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Volume 42(1); January 2009
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Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Differential Parental Transmission of Markers in BCL3 among Korean Cleft Case-parent Trios.
Beyoung Yun Park, Jae Woong Sull, Jung Yong Park, Sun Ha Jee, Terri H Beaty
J Prev Med Public Health. 2009;42(1):1-4.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2009.42.1.1
  • 4,621 View
  • 46 Download
  • 14 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
Isolated cleft lip with or without cleft palate (CL/P) is among the most common human birth defects, with a prevalence of approximately 1 in 700 live births. The B-Cell Leukemia/lymphoma 3 (BCL3) gene has been suggested as a candidate gene for CL/P based on association and linkage studies in some populations. This study tests for an association between markers in BCL3 and isolated, non-syndromic CL/P using a case-parent trio design, while considering parent-of-origin effects. METHODS: Forty case-parent trios were genotyped for two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the BCL3 gene. We performed a transmission disequilibrium test (TDT) on individual SNPs, and the FAMHAP package was used to estimate haplotype frequencies and to test for excess transmission of multi-SNP haplotypes. RESULTS: The odds ratio for transmission of the minor allele, OR (transmission), was significant for SNP rs8100239 (OR=3.50, p=0.004) and rs2965169 (OR=2.08, p=0.027) when parent-of-origin was not considered. Parent-specific TDT revealed that SNP rs8100239 showed excess maternal transmission. Analysis of haplotypes of rs2965169 and rs8100239 also suggested excess maternal transmission. CONCLUSIONS: BCL3 appears to influence risk of CL/P through a parent-of-origin effect with excess maternal transmission.
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Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Genome-Wide Scan for Parent-of-Origin Effects in a sub-Saharan African Cohort With Nonsyndromic Cleft Lip and/or Cleft Palate (CL/P)
    Lord J. J. Gowans, Carissa L. Comnick, Peter A. Mossey, Mekonen A. Eshete, Wasiu L. Adeyemo, Thirona Naicker, Waheed A. Awotoye, Aline Petrin, Chinyere Adeleke, Peter Donkor, Tamara D. Busch, Olutayo James, Mobolanle O. Ogunlewe, Mary Li, Joy Olotu, Mohan
    The Cleft Palate-Craniofacial Journal.2022; 59(7): 841.     CrossRef
  • Association of nucleotide variants of GRHL3, IRF6, NAT2, SDC2, BCL3, and PVRL1 genes with nonsyndromic cleft lip with/without cleft palate in multigenerational families: A retrospective study
    PraveenKumar Neela, SrinivasReddy Gosla, Akhter Husain, Vasavi Mohan, Sravya Thumoju, BV Rajeshwari
    Contemporary Clinical Dentistry.2021; 12(2): 138.     CrossRef
  • Genetic Factors in Nonsyndromic Orofacial Clefts
    Mahamad Irfanulla Khan, Prashanth CS, Narasimha Murthy Srinath
    Global Medical Genetics.2020; 07(04): 101.     CrossRef
  • An integrated genomic-transcriptomic approach supports a role for the proto-oncogene BCL3 in atherosclerosis
    Giovanna Marchetti, Domenico Girelli, Carlotta Zerbinati, Barbara Lunghi, Simonetta Friso, Silvia Meneghetti, Matteo Coen, Teresa Gagliano, Giuseppe Guastella, Marie-Luce Bochaton-Piallat, Francesca Pizzolo, Francesco Mascoli, Giovanni Malerba, Matteo Bov
    Thrombosis and Haemostasis.2015; 113(03): 655.     CrossRef
  • Genomic expression in non syndromic cleft lip and palate patients: A review
    D. Mehrotra
    Journal of Oral Biology and Craniofacial Research.2015; 5(2): 86.     CrossRef
  • Variant of BCL3 gene is strongly associated with five-year survival of non-small-cell lung cancer patients
    Foteinos-Ioannis D. Dimitrakopoulos, Anna G. Antonacopoulou, Anastasia Kottorou, Stella Marousi, Ioulia Koukourikou, Melpomeni Kalofonou, Nikolaos Panagopoulos, Chrisoula Scopa, Dimitrios Dougenis, Helen Papadaki, Athanasios G. Papavassiliou, Haralabos P.
    Lung Cancer.2015; 89(3): 311.     CrossRef
  • Genetic risk factors for orofacial clefts in Central Africans and Southeast Asians
    Jane C. Figueiredo, Stephanie Ly, Haley Raimondi, Kathy Magee, James W. Baurley, Pedro A. Sanchez‐Lara, Ugonna Ihenacho, Caroline Yao, Christopher K. Edlund, David van den Berg, Graham Casey, Yves A. DeClerk, Jonathan M. Samet, William Magee
    American Journal of Medical Genetics Part A.2014; 164(10): 2572.     CrossRef
  • Genome‐wide approaches (GWA) in oral and craniofacial diseases research
    H Kim, S Gordon, R Dionne
    Oral Diseases.2013; 19(2): 111.     CrossRef
  • Male and female differential reproductive rate could explain parental transmission asymmetry of mutation origin in Hirschsprung disease
    Anne-Sophie Jannot, Jeanne Amiel, Anna Pelet, Francesca Lantieri, Raquel M Fernandez, Joke B G M Verheij, Merce Garcia-Barcelo, Stacey Arnold, Isabella Ceccherini, Salud Borrego, Robert M W Hofstra, Paul K H Tam, Arnold Munnich, Aravinda Chakravarti, Fran
    European Journal of Human Genetics.2012; 20(9): 917.     CrossRef
  • Gene Expression Changes in C57BL/6J and DBA/2J Mice Following Prenatal Alcohol Exposure
    Chris Downing, Stephen Flink, Maria L. Florez‐McClure, Thomas E. Johnson, Boris Tabakoff, Katerina J. Kechris
    Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research.2012; 36(9): 1519.     CrossRef
  • BCL3 gene role in facial morphology
    Baiba Lace, Inga Kempa, Janis Klovins, Janis Stavusis, Astrida Krumina, Ilze Akota, Biruta Barkane, Alexandre R. Vieira, Erika Nagle, Ieva Grinfelde, Ieva Maulina
    Birth Defects Research Part A: Clinical and Molecular Teratology.2012; 94(11): 918.     CrossRef
  • Microdeletion of Chromosome 15q24.3–25.2 and Orofacial Clefting
    Bindya Sing, Dongli Song, Glenn Desandre, Balaji Govindaswami, Scott Rosenthal, Shelly Gunn, Robert Wallerstein
    The Cleft Palate-Craniofacial Journal.2011; 48(5): 596.     CrossRef
  • MTHFR and MSX1 contribute to the risk of nonsyndromic cleft lip/palate
    Triin Jagomägi, Tiit Nikopensius, Kaarel Krjutškov, Veronika Tammekivi, Triin Viltrop, Mare Saag, Andres Metspalu
    European Journal of Oral Sciences.2010; 118(3): 213.     CrossRef
  • Parent‐of‐origin effects for MSX1 in a Chilean population with nonsyndromic cleft lip/palate
    José Suazo, José Luis Santos, Lilian Jara, Rafael Blanco
    American Journal of Medical Genetics Part A.2010; 152A(8): 2011.     CrossRef
Evaluation Studieses
The Socioeconomic Cost of Injuries in South Korea.
Kunhee Park, Jin Seok Lee, Yoon Kim, Yong Ik Kim, Jaiyong Kim
J Prev Med Public Health. 2009;42(1):5-11.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2009.42.1.5
  • 5,335 View
  • 60 Download
  • 10 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
This study was conducted to estimate the socioeconomic cost of injuries in South Korea. METHODS: We matched claims data from national health insurance, automobile insurance and industrial accident compensation insurance (IACI), and mortality data obtained from the national statistical office from 2001 to 2003 by patients' unique identifier. Socioeconomic cost included both direct cost and indirect cost: the direct cost was injury-related medical expenditure and the indirect cost included loss of productivity due to healthcare utilization and premature death. RESULTS: The socioeconomic cost of injuries in Korea was approximately 1.9% of the GDP from 2001 to 2003. That is, 12.1 trillion KRW (Korean Won) in 2001, 12.3 trillion KRW in 2002, and 13.7 trillion KRW in 2003. In 2003, direct medical costs were 24.6% (3.4 trillion KRW), the costs for loss of productivity by healthcare utilization were 13.0% (1.8 trillion KRW), and the costs for loss of productivity by premature death were 62.4% (8.6 trillion KRW). CONCLUSIONS: In this study, the socioeconomic cost of injuries in Korea between 2001 and 2003 was estimated by using not only health insurance claims data, but also automobile insurance, IACI claims and mortality data. We conclude that social efforts are required to reduce the socioeconomic cost of injuries in Korea, which represented approximately 1.9% of the GDP for the time period specified.
Summary

Citations

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  • Relationships between trauma death, disability, and geographic factors: a systematic review
    Bona Hwang, Taewook Jeong, Jiyeon Jo
    Clinical and Experimental Emergency Medicine.2023; 10(4): 426.     CrossRef
  • Positive correlation between regional emergency medical resources and mortality in severely injured patients: results from the Korean National Hospital Discharge In-depth Survey
    Hyo Jung Lee, Yeong Jun Ju, Eun-Cheol Park
    CJEM.2017; 19(06): 450.     CrossRef
  • Characteristics and Outcomes of Trauma Patients via Emergency Medical Services
    Dae Hyun Cho, Jae Gil Lee
    Journal of Trauma and Injury.2017; 30(4): 120.     CrossRef
  • Disability-Adjusted Life Years (DALYs) for Injuries Using Death Certificates and Hospital Discharge Survey by the Korean Burden of Disease Study 2012
    Won Kyung Lee, Dohee Lim, Hyesook Park
    Journal of Korean Medical Science.2016; 31(Suppl 2): S200.     CrossRef
  • Current status and future perspective of regional trauma center in Korea
    Kang Hyun Lee
    Journal of the Korean Medical Association.2016; 59(12): 917.     CrossRef
  • Characteristics of Korean Trauma Patients: A Single-center Analysis Using the Korea Trauma Database
    Youngeun Park, Min Chung, Gil Jae Lee, Min A Lee, Jae Jeong Park, Kang Kook Choi, Sung Youl Hyun, Yang Bin Jeon, Dae Sung Ma, Yong-Cheol Yoon, Jungnam Lee, Byungchul Yoo
    Journal of Trauma and Injury.2016; 29(4): 155.     CrossRef
  • Analysis of KTDB Registered Trauma Patients from a Single Trauma Center in Korea
    Byungchul Yu, Min Chung, Giljae Lee, Mina Lee, Jaejeong Park, Kangkook Choi, Sungyeol Hyun, Yangbin Jeon, Daesung Ma, Young-cheol Yoon, Jungnam Lee
    Journal of Trauma and Injury.2015; 28(3): 123.     CrossRef
  • The costs of hepatitis A infections in South Korea
    Kyohyun Kim, Baek-Geun Jeong, Moran Ki, Mira Park, Jin Kyung Park, Bo Youl Choi, Weon-Seob Yoo
    Epidemiology and Health.2014; 36: e2014011.     CrossRef
  • Multilevel Analysis on Factors Influencing Death and Transfer in Inpatient with Severe Injury
    Young Eun Choi, Kang Suk Lee
    Health Policy and Management.2013; 23(3): 233.     CrossRef
  • Trend of Mortality Rate and Injury Burden of Transport Accidents, Suicides, and Falls
    Ki Sook Kim, Soon Duck Kim, Sang Hee Lee
    Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health.2012; 45(1): 8.     CrossRef
Association between the Pattern of Prophylactic Antibiotic Use and Surgical Site Infection Rate for Major Surgeries in Korea.
Pilyong Sakong, Jin Seok Lee, Eun Jung Lee, Kwang Pil Ko, Cheol Hwan Kim, Yoon Kim, Yong Ik Kim
J Prev Med Public Health. 2009;42(1):12-20.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2009.42.1.12
  • 5,317 View
  • 89 Download
  • 15 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
The purpose of this study was to analyze the association between the pattern of prophylactic antibiotic use (PAU) and the surgical site infection (SSI) rate for major surgeries in Korea. METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of patients who underwent cardiac, colon and gastric surgery, hysterectomies and hip/knee replacements at 20 hospitals, and inclusive of over 500 beds. We randomly sampled 60 cases per surgery type for patients discharged between September and November, 2006. A total fo 2,924 cases were included in our analysis. Cox's proportional hazard analysis was conducted to evaluate the association between the pattern of PAU and SSI rate. RESULTS: The proportion of patients who received their first prophylactic antibiotics (PA) 1 hour before incision was 65.5%, who received inappropriate PAs was 80.8%, and the proportion of patients whose PA was discontinued within 24 hours of surgery was 0.5%. The average duration of PAU after surgery was 9 days. The relative risk (RR) of SSI in patients who received their first PA more than 1 hour before incision was significantly higher than for those who received it within 1 hour prior to incision (RR=8.20, 95% CI=4.81-13.99). Inappropriate PA selection increased SSI rate, albeit with marginal significance (RR=1.97, 95% CI=0.96-4.03). Also, prolonged PAU following surgery had no effect on SSI rate. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that the pattern of PAU in the surgeries examined was not appropriate. Errors in the timing of PAU and of PA selection increase SSI rate. SSI rate remained unaltered following prolonged PAU after surgery.
Summary

Citations

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  • The effect of first- and third-generation prophylactic antibiotics on hospitalization and medical expenditures for cardiac surgery
    Sung-Jin Bae, Inah Kim, Jaechul Song, Euy-Suk Chung
    Journal of Cardiothoracic Surgery.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Comparison of erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein in patients with distal radius fractures according to the prophylactic antibiotic period: 1 day versus 1 week
    Dae-Geun Kim, Byung Hoon Kwack
    Archives of Hand and Microsurgery.2022; 27(2): 149.     CrossRef
  • Influence of Duration of Prophylactic Antibiotics Therapy on Uncertainty of Recovery in Elective Laparoscopic Uterine Myomectomy Patients
    Mi Young Jung, Kyung-Yeon Park
    Journal of Korean Academy of Fundamentals of Nursing.2018; 25(4): 240.     CrossRef
  • Comparing the Postoperative Complications, Hospitalization Days and Treatment Expenses Depending on the Administration of Postoperative Prophylactic Antibiotics to Hysterectomy
    Mi Young Jung, Kyung-Yeon Park
    Korean Journal of Women Health Nursing.2017; 23(1): 42.     CrossRef
  • Factors affecting the rate of antibiotic prescription in dental practices
    Hyesung Kim, Myeng Ki Kim, Hyungkil Choi
    Journal of Korean Academy of Oral Health.2017; 41(1): 28.     CrossRef
  • Convergence Research on Periodic Changes in the Quality Assessment of Surgical Prophylactic Antibiotics
    Sae-Yie Yang, Kwang-Hwan Kim
    Journal of Digital Convergence.2016; 14(6): 325.     CrossRef
  • Risk Factors for Surgical Site Infections According to Electronic Medical Records Data
    Young Hee Kim, Young-Hee Yom
    Journal of Korean Academy of Fundamentals of Nursing.2014; 21(2): 151.     CrossRef
  • Appropriateness of Surgical Antibiotic Prophylaxis in a Tertiary Hospital
    Eun Young Nam, Hong Bin Kim, Hyunok Bae, Soyoung Moon, Sun Hee Na, Se Yong Kim, Doran Yoon, Ha Youn Lee, Joohae Kim, Chung-Jong Kim, Kyoung-Ho Song, Eu Suk Kim, Nam Joong Kim
    Korean Journal of Nosocomial Infection Control.2014; 19(2): 64.     CrossRef
  • Incidence and Risk Factors for Surgical Site Infection after Gastric Surgery: A Multicenter Prospective Cohort Study
    Su Jin Jeong, Hea Won Ann, Jae Kyung Kim, Heun Choi, Chang Oh Kim, Sang Hoon Han, Jun Yong Choi, Kyong Ran Peck, Cheol-In Kang, Joon-Sup Yeom, Young Hwa Choi, Seung-Kwan Lim, Young Goo Song, Hee Jung Choi, Hee Jung Yoon, Hyo-Youl Kim, Young-Keun Kim, Min
    Infection & Chemotherapy.2013; 45(4): 422.     CrossRef
  • Overview of Antibiotic Use in Korea
    Baek-Nam Kim
    Infection & Chemotherapy.2012; 44(4): 250.     CrossRef
  • The epidemiology and cost of surgical site infections in Korea: a systematic review
    Kil Yeon Lee, Kristina Coleman, Dan Paech, Sarah Norris, Jonathan T Tan
    Journal of the Korean Surgical Society.2011; 81(5): 295.     CrossRef
  • A Prospective Study of Single-Dose Antibiotic Prophylaxis in Live Donor Nephrectomy
    Ho Sung Jang, Kyung Hwa Choi, Seung Choul Yang, Woong Kyu Han
    Korean Journal of Urology.2011; 52(2): 115.     CrossRef
  • Association Between Prophylactic Antibiotic Use and Surgical Site Infection Based on Quality Assessment Data in Korea
    Kyoung Hoon Kim, Choon Seon Park, Jin Hee Chang, Nam Soon Kim, Jin Seo Lee, Bo Ram Choi, Byung Ran Lee, Kyoo Duck Lee, Sun Min Kim, Seon A Yeom
    Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health.2010; 43(3): 235.     CrossRef
  • Antimicrobial Prophylaxis Using a 2nd Generation Cephalosporin after Laparoscopic Colorectal Resection: A Randomized Trial of 1-day vs. 3-day
    Han Deok Kwak, Dong Jin Choi, Si Uk Woo, Jin Kim, Jun Won Um, Seon Hahn Kim
    Journal of the Korean Surgical Society.2010; 78(6): 385.     CrossRef
  • A Prospective, Multicenter, Randomized Trial for Duration of the Prophylactic Antibiotics after Elective Colorectal Surgery: 3 Days versus 5 Days
    Ji Won Park, Jae Hwan Oh, Hyo Seong Choi, Sang-Bum Yoo, Young-Ju Choe, Sohee Park, Jung Man Kim, Kang Young Lee, Seung Kook Sohn, Hae Ran Yun, Ho-Kyung Chun, Woo Yong Lee
    Journal of the Korean Society of Coloproctology.2010; 26(2): 123.     CrossRef
Association between Hypertension and Pulmonary Function in Rural Adults in Korea.
Joo Young Lee, Song Vogue Ahn, Dong Phil Choi, Mina Suh, Hyeon Chang Kim, Young Sam Kim, Il Suh
J Prev Med Public Health. 2009;42(1):21-28.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2009.42.1.21
  • 5,514 View
  • 77 Download
  • 6 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
Whilst hypertension exerts a negative effect on several organs there have been few studies regarding its effect on pulmonary function. The objective of this study was to examine the relationship between hypertension and pulmonary function in rural Korean adults. METHODS: In 2006, 2534 people were recruited, aged 40 to 70, in Kangwha County. We selected 1454 (male: 624, female: 830) participants whose pulmonary function results were repeatable. Blood pressure (BP) was measured twice and the average calculated. Participants were divided into two groups (hypertensive group and non-hypertensive group) in accordance with The Seventh Report of the Joint National Committee on Prevention, Detection, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Pressure. Pulmonary function was measured by dry rolling seal spirometry. Forced expiratory volume in the one second and forced vital capacity were converted into percent-predicted values based on average pulmonary function amongst Koreans. RESULTS: The number of hypertensive participants in the present study was 460 (male: 205, female: 255) and the number of non-hypertensive participants was 994 (male: 419, female: 575). Our findings have shown that the mean values for expiratory volume in the one second and forced vital capacity were significantly lower for hypertensive people than for non-hypertensive people, among women (P=0.002 for forced expiratory volume in the one second, P<0.001 for forced vital capacity volume). Odds ratio analysis revealed that hypertensive participants were more likely to have lower pulmonary function than non-hypertensive participants, again significantly among women. CONCLUSIONS: The pulmonary function of hypertensive women was significantly lower than that of non-hypertensive women aged 40-70.
Summary

Citations

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  • Comparison between Tai Chi and square dance on the antihypertensive effect and cardiovascular disease risk factors in patients with essential hypertension: a 12-week randomized controlled trial
    Zhi-Wei YAN, Zhen YANG, Jing-Hui YANG, Cheng-Lin SONG, Zhuang ZHAO, Yan GAO
    The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • The association between the metabolic syndrome and metabolic syndrome score and pulmonary function in non-smoking adults
    Hyun Yoon, Mi Young Gi, Ju Ae Cha, Chan Uk Yoo, Sang Muk Park
    Diabetes and Vascular Disease Research.2018; 15(2): 131.     CrossRef
  • Cardiovascular disease risk in people with spinal cord injury: is there a possible association between reduced lung function and increased risk of diabetes and hypertension?
    B F Köseoğlu, V B Safer, Ö Öken, S Akselim
    Spinal Cord.2017; 55(1): 87.     CrossRef
  • Association between changes in systolic blood pressure and incident diabetes in a community-based cohort study in Korea
    Seung Won Lee, Hyeon Chang Kim, Ju-mi Lee, Young Mi Yun, Joo Young Lee, Il Suh
    Hypertension Research.2017; 40(7): 710.     CrossRef
  • Association between stressful life events and resting heart rate
    Ju-Mi Lee, Hyeon Chang Kim, Jee In Kang, Il Suh
    BMC Psychology.2014;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Association Between Serum Uric Acid Level and Metabolic Syndrome
    Ju-Mi Lee, Hyeon Chang Kim, Hye Min Cho, Sun Min Oh, Dong Phil Choi, Il Suh
    Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health.2012; 45(3): 181.     CrossRef
C-reactive Protein and Carotid Intima-media Thickness in a Population of Middle-aged Koreans.
Mina Suh, Joo Young Lee, Song Vogue Ahn, Hyeon Chang Kim, Il Suh
J Prev Med Public Health. 2009;42(1):29-34.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2009.42.1.29
  • 5,222 View
  • 55 Download
  • 3 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
This study was performed to evaluate the relationship between C-reactive protein (CRP) and carotid intima-media thickness (carotid IMT) in a population of middle-aged Koreans. METHODS: A total of 1,054 men and 1,595 women (aged 40-70 years) from Kanghwa County, Korea, were chosen for the present study between 2006 and 2007. We measured high-sensitivity CRP and other major cardiovascular risk factors including anthropometrics, blood pressure, blood chemistry, and carotid ultrasonography. Health related questionnaires were also completed by each study participant. Carotid IMT value was determined by the maximal IMT at each common carotid artery. The relationship between CRP level and carotid IMT was assessed using multiple linear and logistic regression models after adjustment for age, body mass index, menopause (women), systolic blood pressure, total/HDL cholesterol ratio, triglyceride level, fasting glucose, smoking, and alcohol consumption. RESULTS: Mean carotid IMT values from the lowest to highest quartile of CRP were 0.828, 0.873, 0.898, and 0.926 mm for women (p for trend<0.001), and 0.929, 0.938, 0.949, and 0.979 mm for men (p for trend=0.032), respectively. After adjustment for major cardiovascular risk factors, the relationship between CRP and carotid IMT was significant in women (p for trend=0.017), but not in men (p for trend=0.798). Similarly, adjusted odds ratio of increased IMT, defined as the sex-specific top quartile, for the highest versus lowest CRP quartiles was 1.55 (95% CI=1.06-2.26) in women, but only 1.05 (95% CI=0.69-1.62) in men. CONCLUSIONS: CRP and carotid IMT levels appear to be directly related in women, but not in men.
Summary

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  • Hematocrit Values Predict Carotid Intimal-Media Thickness in Obese Patients With Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: A Cross-Sectional Study
    Giovanni Tarantino, Luigi Barrea, Domenico Capone, Vincenzo Citro, Teresa Mosca, Silvia Savastano
    Frontiers in Endocrinology.2018;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Ju-Mi Lee, Hyeon Chang Kim, Hye Min Cho, Sun Min Oh, Dong Phil Choi, Il Suh
    Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health.2012; 45(3): 181.     CrossRef
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    Manuel A Gomez-Marcos, Jose I Recio-Rodríguez, Maria C Patino-Alonso, Cristina Agudo-Conde, Leticia Gomez-Sanchez, Emiliano Rodriguez-Sanchez, Marta Gomez-Sanchez, Vicente Martinez-Vizcaino, Luis Garcia-Ortiz
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English Abstract
Subjective Satisfaction with Medical Care among Older People: Comprehensiveness, General Satisfaction and Accessibility.
Hwa Joon Kim, Young Koh, Eun Jeong Chun, Soong Nang Jang, Chang Yup Kim
J Prev Med Public Health. 2009;42(1):35-41.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2009.42.1.35
  • 4,630 View
  • 46 Download
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AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
The changing population age structure and rapidly increasing medical costs make providing high-quality, effective medical care for the elderly a challenge. This study assessed the satisfaction with medical care in terms of comprehensiveness, general satisfaction, and accessibility among community-dwelling Korean elders. METHODS: Data were obtained from a nationwide representative sample of the older adults(aged 65 years old or older) living in the community, who participated in a 2006 telephone survey conducted using random digit dialing (n=881). General satisfaction, comprehensiveness and accessibility were measured using a 10-item satisfaction survey questionnaire. Descriptive analysis was used to assess the distribution of each of three components of subjective satisfaction. Analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) was used to examine the association of each of the three components with socioeconomic variables. RESULTS: Comprehensiveness and general satisfaction were low among older people with a high socioeconomic status. Accessibility was evaluated as low among older people of low socioeconomic status, those living in rural areas and those who were medical aid beneficiaries. CONCLUSIONS: Urgent interventions should be considered in order to improve accessibility to medical care for elders of low socioeconomic status and those living in rural communities. Given the rapid aging of the population, we need to develop a monitoring system to improve the quality of geriatric care.
Summary

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    Yanyan Gao, Zao Li
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    Kye-Hyun Kim, Eun-Cheol Park, Myung-Il Hahm
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    Gyeong-Jin Choi, Keon-Yeop Kim, Duck-Hee Lee, Chang-Hyun Han, Se-Mook Choi
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    Mayvor Ström, Amir Baigi, Cathrine Hildingh, Bengt Mattsson, Bertil Marklund
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Evaluation Studieses
The Factors Implicated When an Individual Starts to Smoke Again After a 6 Month Cessation.
Hyo Kyung Son, Un Young Jung, Ki Soo Park, Sin Kam, Sun Kyun Park, Won Kee Lee
J Prev Med Public Health. 2009;42(1):42-48.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2009.42.1.42
  • 4,850 View
  • 67 Download
  • 12 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
This study was conducted to examine the factors implicated when people start smoking again after a 6 month cessation, and was carried out at the smoking cessation clinic of a public health center. METHODS: The study subjects were 191 males who had attended the smoking cessation clinic of a public health center for 6 months in an attempt to quit smoking. Data was collected, by phone interview, regarding individual smoking habits, if any, over the 6 month study period. The factors which may have caused an individual to smoke again were examined. This study employed a health belief model as it theoretical basis. RESULTS: Following a 6 month cessation, 24.1% of the study group began to smoke again during the 6 month test period. In a simple analysis, the factors related to individuals relapsing and smoking again included barriers of stress reduction, body weight gain and induction of smoking by surroundings among perceived barriers factor of our health belief model (p<0.05). In multiple logistic regression analysis for relapsed smoking, significant factors included barriers of stress reduction and induction of smoking by surroundings (p<0.05). The most important reason of for an individual to relapse into smoking was stress (60.9%) and the most likely place for a relapse to occur was a drinking establishment (39.1%). CONCLUSIONS: Our results indicate that both regular consultations and a follow-up management program are important considerations in a public health center program geared towards maintaining smoking cessation.
Summary

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    Jina Jung, Hae-Sung Nam
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Usefulness of Comorbidity Indices in Operative Gastric Cancer Cases.
Se Min Hwang, Seok Jun Yoon, Hyeong Sik Ahn, Hyong Gin An, Sang Hoo Kim, Min Ho Kyeong, Eun Kyoung Lee
J Prev Med Public Health. 2009;42(1):49-58.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2009.42.1.49
  • 5,153 View
  • 69 Download
  • 8 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
The purpose of the current study was to evaluate the usefulness of the following four comorbidity indices in gastric cancer patients who underwent surgery: Charlson Comorbidity Index (CCI), Cumulative Illness rating scale (CIRS), Index of Co-existent Disease (ICED), and Kaplan-Feinstein Scale (KFS). METHODS: The study subjects were 614 adults who underwent surgery for gastric cancer at K hospital between 2005 and 2007. We examined the test-retest and inter-rater reliability of 4 comorbidity indices for 50 patients. Reliability was evaluated with Spearman rho coefficients for CCI and CIRS, while Kappa values were used for the ICED and KFS indices. Logistic regression was used to determine how these comorbidity indices affected unplanned readmission and death. Multiple regression was used for determining if the comorbidity indices affected length of stay and hospital costs. RESULTS: The test-retest reliability of CCI and CIRS was substantial (Spearman rho=0.746 and 0.775, respectively), while for ICED and KFS was moderate (Kappa=0.476 and 0.504, respectively). The inter-rater reliability of the CCI, CIRS, and ICED was moderate (Spearman rho=0.580 and 0.668, and Kappa=0.433, respectively), but for KFS was fair (Kappa=0.383). According to the results from logistic regression, unplanned readmissions and deaths were not significantly different between the comorbidity index scores. But, according to the results from multiple linear regression, the CIRS group showed a significantly increased length of hospital stay (p<0.01). Additionally, CCI showed a significant association with increased hospital costs (p<0.01). CONCLUSIONS: This study suggests that the CCI index may be useful in the estimation of comorbidities associated with hospital costs, while the CIRS index may be useful where estimatation of comorbiditie associated with the length of hospital stay are concerned.
Summary

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  • Impact of comorbidity assessment methods to predict non-cancer mortality risk in cancer patients: a retrospective observational study using the National Health Insurance Service claims-based data in Korea
    Sanghee Lee, Yoon Jung Chang, Hyunsoon Cho
    BMC Medical Research Methodology.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Seok-Jun Yoon, Eun-Jung Kim, Hyun-Ju Seo, In-Hwan Oh
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    Ho Kim, Key Hyeon Kim, Ji Won Kim, Yong Jeoung, Yang Jae Yoo, Moon Kyung Joo, Beom Jae Lee, Ji Hoon Kim, Jong Eun Yeon, Jong-Jae Park, Kwan Soo Byun, Young Tae Bak, Sang Woo Lee
    The Korean Journal of Helicobacter and Upper Gastrointestinal Research.2014; 14(1): 39.     CrossRef
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    Hyun-Chul Shin, Se-Ra Kim
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  • Charlson Comorbidity Index as a Predictor of Long-Term Survival after Surgery for Breast Cancer: A Nationwide Retrospective Cohort Study in South Korea
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    Se-Won Kim, Seok-Jun Yoon, Min-Ho Kyung, Young-Ho Yun, Young-Ae Kim, Eun-Jung Kim
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    Dong-Koog Son, Kyu-Sik Lee, Jong-Ku Park, Sang-Baek Koh, Ki-Nam Jin, Eun-Woo Nam, Hae-Jong Lee
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English Abstract
Predictors of Current Smoking among Male Students in a Technical High School: A Prospective Study.
Jong Yeon Kim, Soon Woo Park
J Prev Med Public Health. 2009;42(1):59-66.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2009.42.1.59
  • 4,691 View
  • 32 Download
  • 6 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
This study was performed using a longitudinal approach to explore the predictors for current smoking among male high school students. METHODS: Baseline data was collected in May 2004 through a self-administrated questionnaire completed by 607 male students in a technical high school in Daegu city, Korea. Subsequently, their smoking behaviors were followed one year after. Among the 544 followed participants, data for 439 non-smokers in the first year was used in longitudinal analysis. Current smokers were defined as those respondents who had smoked one or more cigarettes within the 30 days preceding the survey. Several potential predictors for smoking were investigated including smoking history (never, experimental, former smoker), sociodemographic factors, environmental factors, attitudes toward smoking, and behavioral factors. Logistic regression was used to predict smoking with SPSS ver. 12.0. RESULTS: According to multiple logistic regression analysis, those students who were more likely to smoke after one year were former smokers (OR: 2.12, 95% CI=1.01-4.44), current drinkers (OR: 2.55, 95% CI=1.33-4.89), who had four or five smokers among five best friends (OR: 3.43. 95% CI=1.14-10.30). In addition, those who had smokers among family members besides parents or siblings (OR: 1.66, 95% CI=0.92-2.98), exhibited a high level of subjective stress (OR: 1.77, 95% CI=0.96-3.26), or had a very good relationship with friends (OR: 1.93, 95% CI=0.99-3.75) were also more likely to smoke albeit with marginal statistical significance (p<0.1). CONCLUSIONS: A smoking prevention program aimed at high school students may be more effective with due consideration of the predictors highlighted in this study. However, further studies with larger sample size and various target populations are necessary to find potential predictors not found in this study but suggested in other longitudinal studies.
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  • The Causes and Courses of Nonviolent and Violent Delinquency among South Korean Adolescents
    Trent Bax, Vladimir Hlasny
    Deviant Behavior.2019; 40(7): 816.     CrossRef
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    Junghee Kim, Sunhee Park
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    Eun Su Do, Eunsuk Choi
    Journal of Korean Academy of Nursing.2017; 47(2): 211.     CrossRef
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    Jun Hyun Hwang, Soon-Woo Park
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    Jun Sung Hong, Na Youn Lee, Andrew Grogan-Kaylor, Hui Huang
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    Eunjeong Kang, Jaehee Lee
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Evaluation Studies
Explaining Cancer Incidence in the Jejudo Population.
Jong Myon Bae
J Prev Med Public Health. 2009;42(1):67-72.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2009.42.1.67
  • 4,964 View
  • 36 Download
  • 4 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
Using the population-based cancer registry in Jejudo, we found that Jejudo had lower incidence in stomach cancer than other regions in Korea. The aim of this study was to evaluate reasons for this difference. METHODS: Citrus is the leading agricultural production in Jejudo, suggesting that lower cancer incidence in Jejudo could be explained by citrus fruit intake. We evaluated this hypothesis with quantitative systematic review (QSR). RESULTS: Stomach cancer incidence was significantly lower, with a summary odds ratio (SOR) after QSR of 0.72 [95% CI=0.64-0.81]. In addition, the SOR of pancreatic cancer tended to be lower at 0.83 [95% CI=0.70-0.98]. The SOR of prostate cancer was slightly higher at 1.03 [0.89-1.19]. CONCLUSIONS: Quantitative systematic reviews for the effect of citrus fruit intake on cancer occurrence suggested that lower cancer incidence in Jejudo could be explained by intake of citrus fruits.
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    Weon-Young Chang
    Journal of the Korea Academia-Industrial cooperation Society.2015; 16(2): 1292.     CrossRef
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    Jong-Myon Bae
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    Jung-Kook Song, Jong-Myon Bae
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    Sanggon Lee, Jehyeon Ra, Ju-Young Song, ChangHo Gwak, Ha-Jeong Kwon, Sung-Vin Yim, Seon-Pyo Hong, Jinju Kim, Kun-Hee Lee, Jeong-Je Cho, Yong Seek Park, Cheung-Seog Park, Hyun-Jong Ahn
    Journal of Ethnopharmacology.2011; 133(3): 973.     CrossRef

JPMPH : Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health