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Ji Young Kim 4 Articles
Levothyroxine Dose and Fracture Risk According to the Osteoporosis Status in Elderly Women
Young-Jin Ko, Ji Young Kim, Joongyub Lee, Hong-Ji Song, Ju-Young Kim, Nam-Kyong Choi, Byung-Joo Park
J Prev Med Public Health. 2014;47(1):36-46.   Published online January 29, 2014
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2014.47.1.36
  • 12,109 View
  • 171 Download
  • 24 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives

To evaluate the association between fracture risk and levothyroxine use in elderly women with hypothyroidism, according to previous osteoporosis history.

Methods

We conducted a cohort study from the Korean Health Insurance Review and Assessment Service claims database from January 2005 to June 2006. The study population comprised women aged ≥65 years who had been diagnosed with hypothyroidism and prescribed levothyroxine monotherapy. We excluded patients who met any of the following criteria: previous fracture history, hyperthyroidism, thyroid cancer, or pituitary disorder; low levothyroxine adherence; or a follow-up period <90 days. We categorized the daily levothyroxine doses into 4 groups: ≤50 µg/d, 51 to 100 µg/d, 101 to 150 µg/d, and >150 µg/d. The hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated with the Cox proportional hazard model, and subgroup analyses were performed according to the osteoporosis history and osteoporosis-specific drug prescription status.

Results

Among 11 155 cohort participants, 35.6% had previous histories of osteoporosis. The adjusted HR of fracture for the >150 µg/d group, compared with the 51 to 100 µg/d group, was 1.56 (95% CI, 1.03 to 2.37) in osteoporosis subgroup. In the highly probable osteoporosis subgroup, restricted to patients who were concurrently prescribed osteoporosis-specific drugs, the adjusted HR of fracture for the >150 µg/d group, compared with the 51 to 100 µg/d group, was 1.93 (95% CI, 1.14 to 3.26).

Conclusions

While further studies are needed, physicians should be concerned about potential levothyroxine overtreatment in elderly osteoporosis patients.

Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Diagnosis and therapeutic approach to bone health in patients with hypopituitarism
    Justyna Kuliczkowska-Płaksej, Aleksandra Zdrojowy-Wełna, Aleksandra Jawiarczyk-Przybyłowska, Łukasz Gojny, Marek Bolanowski
    Reviews in Endocrine and Metabolic Disorders.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Hypopituitarism and bone disease: pathophysiology, diagnosis and treatment outcomes
    Amit Akirov, Yaron Rudman, Maria Fleseriu
    Pituitary.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Evaluation and Management of Bone Health in Patients with Thyroid Diseases: A Position Statement of the Korean Thyroid Association
    A Ram Hong, Ho-Cheol Kang
    Endocrinology and Metabolism.2023; 38(2): 175.     CrossRef
  • Refractory Hypothyroidism: Unraveling the Complexities of Diagnosis and Management
    Juan Eduardo Quiroz-Aldave, Marcio José Concepción-Zavaleta, María del Carmen Durand-Vásquez, Luis Alberto Concepción-Urteaga, Elman Rolando Gamarra-Osorio, Jacsel Suárez-Rojas, Luciana del Pilar Rafael-Robles, José Paz-Ibarra, Alejandro Román-González
    Endocrine Practice.2023; 29(12): 1007.     CrossRef
  • Assessing the cardiovascular effects of levothyroxine use in an ageing United Kingdom population (ACEL-UK) protocol: a cohort and target trial emulation study
    Mia Holley, Salman Razvi, Rosie Dew, Ian Maxwell, Scott Wilkes
    Thyroid Research.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Endocrine Practice.2022; 28(1): 25.     CrossRef
  • Evaluation and Management of Bone Health in Patients with Thyroid Diseases: a Position Statement from the Korean Thyroid Association
    A Ram Hong, Hwa Young Ahn, Bu Kyung Kim, Seong Hee Ahn, So Young Park, Min-Hee Kim, Jeongmin Lee, Sun Wook Cho, Ho-Cheol Kang
    International Journal of Thyroidology.2022; 15(1): 1.     CrossRef
  • Levothyroxine Therapy in Elderly Patients With Hypothyroidism
    Grigoris Effraimidis, Torquil Watt, Ulla Feldt-Rasmussen
    Frontiers in Endocrinology.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    British Dental Journal.2021; 231(1): 33.     CrossRef
  • The Influence of Thyroid Pathology on Osteoporosis and Fracture Risk: A Review
    Dragos Apostu, Ondine Lucaciu, Daniel Oltean-Dan, Alexandru-Dorin Mureșan, Cristina Moisescu-Pop, Andrei Maxim, Horea Benea
    Diagnostics.2020; 10(3): 149.     CrossRef
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    Dong Ryul Lee, Jungun Lee
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    Md. Anzar Alam, Mohd Aleemuddin Quamri, Ghulamuddin Sofi, Barkati Md. Tarique
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    JBJS Reviews.2019; 7(6): e6.     CrossRef
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    Simin Fazelipour, Minoo Shafii, Mahsa Hadipour Jahromi, Zahra Tootian, Mohammad Taghi Sheibani, Hassan Morovvati, Marzieh Minaei, Anahita Shahriari, Pooneh Koochaki, Safora Karimi
    Comparative Clinical Pathology.2018; 27(1): 45.     CrossRef
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    Gherardo Mazziotti, Anna Maria Formenti, Stefano Frara, Roberto Olivetti, Giuseppe Banfi, Maurizio Memo, Roberto Maroldi, Raffaele Giubbini, Andrea Giustina
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  • Subclinical thyrotoxicosis and bone
    M. Doga, A.M. Formenti, S. Frara, M. Memo, A. Giustina, G. Mazziotti
    Current Opinion in Endocrine and Metabolic Researc.2018;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Effects of Abnormal Thyroid Function Status to Bone Metabolism
    Hwa Young Ahn
    International Journal of Thyroidology.2018; 11(1): 21.     CrossRef
  • RETRACTED ARTICLE: The relationship between subclinical thyroid dysfunction and the risk of fracture or low bone mineral density: a systematic review and meta-analysis of cohort studies
    Ruifei Yang, Liang Yao, Yuan Fang, Jing Sun, Tiankang Guo, Kehu Yang, Limin Tian
    Journal of Bone and Mineral Metabolism.2018; 36(2): 209.     CrossRef
  • MANAGEMENT OF ENDOCRINE DISEASE: l-Thyroxine replacement therapy in the frail elderly: a challenge in clinical practice
    R M Ruggeri, F Trimarchi, B Biondi
    European Journal of Endocrinology.2017; 177(4): R199.     CrossRef
  • THE IMPACT OF AGE IN THE MANAGEMENT OF HYPOTHYROIDISM: RESULTS OF A NATIONWIDE SURVEY
    Maria Papaleontiou, Brittany L. Gay, Nazanene H. Esfandiari, Sarah T. Hawley, Megan R. Haymart
    Endocrine Practice.2016; 22(6): 708.     CrossRef
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    Kyoung Sik Park
    Korean Journal of Endocrine Surgery.2016; 16(1): 1.     CrossRef
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    Kyoung Sik Park
    Korean Journal of Endocrine Surgery.2016; 16(1): 1.     CrossRef
  • Role of Thyroid Hormones in Skeletal Development and Bone Maintenance
    J. H. Duncan Bassett, Graham R. Williams
    Endocrine Reviews.2016; 37(2): 135.     CrossRef
Cardiovascular Health Metrics and All-cause and Cardiovascular Disease Mortality Among Middle-aged Men in Korea: The Seoul Male Cohort Study
Ji Young Kim, Young-Jin Ko, Chul Woo Rhee, Byung-Joo Park, Dong-Hyun Kim, Jong-Myon Bae, Myung-Hee Shin, Moo-Song Lee, Zhong Min Li, Yoon-Ok Ahn
J Prev Med Public Health. 2013;46(6):319-328.   Published online November 28, 2013
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2013.46.6.319
  • 14,907 View
  • 158 Download
  • 52 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives

This study estimated the association of cardiovascular health behaviors with the risk of all-cause and cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality in middle-aged men in Korea.

Methods

In total, 12 538 men aged 40 to 59 years were enrolled in 1993 and followed up through 2011. Cardiovascular health metrics defined the following lifestyle behaviors proposed by the American Heart Association: smoking, physical activity, body mass index, diet habit score, total cholesterol, blood pressure, and fasting blood glucose. The cardiovascular health metrics score was calculated as a single categorical variable, by assigning 1 point to each ideal healthy behavior. A Cox proportional hazards regression model was used to estimate the hazard ratio of cardiovascular health behavior. Population attributable risks (PARs) were calculated from the significant cardiovascular health metrics.

Results

There were 1054 total and 171 CVD deaths over 230 690 person-years of follow-up. The prevalence of meeting all 7 cardiovascular health metrics was 0.67%. Current smoking, elevated blood pressure, and high fasting blood glucose were significantly associated with all-cause and CVD mortality. The adjusted PARs for the 3 significant metrics combined were 35.2% (95% confidence interval [CI], 21.7 to 47.4) and 52.8% (95% CI, 22.0 to 74.0) for all-cause and CVD mortality, respectively. The adjusted hazard ratios of the groups with a 6-7 vs. 0-2 cardiovascular health metrics score were 0.42 (95% CI, 0.31 to 0.59) for all-cause mortality and 0.10 (95% CI, 0.03 to 0.29) for CVD mortality.

Conclusions

Among cardiovascular health behaviors, not smoking, normal blood pressure, and recommended fasting blood glucose levels were associated with reduced risks of all-cause and CVD mortality. Meeting a greater number of cardiovascular health metrics was associated with a lower risk of all-cause and CVD mortality.

Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
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    Kyoung Ae Kong, Kyung-Hee Jung-Choi, Dohee Lim, Hye Ah Lee, Won Kyung Lee, Sun Jung Baik, Su Hyun Park, Hyesook Park
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Impact of Individual and Combined Health Behaviors on All Causes of Premature Mortality Among Middle Aged Men in Korea: The Seoul Male Cohort Study
Chul Woo Rhee, Ji Young Kim, Byung Joo Park, Zhong Min Li, Yoon-Ok Ahn
J Prev Med Public Health. 2012;45(1):14-20.   Published online January 31, 2012
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2012.45.1.14
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AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives

The aim of this study was to evaluate and quantify the risk of both individual and combined health behaviors on premature mortality in middle aged men in Korea.

Methods

In total, 14 533 male subjects 40 to 59 years of age were recruited. At enrollment, subjects completed a baseline questionnaire, which included information about socio-demographic factors, past medical history, and life style. During the follow-up period from 1993 to 2008, we identified 990 all-cause premature deaths using national death certificates. A Cox proportional hazard regression model was used to estimate the hazard ratio (HR) of each health risk behavior, which included smoking, drinking, physical inactivity, and lack of sleep hours. Using the Cox model, each health behavior was assigned a risk score proportional to its regression coefficient value. Health risk scores were calculated for each patient and the HR of all-cause premature mortality was calculated according to risk score.

Results

Current smoking and drinking, high body mass index, less sleep hours, and less education were significantly associated with all-cause premature mortality, while regular exercise was associated with a reduced risk. When combined by health risk score, there was a strong trend for increased mortality risk with increased score (p-trend < 0.01). When compared with the 1-9 score group, HRs of the 10-19 and 20-28 score groups were 2.58 (95% confidence intervals [CIs], 2.19 to 3.03) and 7.09 (95% CIs, 5.21 to 9.66), respectively.

Conclusions

Modifiable risk factors, such as smoking, drinking, and regular exercise, have considerable impact on premature mortality and should be assessed in combination.

Summary

Citations

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A study on occupational hydrofluoric acid burns in a hydrofluoric acid manufacturing factory.
Hyun Sul Lim, Hae Kwan Cheong, Ji Young Kim
Korean J Prev Med. 1993;26(4):587-598.
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AbstractAbstract PDF
Hydrofluoric acid is one of the strongest irritating, corrosive and poisonous inorganic chemicals. Hydrofluoric acid burns are occurring with ever-increasing frequency due to the wide use of this acid in industries. Hydrofluoric acid burns are characterized by severe progressive tissue destruction and excruciating pain due to the unique properties of the freely dissolvable fluoride ion. The authors reviewed medical records of 32 cases(36 spells) of hydrofluoric acid burns which occurred in a hydrofluoric acid manufacturing factory from Sep. 1, 1990 to June 30, 1993. The results are as follows; 1. Eleven measurements of air concentrations of hydrofluoric acid by detection tube method from 1990 to 1992 were all below TLV(Department of Labor, R. O. K). 2. There were 19 cases(22 spells) of hydrofluoric acid burns which occurred during the study period among regular employees. The overall incidence density of hydrofluoric acid was 17.8 cases(20.6 spells) per 100 person-year. Incidence density was 19.0 cases(22.0 spells) per 100 person-year among male workers and there were no female cases. Incidence density was 32.9 cases(38.3 spells) per 100 person-year among production workers and 1.9 cases(1.9 spells) per 100 person-years among management workers with the difference being statistically significant(P<0.01). 3. Of 32 cases(36 spells) of hydrofluoric acid burns among workers who were regularly employed or temporarily employed, 26 spells(81.2%) were between age 20 to 39. In 15 spells(41.7%) burns occurred between 12 : 00 and 17 : 59 with 16 spells(44.3%) having arrived at hospital within 2 hours after the accident. 4. Of 36 spells, the main cause of hydrofluoric acid burns were by splashes(8 spells, 22.2 %). The most frequent site of burns were fingers and pain was the most frequent symptom. Thirty spells(83.3%) of the hydrofluoric acid burns were treated with local injection of antidote(calcium gluconate). Complete recovery without scarring were observed in most of the cases(34 out of 36 cases, 94.4%). The study results suggest that to prevent hydrofluoric acid burns, environmental control and the wearing of hydrofluoric acid resistant protective clothes and gloves are important. It is also stressed that establishment of an emergency management and a transfer system for hydrofluoric acid burn victims is necessary.
Summary

JPMPH : Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health