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Volume 50(5); September 2017
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Original Articles
A Survival Analysis of Gastric or Colorectal Cancer Patients Treated With Surgery: Comparison of Capital and a Non-capital City
Nam-Soo Hong, Kyeong Soo Lee, Sin Kam, Gyu Seog Choi, Oh Kyoung Kwon, Dong Hee Ryu, Sang Won Kim
J Prev Med Public Health. 2017;50(5):283-293.   Published online July 3, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.17.043
  • 5,819 View
  • 223 Download
  • 3 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Objectives
The objective of the present study was to compare prognosis of patients with gastric or colorectal cancer according to places where they received surgeries. Methods: The cancer patients underwent surgeries in sampled hospitals located in Daegu were matched 1:1 to the patients who visited sampled hospitals in Seoul using propensity score method. After the occurrences of death were examined, Kaplan-Meier method was used for survival analysis and the log-rank test was performed to compare the survival curves. Results: A total of six out of 291 gastric cancer patients who had surgeries in Daegu died (2.1%) and ten deaths (3.4%) occurred from patients went Seoul hospitals. Out of 84 gastric cancer patients who had chemotherapy after surgeries in Daegu, 13 (15.5%) patients died while 18 (21.4%) deaths occurred among patients underwent surgeries in Seoul. Six deaths (6.9%) out of 87 colorectal cancer patients who had surgeries in Daegu were reported. Five patients (5.7%) died among the patients underwent surgeries in Seoul. Among the colorectal cancer patients with chemotherapy after surgeries, 13 patients (12.4%) who visited hospitals in Daegu and 14 (13.3%) patients who used medical centers in Seoul died. There were no significant differences according to places where patients used medical services. Conclusions: The result of this study is expected to be used as basic data for policy making to resolve centralization problem of cancer patients and to help patients to make rational choices in selection of medical centers.
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  • Domestic medical travel from non-Seoul regions to Seoul for initial breast cancer treatment: a nationwide cohort study
    Jae Ho Jeong, Jinhong Jung, Hee Jeong Kim, Jong Won Lee, Beom-Seok Ko, Byung Ho Son, Kyung Hae Jung, Il Yong Chung
    Annals of Surgical Treatment and Research.2023; 104(2): 71.     CrossRef
  • MCR1 and KPC2 Co-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae Bacteremia: First Case in Korea
    Ji Young Park, Sang Taek Heo, Ki Tae Kwon, Do Young Song, Kwang Jun Lee, Ji Ae Choi
    Infection & Chemotherapy.2019; 51(4): 399.     CrossRef
  • The Effect of Residential Area and Hospital Bed Size on the Use of Hospital in Other Regions for Cancer Inpatients
    Sung-Soo Kim
    Journal of Health Informatics and Statistics.2018; 43(1): 18.     CrossRef
Level of Agreement and Factors Associated With Discrepancies Between Nationwide Medical History Questionnaires and Hospital Claims Data
Yeon-Yong Kim, Jong Heon Park, Hee-Jin Kang, Eun Joo Lee, Seongjun Ha, Soon-Ae Shin
J Prev Med Public Health. 2017;50(5):294-302.   Published online July 20, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.17.024
  • 6,722 View
  • 177 Download
  • 13 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
The objectives of this study were to investigate the agreement between medical history questionnaire data and claims data and to identify the factors that were associated with discrepancies between these data types. Methods: Data from self-reported questionnaires that assessed an individual’s history of hypertension, diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia, stroke, heart disease, and pulmonary tuberculosis were collected from a general health screening database for 2014. Data for these diseases were collected from a healthcare utilization claims database between 2009 and 2014. Overall agreement, sensitivity, specificity, and kappa values were calculated. Multiple logistic regression analysis was performed to identify factors associated with discrepancies and was adjusted for age, gender, insurance type, insurance contribution, residential area, and comorbidities. Results: Agreement was highest between questionnaire data and claims data based on primary codes up to 1 year before the completion of self-reported questionnaires and was lowest for claims data based on primary and secondary codes up to 5 years before the completion of self-reported questionnaires. When comparing data based on primary codes up to 1 year before the completion of self-reported questionnaires, the overall agreement, sensitivity, specificity, and kappa values ranged from 93.2 to 98.8%, 26.2 to 84.3%, 95.7 to 99.6%, and 0.09 to 0.78, respectively. Agreement was excellent for hypertension and diabetes, fair to good for stroke and heart disease, and poor for pulmonary tuberculosis and dyslipidemia. Women, younger individuals, and employed individuals were most likely to under-report disease. Conclusions: Detailed patient characteristics that had an impact on information bias were identified through the differing levels of agreement.
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    Yeon-Hee Baek, Yunha Noh, In-Sun Oh, Han Eol Jeong, Kristian B. Filion, Hyesung Lee, Ju-Young Shin
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  • Trajectory and determinants of agreement between parental and physicians' reports of childhood atopic dermatitis
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    Benjamin L. Smarr, Kirstin Aschbacher, Sarah M. Fisher, Anoushka Chowdhary, Stephan Dilchert, Karena Puldon, Adam Rao, Frederick M. Hecht, Ashley E. Mason
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  • Clinical outcomes of COVID-19 following the use of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin-receptor blockers among patients with hypertension in Korea: a nationwide study
    Ju Hwan Kim, Yeon-Hee Baek, Hyesung Lee, Young June Choe, Hyun Joon Shin, Ju-Young Shin
    Epidemiology and Health.2020; 43: e2021004.     CrossRef
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    Bélène Podmore, Andrew Hutchings, Sujith Konan, Jan van der Meulen
    BMC Medical Research Methodology.2019;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Yeon Young Cho, Sung-Il Cho
    Metabolism.2018; 85: 14.     CrossRef
  • Stroke at baseline of the Brazilian Longitudinal Study of Adult Health (ELSA-Brasil): a cross-sectional analysis
    Fernanda Gabriela de Abreu, Alessandra Carvalho Goulart, Marina Gabriela Birck, Isabela Martins Benseñor
    Sao Paulo Medical Journal.2018; 136(5): 398.     CrossRef
Socioeconomic Inequalities in the Oral Health of People Aged 15-40 Years in Kurdistan, Iran in 2015: A Cross-sectional Study
Ghobad Moradi, Ardavan Moinafshar, Hemen Adabi, Mona Sharafi, Farideh Mostafavi, Amjad Mohamadi Bolbanabad
J Prev Med Public Health. 2017;50(5):303-310.   Published online July 25, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.17.035
  • 6,570 View
  • 189 Download
  • 16 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
The aim of this study was to evaluate socioeconomic inequalities in the prevalence of dental caries among an urban population. Methods: This study was conducted among 2000 people 15-40 years of age living in Kurdistan, Iran in 2015. Using a questionnaire, data were collected by 4 trained dental students. The dependent variable was the decayed, missing, and filled teeth (DMF) index. Using principal component analysis, the socioeconomic status (SES) of families was determined based on their household assets. Inequality was measured using the concentration index; in addition, the Oaxaca analytical method was used to determine the contribution of various determinants to the observed inequality. Results: The concentration index for poor scores on the DMF index was -0.32 (95% confidence interval [CI], -0.40 to -0.36); thus, poor DMF indices had a greater concentration in groups with a low SES (p<0.001). Decomposition analysis showed that the mean prevalence of a poor DMF index was 43.7% (95% CI, 40.4 to 46.9%) in the least privileged group and 14.4% (95% CI, 9.5 to 9.2%) in the most privileged group. It was found that 85.8% of the gap observed between these groups was due to differences in sex, parents’ education, and the district of residence. A poor DMF index was less prevalent among people with higher SES than among those with lower SES (odds ratio, 0.31; 95% CI, 0.19 to 0.52). Conclusions: An alarming degree of SES inequality in oral health status was found in the studied community. Hence, it is suggested that inequalities in oral health status be reduced via adopting appropriate policies such as the delivery of oral health services to poorer groups and covering such services in insurance programs.
Summary

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  • The prevalence of seat belt use among drivers and passengers: a systematic review and meta-analysis
    Shiva Kargar, Alireza Ansari-Moghaddam, Hossein Ansari
    Journal of the Egyptian Public Health Association.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Utilization of dental care among adult populations: a scoping review of applied models
    Ashkan Negintaji Zardak, Mostafa Amini-Rarani, Ibrahim Abdollahpour, Faezeh Eslamipour, Bahareh Tahani
    BMC Oral Health.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Ramazan İNCİ, Veysel ERATİLLA
    İnönü Üniversitesi Sağlık Hizmetleri Meslek Yüksek Okulu Dergisi.2023; 11(3): 1816.     CrossRef
  • Investigation of the awareness status of HIV/AIDS and socioeconomic inequalities in women 15–54 years old in Iran: study of Iran’s Multiple Indicator Demographic and Health Survey (IrMIDHS)
    Ghobad Moradi, Elham Goodarzi, Ardeshir Khosravi, Farideh Mostafavi, Yousef Veisani
    Journal of Public Health.2021; 29(5): 1143.     CrossRef
  • Socioeconomic Inequality in Dental Caries Experience Expressed by the Significant Caries Index: Cross-Sectional Results From the RaNCD Cohort Study
    Moslem Soofi, Behzad Karami-Matin, Ali Kazemi-Karyani, Shahin Soltani, Hosein Ameri, Mehdi Moradi-Nazar, Farid Najafi
    International Dental Journal.2021; 71(2): 153.     CrossRef
  • Evaluating the quality of care for patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus based on the HbA1c: A national survey in Iran
    Ghobad Moradi, Azad Shokri, Amjad Mohamadi-Bolbanabad, Bushra Zareie, Bakhtiar Piroozi
    Heliyon.2021; 7(3): e06485.     CrossRef
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    Ghobad Moradi, Amjad Mohamadi Bolbanabad, Farman Zahir Abdullah, Hossein Safari, Satar Rezaei, Abbas Aghaei, Siros Hematpour, Salahaddin Farshadi, Nima Naleini, Bakhtiar Piroozi
    The International Journal of Health Planning and Management.2021; 36(5): 1861.     CrossRef
  • Inequality in dental care expenditure in Iranian households: analysis of income quintiles and educational levels
    Elahe Najafi, Mostafa Amini-Rarani, Maryam Moeeni
    BMC Oral Health.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Oral Health Behaviors among Schoolchildren in Western Iran: Determinants and Inequality


    Satar Rezaei, Halasa-Rappel Yara A.
    Clinical, Cosmetic and Investigational Dentistry.2020; Volume 12: 319.     CrossRef
  • Incidence and Intensity of Catastrophic Health-care Expenditure for Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Care in Iran: Determinants and Inequality


    Bakhtiar Piroozi, Amjad Mohamadi-Bolbanabad, Ghobad Moradi, Hossein Safari, Shahnaz Ghafoori, Yadolah Zarezade, Farzam Bidarpour, Satar Rezaei
    Diabetes, Metabolic Syndrome and Obesity: Targets and Therapy.2020; Volume 13: 2865.     CrossRef
  • Decomposing socioeconomic inequality in dental caries in Iran: cross-sectional results from the PERSIAN cohort study
    Farid Najafi, Satar Rezaei, Mohammad Hajizadeh, Moslem Soofi, Yahya Salimi, Ali Kazemi Karyani, Shahin Soltani, Sina Ahmadi, Enayatollah Homaie Rad, Behzad Karami Matin, Yahya Pasdar, Behrooz Hamzeh, Mehdi Moradi Nazar, Ali Mohammadi, Hossein Poustchi, Na
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  • Risk factors for tooth loss in community-dwelling Japanese aged 40 years and older: the Yamagata (Takahata) study
    Shigeo Ishikawa, Tsuneo Konta, Shinji Susa, Kenichiro Kitabatake, Kenichi Ishizawa, Hitoshi Togashi, Atsushi Tsuya, Yoshiyuki Ueno, Isao Kubota, Hidetoshi Yamashita, Takamasa Kayama, Mitsuyoshi Iino
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Hazardous Alcohol Use in 2 Countries: A Comparison Between Alberta, Canada and Queensland, Australia
Diana C. Sanchez-Ramirez, Richard Franklin, Donald Voaklander
J Prev Med Public Health. 2017;50(5):311-319.   Published online July 14, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.17.040
  • 7,529 View
  • 136 Download
  • 10 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
This article aimed to compare alcohol consumption between the populations of Queensland in Australia and Alberta in Canada. Furthermore, the associations between greater alcohol consumption and socio-demographic characteristics were explored in each population. Methods: Data from 2500 participants of the 2013 Alberta Survey and the 2013 Queensland Social Survey were analyzed. Regression analyses were used to explore the associations between alcohol risk and socio-demographic characteristics. Results: A higher rate of hazardous alcohol use was found in Queenslanders than in Albertans. In both Albertans and Queenslanders, hazardous alcohol use was associated with being between 18 and 24 years of age. Higher income, having no religion, living alone, and being born in Canada were also associated with alcohol risk in Albertans; while in Queenslanders, hazardous alcohol use was also associated with common-law marital status. In addition, hazardous alcohol use was lower among respondents with a non-Catholic or Protestant religious affiliation. Conclusions: Younger age was associated with greater hazardous alcohol use in both populations. In addition, different socio-demographic factors were associated with hazardous alcohol use in each of the populations studied. Our results allowed us to identify the socio-demographic profiles associated with hazardous alcohol use in Alberta and Queensland. These profiles constitute valuable sources of information for local health authorities and policymakers when designing suitable preventive strategies targeting hazardous alcohol use. Overall, the present study highlights the importance of analyzing the socio-demographic factors associated with alcohol consumption in population-specific contexts.
Summary

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  • Relationship between attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder and substance use among college students in southeastern Iran
    Mansoor Kodori, Sajjad Khosravi, Nadia Oroomiei, Maryam Abdoli, Morteza Ali Moradi, Tahereh Fani, Leili Abedi Gheshlaghi
    Journal of Substance Use.2023; : 1.     CrossRef
  • Predicting Hazardous Alcohol Drinking Behaviors in Family Members of Hazardous Alcohol-Drinker Patients
    Ching-Yen Chen, Chen-Chun Lin, Jung-Ta Kao, Wen-Ling Yeh, Chiao-Yun Lin, Yun-Fang Tsai
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2022; 19(9): 5497.     CrossRef
  • Alcohol use disorder and its associated factors among residents in Southern Ethiopia during the era of COVID-19
    Habtamu Endashaw Hareru, Abdene Weya Kaso, Berhanu Gidisa Debela, Lulu Abebe, Daniel Sisay W/tsadik, Reta Kassa Abebe, Chalachew Kassaw
    SAGE Open Medicine.2022; 10: 205031212211050.     CrossRef
  • Factors associated with alcohol use and abuse in Brazilian primary health care settings
    Tatiana Longo Borges, Ligiane Paula da Cruz de Sousa, Emilene Reisdorfer, Kelly Graziani Giacchero Vedana, Sandra Cristina Pillon, Adriana Inocenti Miasso
    Archives of Psychiatric Nursing.2021; 35(5): 486.     CrossRef
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    Kym Roberts, Ogilvie Thom, Susan Devine, Peter A. Leggat, Amy E. Peden, Richard C. Franklin
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    Yohannes Gebreegziabhere Haile, Kaleab Berhanu Kebede, Asnake Limenhe, Kassahun Habatmu, Atalay Alem
    Substance Abuse Treatment, Prevention, and Policy.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Behrad Pourmohammadi, Moahammad Ali Jalilvand
    AIMS Public Health.2019; 6(4): 523.     CrossRef
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  • Alcohol Consumption and Risky Drinking Patterns among College Students from Selected Countries of the Carpathian Euroregion
    Maria Zadarko-Domaradzka, Zbigniew Barabasz, Marek Sobolewski, Edyta Nizioł-Babiarz, Beata Penar-Zadarko, Agnieszka Szybisty, Emilian Zadarko
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High Level Physical Activity and Prevalence of Cardiovascular Disease Using the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey Data, 2007-2013
Kyounghoon Park, Byung-Joo Park
J Prev Med Public Health. 2017;50(5):320-327.   Published online September 5, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.17.073
  • 7,040 View
  • 223 Download
  • 1 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
The purpose of our study was to evaluate the association between the intensity of physical activity (PA) and prevalence of cardiovascular disease (CVD) using Korean representative data. Methods: We analyzed 39 804 participant data from the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 2007-2013. Exposure variable was three levels of PA (low, medium, and high) in a week, and outcome variable was prevalence of CVD based on patient self-recognition and doctor’s diagnosis. Complex logistic regression analysis was performed to evaluate the relationship between level of PA and CVD adjusted by body mass index, hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, diabetes mellitus, stress recognition, household income, smoking, and current drinking. The indices of association w ere estimated as crude prevalence odds ratio (POR), adjusted POR, and their 95% confidence interval (CI). All statistical analyzes were performed using complex sample analysis procedure of the SPSS version 23.0. Results: When all variables were adjusted, only high level PA in women showed a significant association with stroke (adjusted POR by patient’s self-recognition, 0.57; 95% CI, 0.32 to 0.99, adjusted POR by doctor’s diagnosis, 0.55; 95% CI, 0.34 to 0.87) and CVD (adjusted POR by doctor’s diagnosis, 0.68; 95% CI, 0.48 to 0.96). Conclusions: High level PA in women has a significant reverse association with prevalence of stroke and CVD in Korea. Further study for elucidating the mechanism will be needed.
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  • Role of regular physical activity in modifying cardiovascular disease risk factors among elderly Korean women
    Seunghui Baek, Youngmee Kim, Lorraine S. Evangelista
    IJASS(International Journal of Applied Sports Scie.2018; 30(1): 20.     CrossRef
Housing Conditions Contribute to Underweight in Children: An Example From Rural Villages in Southeast Sulawesi, Indonesia
Tasnim Tasnim, Gouranga Dasvarma, Lillian Mwanri
J Prev Med Public Health. 2017;50(5):328-335.   Published online September 7, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.17.046
  • 6,425 View
  • 198 Download
  • 4 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
The prevalence of underweight in children under 5 years of age is anomalously high in Konawe District, Southeast Sulawesi Province, Indonesia. This state of affairs may be related to poor housing conditions, such as limited access to clean water, the absence of a sanitary latrine, and the use of poor housing materials. Therefore, this study aimed to examine the effect of housing conditions on underweight in under-5 children in Konawe District. Methods: This study was conducted in 2013 in 5 health centres in Konawe District, Southeast Sulawesi Province, and used a case-control study design. The study recruited 400 under-5 children, including 100 of whom were cases and 300 of whom were age-matched controls (1:3). Cases were underweight children, while the controls were children with a normal nutritional status. The independent variables were the availability and types of water and latrine facilities and housing materials (roof, wall, and floor). The statistical analysis used Cox regression. Results: A lack of water availability (odds ratio [OR], 5.0; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.7 to 9.5; p<0.001), a lack of latrine availability in the home (OR, 2.5; 95% CI, 1.5 to 4.0; p<0.001), and poor-quality roofing materials (OR, 1.7; 95% CI, 1.1 to 2.7; p<0.02) significantly contributed to underweight in children. In contrast, the walls and the floors did not contribute to under-5 year children being underweight (p=0.09 and p=0.71, respectively). Conclusions: Sanitation facilities and roofing were identified as important factors to address in order to improve children’s nutritional status. Children’s health status was directly impacted by food intake via their nutritional status.
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  • Stunting incident prevention: a systematic literature review
    Fitri Rachmillah Fadmi, Kuntoro Kuntoro, Bambang Otok Widjanarko, Soenarnatalina Melaniani
    Journal of Public Health in Africa.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Ahmad Komarulzaman, Robi Andoyo, Zuzy Anna, Aisyah Amatul Ghina, Putri Riswani Halim, Herlina Napitupulu, Monica Ruth Karunia, Annisa Andriani
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    Ely Nurhidayati, Trida Ridho Fariz
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  • Demographic and Social-Economic Determinants of Malnutrition among Children (0-23 Months Old) in Kenya
    Teresia Mbogori, James Muriuki
    International Journal of Child Health and Nutrition.2021; 10(3): 80.     CrossRef
Using Focus Group Interviews to Analyze the Behavior of Users of New Types of Tobacco Products
Jinyoung Kim, Sungkyu Lee
J Prev Med Public Health. 2017;50(5):336-346.   Published online September 18, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.17.052
  • 16,283 View
  • 181 Download
  • 9 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
To characterize the usage patterns of new types of tobacco products (NTTPs) to develop effective strategies for the regulation of NTTPs in Korea. Methods: We conducted focus group interviews to identify the NTTP usage patterns of research subjects. The NTTPs were limited to electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes), waterpipe tobacco, and rolling tobacco. We categorized 30 research subjects into 4 groups. The e-cigarette group was divided into adult and adolescent groups. Each group contained 7-8 subjects. An interview lasting approximately 2 hours was conducted with each group. Results: Ninety percent of NTTP users used an NTTP in combination with conventional cigarettes. Subjects mostly bought NTTPs online, unlike how they bought cigarettes. Additionally, a great deal of information, such as how to use NTTPs and descriptions of NTTP products, was exchanged through online or offline societies. The primary reason why the subjects used NTTPs was that NTTPs offer a greater range of flavors and aromas than cigarettes. Moreover, NTTPs were felt to be less repulsive than cigarettes. NTTPs were not used as a cigarette substitute; rather, they were mostly used in places and situations where traditional cigarette smoking was not allowed. Conclusions: Based on the results of this study, the government should conduct studies on the effects of the combined use of NTTPs and cigarettes on the human body, obtain and provide accurate data regarding NTTP use, and develop and implement polices to ban NTTP advertising, which may arouse adolescents’ curiosity, and the addition of flavoring substances to tobacco products.
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  • Determinants of e-cigarette use among a sample of high school students in Jakarta, Indonesia
    Mouhamad Bigwanto, Mochamad Iqbal Nurmansyah, Elizabeth Orlan, Yoli Farradika, Tri Bayu Purnama
    International Journal of Adolescent Medicine and Health.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Caitlin Notley, Sarah Gentry, Sharon Cox, Martin Dockrell, Michelle Havill, Angela S. Attwood, Matthew Smith, Marcus R. Munafò
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    Hannah Smith, Mark Lucherini, Amanda Amos, Sarah Hill
    International Journal of Drug Policy.2021; 94: 103227.     CrossRef
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    Ara Cho, Jeonggyu Lee, YunJin Kim, Byung Mann Cho, Sang Yeoup Lee, Eunhee Kong, Minjeong Kim, Jinseung Kim, Dong Sik Jung, Seongho Han
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  • Impact of tobacco and/or nicotine products on health and functioning: a scoping review and findings from the preparatory phase of the development of a new self-report measure
    Esther F. Afolalu, Erica Spies, Agnes Bacso, Emilie Clerc, Linda Abetz-Webb, Sophie Gallot, Christelle Chrea
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JPMPH : Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health