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Jong-Heon Park 3 Articles
The Effect of Sleep Duration on the Risk of Unintentional Injury in Korean Adults
Yeon-Yong Kim, Un-Na Kim, Jin-Seok Lee, Jong-Heon Park
J Prev Med Public Health. 2014;47(3):150-157.   Published online May 30, 2014
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2014.47.3.150
  • 11,083 View
  • 90 Download
  • 6 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives

The decrease or increase in sleep duration has recently been recognized as a risk factor for several diseases, including hypertension and obesity. Many studies have explored the relationship of decreased sleep durations and injuries, but few have examined the relationship between increased sleep duration and injury. The objective of this research is to identify the risk for injury associated with both decreased and increased sleep durations.

Methods

Data from the 2010 Community Health Survey were used in this study. We conducted logistic regression with average sleep duration as the independent variable, injury as a dependent variable, and controlling for age, sex, occupation, education, region (cities and provinces), smoking, alcohol use, body mass index, hypertension, diabetes, arthritis, and depression. Seven categories of sleep duration were established: ≤4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, and ≥10 hours.

Results

Using 7 hours of sleep as the reference, the adjusted injury risk (odds ratio) for those sleeping a total of ≤4 h/d was 1.53; 1.28 for 5 hours, for 1.11 for 6 hours, 0.98 for 8 hours, 1.12 for 9 hours, and 1.48 for ≥10 hours. The difference in risk was statistically significant for each category except for the 8 and 9 hours. In this study, risk increased as the sleep duration decreased or increased, except for the 8 and 9 hours.

Conclusions

This research found that either a decrease or increase in sleep duration was associated with an increased risk for injury. The concept of proper sleep duration can be evaluated by its associated injury risk.

Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Musculoskeletal injuries in UK Service Personnel and the impact of in-theatre rehabilitation during Cold Weather Warfare training: Exercise CETUS 2020
    David H Ferraby, D Hayhurst, R Strachan, H Knapman, S Wood, J L Fallowfield
    BMJ Military Health.2023; 169(6): 517.     CrossRef
  • Prevalence and behavioural associations of unintentional injuries among Chinese college students: a 50-University population-based study
    Dan Wu, Tingzhong Yang, Randall R Cottrell, Huan Zhou, Xueying Feng
    Injury Prevention.2019; 25(1): 52.     CrossRef
  • Association of physical activity, sedentary time, and sleep duration on the health-related quality of life of college students in Northeast China
    Yinjian Ge, Shimeng Xin, Dechun Luan, Zhili Zou, Mengting Liu, Xue Bai, Qian Gao
    Health and Quality of Life Outcomes.2019;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Risk factors for unintentional injuries among the rural elderly: a county-based cross-sectional survey
    Hongping Zhang, Feng Wei, Mo Han, Jianquan Chen, Songxu Peng, Yukai Du
    Scientific Reports.2017;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Unintentional Injuries among Psychiatric Outpatients with Major Depressive Disorder
    Ching-I Hung, Chia-Yih Liu, Ching-Hui Yang, Yinglin Xia
    PLOS ONE.2016; 11(12): e0168202.     CrossRef
  • The Effect of Sleep Duration and Relief of Fatigue after Sleep on the Risk of Injury at School among Korean Adolescents
    Jungok Yu, Jungsoon Kim
    Journal of Korean Academy of Community Health Nursing.2015; 26(2): 100.     CrossRef
The Relationship Between the Social Network of Community-living Elders and Their Health-related Quality of Life in Korean Province
Jun Tae Lim, Jong-Heon Park, Jin-Seok Lee, Juhwan Oh, Yoon Kim
J Prev Med Public Health. 2013;46(1):28-38.   Published online January 31, 2013
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2013.46.1.28
  • 11,411 View
  • 121 Download
  • 11 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives

This study aimed to collect information that will help enhance the social networks and improve the quality of life among elderly people by observing the relationship between their social network and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and by analyzing social network factors affecting HRQoL.

Methods

This study was based on the 2008 Community Health Survey in Yeoncheon County. Three hundred elders were included in the study population. We compared the revised Lubben Social Network Scale (LSNS-R) score and Euro quality of life-5 dimensions health status index by demographic characteristics and chronic disease prevalence. We analyzed the data using multiple regression and tobit regression by setting the HRQoL as the dependent variable and social network and other characteristics as the independent variables. We analyzed social network factors by using factor analysis.

Results

The LSNS-R score differed significantly according to age and existence of a spouse. According to the results from the hierarchical multiple regression analysis, the LSNS-R explained 0.10 of the variance and LSNS-R friends factor explained 0.10 of the variance. The tobit regression indicated that the contribution of the LSNS-R family size factor to the regression coefficient of the independent variable that affected the HRQoL was BT=2.96, that of the LSNS-R family frequency factor was BT=3.60, and that of LSNS-R friends factor was BT=5.41.

Conclusions

Social networks among elderly people had a significant effect on HRQoL and their networks of friends had a relatively higher effect than those of family members.

Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • COVID-19: social isolation, social support, and depression among rural older adults
    Jung Sim Jun, Kyoung Hag Lee, Joyce Baptist, Arely Yanez, April Zimmermann
    Social Work in Mental Health.2024; : 1.     CrossRef
  • Quality of Life and Multilevel Contact Network Structures Among Healthy Adults in Taiwan: Online Participatory Cohort Study
    Tso-Jung Yen, Ta-Chien Chan, Yang-Chih Fu, Jing-Shiang Hwang
    Journal of Medical Internet Research.2022; 24(1): e23762.     CrossRef
  • The Effectiveness of Predicting Suicidal Ideation through Depressive Symptoms and Social Isolation Using Machine Learning Techniques
    Sunhae Kim, Kounseok Lee
    Journal of Personalized Medicine.2022; 12(4): 516.     CrossRef
  • Validity and reliability of the Lubben Social Network Scale-Revised (LSNS-R) on older adults in Turkey
    Nilgün Kuru Alici, Bilge Kalanlar
    Current Psychology.2021; 40(1): 21.     CrossRef
  • Information and Communication Technology Use, Social Support, and Life Satisfaction among Korean Immigrant Elders
    Jung Sim Jun, Colleen Galambos, Kyoung Hag Lee
    Journal of Social Service Research.2021; 47(4): 537.     CrossRef
  • Structural Social Support and Changes in Depression During the Retirement Transition: “I Get by With a Little Help from My Friends”
    Ben Lennox Kail, Dawn C Carr, Deborah Carr
    The Journals of Gerontology: Series B.2020; 75(9): 2040.     CrossRef
  • Association of Formal and Informal Social Support With Health-Related Quality of Life Among Chinese Rural Elders
    Shan Lu, Yupan Wu, Zongfu Mao, Xiaohui Liang
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2020; 17(4): 1351.     CrossRef
  • Health-related quality of life and associated factors in functionally independent older people
    Mónica Machón, Isabel Larrañaga, Miren Dorronsoro, Kalliopi Vrotsou, Itziar Vergara
    BMC Geriatrics.2017;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Social participation as an indicator of successful aging: an overview of concepts and their associations with health
    Heather Douglas, Andrew Georgiou, Johanna Westbrook
    Australian Health Review.2017; 41(4): 455.     CrossRef
  • Factors Affecting the Health-Related Quality of Life of Community-Dwelling Elderly in Japan: A Focus on Spirituality
    Minako Kobayashi, Eiji Marui
    Health.2017; 09(07): 1095.     CrossRef
  • Predictors of Long-Term Care Facility Residents’ Self-Reported Quality of Life With Individual and Facility Characteristics in Canada
    Vahe Kehyayan, John P. Hirdes, Suzanne L. Tyas, Paul Stolee
    Journal of Aging and Health.2016; 28(3): 503.     CrossRef
Differences in Obesity Rates Between People With and Without Disabilities and the Association of Disability and Obesity: A Nationwide Population Study in South Korea
Moo-Kyung Oh, Hyeongap Jang, Yong-Ik Kim, Belong Jo, Yoon Kim, Jong-Heon Park, Jin-Seok Lee
J Prev Med Public Health. 2012;45(4):211-218.   Published online July 31, 2012
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2012.45.4.211
  • 8,910 View
  • 70 Download
  • 11 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives

The objective of this study was to identify the differences in obesity rates among people with and without disabilities, and evaluate the relationship between obesity rates and the existence of disabilities or characteristics of disabilities.

Methods

Mass screening data from 2008 from the National Disability Registry and National Health Insurance (NHI) are used. For analysis, we classified physical disability into three subtypes: upper limb disability, lower limb disability, and spinal cord injury. For a control group, we extracted people without disabilities by each subtype. To adjust for the participation rate in the NHI mass screening, we calculated and adopted the weight stratified by sex, age, and grade of disability. Differences in obesity rates between people with and without disabilities were examined by a chi-squared test. In addition, the effect of the existence of disabilities and grade of disabilities on obesity was examined by multiple logistic regression analysis.

Results

People with disabilities were found to have a higher obesity rate than those without disabilities. The obesity rates were 35.2% and 35.0% (people with disabilities vs. without disabilities) in the upper limb disability, 44.5% and 34.8% in the lower limb disability, 43.4% and 34.6% in the spinal cord injury. The odds for existence of physical disability and grade of disability are higher than the non-disabilities.

Conclusions

These results show that people with physical disability have a higher vulnerability to obesity.

Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Weight history of individuals with and without physical disability in the International Weight Control Registry
    Julianne G. Clina, R. Drew Sayer, Anna M. Gorczyca, Sai Krupa Das, James E. Friedman, Tsz Kiu Chui, Susan B. Roberts, James O. Hill
    Obesity Science & Practice.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Adapting an evidence-based physical activity questionnaire for people with physical disabilities: A methodological process
    Julianne G. Clina, Cassandra Herman, Christine C. Ferguson, James H. Rimmer
    Disability and Health Journal.2023; 16(3): 101447.     CrossRef
  • Investigation of the Relationship Between Psychiatry Visit and Suicide After Deliberate Self-harm: Longitudinal National Cohort Study
    Hye Hyeon Kim, Chanyoung Ko, Ji Ae Park, In Han Song, Yu Rang Park
    JMIR Public Health and Surveillance.2023; 9: e41261.     CrossRef
  • A cross‐sectional study on the use of big data for the past H1N1 influenza epidemic in obesity after COVID‐19: Focused on the body slimming cream and leptin via DTC gene test
    Jinkyung Lee, Ki Han Kwon
    Journal of Cosmetic Dermatology.2022; 21(11): 5321.     CrossRef
  • A Study on the Research Trends on Obese People with Disabilities: Focused on Domestic Journal
    Jung-Sik Park, Yun-Kyung Song
    Journal of Korean Medicine for Obesity Research.2019; 19(1): 68.     CrossRef
  • The complexity of reaching and maintaining a healthy body weight – the experience from adults with a mobility disability
    Marianne Holmgren, Magnus Sandberg, Gerd Ahlström
    BMC Obesity.2018;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • The bidirectional association between body weight and mobility disability: A population-based cohort
    Jeroen S. de Munter, Per Tynelius, Gerd Ahlström, Finn Rasmussen
    Disability and Health Journal.2016; 9(4): 632.     CrossRef
  • Effects of a walking exercise program for obese individuals with intellectual disability staying in a residential care facility
    Sungmin Son, Byoungjin Jeon, Heejung Kim
    Journal of Physical Therapy Science.2016; 28(3): 788.     CrossRef
  • Impacts of mobility disability and high and increasing body mass index on health-related quality of life and participation in society: a population-based cohort study from Sweden
    Marianne Holmgren, Anna Lindgren, Jeroen de Munter, Finn Rasmussen, Gerd Ahlström
    BMC Public Health.2014;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Comparison of sarcopenic status between elderly leprosy survivors and general population
    Won Kim, Hee Won Park, Byung Kwan Hwang, Soon Ook Bae, In Kwon Kim, Sun G. Chung
    Archives of Gerontology and Geriatrics.2014; 58(1): 134.     CrossRef
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    Sandra L. Reynolds
    Current Obesity Reports.2013; 2(3): 267.     CrossRef

JPMPH : Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health