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Bo Youl Choi 21 Articles
Health Indicators Related to Disease, Death, and Reproduction
Jeoungbin Choi, Moran Ki, Ho Jang Kwon, Boyoung Park, Sanghyuk Bae, Chang-Mo Oh, Byung Chul Chun, Gyung-Jae Oh, Young Hoon Lee, Tae-Yong Lee, Hae Kwan Cheong, Bo Youl Choi, Jung Han Park, Sue K. Park
J Prev Med Public Health. 2019;52(1):14-20.   Published online January 23, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.18.250
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  • 16 Crossref
AbstractAbstract AbstractSummary PDFSupplementary Material
One of the primary goals of epidemiology is to quantify various aspects of a population’s health, illness, and death status and the determinants (or risk factors) thereof by calculating health indicators that measure the magnitudes of various conditions. There has been some confusion regarding health indicators, with discrepancies in usage among organizations such as the World Health Organization the, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), and the CDC of other countries, and the usage of the relevant terminology may vary across papers. Therefore, in this review, we would like to propose appropriate terminological definitions for health indicators based on the most commonly used meanings and/or the terms used by official agencies, in order to bring clarity to this area of confusion. We have used appropriate examples to make each health indicator easy for the reader to understand. We have included practical exercises for some health indicators to help readers understand the underlying concepts.
Summary
Korean summary
본 논문에서는 질병과 사망, 출생 관련 지표들의 개념과 종류를 설명하고, 특히 연구자들이 흔히 혼동하여 사용하는 지표들에 대한 적절한 정의를 제시하였다. 또한 지표들의 예시를 부록으로 수록하여 독자들이 지표의 개념을 보다 쉽게 습득하도록 돕고자 하였다.

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    Revista de Salud Pública.2022; 24(5): 1.     CrossRef
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    R Elzein, E Chouery, F Abdel-Sater, R Bacho, F Ayoub
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    Heather Bradley, Elizabeth M Rosenthal, Meredith A Barranco, Tomoko Udo, Patrick S Sullivan, Eli S Rosenberg
    The Journal of Infectious Diseases.2020; 222(Supplement): S218.     CrossRef
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    One Health.2020; 11: 100177.     CrossRef
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    Health Equity.2020; 4(1): 476.     CrossRef
  • SAĞLIK RİSK FAKTÖRLERİNE GÖRE ÜLKELERİN KÜMELENMESİ VE ÇOK KRİTERLİ KARAR VERME TEKNİKLERİYLE SAĞLIK DURUMU GÖSTERGELERİNİN ANALİZİ
    Faruk YILMAZ, Selma SÖYÜK
    Sosyal Guvence.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Prohibition on Changing Workplaces and Fatal Occupational Injuries among Chinese Migrant Workers in South Korea
    Ju-Yeun Lee, Sung-il Cho
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2019; 16(18): 3333.     CrossRef
Effect of Uric Acid on the Development of Chronic Kidney Disease: The Korean Multi-Rural Communities Cohort Study
Kwang Ho Mun, Gyeong Im Yu, Bo Youl Choi, Mi Kyung Kim, Min-Ho Shin, Dong Hoon Shin
J Prev Med Public Health. 2018;51(5):248-256.   Published online September 7, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.18.112
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  • 10 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
Several studies have investigated the effects of serum uric acid (SUA) levels on chronic kidney disease (CKD), with discrepant results. The effect of SUA levels on CKD development was studied in the Korean rural population.
Methods
A total of 9695 participants aged ≥40 years were recruited from 3 rural communities in Korea between 2005 and 2009. Of those participants, 5577 who participated in the follow-up and did not have cerebrovascular disease, myocardial infarction, cancer, or CKD at baseline were studied. The participants, of whom 2133 were men and 3444 were women, were grouped into 5 categories according to their quintile of SUA levels. An estimated glomerular filtration rate of <60 mL/min/1.73 m2 at the time of follow-up was considered to indicate newly developed CKD. The effects of SUA levels on CKD development after adjusting for potential confounders were assessed using Cox proportional hazard models.
Results
Among the 5577 participants, 9.4 and 11.0% of men and women developed CKD. The hazard ratio (HR) of CKD was higher in the highest quintile of SUA levels than in the third quintile in men (adjusted HR, 1.60; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.02 to 2.51) and women (adjusted HR, 1.56; 95% CI, 1.14 to 2.15). Furthermore, CKD development was also more common in the lowest quintile of SUA levels than in the third quintile in men (adjusted HR, 1.83; 95% CI, 1.15 to 2.90). The effect of SUA was consistent in younger, obese, and hypertensive men.
Conclusions
Both high and low SUA levels were risk factors for CKD development in rural Korean men, while only high levels were a risk factor in their women counterparts.
Summary

Citations

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  • Serum Uric Acid Levels and Nephrosclerosis in a Population-Based Autopsy Study: The Hisayama Study
    Kenji Maki, Jun Hata, Satoko Sakata, Emi Oishi, Yoshihiko Furuta, Toshiaki Nakano, Yoshinao Oda, Takanari Kitazono, Toshiharu Ninomiya
    American Journal of Nephrology.2022; 53(1): 69.     CrossRef
  • Clinical features suggesting renal hypouricemia as the cause of acute kidney injury: a case report and review of the literature
    Tommaso Mazzierli, Luigi Cirillo, Viviana Palazzo, Fiammetta Ravaglia, Francesca Becherucci
    Journal of Nephrology.2022; 36(3): 651.     CrossRef
  • U-shaped relationship between serum uric acid level and decline in renal function during a 10-year period in female subjects: BOREAS-CKD2
    Kazuma Mori, Masato Furuhashi, Marenao Tanaka, Keita Numata, Takashi Hisasue, Nagisa Hanawa, Masayuki Koyama, Arata Osanami, Yukimura Higashiura, Masafumi Inyaku, Megumi Matsumoto, Norihito Moniwa, Hirofumi Ohnishi, Tetsuji Miura
    Hypertension Research.2021; 44(1): 107.     CrossRef
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    Po-Ya Chang, Yu-Wei Chang, Yuh-Feng Lin, Hueng-Chuen Fan
    Journal of Personalized Medicine.2021; 11(5): 415.     CrossRef
  • Detailed association between serum uric acid levels and the incidence of chronic kidney disease stratified by sex in middle-aged adults
    Shingo Nakayama, Michihiro Satoh, Yukako Tatsumi, Takahisa Murakami, Tomoko Muroya, Takuo Hirose, Takayoshi Ohkubo, Takefumi Mori, Atsushi Hozawa, Hirohito Metoki
    Atherosclerosis.2021; 330: 107.     CrossRef
  • Association between Serum Uric Acid Level and ESRD or Death in a Korean Population
    Kipyo Kim, Suryeong Go, Hyung Eun Son, Ji Young Ryu, Hajeong Lee, Nam Ju Heo, Ho Jun Chin, Jung Hwan Park
    Journal of Korean Medical Science.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Jung Hwan Park, Yong-Il Jo, Jong-Ho Lee
    The Korean Journal of Internal Medicine.2020; 35(6): 1291.     CrossRef
  • Hyperuricemia Predicts Residual Diuresis Decline in Peritoneal Dialysis Patients
    Natalia Stapanova, Lyudmyla Snisar, Larysa Lebid
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    Ji-Yong Ge, Yuan Ji, Zhen-Yan Zhu, Xun Li
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  • Threshold Effects of Serum Uric Acid on Chronic Kidney Disease in US Women without Hypertension and Diabetes: A Cross-Sectional Study
    Guiping Hu, Yi Bai, Tian Chen, Shichuan Tang, Lihua Hu
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C-reactive Protein Concentration Is Associated With a Higher Risk of Mortality in a Rural Korean Population
Jung Hyun Lee, Hyungseon Yeom, Hyeon Chang Kim, Il Suh, Mi Kyung Kim, Min-Ho Shin, Dong Hoon Shin, Sang-Baek Koh, Song Vogue Ahn, Tae-Yong Lee, So Yeon Ryu, Jae-Sok Song, Hong-Soon Choe, Young-Hoon Lee, Bo Youl Choi
J Prev Med Public Health. 2016;49(5):275-287.   Published online August 23, 2016
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.16.025
  • 8,923 View
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  • 4 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Objectives
C-reactive protein (CRP), an inflammatory biomarker, has been widely used as a preclinical marker predictive of morbidity and mortality. Although many studies have reported a positive association between CRP and mortality, uncertainty still remains about this association in various populations, especially in rural Korea.
Methods
A total of 23 233 middle-aged participants (8862 men and 14 371 women) who were free from cardiovascular disease, cancer, and acute inflammation (defined by a CRP level ≥10 mg/L) were drawn from 11 rural communities in Korea between 2005 and 2011. Blood CRP concentration was analyzed as a categorical variable (low: 0.0-0.9 mg/L; intermediate: 1.0-3.0 mg/L; high: 3.1-9.9 mg/L) as well as a continuous variable. Each participant’s vital status through December 2013 was confirmed by death statistics from the National Statistical Office. Cox proportional hazard models were used to assess the independent association between CRP and mortality after adjusting for other risk factors.
Results
The total quantity of observed person-years was 57 975 for men and 95 146 for women, and the number of deaths was 649 among men and 367 among women. Compared to the low-CRP group, the adjusted hazard ratio for all-cause mortality of the intermediate group was 1.17 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.98 to 1.40) for men and 1.27 (95% CI, 1.01 to 1.61) for women, and the corresponding values for the high-CRP group were 1.98 (95% CI, 1.61 to 2.42) for men and 1.41 (95% CI, 1.03 to 1.95) for women. Similar trends were found for CRP evaluated as a continuous variable and for cardiovascular mortality.
Conclusions
Higher CRP concentrations were associated with higher mortality in a rural Korean population, and this association was more prominent in men than in women.
Summary

Citations

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  • Binary cutpoint and the combined effect of systolic and diastolic blood pressure on cardiovascular disease mortality: A community-based cohort study
    Ju-Yeun Lee, Ji Hoon Hong, Sangjun Lee, Seokyung An, Aesun Shin, Sue K. Park, Tariq Jamal Siddiqi
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Author Response: The Increasing Hepatitis A Incidence in Korea: Is It Possible Within a Limited Time?
Joo Youn Seo, Moran Ki, Bo Youl Choi
J Prev Med Public Health. 2012;45(5):331-332.   Published online September 28, 2012
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2012.45.5.331
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  • 70 Download
PDF
Summary
Pattern of Hepatitis A Incidence According to Area Characteristics Using National Health Insurance Data
Joo Youn Seo, Jae Hee Seo, Myoung Hee Kim, Moran Ki, Hee Suk Park, Bo Youl Choi
J Prev Med Public Health. 2012;45(3):164-173.   Published online May 31, 2012
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2012.45.3.164
  • 10,436 View
  • 62 Download
  • 11 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives

Over the past several years, the incidence of hepatitis A infection has been increasing rapidly in the young-adult population in Korea. We examined the effects of area-level socioeconomic status and environmental hygiene on the incidence of hepatitis A.

Methods

This study is based on the registered national population of Korea and the national health insurance data from 2004 to 2008. A total of 73 459 individuals were confirmed to have had hepatitis A. The standardized incidences of hepatitis A in 232 districts adjusted for sex and age of people were calculated for each year, and the rate ratios of the incidence rates were estimated according to area-level socioeconomic status and environmental hygiene using multiple Poisson regression models.

Results

The incidence rates of hepatitis A infection were 15.6 (per 100 000) in 2004, 19.0 (per 100 000) in 2005, 27.2 (per 100 000) in 2006, 25.1 (per 100 000) in 2007, and 61.7 (per 100 000) in 2008. The analysis of the area-level effects showed that residential areas of the less deprived than other regions, areas with higher levels of education, and heavily populated areas were significantly associated with increased risk.

Conclusions

There is a very strong possibility that both area-level socioeconomic status and environmental hygiene play a role in increasing the risk of hepatitis A infection in Korea. Therefore, to reduce hepatitis A infection, we need a nationwide strategy that considers these area-level characteristics.

Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Investigating the spatio-temporal variation of hepatitis A in Korea using a Bayesian model
    Jaehong Jeong, Mijeong Kim, Jungsoon Choi
    Frontiers in Public Health.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Impact of urbanization on morbidity of hepatitis A: a national panel study in China during 2005–2018
    Bo-Wen Ming, Zhou Yang, Ze-Lin Yan, Chen Shi, Xiao-Han Xu, Li Li, Chun-Quan Ou
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    Dae Hyun Lim, Won Sohn, Jae Yoon Jeong, Hyunwoo Oh, Jae Gon Lee, Eileen L. Yoon, Tae Yeob Kim, Seungwoo Nam, Joo Hyun Sohn
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    Hyunsuk Kim, Jiwon Ryu, Young-Ki Lee, Myung Jin Choi, Ajin Cho, Ja-Ryong Koo, Sae Yun Baik, Eun Hee Lee, Jong-Woo Yoon, Jung-Woo Noh
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    Joo Yeon Seo, Sungyong Choi, BoYoul Choi, Moran Ki
    Epidemiology and Health.2016; 38: e2016040.     CrossRef
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    Eu Suk Kim, Kyoung-Ho Song, Baek-Nam Kim, Yee Gyung Kwak, Chang-Seop Lee, Sang Won Park, Chisook Moon, Kyung Hwa Park, Hee-Chang Jang, Joon-Sup Yeom, Won Sup Oh, Chung-Jong Kim, Hong Bin Kim, Hyun-Sul Lim
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    Clinical and Molecular Hepatology.2014; 20(2): 162.     CrossRef
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    Joo Youn Seo, Bo Youl Choi, Moran Ki, Hye Lim Jang, Hee Suk Park, Hyun Jin Son, Si Hyun Bae, Jin Han Kang, Dae Won Jun, Jin-Woo Lee, Young Jin Hong, Young Seok Kim, Chang-Hwi Kim, U Im Chang, Jong-Hyun Kim, Hyeon Woong Yang, Hong Soo Kim, Kyeong Bae Park,
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  • Letter to the Editor: The Increasing Hepatitis A Incidence in Korea: Is It Possible Within a Limited Time?
    Pegah Karimi Elizee, Seyed Moayed Alavian, Seyyed Mohammad Miri
    Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health.2012; 45(5): 329.     CrossRef
  • Author Response: The Increasing Hepatitis A Incidence in Korea: Is It Possible Within a Limited Time?
    Joo Youn Seo, Moran Ki, Bo Youl Choi
    Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health.2012; 45(5): 331.     CrossRef
Awareness, Treatment and Control of Hypertension and Related Factors in the Jurisdictional Areas of Primary Health Care Posts in a Rural Community of Korea.
Hyung Min Lee, Yu Mi Kim, Cheol Heon Lee, Jin Ho Shin, Mi Kyung Kim, Bo Youl Choi
J Prev Med Public Health. 2011;44(2):74-83.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2011.44.2.74
  • 5,314 View
  • 97 Download
  • 13 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
This study aimed to identify and assess the factors related to the awareness, treatment, and control of hypertension based on jurisdictional areas of primary health care posts in a rural community of Korea. METHODS: This study was performed on 4598 adults aged over 30 years in a rural community and we measured their blood pressure (BP) from October. 2007 to August. 2009. Hypertension is defined as a condition characterized by a systolic BP > or =140 mmHg, a diastolic BP > or =90 mmHg or reported treatment with antihypertensive medications. We analyzed the factors related with the prevalence, awareness, treatment and control of hypertension using chi-square test and multivariate logistic regression analysis. RESULTS: The age-adjusted prevalence of hypertension was 34.7%. The age-adjusted rates of hypertension awareness, treatment and control were 50.6%, 93.9% and 64.1%, respectively. Awareness of hypertension was related with increasing age. Higher awareness was found among men who were felt more stress, were obese and had hypercholesterolemia, and among women who were regulary taking medicine for hypertension, were obese and had diabetes mellitus. In women, the hypertension treatment was related a Medical aid and education for hypertension management. Controlled hypertension was more common among men who were educated about the management of hypertension and among women who had hypercholesterolemia. CONCLUSIONS: The awareness of hypertension was low and the control of hypertension was high compared with the nationwide data (KNHANES 2005). The results suggest that understanding the characteristics of hypertension in a community is important to perform a community based hypertension control program.
Summary

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    Seung Yang, Jin Soon Hwang, Hong Kyu Park, Hae Sang Lee, Hae Soon Kim, Eun Young Kim, Jung Sub Lim, Weili Zhang
    PLoS ONE.2012; 7(12): e49253.     CrossRef
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    Abdalla A. Saeed, Nasser A. Al-Hamdan, Ahmed A. Bahnassy, Abdelshakour M. Abdalla, Mostafa A. F. Abbas, Lamiaa Z. Abuzaid
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Reliability and Data Integration of Duplicated Test Results Using Two Bioelectrical Impedence Analysis Machines in the Korean Genome and Epidemiology Study.
Boyoung Park, Jae Jeong Yang, Ji Hyun Yang, Jimin Kim, Lisa Y Cho, Daehee Kang, Chol Shin, Young Seoub Hong, Bo Youl Choi, Sung Soo Kim, Man Suck Park, Sue K Park
J Prev Med Public Health. 2010;43(6):479-485.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2010.43.6.479
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AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
The Korean Genome and Epidemiology Study (KoGES), a multicenter-based multi-cohort study, has collected information on body composition using two different bioelectrical impedence analysis (BIA) machines. The aim of the study was to evaluate the possibility of whether the test values measured from different BIA machines can be integrated through statistical adjustment algorithm under excellent inter-rater reliability. METHODS: We selected two centers to measure inter-rater reliability of the two BIA machines. We set up the two machines side by side and measured subjects' body compositions between October 2007 and December 2007. Duplicated test values of 848 subjects were collected. Pearson and intra-class correlation coefficients for inter-rater reliability were estimated using results from the two machines. To detect the feasibility for data integration, we constructed statistical compensation models using linear regression models with residual analysis and R-square values. RESULTS: All correlation coefficients indicated excellent reliability except mineral mass. However, models using only duplicated body composition values for data integration were not feasible due to relatively low R2 values of 0.8 for mineral mass and target weight. To integrate body composition data, models adjusted for four empirical variables that were age, sex, weight and height were most ideal (all R2>0.9). CONCLUSIONS: The test values measured with the two BIA machines in the KoGES have excellent reliability for the nine body composition values. Based on reliability, values can be integrated through algorithmic statistical adjustment using regression equations that includes age, sex, weight, and height.
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  • Nutritional Consequences and Management After Gastrectomy
    Jae-Moon Bae
    Hanyang Medical Reviews.2011; 31(4): 254.     CrossRef
Mumps Transmission Control Status and Inapparent Infection Rate among Middle and High School Students during the 2007-2008 Mumps Outbreak in Daegu.
Kyo Hyun Kim, Chang Hwi Kim, Bo Youl Choi, Un Yeong Go, Dong Han Lee, Moran Ki
J Prev Med Public Health. 2009;42(6):408-415.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2009.42.6.408
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AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
This study was performed to investigate the mumps transmission control status and inapparent infection rate among middle and high school students in Daegu City during a mumps outbreak. METHODS: Nine schools (two middle schools and seven high schools), which reported a number of mumps cases between 2007 and 2008 were selected for investigation. During March-May 2008, a standard questionnaire was distributed to gather information about case identification, instructed isolation measure, isolation status of mumps cases and related factors, and outdoor activities of non-isolated mumps case. Inapparent infection rate was estimated by serum mumps IgM and IgG antibodies status and self-reported mumps symptoms in three of the nine schools. RESULTS: Among 2,560 respondents, more than half of students answered that they did not receive instructions in mumps transmission control measures during the outbreak. Among the 327 mumps cases identified by the questionnaire, 131 cases (40.1%) were considered as isolated and the isolation rates were significantly different among schools, grades, and gender. Of the non-isolated cases, 88.3% continued attending school. Inapparent mumps infection rates were between 56.3% and 70.2%. CONCLUSIONS: Mumps transmission control was inadequate to control the mumps outbreak. Although high inapparent infection rate would mitigate the transmission control effect of case isolation, this measure is fundamental for infection control. The reasons of this inadequate status need to be explored to develop an effective intervention strategy.
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  • Trend of measles, mumps, and rubella incidence following the measles‐rubella catch up vaccination in the Republic of Korea, 2001
    Young June Choe, Hye‐Eun Eom, Sung‐Il Cho
    Journal of Medical Virology.2017; 89(9): 1528.     CrossRef
  • Resurgence of Mumps in Korea
    Sun Hee Park
    Infection & Chemotherapy.2015; 47(1): 1.     CrossRef
  • An Outbreak of Mumps in a High School, Seoul, 2013
    Ha Ra Kang, Sung Yoon Kim, Hyo Hyun Cha, Young Min An, In Ah Park, Hae Ji Kang, Byung Wook Eun
    Pediatric Infection & Vaccine.2015; 22(1): 1.     CrossRef
  • Reappraisal of MMR vaccines currently used in Korea
    Hyunju Lee, Han Wool Kim, Hye Kyung Cho, Eun Ae Park, Kyong Min Choi, Kyung‐Hyo Kim
    Pediatrics International.2011; 53(3): 374.     CrossRef
The Relationship between Physical Activity and Clustering of Metabolic Abnormalities in Children.
Hyun Jin Son, Mi Kyung Kim, Hyun Ja Kim, Ho Kim, Bo Youl Choi
J Prev Med Public Health. 2008;41(6):427-433.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2008.41.6.427
  • 3,642 View
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AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
This study was performed to assess the association between physical activity and the clustering of metabolic abnormalities among Korean children. The effect of substituting moderate to vigorous physical activity for the time spent in inactivity was examined as well. METHODS: The study subjects were comprised of 692 (354 boys, 338 girls) 4th grade elementary school students. We used a modified form of the physical activity questionnaire that was developed in the Five-City Project. The subjects with clustering of metabolic abnormalities were defined as having two or more of the following five characteristics: waist circumference > or =90 %, systolic or diastolic blood pressure > or =90 %, fasting glucose > or =110 mg/dl, triglycerides > or =110 mg/dl and HDL cholesterol < or =40 mg/dl. We calculated the odds ratios to assess the effect of substituting moderate to vigorous physical activity for time spent in inactivity. RESULTS: The risk of clustered metabolic abnormalities was inversely correlated with the increased time spent on moderate to vigorous physical activity, but the correlation was not significant. The odds ratio for clustering of metabolic abnormalities that represented the effect of substituting moderate to vigorous physical activity for 30minutes of sedentary activity was 0.87 (95% CI=0.76-1.01). CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that substituting moderate to vigorous physical activity for sedentary activity could decrease the risk of clustered metabolic abnormalities.
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  • Prevalence of Metabolic Syndrome and Associated Risk Factors Among Korean Adolescents
    Mi-Ae You, Youn-Jung Son
    Asia Pacific Journal of Public Health.2012; 24(3): 464.     CrossRef
The Prevalence of Atrophic Gastritis and Intestinal Metaplasia according to Gender, Age and Helicobacter Pylori Infection in a Rural Population.
Hyun Ja Kim, Bo Youl Choi, Tae Joon Byun, Chang Soo Eun, Kyu Sang Song, Yong Sung Kim, Dong Soo Han
J Prev Med Public Health. 2008;41(6):373-379.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2008.41.6.373
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AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
The objective of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of atrophic gastritis and intestinal metaplasia according to gender, age and Helicobacter pylori infection in a rural population in Korea. METHODS: Between April 2003 and January 2007, 713 subjects (298 men and 415 women, age range: 18-85) among the 2,161 adults who participated in a populationbased survey received gastrointestinal endoscopy. All the subjects provided informed consent. Multiple biopsy specimens were evaluated for the presence of atrophic gastritis and intestinal metaplasia. The presence of Helicobacter pylori was determined using CLO and histology testing. RESULTS: The age-adjusted prevalence of atrophic gastritis was 42.7% for men and 38.1% for women and the prevalence of intestinal metaplasia was 42.5% for men and 32.7% for women. The prevalence of atrophic gastritis and intestinal metaplasia increased significantly with age for both men and women (p for trend<0.001). The ageadjusted prevalence of Helicobacter pylori was similar for men (59.0%) and women (56.7%). The subjects with Helicobacter pylori infection showed a significantly higher prevalence of intestinal metaplasia (44.3%) compared with that (26.8%) of the noninfected subjects (p<0.001). However, the prevalence of atrophic gastritis was not statistically different between the Helicobacter pyloriinfected subjects and the noninfected individuals. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest that the prevalence of atrophic gastritis and intestinal metaplasia is higher for a Korean rural population than that for a Western population; this may be related to the high incidence of gastric cancer in Koreans. Especially, the prevalence of intestinal metaplasia was high for the subjects with Helicobacter pylori infection. The multistep process of gastric carcinogenesis and the various factors contributing to each step of this process need to be determined by conducting future follow-up studies.
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    The Korean Journal of Helicobacter and Upper Gastrointestinal Research.2023; 23(3): 197.     CrossRef
  • Clinical Practice Guideline for Gastritis in Korea
    Seung Joo Kang, Jae Gyu Kim, Hee Seok Moon, Myeong-Cherl Kook, Jong Yeul Lee, Chang Seok Bang, Chung Hyun Tae, Eun Jeong Gong, Su Youn Nam, Hyun Jung Kim
    Journal of Korean Medical Science.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Mingee Choi, Woo-Ri Lee, Kyu-Tae Han, Woorim Kim
    Cancer Causes & Control.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Claudia Corso, Diego Mauricio Aponte, Javier Preciado, Jorge Medina-Parra, Luis Carlos Sabbagh Sanvicente
    Revista colombiana de Gastroenterología.2022; 37(3): 289.     CrossRef
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    Stephen Z. Molaoa
    Journal of Drug Assessment.2021; 10(1): 57.     CrossRef
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    Ioana Alexandra Cardos, Dana Carmen Zaha, Rakesh K. Sindhu, Simona Cavalu
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    Shiu Kum Lam, George Lau
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    Shin Ah Kim, Bo Youl Choi, Kyu Sang Song, Chan Hyuk Park, Chang Soo Eun, Dong Soo Han, Yong Sung Kim, Hyun Ja Kim
    The Korean Journal of Gastroenterology.2019; 73(3): 141.     CrossRef
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    Timothy N Archampong, Richard H Asmah, Cathy J Richards, Vicki J Martin, Christopher D Bayliss, Edília Botão, Leonor David, Sandra Beleza, Carla Carrilho
    World Journal of Gastroenterology.2019; 25(26): 3344.     CrossRef
  • Chronic atrophic gastritis and intestinal metaplasia surrounding diffuse-type gastric cancer: Are they just bystanders in the process of carcinogenesis?
    Seung Yong Shin, Jie-Hyun Kim, Jaeyoung Chun, Young Hoon Yoon, Hyojin Park, Dajun Deng
    PLOS ONE.2019; 14(12): e0226427.     CrossRef
  • Observation Time for Complete Endoscopy in Gastric Cancer Screening
    Jae Myung Park
    The Korean Journal of Helicobacter and Upper Gastrointestinal Research.2018; 18(1): 13.     CrossRef
  • Gastric Intestinal Metaplasia Is the Most Common Histopathological Phenotype among Endoscopically Diagnosed Atrophic Gastritis Patients in North-East China
    Tayyab Hamid Malik, Caihan Zhao, Jafer Mohammed AlAhmed, Sohaib Ahmad Alam, Hong Xu
    Open Journal of Gastroenterology.2017; 07(02): 65.     CrossRef
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    R. M. Genta, K. O. Turner, A. Sonnenberg
    Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics.2017; 46(3): 322.     CrossRef
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    Jae Myung Park, Sol Mi Huo, Han Hee Lee, Bo-In Lee, Ho Jin Song, Myung-Gyu Choi
    Gastroenterology.2017; 153(2): 460.     CrossRef
  • Chemoprevention of Gastric Cancer: Helicobacter pylori Eradication
    Eun Jin Kim, Hang Lak Lee
    The Korean Journal of Helicobacter and Upper Gastrointestinal Research.2017; 17(4): 166.     CrossRef
  • Review of Atrophic Gastritis and Intestinal Metaplasia as a Premalignant Lesion of Gastric Cancer
    Yo Han Park, Nayoung Kim
    Journal of Cancer Prevention.2015; 20(1): 25.     CrossRef
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  • Guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of Helicobacter pylori infection in Korea, 2013 revised edition
    Sang Gyun Kim, Hye‐Kyung Jung, Hang Lak Lee, Jae Young Jang, Hyuk Lee, Chan Gyoo Kim, Woon Geon Shin, Ein Soon Shin, Yong Chan Lee
    Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology.2014; 29(7): 1371.     CrossRef
  • Risk factors for intestinal metaplasia in concomitant gastric and duodenal ulcer disease
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    Experimental and Therapeutic Medicine.2014; 7(4): 929.     CrossRef
  • Atrophic Gastritis: Pathophysiology and Etiology
    Ho Suk Kang, Jeong Hwan Kim
    The Korean Journal of Helicobacter and Upper Gastrointestinal Research.2013; 13(1): 1.     CrossRef
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    Joon Sung Kim, Byung-Wook Kim
    The Korean Journal of Helicobacter and Upper Gastrointestinal Research.2013; 13(2): 73.     CrossRef
  • Guidelines for the Diagnosis and Treatment ofHelicobacter pyloriInfection in Korea, 2013 Revised Edition
    Sang Gyun Kim, Hye-Kyung Jung, Hang Lak Lee, Jae Young Jang, Hyuk Lee, Chan Gyoo Kim, Woon Geon Shin, Ein Soon Shin, Yong Chan Lee
    The Korean Journal of Gastroenterology.2013; 62(1): 3.     CrossRef
  • Surveillance Strategy of Atrophic Gastritis and Intestinal Metaplasia in a Country with a High Prevalence of Gastric Cancer
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    Digestive Diseases and Sciences.2012; 57(3): 746.     CrossRef
Introduction and Evaluation of Communicable Disease Surveillance in the Republic of Korea.
Ok Park, Bo Youl Choi
J Prev Med Public Health. 2007;40(4):259-264.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2007.40.4.259
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AbstractAbstract PDF
Effective communicable disease surveillance systems are the basis of the national disease prevention and control. Following the increase in emerging and re-emerging infectious diseases since late 1990s, the Korean government has strived to enhance surveillance and response system. Since 2000, sentinel surveillance, such as influenza sentinel surveillance, pediatric sentinel surveillance, school-based sentinel surveillance and ophthalmological sentinel surveillance, was introduced to improve the surveillance activities. Electronic reporting system was developed in 2000, enabling the establishment of national database of reported cases. Disweb, a portal for sharing communicable disease information with the public and health care workers, was developed. In general, the survey results on usefulness and attributes of the system, such as simplicity, flexibility, acceptability, sensitivity, timeliness, and representa-tiveness, received relatively high recognition. Compared to the number of paid cases of national health insurance, reported cases by national notifiable disease surveillance system, and various sentinel surveillance system, the result of the correlation analysis was high. According to the research project conducted by KCDC, the reporting rate of physicians in 2004 has also greatly improved, compared with that in 1990s. However, continuous efforts are needed to further improve the communicable disease surveillance system. Awareness of physicians on communicable disease surveillance system must be improved by conducting education and information campaigns on a continuous basis. We should also devise means for efficient use of various administrative data including cause of death statistics and health insurance. In addition, efficiency of the system must be improved by linking data from various surveillance system.
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    Soyeoun Kim, Sohee Kim, Bo Youl Choi, Boyoung Park
    The Journal of Infectious Diseases.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • The National Influenza Surveillance System of Korea
    Won Suk Choi
    Infection & Chemotherapy.2019; 51(2): 98.     CrossRef
  • Incidences of Waterborne and Foodborne Diseases After Meteorologic Disasters in South Korea
    Wonwoong Na, Kyeong Eun Lee, Hyung-Nam Myung, Soo-Nam Jo, Jae-Yeon Jang
    Annals of Global Health.2017; 82(5): 848.     CrossRef
  • Survey of the perceptions of key stakeholders on the attributes of the South African Notifiable Diseases Surveillance System
    F. G. Benson, A. Musekiwa, L. Blumberg, L. C. Rispel
    BMC Public Health.2016;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Current status of measles in the Republic of Korea: an overview of case-based and seroepidemiological surveillance scheme
    Young June Choe, Geun-Ryang Bae
    Korean Journal of Pediatrics.2012; 55(12): 455.     CrossRef
The Resting Electrocardiographic ST Segment Depression and Related Factors at a Rural Adult Community, Korea.
Yu Mi Kim, Mi Kyung Kim, Jin Ho Shin, Heon Kil Lim, Do Myung Paek, Bo Youl Choi
J Prev Med Public Health. 2006;39(6):485-492.
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AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
To measure the distribution of electrocardiographic ST segment depression, and evaluate its relationships with cardiovascular risk factors based on the cross-sectional studies within a rural Korean community. METHODS: This study analyzed 1,343 persons, over 40 years old, who participated in a baseline survey during 2002~2005; the exclusion criteria included: a past history of myocardial infarction and angina pectoris, and specific conduction abnormalities. A Standard 12 leads ECG was recorded using an FCP-2101 (Fukuda Denshi Co.). The ST segment depression was retrospectively measured by a physician, according to the Minnesota code classification. RESULTS: ST segment depression was found in 3.6 and 6.4% of male and female participants, respectively. After adjusting for age, gender, smoking, physical activity and obesity differences, high blood pressure showed significant relations with ST depression in females (male ORs=2.67, 95% CI=0.85-8.50; female ORs=2.62, 95% CI=1.29-5.32) CONCLUSIONS: As an ischemic ECG sign, ST depression was related to hypertension in female participants. This relationship remained significant, even after cases with left ventricular hypertrophy were removed.
Summary
The Association between the Psychosocial Well-being Status and Adverse Lipid Profiles in a Rural Korean Community.
Chang Hoon Kim, Myoung Hee Kim, Sung Il Cho, Jung Hyun Nam, Bo Youl Choi
Korean J Prev Med. 2003;36(1):24-32.
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AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
To identify the psychosocial well-being status in a rural community, and examine the association between the psychosocial well-being status and adverse lipid profile. METHOD: In 2001, we surveyed 575 subjects in Yangpyoung, Kyounggido, including medical examination, fasting-blood sample and questionnaires for the psychosocial well-being status, socioeconomic position and behavioral risk factors. The logistic regression analysis was used to examine explanatory factors of the psychosocial well-being status, and association between the psychosocial well-being status and adverse lipid profiles. RESULT: The association between the psychosocial well-being status and adverse lipid profiles was not strong. The total cholesterol and triglyceridelevels were associated with psychosocial well-being. The adjusted odds ratio for moderate psychosocial well-being relating to total cholesterol was 1.90 (95%CI, 0.82-4.04), but that for triglyceride was 0.65 (95%CI, 0.36-1.21). The HDL-Cholesterol and LDL-Cholesterol level were not associated with the psychosocial well-being status. CONCLUSION: The total cholesterol and psychosocial well-being status were weakly associated, but the between the psychosocial well-being status and adverse lipid profiles were not consistent.
Summary
Prevalence of Congenital Heart Disease from the Elementary Student Heart Disease Screening Program.
Hong Jue Lee, Myoung Hee Kim, Jo Won Jung, Seong Ho Kim, Bo Youl Choi
Korean J Prev Med. 2001;34(4):427-436.
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AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVE
To estimate the prevalence of congenital heart disease from the 1998 student heart disease screening program. METHODS: The heart disease screening program for elementary students was conducted in Kyonggi-do, in 1998. The subjects of the present study comprised the 40,402 students who attended the schools in the catchment area of a collaborative university hospital and who participated in the primary examination. The congenital heart disease (CHD) patients were initially identified through a questionnaire about prior medical history, and further through diagnostic tests & medical examinations in the secondary & the tertiary examinations. Certain assumptions were used in the estimation of the number of CHD cases among non-participants of the secondary & tertiary examinations. The overall prevalence of CHD was estimated by adding the CHD detection rates of the participants and the estimated prevalence of the non-participants. RESULTS: Among the 40,402 primary participants, 1,655 were referred further, of whom 79.1% (1,309) participated in the secondary examination. Of these, 121 were referred to the tertiary examination, with a participation rate at this last stage of 80.2%. The positive predictive value (PPV) of the screening tools was the highest when the results of both EKG and the questionnaire were positive. Because 85.9% of the detected cases had a past history of CHD, PPV was higher when the selection criteria in the questionnaire included past CHD history than when it didnt. The CHD detection rate among the participants was 1.76 cases/1,000 and the presumed number of cases among the non-participants was 31; giving an estimated final CHD prevalence of 2.52 cases/1,000 (95% CI : 2.06-3.06). Among the identified cases of CHD, VSD (52.8%) was the most common, followed by PDA (9.7%), TOF (9.7%) & PS (9.7%). CONCLUSION: Because the characteristics of the non-participants differed from those of the participants, the estimation of prevalence was influenced by the participation rate. Of the detected cases, 85.9% had a past history of diagnosis or operation for CHD. These findings suggested that the prevalence estimated in this study may be an underestimation of the actual condition. Therefore, a birth cohort study is required in order to more accurately estimate the prevalence and the effects of the program.
Summary
Evaluation of the Completeness of Case Reporting during the 1998 Cheju-do Mumps Epidemic, Using Capture-recapture Methods .
Myoung Hee Kim, Jin Kyoung Park, Mo Ran Ki, Young Joo Hur, Bo Youl Choi, Joung Soon Kim
Korean J Prev Med. 2000;33(3):313-322.
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AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
To estimate mumps incidence during the study period and to evaluate the completeness of case reporting. METHODS: Capture-recapture methods, originally developed for counting wildlife animals, were used. The data sources were 1) the National Notifiable Communicable Disease Reporting System (NNCDRS; 848 cases), 2) the School Health Reporting System, temporarily administered by the Division of Education (SHRS; 1,026 cases), and 3) a survey of students (785 cases). We estimated the number of unobserved mumps cases by matching the three data sources and fitting loglinear models to the data. We then determined the estimated total number of mumps cases by adding this to the number of observed cases. Completeness was defined as the proportion of observed cases from each source to the total of estimated cases. RESULTS: The total number of observed cases was 1,844 and the total number of estimated cases was 1,935 (95% CI: 1,878-2,070). The overall completeness was 43.8% of the NNCDRS, 53.0% of the SHRS, and 40.6% of the survey. However, completeness varied by area and age. CONCLUSION: Although the completeness of NNCDRS data appeared higher than in the past, it is difficult to generalize this result. In Korea, it is possible to estimate the size of health hazards relatively cheaply and quickly, by applying capture-recapture methods to various data using a multiple data collection system.
Summary
Relationship between Adolescent Obesity and Socioeconomic Status of Parents: In Seoul, Yangpyong, and Yanbian Area.
Moran Ki, Bo Youl Choi, Mi Kyoung Kim, Jin Nu Fang, Chun Ying Xu, Dong Hyon Ahn, Yun Ju Kang
Korean J Prev Med. 1999;32(1):9-16.
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AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
Few studies have attempted to explain the association between socioeconomic status (SES) and obesity in Korea. Especially the studies on same race with different SES at same time are good for SES influence estimation. The present study highlights the influence of SES of parents on adolescent obesity. The subjects are the same race, but live in different areas, with different SES, Seoul and Yangpung in Korea, and Yanbian in China. METHODS: The cross-sectional study was conducted in Mar-Jun 1996. We carried out anthropometry, 24 hour-recall diet survey, self-reported questionnaire about sociodemographic characteristics and physical activity. For SES indicators, we used income and education of parents. RESULTS: The relationship between SES of parents, defined as educational status, and obesity in boys in Korea and China is direct, but not significant. The relationship is inverse and non-significant among Korean girls. However, for the Korean girls in severe obesity, the relationship is significant. For the Korean-Chinese girls, there is an inverse relationship between the education level and obesity but a direct relationship between the income level of parents and obesity. For the Korean adolescent, there are a direct association between the SES of parents and the nutrients factors such as energy, protein, and fat intake. The energy expenditure of adolescent has no relationship with SES of parents. CONCLUSION: Among boys, the higher the SES, the greater the risk of obese. Among girls in Korea and Korean-Chinese, on the other hand, the lower the educational status of parents, the greater the risk of obese.
Summary
A Comparative Study on Enhancing the Function of the Heath Center in a urban area.
Weon Young Lee, Young Jeon Shin, Young Jun Kwon, Bo Youl Choi, Ok Ryun Moon, Hye Jeong Jeon
Korean J Prev Med. 1998;31(4):857-874.
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Summary
Correlation between Obesity Indices and Cardiovascular Risk Factors and Usefullness of Abdominal Obesity Indices.
Hunyoung Ha, Bo Youl Choi, Hung Bae Park
Korean J Prev Med. 1997;30(2):327-341.
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AbstractAbstract PDF
It is a well known fact that obesity is an important cause of cardiovascular disease, emphasized by many studies. Recently, cardiovascular diseaase has been found to correlate not only to the extent of obesity, but also the fat distribution of the individual; especially, focusing on obesity of the abdomen. Unfortunately, the proposed indices for abdominal obesity are numerous, and the results vary according to the index chosen. Three-hundred and twelve bus drivers in November, 1995, were chosen as subjects of this study. The author chose to measure serum lipid levels, fasting blood sugar levels and blood pressure, that are thought to be important risk factors of cardiovascular diseases. Obesity indices were calculated using anthropometric measurements. We were able to evaluate the significance of obesity indices by examining correlations between these indices and the risk factors of cardiovascular disease. The results obtained were as follows: 1. The abdominal obesity indices and risk factors of cardiovascular disease, the levels of total cholesterol in the serum, fasting blood sugar levels, and diastolic blood pressure, increased significantly according to age. 2. There was a significant difference in the abdominal obesity indices according to drinking and smoking habits controlled for age. Among the risk factors of cardiovascular disease, triglyceride and diastolic pressures had significant differences according to the presence or absence of a drinking history controlled for age. 3. Although all obesity indices showed significant correlations, the weakest correlation was between BMI and abdominal diameter index and the strongest correlation was between sagittal diameter and sagittal diameter matched for height. 4. There was a negative correlation between HDL-cholesterol and obesity indices. The weakest correlation was between fasting blood sugar levels and both SD and SDH showed correlations with the risk factors. 5. There was a significant correlation between SD and total cholesterol in the serum and fasting blood sugars controlled for age, drinking, and BMI. 6. After categorizing the subjects into 2 separate age groups at the 40 year mark, in the less than 40 year old age group, controlled for drinking and BMI, the results of comparitive studies have shown correlations between total cholesterol serum levels and waist-hip ratio, conicity-index, and SD. There were correlations between fasting blood sugar levels and SD, ADI, and SDH. There were no correlations between obesity indices and both total cholesterol serum levels and fasting blood sugar levels in the greater than 40 year old age group. There were significant correlations between abdominal obesity indices and total serum cholesterol or fasting blood sugar levels in the less than 40 year old age group, but no correlations in the age group over 40. These correlated factors between abdominal obesity and cardiovascular disease are assumed to exist in Korea as well. Furthermore, in this study a high correlation was found between SD, SDH and the risk factors of cardiovascular disease. Even when controlled for age, drinking, smoking, and BMI, the correlations between risk factors of cardiovascular disease and these indices exist. Therefore, the obesity indices, SD and SDH may prove to be important prognostic indicators or risk factors of cardiovascular disease
Summary
Cost-Benefit Analysis on Rubella Vaccination Policy.
Young Jeon Shin, Bo Youl Choi, Hung Bae Park, Ok Ryun Moon, Bae Joong Yoon
Korean J Prev Med. 1994;27(2):337-365.
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AbstractAbstract PDF
Rubella is a viral disease with mild constitutional symptoms and generalized rashes ln childhood, it is an inconsequential illness, but when it occurs during early pregnant period, there are significant risks of heart defects, cataract, mental retardation to the fetus. The series of congenital defects induced by rubella is called 'congenital rubella syndrome'. Many research have been performed to find out more effective prevention program on rubella. The objectives of this study are, first, to calculate the incidence rate of acute rubella infection and congenital rubella syndrome in korea, second, to evaluate economic efficiency of several rubella vaccination policies and to offer data for the most reasonable decision on vaccination policy. Study populations are 663,312 children of one year-old in 1992. The author has performed cost-benefit analyses according to the three vaccination policies-U.S.A.'s. U.K's and Sweden's. In this study, the author got the incidence rate of acute rubella infection using the catalytic model. In the meantime, the author used 50 per 100,000 live births as the incidence rate of congenital rubella syndrome. The discount rate used in this study was 5 percent per annum. The sensitivity analyses were done with different discount rates (4%, 7%) and different incidence rate of congenital rubella syndrome (10,100 per 100,000 live births): The study results are as follows: 1. Without vaccination, lifetime expenditures per patient for acute rubella infection amount to 14,822 won and the total expenditures to about 3.1 billion won. Meanwhile, lifetime expenditures per patient for congenital rubella syndrome amount to about 91 million won and the total expenditures to about 16.3 billion won without vaccination. 2. The cost of vaccination for a child of one year old was 2,322 won and the total cost for the one year old children was about 1.5 billion won(American style). The cost for vaccination of female children at fifteen was about 339 million won (British style). And the cost of vaccination at one for both sex and female children at fifteen was about 1.9billion won (Swedish style). 3. The benefit to cost ratios of vaccination or female children at fifteen that is the british mode of rubella vaccination, was 60.0 at the level of 80 % population coverage and 48.6 at 100% coverage. It shows much higher benefit to cost ratio than those of the other two vaccination policies. 4. Both net benefits of vaccination at one (American style) and that of vaccinations at one and fifteen (Swedish style) range from about 17.0 billion to 17.8 billion won, those were larger than that of vaccinations of female children at fifteen(British style, about 16.0 billion). 5. In marginal cost-benefit analysis of only additional program or revaccination, the benefit to cost ratios were 3.6(80% coverage rate) or 0.6 (100% coverage rate). It implies that additional program was less efficient or inefficient 6. In sensitively analysis with different discount rates (4% or 7%) and different incidence rates of congenital rubella syndrome (l0 or 100 per 100,000 live births), the benefit to cost ratios has fluctuated in wide range. However, all the ratios of vaccination of female children at fifteen were higher than those of the others. Even under the most conservative assumption, the benefit to cost ratios of all the rubella vaccination policies were higher than 3.3. In conclusion all the rubella vaccination policies found to be cost-effective and particularly the vaccination of female children at fifteen was strongly recommended.
Summary
Epidemiologic investigation to identify the cause of an infant methemoglobinemia.
young Yeul Kim, Bo Youl Choi, Hung Bae Park, Min Young Kim, In Hak Yeo
Korean J Prev Med. 1993;26(2):192-201.
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Epidemiologic investigation was conducted on January, 1993 in Seoul to identify the cause of an infant methemoglobinemia. Field investigation of the area of outbreak, survey of household and family members, analysis of ground water, and blood tests of involved family members were performed. Following results were obtained. On analyzing the quality of the ground water on patients's household high levels of nitrate was found indicating contamination of water as the cause of a methemoglobinemia outbreak. On analyzing the quality of the ground waters on seven other places within the neighborhood five were contaminated by nitrate in concentration that exceeded the permissible limit implying presence nearby source of contamination. Sources of contamination were thought to be originating from human waste in conventional bathroom facilities, chicken manure used in nearby orchards and plant fields or fertilizers. But the results of water analysis with presence of bacteria or E.coli, concentration of potassium, phosphate and the past history of diarrhea among family members, chicken manure suggested the most possible source of contamination. To evaluate the health status of members in the neighborhood past history was reviewed revealing no prior existence of patient with cyanosis and 65 people in the neighborhood had normal levels of methemoglobin concentration in their blood. Conclusively, the ground water on patient's household was contaminated with nitrate and despite provision of adequate water supply, family members of the patient along with distrust in the water supply system had used ground water as their source of drinking water resulting of methemoglobinemia. Many suburban area of Seoul and country side thought to be having similar problems concerning contaminated ground water supply and dormant outbreak of patients as a result of the drinking of the contaminated water. Epidemiologic investigation and water analysis of ground waters are advised.
Summary
Incidence of Hepatitis B Virus Infection of the School Children in a Rural Area of Korea.
Bo Youl Choi
Korean J Prev Med. 1986;19(2):281-292.
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Infection by hepatitis B virus is one of the major health problems of this nation. HBsAg positive rates of general population and school children were known to be as about 8 percent and 3.9 to 5.9 percent respectively. To study the incidence rate of hepatitis B infection in school children of rural area, author had examined 475 school children of relatively isolated agricultural area for baseline prevalence of hepatitis B virus serologic markers and followed up 415 school children during 10 months to determined the frequency of serologic conversion. The major results are summarized as followings: 1) Among the 278 susceptible children who were followed up, 26 had seroconversion for HBsAg or Anti-HBs. Therefore, the cumulative incidence rate during 10 months is estimated 9.4%. 2) The incidence rate of hepatitis B infection tends to increase with age (6-9yrs:3.2%, 10-14yrs:9.5%, 15-17yus:18.9%), and the incidence rate in male (13.0%) was higher than in female (5.7%). 3) The incidence rates of hepatitis B virus infection were not different statistically between visitors and non-visitors of clinic or hospital, dental clinic, person received IV and not received IV, and persons with familial history and without familial history of liver diseases. Therefore all of these factors were not identified as risk factor of hepatitis B virus infection. And the transmissibility within the class of school was not recognized, too. 5) Among the 25 children who were HBsAg positive when enrolled, 15 (60%) were still HBsAg positive, who were identified as chronic carrier. 15 of 415 school children were chronic carriers, then chronic carrier rate was estimated 3.6%, and there was no difference between sexes. 6) Of 38 children who had been Anti-HBs positive when enrolled, 5 (13.2%) lost Anti-HBs. Therefore, the loss rate of Anti-HBs per year is estimated to be 15.8%.
Summary

JPMPH : Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health