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Volume 51(3); May 2018
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Original Articles
Knowledge, Perceptions, and Self-reported Performance of Hand Hygiene Among Registered Nurses at Community-based Hospitals in the Republic of Korea: A Cross-sectional Multi-center Study
Hyang Soon Oh
J Prev Med Public Health. 2018;51(3):121-129.   Published online May 14, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.17.188
  • 9,933 View
  • 332 Download
  • 7 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Objectives
To assess the nurses’ hand hygiene (HH) knowledge, perception, attitude, and self-reported performance in small- and medium-sized hospitals after Middle East Respiratory Syndrome outbreak.
Methods
The structured questionnaire was adapted from the World Health Organization’s survey. Data were collected between June 26 and July 14, 2017.
Results
Nurses showed scores on knowledge (17.6±2.5), perception (69.3±0.8), self-reported HH performance of non-self (86.0±11.0), self-reported performance of self (88.2±11.0), and attitude (50.5±5.5). HH performance rate of non-self was Y1=36.678+ 0.555X1 (HH performance rate of self) (adjusted R2=0.280, p<0.001). The regression model for performance was Y4=18.302+0.247X41 (peception)+0.232X42 (attitude)+0.875X42 (role model); coefficients were significant statistically except attitude, and this model significant statistically (adjusted R2=0.191, p<0.001).
Conclusions
Advanced HH education program would be developed and operated continuously. Perception, attitude, role model was found to be a significant predictors of HH performance of self. So these findings could be used in future HH promotion strategies for nurses.
Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
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    Mohamad Hazni Abd Rahim, Mohd Ismail Ibrahim
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    Hyang Soon Oh
    Healthcare.2021; 9(7): 913.     CrossRef
  • Hand hygiene in surgery in Benin: opportunities and challenges
    Carine Laurence Yehouenou, Angèle Modupe Dohou, Ariane Dessièdé Fiogbe, Marius Esse, Cyriaque Degbey, Anne Simon, Olivia Dalleur
    Antimicrobial Resistance & Infection Control.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Healthcare Workers’ Knowledge and Attitudes Regarding the World Health Organization’s “My 5 Moments for Hand Hygiene”: Evidence From a Vietnamese Central General Hospital
    Huy Van Nguyen, Hieu Trung Tran, Long Quynh Khuong, Thanh Van Nguyen, Na Thi Nhi Ho, An Thi Minh Dao, Minh Van Hoang
    Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health.2020; 53(4): 236.     CrossRef
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    Hyang Soon Oh
    American Journal of Infection Control.2019; 47(3): 258.     CrossRef
The Impact of Air Pollution, Including Asian Sand Dust, on Respiratory Symptoms and Health-related Quality of Life in Outpatients With Chronic Respiratory Disease in Korea: A Panel Study
Motoyuki Nakao, Yoko Ishihara, Cheol-Hong Kim, In-Gyu Hyun
J Prev Med Public Health. 2018;51(3):130-139.   Published online May 9, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.18.021
  • 8,706 View
  • 246 Download
  • 28 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Objectives
Air pollution is a growing concern in Korea because of transboundary air pollution from mainland China. A panel study was conducted to clarify the effects of air pollution on respiratory symptoms and health-related quality of life (HR-QoL) in outpatients with and without chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in Korea.
Methods
Patients filled out a questionnaire including self-reported HR-QoL in February and were followed up in May and July. The study was conducted from 2013 to 2015, with different participants each year. Air quality parameters were applied in a generalized estimating equation as independent variables to predict factors affecting HR-QoL.
Results
Lower physical fitness scores were associated with Asian sand dust events. Daily activity scores were worse when there were high concentrations of particulate matter (PM) less than 10 μm in diameter (PM10). Lower social functioning scores were associated with high PM less than 2.5 μm in diameter and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) concentrations. High NO2 concentrations also showed a significant association with mental health scores. Weather-related cough was prevalent when PM10, NO2, or ozone (O3) concentrations were high, regardless of COPD severity. High PM10 concentrations were associated with worsened wheezing, particularly in COPD patients.
Conclusions
The results suggest that PM, NO2, and O3 cause respiratory symptoms leading to HR-QoL deterioration. While some adverse effects of air pollution appeared to occur regardless of COPD, others occurred more often and more intensely in COPD patients. The public sector, therefore, needs to consider tailoring air pollution countermeasures to people with different conditions to minimize adverse health effects.
Summary

Citations

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Effects of Air Pollution on Public and Private Health Expenditures in Iran: A Time Series Study (1972-2014)
Pouran Raeissi, Touraj Harati-Khalilabad, Aziz Rezapour, Seyed Yaser Hashemi, Abdoreza Mousavi, Saeed Khodabakhshzadeh
J Prev Med Public Health. 2018;51(3):140-147.   Published online May 14, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.17.153
  • 7,776 View
  • 197 Download
  • 19 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
Environmental pollution is a negative consequence of the development process, and many countries are grappling with this phenomenon. As a developing country, Iran is not exempt from this rule, and Iran pays huge expenditures for the consequences of pollution. The aim of this study was to analyze the long- and short-run impact of air pollution, along with other health indicators, on private and public health expenditures.
Methods
This study was an applied and developmental study. Autoregressive distributed lag estimating models were used for the period of 1972 to 2014. In order to determine the co-integration between health expenditures and the infant mortality rate, fertility rate, per capita income, and pollution, we used the Wald test in Microfit version 4.1. We then used Eviews version 8 to evaluate the stationarity of the variables and to estimate the long- and short-run relationships.
Results
Long-run air pollution had a positive and significant effect on health expenditures, so that a 1.00% increase in the index of carbon dioxide led to an increase of 3.32% and 1.16% in public and private health expenditures, respectively. Air pollution also had a greater impact on health expenditures in the long term than in the short term.
Conclusions
The findings of this study indicate that among the factors affecting health expenditures, environmental quality and contaminants played the most important role. Therefore, in order to reduce the financial burden of health expenditures in Iran, it is essential to reduce air pollution by enacting and implementing laws that protect the environment.
Summary

Citations

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Malaria Risk Factors in Kaligesing, Purworejo District, Central Java Province, Indonesia: A Case-control Study
Pratiwi Cahyaningrum, Sulistyawati Sulistyawati
J Prev Med Public Health. 2018;51(3):148-153.   Published online May 16, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.18.036
  • 7,253 View
  • 329 Download
  • 4 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
Malaria remains a public health concern worldwide, including Indonesia. Purworejo is a district in which endemic of malaria, they have re-setup to entering malaria elimination in 2021. Accordingly, actions must be taken to accelerate and guaranty that the goal will reach based on an understanding of the risk factors for malaria. Thus, we analysed malaria risk factors based on human and housing conditions in Kaligesing, Purworejo, Indonesia.
Methods
A case-control study was carried out in Kaligesing subdistrict, Purworejo, Indonesia in July to August 2017. A structured questionnaire and checklist were used to collect data from 96 participants, who consisted of 48 controls and 48 cases. Univariate, bivariate, and multivariate analyses were performed.
Results
Bivariate analysis found that education level, the presence of a cattle cage within 100 m of the house, not sleeping under a bednet the previous night, and not closing the doors and windows from 6 p.m. to 5 a.m. were significantly (p≤0.25) associated with malaria. Of these factors, only not sleeping under a bednet the previous night and not closing the doors and windows from 6 p.m. to 5 a.m. were significantly associated with malaria.
Conclusions
The findings of this study demonstrate that potential risk factor for Malaria should be paid of attention all the time, particularly for an area which is targeting Malaria elimination.
Summary

Citations

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Probability of Early Retirement Among Emergency Physicians
Jaemyeong Shin, Yun Jeong Kim, Jong Kun Kim, Dong Eun Lee, Sungbae Moon, Jae Young Choe, Won Kee Lee, Hyung Min Lee, Kwang Hyun Cho
J Prev Med Public Health. 2018;51(3):154-162.   Published online May 17, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.18.079
  • 7,006 View
  • 148 Download
  • 14 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Objectives
Early retirement occurs when one’s job satisfaction suffers due to employment mismatch resulting from factors such as inadequate compensation. Medical doctors report high levels of job stress and burnout relative to other professionals. These levels are highest among emergency physicians (EPs), and despite general improvements in their working conditions, early retirement continues to become more common in this population. The purpose of this study was to identify the factors influencing EPs intention to retire early and to develop a probability equation for its prediction.
Methods
A secondary analysis of data from the 2015 Korean Society of Emergency Physicians Survey was performed. The variables potentially influencing early retirement were organized into personal characteristics, extrinsic factors, and intrinsic factors. Logistic regression analysis was performed to identify risk factors and to develop a probability equation; these findings were then arranged in a nomogram.
Results
Of the 377 survey respondents included in the analysis, 48.0% intended to retire early. Risk factors for early retirement included level of satisfaction with the specialty and its outlook, slanderous reviews, emergency room safety, health status, workload intensity, age, and hospital type. Intrinsic factors (i.e., slanderous reviews and satisfaction with the specialty and its outlook) had a stronger influence on early retirement than did extrinsic factors.
Conclusions
To promote career longevity among EPs, it is vital to improve emergency room safety and workload intensity, to enhance medical professionalism through a stronger vision of emergency medicine, and to strengthen the patient-doctor relationship.
Summary

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Brief Report
The Pyramid of Injury: Estimation of the Scale of Adolescent Injuries According to Severity
Hyejin Han, Bomi Park, Bohyun Park, Namsoo Park, Ju Ok Park, Ki Ok Ahn, Yang Ju Tak, Hye Ah Lee, Hyesook Park
J Prev Med Public Health. 2018;51(3):163-168.   Published online May 23, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.18.027
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AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
Due to their developmental characteristics, adolescents have a higher probability than other age groups of experiencing injuries caused by accidents, violence, and intentional self-harm. The severity and characteristics of injuries vary by the intentionality and mechanism of injury; therefore, there is a need for a national-level estimate of the scale and the severity of injuries in adolescents that takes these factors into account.
Methods
By using data from the Emergency Department-based Injury In-depth Surveillance Data, National Emergency Department Information System, the Korean National Hospital Discharge In-depth Injury Survey, and cause of death statistics, we calculated the emergency department (ED) visit rate, hospitalization rate, and death rate of injuries per 100 000 adolescents for each injury mechanism. The calculated rates were used to generate the injury pyramid ratio (ratio of death rate to hospitalization rate to ED visit rate) to visualize the scale and the severity of the injury.
Results
The mortality rate in adolescents due to injury was 10/100 000; the corresponding rates for hospitalization and ED visits were 1623 and 4923, respectively, resulting in an injury pyramid ratio with the general pyramid form, with a 1:162:492 ratio of deaths to hospitalizations to ED visits. The mortality rate due to suicide/intentional self-harm was 5/100 000, while 35 were hospitalized for this reason and 74 made ED visits. The pyramid ratio of 1:7:15 for intentional self-harm/suicide showed a steep pyramidal form, indicating considerable lethality. The mortality rate due to motor vehicle collisions (MVCs) was 3/100 000; 586 were hospitalized for this reason, while 1023 made ED visits. The pyramid ratio of 1:195:341 for MVCs showed a gradual pyramid form, indicating that the lethality was low and the scale of injury was high.
Conclusions
The main categories of injuries in adolescents were visualized in pyramid form, contributing to an understanding of the scale of each injury by mechanism in terms of levels of death, hospitalization, and ED visits. These findings will be helpful for understanding how to prioritize injuries in adolescents.
Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
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    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2019; 16(22): 4581.     CrossRef

JPMPH : Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health