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Volume 48(1); January 2015
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Review
Alcohol as a Risk Factor for Cancer: Existing Evidence in a Global Perspective
Nina Roswall, Elisabete Weiderpass
J Prev Med Public Health. 2015;48(1):1-9.   Published online January 27, 2015
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.14.052
  • 15,588 View
  • 306 Download
  • 12 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
The purpose of the present review is to give an overview of the association between alcohol intake and the risk of developing cancer. Two large-scale expert reports; the World Cancer Research Fund (WCRF)/American Institute of Cancer Research (AICR) report from 2007, including its continuous update project, and the International Agency for Research of Cancer (IARC) monograph from 2012 have extensively reviewed this association in the last decade. We summarize and compare their findings, as well as relate these to the public health impact, with a particular focus on region-specific drinking patterns and disease tendencies. Our findings show that alcohol intake is strongly linked to the risk of developing cancers of the oral cavity, pharynx, larynx, oesophagus, colorectum (in men), and female breast. The two expert reports diverge on the evidence for an association with liver cancer and colorectal cancer in women, which the IARC grades as convincing, but the WCRF/AICR as probable. Despite these discrepancies, there does, however, not seem to be any doubt, that the Population Attributable Fraction of alcohol in relation to cancer is large. As alcohol intake varies largely worldwide, so does, however, also the Population Attributable Fractions, ranging from 10% in Europe to almost 0% in countries where alcohol use is banned. Given the World Health Organization’s prediction, that alcohol intake is increasing, especially in low- and middle-income countries, and steadily high in high-income countries, the need for preventive efforts to curb the number of alcohol-related cancers seems growing, as well as the need for taking a region- and gender-specific approach in both future campaigns as well as future research. The review acknowledges the potential beneficial effects of small doses of alcohol in relation to ischaemic heart disease, but a discussion of this lies without the scope of the present study.
Summary

Citations

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  • Alcohol and Periodontal Disease: A Narrative Review
    Utsav H Gandhi, Amit Benjamin, Shreya Gajjar, Tanvi Hirani, Khushboo Desai, Bansariben B Suhagia, Rahnuma Ahmad, Susmita Sinha, Mainul Haque, Santosh Kumar
    Cureus.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Biosynthesis of anticancer phytochemical compounds and their chemistry
    Amandeep Dogra, Jitender Kumar
    Frontiers in Pharmacology.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Association of Healthy Diet and Physical Activity With Breast Cancer: Lifestyle Interventions and Oncology Education
    Tiantian Jia, Yufeng Liu, Yuanyuan Fan, Lintao Wang, Enshe Jiang
    Frontiers in Public Health.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Respiratory Tract Cancer Incidences across Industry Groups: A Nationwide Cohort Study with More Than 70 Million Person-Years of Follow-Up
    Seong-Uk Baek, Woo-Ri Lee, Ki-Bong Yoo, Jun-Hyeok Choi, Kyung-Eun Lee, Wanhyung Lee, Jin-Ha Yoon
    Cancers.2022; 14(21): 5219.     CrossRef
  • Cancer Incidence and Risk of Multiple Cancers after Environmental Asbestos Exposure in Childhood—A Long-Term Register-Based Cohort Study
    Sofie Bünemann Dalsgaard, Else Toft Würtz, Johnni Hansen, Oluf Dimitri Røe, Øyvind Omland
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2021; 19(1): 268.     CrossRef
  • Combining population projections with quasi-likelihood models: A new way to predict cancer incidence and cancer mortality in Austria up to 2030
    Johannes Klotz, Monika Hackl, Markus Schwab, Alexander Hanika, Daniela Haluza
    Demographic Research.2019; 40: 503.     CrossRef
  • Psychosocial Motivators for Moderate Drinking among Young Asian Flushers in Singapore
    Hye Kyung Kim, Rachel Lim Si En, Dorothy Wong Kang Min
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2019; 16(11): 1897.     CrossRef
  • My own personal hell: approaching and exceeding thresholds of too much alcohol
    Mark Burgess, Richard Cooke, Emma L. Davies
    Psychology & Health.2019; 34(12): 1451.     CrossRef
  • Nutrition and Breast Cancer: A Literature Review on Prevention, Treatment and Recurrence
    Paola De Cicco, Maria Valeria Catani, Valeria Gasperi, Matteo Sibilano, Maria Quaglietta, Isabella Savini
    Nutrients.2019; 11(7): 1514.     CrossRef
  • The Effect of Okra (Abelmoschus esculentus (L.) Moench) Seed Extract on Human Cancer Cell Lines Delivered in Its Native Form and Loaded in Polymeric Micelles
    Watcharaphong Chaemsawang, Weerapong Prasongchean, Konstantinos I. Papadopoulos, Garnpimol Ritthidej, Suchada Sukrong, Phanphen Wattanaarsakit
    International Journal of Biomaterials.2019; 2019: 1.     CrossRef
  • Colorectal Cancer and Alcohol Consumption—Populations to Molecules
    Marco Rossi, Ahmad Usman, Ali Keshavarzian, Faraz Bishehsari
    Cancers.2018; 10(2): 38.     CrossRef
  • Differential Expression of Prostaglandin I2 Synthase Associated with Arachidonic Acid Pathway in the Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma
    Anelise Russo, Patrícia M. Biselli-Chicote, Rosa S. Kawasaki-Oyama, Márcia M. U. Castanhole-Nunes, José V. Maniglia, Dalísio de Santi Neto, Érika C. Pavarino, Eny M. Goloni-Bertollo
    Journal of Oncology.2018; 2018: 1.     CrossRef
Original Articles
Respiratory Syncytial Virus Outbreak in the Basic Military Training Camp of the Republic of Korea Air Force
Won-Ju Park, Seok-Ju Yoo, Suk-Ho Lee, Jae-Woo Chung, Keun-Ho Jang, Jai-Dong Moon
J Prev Med Public Health. 2015;48(1):10-17.   Published online January 14, 2015
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.14.037
  • 9,833 View
  • 98 Download
  • 2 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
An outbreak of acute febrile illness occurred in the Republic of Korea Air Force boot camp from May to July 2011. An epidemiological investigation of the causative agent, which was of a highly infective nature, was conducted.
Methods
Throat swabs were carried out and a multiplex reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay was performed to identify possible causative factors.
Results
The mean age of patients who had febrile illness during the study period was 20.24 years. The multiplex RT-PCR assay identified respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) as the causative agent. The main symptoms were sore throat (76.0%), sputum (72.8%), cough (72.1%), tonsillar hypertrophy (67.9%), and rhinorrhea (55.9%). The mean temperature was 38.75°C and the attack rate among the recruits was 15.7% (588 out of 3750 recruits), while the mean duration of fever was 2.3 days. The prognosis was generally favorable with supportive care but recurrent fever occurred in 10.1% of the patients within a month.
Conclusions
This is the first epidemiological study of an RSV outbreak that developed in a healthy young adult group. In the event of an outbreak of an acute febrile illness of a highly infective nature in facilities used by a young adult group, RSV should be considered among the possible causative agents.
Summary

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  • Respiratory syncytial virus infection and the need for immunization in Korea
    Hye Young Kim, Ki Wook Yun, Hee Jin Cheong, Eun Hwa Choi, Hoan Jong Lee
    Expert Review of Vaccines.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • COVID-19 outbreak in a military unit in Korea
    Chanhee Kim, Young-Man Kim, Namwoo Heo, Eunjung Park, Sojin Choi, Sehyuk Jang, Nayoung Kim, Donghyok Kwon, Young-Joon Park, Byeongseop Choi, Beomman Ha, Kyounghwa Jung, Changbo Park, Sejin Park, Heeyoung Lee
    Epidemiology and Health.2021; 43: e2021065.     CrossRef
Civic Participation and Self-rated Health: A Cross-national Multi-level Analysis Using the World Value Survey
Saerom Kim, Chang-yup Kim, Myung Soon You
J Prev Med Public Health. 2015;48(1):18-27.   Published online January 27, 2015
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.14.031
  • 11,195 View
  • 144 Download
  • 4 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
Civic participation, that which directly influences important decisions in our personal lives, is considered necessary for developing a society. We hypothesized that civic participation might be related to self-rated health status.
Methods
We constructed a multi-level analysis using data from the World Value Survey (44 countries, n=50 859).
Results
People who participated in voting and voluntary social activities tended to report better subjective health than those who did not vote or participate in social activities, after controlling for socio-demographic factors at the individual level. A negative association with unconventional political activity and subjective health was found, but this effect disappeared in a subset analysis of only the 18 Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) countries. Moreover, social participation and unconventional political participation had a statistically significant contextual association with subjective health status, but this relationship was not consistent throughout the analysis. In the analysis of the 44 countries, social participation was of borderline significance, while in the subset analysis of the OECD countries unconventional political participation was a stronger determinant of subjective health. The democratic index was a significant factor in determining self-rated health in both analyses, while public health expenditure was a significant factor in only the subset analysis.
Conclusions
Despite the uncertainty of its mechanism, civic participation might be a significant determinant of the health status of a country.
Summary

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  • Effect of social capital, social support and social network formation on the quality of life of American adults during COVID-19
    Ebenezer Larnyo, Sharon Tettegah, Brianna Griffin, Jonathan Aseye Nutakor, Natasha Preece, Stephen Addai-Dansoh, Natalia Dubon, Senyuan Liu
    Scientific Reports.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • A bird's eye view of civic engagement and its facets: Canonical correlation analysis across 34 countries
    Kaitlyn Battershill, Victor Kuperman
    Journal of Civil Society.2023; 19(4): 437.     CrossRef
  • Welfare States and the Health Impact of Social Capital: Focusing on the Crowding-Out and Crowding-In Perspectives
    Naoki Akaeda
    Social Indicators Research.2021; 157(3): 841.     CrossRef
  • Depression Fully Mediates the Effect of Multimorbidity on Self-Rated Health for Economically Disadvantaged African American Men but Not Women
    Shervin Assari, James Smith, Mohsen Bazargan
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2019; 16(10): 1670.     CrossRef
Factors That Affect Suicidal Attempt Risk Among Korean Elderly Adults: A Path Analysis
Junsoo Ro, Jongheon Park, Jinsuk Lee, Hyemin Jung
J Prev Med Public Health. 2015;48(1):28-37.   Published online January 14, 2015
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.14.030
  • 11,658 View
  • 159 Download
  • 4 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
Among the Korean elderly (those 65 years of age and older), the suicide rate is 80.3/100 000 people, which is ten times higher than the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development average. Because South Korea is rapidly becoming an aging population, this high elderly suicidal rate will only get worse. Although the size of the elderly suicide problem is quite large, previous research in South Korea has surveyed restricted areas and not the entire country. Even though the factors that affect elderly suicide are complicated, there has been little research into these influencing factors. Thus, this research uses the national survey data (Community Health Survey) that was obtained in 2009. Additionally, we analyze factors affecting elderly suicidal ideation and attempts as well as the paths of these effects.
Methods
Community Health Survey data obtained by the Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in 2009 was used for this study. We additionally examined the factors that affect suicide with chi-squared tests, t-tests, Pearson’s correlation test, and path analysis.
Results
Depressive symptoms and suicidal ideation are the only factors that directly affect suicidal attempts. Demographic, behavioral, and physical activity factors have indirect effects on suicidal attempts.
Conclusions
Depression has the strongest influence on suicidal ideation and attempts. Demographic, behavioral, and physical activity factors affect suicidal attempts mostly through depressive symptoms. In addition, there is a path that suggests that demographic, behavioral, and physical activity factors affect suicidal attempts not through depression symptoms but only through suicidal ideation. This means that the elderly who do not have depression symptoms attempt suicide according to their own situations and characteristics.
Summary

Citations

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  • Socioeconomic factors associated with suicidal behaviors in South Korea: systematic review on the current state of evidence
    Nicolas Raschke, Amir Mohsenpour, Leona Aschentrup, Florian Fischer, Kamil J. Wrona
    BMC Public Health.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Suicidal Behavior Among Elderly Inpatients: its Relation to Functional Disability and Pain
    Suzaily Wahab, Tien Yong Chua, Rosdinom Razali, Zanariah Mat Saher, Iman Hakimi Zamzam, Mohamad Adam Bujang
    Psychology Research and Behavior Management.2022; Volume 15: 737.     CrossRef
  • Parks and green areas and the risk for depression and suicidal indicators
    Kyoung-bok Min, Hyun-Jin Kim, Hye-Jin Kim, Jin-young Min
    International Journal of Public Health.2017; 62(6): 647.     CrossRef
  • Prevalence and Predictive Factors of Depression in Community-Dwelling Older Adults in South Korea
    Jae Soon Yoo, Sun Ju Chang, Hyun Sook Kim
    Research and Theory for Nursing Practice.2016; 30(3): 200.     CrossRef
Gender Differences in Hypertension Control Among Older Korean Adults: Korean Social Life, Health, and Aging Project
Sang Hui Chu, Ji Won Baek, Eun Sook Kim, Katherine M. Stefani, Won Joon Lee, Yeong-Ran Park, Yoosik Youm, Hyeon Chang Kim
J Prev Med Public Health. 2015;48(1):38-47.   Published online January 14, 2015
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.14.043
  • 11,054 View
  • 136 Download
  • 3 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
Controlling blood pressure is a key step in reducing cardiovascular mortality in older adults. Gender differences in patients’ attitudes after disease diagnosis and their management of the disease have been identified. However, it is unclear whether gender differences exist in hypertension management among older adults. We hypothesized that gender differences would exist among factors associated with hypertension diagnosis and control among community-dwelling, older adults.
Methods
This cross-sectional study analyzed data from 653 Koreans aged ≥60 years who participated in the Korean Social Life, Health, and Aging Project. Multiple logistic regression was used to compare several variables between undiagnosed and diagnosed hypertension, and between uncontrolled and controlled hypertension.
Results
Diabetes was more prevalent in men and women who had uncontrolled hypertension than those with controlled hypertension or undiagnosed hypertension. High body mass index was significantly associated with uncontrolled hypertension only in men. Multiple logistic regression analysis indicated that in women, awareness of one’s blood pressure level (odds ratio [OR], 2.86; p=0.003) and the number of blood pressure checkups over the previous year (OR, 1.06; p=0.011) might influence the likelihood of being diagnosed with hypertension. More highly educated women were more likely to have controlled hypertension than non-educated women (OR, 5.23; p=0.013).
Conclusions
This study suggests that gender differences exist among factors associated with hypertension diagnosis and control in the study population of community-dwelling, older adults. Education-based health promotion strategies for hypertension control might be more effective in elderly women than in elderly men. Gender-specific approaches may be required to effectively control hypertension among older adults.
Summary

Citations

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  • Predictive Performance of Pender’s Health Promotion Model for Hypertension Control in Iranian Patients


    Fatemeh Gorbani, Hassan Mahmoodi, Parvin Sarbakhsh, Abdolreza Shaghaghi
    Vascular Health and Risk Management.2020; Volume 16: 299.     CrossRef
  • CHANGES OF LIFE QUALITY SCORE DEPENDING ON THE ARTERIAL HYPERTENSION DEGREE IN THE GENDER ASPECT
    O.A. Alifer
    Medical Science of Ukraine (MSU).2020; 16(2): 16.     CrossRef
  • Pathogenetic features of the combined course of arterial hypertension and diabetes mellitus 2 type
    O.M. Bilovol, L.R. Bobronnikova, O.V. Al-Trawneh
    Shidnoevropejskij zurnal vnutrisnoi ta simejnoi medicini.2017; 2017(1): 4.     CrossRef
Rates of Change to a Positive Result in Subsequent Screening Mammography in Korean Women: A Retrospective Observational Study
Jong-Myon Bae, Sang Yop Shin, Eun Hee Kim, Yoon-Nam Kim, Chung Mo Nam
J Prev Med Public Health. 2015;48(1):48-52.   Published online December 26, 2014
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.14.042
  • 9,614 View
  • 82 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
This retrospective cohort study aimed at calculating some parameters of changes in the findings of the subsequent screening mammography (SSM) in female Korean volunteers.
Methods
The study included screenees aged 30 to 79 years who underwent SSM voluntarily after testing negative in the baseline screenings performed between January 2007 and December 2011. A change to a positive result was defined as category 4 or 5 by using the American College of Radiology Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System. The proportion of results that had changed to positive (CP, %) was calculated by dividing the number of cases with results that were positive in the SSM by the total number of study participants. The rate of results that had changed to positive (CR, cases per 100 000 screenee-months) was calculated by dividing the number of cases with results that were positive in the SSM by the total number of months of the follow-up period.
Results
The overall CP and CR in all age groups (n=77 908) were 2.26% and 93.94 cases per 100 000 screenee-months, respectively. The median CP interval in the subjects who had positive SSM results was 30 to 36 months, while that in the age group of 30 to 39 years was shorter.
Conclusions
Different screening intervals should be considered among women aged between 30 and 59 years. In addition, a strategy for a screening program should be developed for the age group of 30 to 39 years, in particular.
Summary
A Survey on the Status of Hepatitis E Virus Infection Among Slaughterhouse Workers in South Korea
Byung-Seok Kim, Hyun-Sul Lim, Kwan Lee, Young-Sun Min, Young-Sil Yoon, Hye-Sook Jeong
J Prev Med Public Health. 2015;48(1):53-61.   Published online January 15, 2015
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.14.048
  • 8,653 View
  • 119 Download
  • 2 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
The seroprevalence of hepatitis E virus (HEV) among high-risk groups overseas is high, but studies in these groups are rare in South Korea. We conducted the present study from April to November 2012 to obtain data on the seroprevalence and associated risk factors for HEV among slaughterhouse workers in South Korea.
Methods
Slaughterhouse workers from 80 workplaces nationwide were surveyed in South Korea in 2012. The subjects comprised 1848 cases: 1434 slaughter workers and 414 residual products handlers. By visiting 80 slaughterhouses, which were mixed with 75 of which also performed residual products handling, we conducted a questionnaire survey for risk factors and obtained blood samples in order to determine the seropositivity and seroprevalence of HEV. Anti-HEV IgG and IgM were measured using HEV IgG and IgM enzyme-linked immunospecific assay kits and HEV antigen was measured by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR).
Results
The seropositivity of anti-HEV IgG was 33.5% (slaughter workers 32.8% and residual products handlers 36.2%), and among the seropositive individuals the seroprevalence of anti-HEV IgM was 0.5% (slaughter workers 0.5%, residual products handlers 0.7%). The response rate of HEV-antigen as measured by RT-PCR was 0.2%. Risk factors significantly related to anti-HEV IgG seropositivity were age, sex , and working duration (slaughter workers only).
Conclusions
There were significant risk factors (sex, age, and working duration) for HEV identified in our study. All three positive cases for HEV-antigen by RT-PCR were related to pig slaughter but without statistical significance. To prevent HEV, an educational program and working guidelines may be needed for high risk groups.
Summary

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  • Epidemiological Aspects of Hepatitis E Virus Infections between South Korea and Japan
    Myeong-Jin Lee, Won-Chang Lee, Young Hwan Kwon
    The Korean Journal of Aerospace and Environmental Medicine.2022; 32(1): 27.     CrossRef
  • Hepatitis E virus in professionally exposed: A reason for concern?
    Anna Mrzljak, Ivan Balen, Ljubo Barbic, Maja Ilic, Tatjana Vilibic-Cavlek
    World Journal of Hepatology.2021; 13(7): 723.     CrossRef
A Study of Mental Health Literacy Among North Korean Refugees in South Korea
Jin-Won Noh, Young Dae Kwon, Sieun Yu, Hyunchun Park, Jong-Min Woo
J Prev Med Public Health. 2015;48(1):62-71.   Published online January 16, 2015
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.14.040
  • 11,556 View
  • 168 Download
  • 3 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
This study aimed to investigate North Korean refugees’ knowledge of mental illnesses and treatments and analyze the factors affecting this knowledge.
Methods
Subjects were selected via a snowball sampling method, and the survey outcomes of 152 North Korean refugee participants were analyzed. The factors affecting knowledge of mental illnesses were analyzed via a regression analysis by constructing a multivariate model with mental illness knowledge score as the dependent variable.
Results
The North Korean refugees’ mental illness scores ranged from 3 to 24 points, with an average score of 13.0. Regarding the factors that influence mental illness knowledge, the subjects with South Korean spouses and those who had spent more time in South Korea had higher knowledge scores. Furthermore, the subjects who considered the mental health of North Korean refugees to be a serious issue revealed lower knowledge scores than those who did not believe it was a serious issue. The subjects who visit psychiatric clinics showed higher knowledge scores than those who do not. The South Korean subjects who had at least a college education exhibited higher scores than did those without advanced education. The subjects who are satisfied with life in South Korea manifested a higher mental illness knowledge score than those who are not.
Conclusions
This study is significant as being the first study to ever measure and evaluate the level of North Korean refugees’ knowledge of mental illnesses. In addition, the evaluations of North Korean refugees’ mental illness knowledge and influencing factors while residing in South Korea created basic data that formed the foundation of an effort to enhance mental health literacy and provide proper mental health services. The results of this study can be utilized to solve mental health problems that might frequently occur during the unification process of North and South Korea in the future.
Summary

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  • Üniversite öğrencilerinin ruh sağlığı okuryazarlık düzeyi: kesitsel bir çalışma
    Bediye ÖZTAŞ, Nursemin ÜNAL, Zeynep ÖLÇER, Ayşe ÇAL, Günay HAZİR
    TOGÜ Sağlık Bilimleri Dergisi.2023; 3(2): 198.     CrossRef
  • A Walk-In Clinic for Newly Arrived Mentally Burdened Refugees: The Patient Perspective
    Catharina Zehetmair, Valentina Zeyher, Anna Cranz, Beate Ditzen, Sabine C. Herpertz, Rupert Maria Kohl, Christoph Nikendei
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2021; 18(5): 2275.     CrossRef
  • The Mediator Role of Mental Health Literacy in the Relationship Between Demographic Variables and Health-Promoting Behaviours
    Azita Noroozi, Farzaneh Khademolhosseini, Hamideh Lari, Rahim Tahmasebi
    Iranian Journal of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences.2018;[Epub]     CrossRef

JPMPH : Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health