation of interdisciplinary, centrally administered courses would result in a weakening of content and teaching expertise as well as a loss of departmental power and control. This paper foresees that preventive medicine and public health will be more important in Korea in the future and proposes that preventive medicine educators will have to step forward and turn the challenges of curricula restructuring into opportunities to expand the role of preventive medicine in the curricula of their institutions.
Summary

JPMPH : Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health