Skip Navigation
Skip to contents

JPMPH : Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health

OPEN ACCESS
SEARCH
Search

Search

Page Path
HOME > Search
20 "Research"
Filter
Filter
Article category
Keywords
Publication year
Authors
Funded articles
Original Article
Trends in Research on Patients With COVID-19 in Korean Medical Journals
Heejeong Choi, Seunggwan Song, Heesang Ahn, Hyobean Yang, Hyeonseong Lim, Yohan Park, Juhyun Kim, Hongju Yong, Minseok Yoon, Mi Ah Han
J Prev Med Public Health. 2024;57(1):47-54.   Published online January 17, 2024
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.23.254
  • 840 View
  • 50 Download
AbstractAbstract AbstractSummary PDFSupplementary Material
Objectives
This study was conducted to systematically summarize trends in research concerning patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) as reported in Korean medical journals.
Methods
We performed a literature search of KoreaMed from January 2020 to September 2022. We included only primary studies of patients with COVID-19. Two reviewers screened titles and abstracts, then performed full-text screening, both independently and in duplicate. We first identified the 5 journals with the greatest numbers of eligible publications, then extracted data pertaining to the general characteristics, study population attributes, and research features of papers published in these journals.
Results
Our analysis encompassed 142 primary studies. Of these, approximately 41.0% reported a funding source, while 3.5% disclosed a conflict of interest. In 2020, 42.9% of studies included fewer than 10 participants; however, by 2022, the proportion of studies with over 200 participants had increased to 40.6%. The most common design was the cohort study (48.6%), followed by case reports/series (35.2%). Only 3 randomized controlled trials were identified. Studies most frequently focused on prognosis (58.5%), followed by therapy/intervention (20.4%). Regarding the type of intervention/exposure, therapeutic clinical interventions comprised 26.1%, while studies of morbidity accounted for 13.4%. As for the outcomes measured, 50.7% of studies assessed symptoms/clinical status/improvement, and 14.1% evaluated mortality.
Conclusions
Employing a systematic approach, we examined the characteristics of research involving patients with COVID-19 that was published in Korean medical journals from 2020 onward. Subsequent research should assess not only publication trends over a longer timeframe but also the quality of evidence provided.
Summary
Korean summary
본 연구는 2020년 이후 국내 의학저널에 보고된 코로나19 환자를 대상으로 진행된 연구의 특성을 체계적 방법론을 통해 살펴보았다. 142개 연구 중 5개는 국제 연구자들과 협력했으며 약 50%가 자금 지원에 관해 보고하였으며, 2022년에는 2020년에 비해 대규모 환자 코호트를 포함하는 연구 수가 증가하였다. 연구의 약 20%는 약물 치료와 같은 개입의 영향을 평가하였으며, 향후 연구에서는 장기간에 걸친 연구 경향 뿐만 아니라 연구의 질도 평가해야 할 것이다.
Key Message
This study employed a systematic approach to examine the characteristics of research conducted among patients with COVID-19, as reported in Korean medical journals from 2020 onward. Of 142 studies, 5 involved collaborations with international researchers, and approximately 50% made any declaration regarding funding, and By 2022, an increase was evident in the number of studies that included a large patient cohort relative to the year 2020. Roughly 20% of the studies assessed the impact of interventions, such as pharmaceutical treatments, and further research should assess not only publication trends over a longer timeframe but also the quality of evidence provided.
Reviews
Qualitative Research in Healthcare: Data Analysis
Dasom Im, Jeehye Pyo, Haneul Lee, Hyeran Jung, Minsu Ock
J Prev Med Public Health. 2023;56(2):100-110.   Published online February 15, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.22.471
  • 7,657 View
  • 438 Download
  • 4 Web of Science
  • 9 Crossref
AbstractAbstract AbstractSummary PDF
Qualitative research methodology has been applied with increasing frequency in various fields, including in healthcare research, where quantitative research methodology has traditionally dominated, with an empirically driven approach involving statistical analysis. Drawing upon artifacts and verbal data collected from in-depth interviews or participatory observations, qualitative research examines the comprehensive experiences of research participants who have experienced salient yet unappreciated phenomena. In this study, we review 6 representative qualitative research methodologies in terms of their characteristics and analysis methods: consensual qualitative research, phenomenological research, qualitative case study, grounded theory, photovoice, and content analysis. We mainly focus on specific aspects of data analysis and the description of results, while also providing a brief overview of each methodology’s philosophical background. Furthermore, since quantitative researchers have criticized qualitative research methodology for its perceived lack of validity, we examine various validation methods of qualitative research. This review article intends to assist researchers in employing an ideal qualitative research methodology and in reviewing and evaluating qualitative research with proper standards and criteria.
Summary
Korean summary
질적연구 방법론은 보건의료 연구에서 연구 참여자가 경험하는 주요 현상을 잘 포착할 수 있도록 해 준다. 이 논문에서는 합의적 질적연구, 현상학적 연구, 질적 사례 연구, 근거이론, 포토보이스, 내용 분석 등 6가지의 대표적인 질적 연구 방법론에 대한 간략한 철학적 배경과 구체적인 데이터 분석 및 해석 방법을 소개한다.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Surgical De-escalation in Breast Cancer: Qualitative Research Introduces Hope for Patients and Illuminates a Blind Spot Within Blinded Studies
    Jose G. Bazan, Benjamin W. Corn
    International Journal of Radiation Oncology*Biology*Physics.2024; 118(2): 455.     CrossRef
  • Consumer Perceptions of Home-Based Percussive Massage Therapy for Musculoskeletal Concerns: Inductive Thematic Qualitative Analysis
    Saloni Butala, Pearl Valentine Galido, Benjamin K P Woo
    JMIR Rehabilitation and Assistive Technologies.2024; 11: e52328.     CrossRef
  • Analyzing the prohibition of interfaith marriage in Indonesia: legal, religious, and human rights perspectives
    M. Thahir Maloko, Sippah Chotban, Muhammad Ikram Nur Fuady, Hasdiwanti
    Cogent Social Sciences.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Intervention in autism based on Early Start Denver Model in a multiethnic immigrant setting—experiences of preschool staff involved in its implementation
    Petra Linnsand, Gudrun Nygren, Jonas Hermansson, Christopher Gillberg, Emilia Carlsson
    Frontiers in Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Author Response: Students’ Positive Coping Strategies From Disaster: A Narrative Analysis
    Minsu Ock
    Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health.2023; 56(4): 390.     CrossRef
  • Letter to the Editor: Students’ Positive Coping Strategies From Disaster: A Narrative Analysis
    Allan M. Abiera, Jan Gresil Kahambing
    Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health.2023; 56(4): 388.     CrossRef
  • Knowledge, Attitude, and Practice of Qualitative Research Among Health Sciences Faculty
    Mohamud Mohamud, Alwaleed A Albarkani, Emad Masuadi, Abdullaziz A Alsahly, Abdulaziz I Alkudairy, Yazeed F Shalabi, Abdulrahman Faqih, Khaled A Alaukili, Saad J Alsahli
    Cureus.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Patients’ Reasons to Consider and Their Attitudes toward Complementary and Alternative Medicine
    Katharina Matjuschenko, Christian Keinki, Jutta Huebner, Pranshu Sahgal
    European Journal of Cancer Care.2023; 2023: 1.     CrossRef
  • The human role to guarantee an ethical AI in healthcare: a five-facts approach
    Raquel Iniesta
    AI and Ethics.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
Qualitative Research in Healthcare: Necessity and Characteristics
Jeehee Pyo, Won Lee, Eun Young Choi, Seung Gyeong Jang, Minsu Ock
J Prev Med Public Health. 2023;56(1):12-20.   Published online January 10, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.22.451
  • 8,061 View
  • 467 Download
  • 11 Web of Science
  • 13 Crossref
AbstractAbstract AbstractSummary PDF
Quantitative and qualitative research explore various social phenomena using different methods. However, there has been a tendency to treat quantitative studies using complicated statistical techniques as more scientific and superior, whereas relatively few qualitative studies have been conducted in the medical and healthcare fields. This review aimed to provide a proper understanding of qualitative research. This review examined the characteristics of quantitative and qualitative research to help researchers select the appropriate qualitative research methodology. Qualitative research is applicable in following cases: (1) when an exploratory approach is required on a topic that is not well known, (2) when something cannot be explained fully with quantitative research, (3) when it is necessary to newly present a specific view on a research topic that is difficult to explain with existing views, (4) when it is inappropriate to present the rationale or theoretical proposition for designing hypotheses, as in quantitative research, and (5) when conducting research that requires detailed descriptive writing with literary expressions. Qualitative research is conducted in the following order: (1) selection of a research topic and question, (2) selection of a theoretical framework and methods, (3) literature analysis, (4) selection of the research participants and data collection methods, (5) data analysis and description of findings, and (6) research validation. This review can contribute to the more active use of qualitative research in healthcare, and the findings are expected to instill a proper understanding of qualitative research in researchers who review qualitative research reports and papers.
Summary
Korean summary
이 원고는 질적연구 방법론의 필요성 및 특징과 함께 보건의료 분야에서 질적연구 방법론이 활용된 선행 연구들을 정리하였다. 이는 보건의료 분야의 사회과학적 특성을 더 잘 드러내는 질적연구 방법론의 적용 및 확대에 도움이 될 것이다.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • A qualitative pilot study exploring clients’ and health-care professionals’ experiences with aquatic therapy post-stroke in Ontario, Canada
    Andresa R. Marinho-Buzelli, Abirami Vijayakumar, Elizabeth Linkewich, Catherine Gareau, Hasnain Mawji, Zoe Li, Sander L. Hitzig
    Topics in Stroke Rehabilitation.2024; 31(1): 86.     CrossRef
  • The Mindfulness-Based Social Work and Self-Care Programme: A Focus Group Study
    Alan Maddock, Karen McGuigan, Pearse McCusker, Jane Kellock
    Clinical Social Work Journal.2024; 52(1): 48.     CrossRef
  • Kazakhstani elite athletes’ perspectives on the Tokyo 2020 olympic and paralympic games postponement and their preparation during the COVID-19 pandemic: A qualitative study
    Venera Abdulla, Natalya Glushkova, Kulman Nyssanbayeva, Maira Bakasheva, Dominic Sagoe
    Performance Enhancement & Health.2024; 12(1): 100270.     CrossRef
  • Surgical De-escalation in Breast Cancer: Qualitative Research Introduces Hope for Patients and Illuminates a Blind Spot Within Blinded Studies
    Jose G. Bazan, Benjamin W. Corn
    International Journal of Radiation Oncology*Biology*Physics.2024; 118(2): 455.     CrossRef
  • Quantitative, Qualitative, Mixed Methods, and Triangulation Research Simplified
    Lina Najib Kawar, Ghada B. Dunbar, Emma M. Aquino-Maneja, Sarah L. Flores, Victoria Rondez Squier, Kim Reina Failla
    The Journal of Continuing Education in Nursing.2024; : 1.     CrossRef
  • Conducting and Writing Quantitative and Qualitative Research
    Edward Barroga, Glafera Janet Matanguihan, Atsuko Furuta, Makiko Arima, Shizuma Tsuchiya, Chikako Kawahara, Yusuke Takamiya, Miki Izumi
    Journal of Korean Medical Science.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • “The chameleon among diseases” - an explorative view of sarcoidosis and identification of the consequences for affected patients and relatives using qualitative interviews
    Charlotte Hilker, Johanna Weis, Stefanie Ziehfreund, Elizabeth V. Arkema, Tilo Biedermann, Alexander Zink
    Orphanet Journal of Rare Diseases.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Qualitative Research in Healthcare: Data Analysis
    Dasom Im, Jeehye Pyo, Haneul Lee, Hyeran Jung, Minsu Ock
    Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health.2023; 56(2): 100.     CrossRef
  • ‘How is our job affecting us?’ Neonatal Intensive Care Unit healthcare providers and their pregnancy: A descriptive qualitative study
    Gaia Dussi, Stefano Bembich, Roberta Crevatin, Sara Buchini, Silvana Schreiber, Livia Bicego, Andrea Cassone, Raffaella Dobrina
    Journal of Advanced Nursing.2023; 79(10): 3776.     CrossRef
  • Investigating Functional Impairment in Chronic Low Back Pain: A Qualitative Study from the Patients and Specialists’ Perspectives
    Arturo Cuomo, Franco Marinangeli, Alberto Magni, Emiliano Petrucci, Alessandro Vittori, Marco Cascella
    Journal of Personalized Medicine.2023; 13(6): 1012.     CrossRef
  • Author Response: Students’ Positive Coping Strategies From Disaster: A Narrative Analysis
    Minsu Ock
    Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health.2023; 56(4): 390.     CrossRef
  • Knowledge, Attitude, and Practice of Qualitative Research Among Health Sciences Faculty
    Mohamud Mohamud, Alwaleed A Albarkani, Emad Masuadi, Abdullaziz A Alsahly, Abdulaziz I Alkudairy, Yazeed F Shalabi, Abdulrahman Faqih, Khaled A Alaukili, Saad J Alsahli
    Cureus.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • A qualitative study on hope in iranian end stage renal disease patients undergoing hemodialysis
    Masoume Rambod, Nilofar Pasyar, Ali Mohammad Parviniannasab
    BMC Nephrology.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
Special Article
Perceptions of the General Public About Health-related Quality of Life and the EQ-5D Questionnaire: A Qualitative Study in Korea
Minsu Ock, Jeehee Pyo, Min-Woo Jo, Michael Herdman, Nan Luo
J Prev Med Public Health. 2022;55(3):213-225.   Published online May 31, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.22.151
  • 2,972 View
  • 173 Download
  • 2 Web of Science
  • 2 Crossref
AbstractAbstract AbstractSummary PDF
Objectives
The aim of this qualitative study was to investigate how members of the general public in Korea interpret the concept of health, and which dimensions of health are most important to them. We also explored their perceptions of the EuroQoL 5-Dimension (EQ-5D), including the EuroQoL visual analogue scale (EQ-VAS).
Methods
We conducted face-to-face, in-depth interviews with 20 individuals from the general population, using a semi-structured interview guide. Content analysis was performed with verbatim transcripts and field notes to identify codes and categorize them according to their similarities and associations.
Results
In total, 734 different codes were derived and classified into 4 categories. Participants cited the importance of both the mental and physical aspects of health, although they emphasized that the physical aspects appeared to play a larger role in their conceptualization of health. Participants noted that the EQ-5D has the advantage of being composed of 5 dimensions that are simple and contain both physical and mental areas necessary to describe health. However, some of them mentioned the need to add more dimensions of mental health and social health. Participants showed great satisfaction with the visually well-presented EQ-VAS. However, participants opined that the EQ-VAS scores might not be comparable across respondents because of different ways of responding to the scale.
Conclusions
While physical health is a fundamental aspect of health, mental and social aspects are also important to Koreans. The content of the EQ-5D broadly matched the attributes of health considered important by Koreans.
Summary
Korean summary
이번 연구에서는 질적 연구 방법론을 활용하여 한국인이 건강을 이해하고 개념화하는 방법과 건강의 어떤 차원을 중요하게 여기는지 살펴보면서 EQ-5D에 대한 인식을 살펴보았다. 이번 연구를 통하여 EQ-5D와 EQ VAS가 전반적으로 한국인의 건강 관련 삶의 질을 잘 측정할 수 있지만, 정신적 및 사회적 측면에 대한 항목을 추가하면 한국인의 건강 관련 삶의 질을 더 잘 반영할 수 있음을 확인하였다.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • How Well Does the EQ-5D-Y-5L Describe Children With Intellectual Disability?: “There’s a Lot More to My Child Than That She Can’t Wash or Dress Herself.”
    A. Marie Blackmore, Brendan Mulhern, Richard Norman, Dinah Reddihough, Catherine S. Choong, Peter Jacoby, Jenny Downs
    Value in Health.2024; 27(2): 190.     CrossRef
  • Acceptability of the routine use and collection of a generic patient reported outcome measure from the perspective of healthcare staff: a qualitative study
    David A Snowdon, Velandai Srikanth, Richard Beare, Kate E Noeske, Elizabeth Le, Bridget O’Bree, Nadine E Andrew
    Journal of Patient-Reported Outcomes.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
COVID-19: Original Article
Associations Between Compliance With Non-pharmaceutical Interventions and Social-distancing Policies in Korea During the COVID-19 Pandemic
Yu Seong Hwang, Heui Sug Jo
J Prev Med Public Health. 2021;54(4):230-237.   Published online June 16, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.21.139
  • 4,996 View
  • 179 Download
  • 6 Crossref
AbstractAbstract AbstractSummary PDFSupplementary Material
Objectives
This study explored changes in individuals’ behavior in response to social distancing (SD) levels and the “no gatherings of more than 5 people” (NGM5) rule in Korea during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic.
Methods
Using survey data from the COVID-19 Behavior Tracker, exploratory factor analysis extracted 3 preventive factors: maintenance of personal hygiene, avoiding going out, and avoiding meeting people. Each factor was used as a dependent variable. The chi-square test was used to compare differences in distributions between categorical variables, while binary logistic regression was performed to identify factors associated with high compliance with measures to prevent transmission.
Results
In men, all 3 factors were significantly associated with lower compliance. Younger age groups were associated with lower compliance with maintenance of personal hygiene and avoiding meeting people. Employment status was significantly associated with avoiding going out and avoiding meeting people. Residence in the capital area was significantly associated with higher compliance with personal hygiene and avoiding venturing out. Increasing SD levels were associated with personal hygiene, avoiding going out, and avoiding meeting people. The NGM5 policy was not significantly associated with compliance.
Conclusions
SD levels, gender, age, employment status, and region had explanatory power for compliance with non-pharmaceutical interventions (NPIs). Strengthening social campaigns to inspire voluntary compliance with NPIs, especially focused on men, younger people, full-time workers, and residents of the capital area is recommended. Simultaneously, efforts need to be made to segment SD measures into substrategies with detailed guidance at each level.
Summary
Korean summary
이 연구에서는 대한민국 정부가 COVID-19 방역 정책으로 시행한 ‘사회적 거리두기 단계 조절’과 ‘5인 이상 집합 금지 조치’에 대한 개인의 순응도를 파악하였다. 이를 위해 영국 임페리얼 대학이 2020년 4월부터 2021년 4월까지 24회에 걸쳐 한국인 총 13,300명에게 개인 행동을 조사한 공개 데이터를 분석하였다. 그 결과, 더 높은 수준의 사회적 거리두기 단계 – 특히 다중이용시설들이 폐쇄되는 2.5 단계 -에서 비약물적 중재 조치의 순응도와 더 강한 상관관계를 보였다. 그러나 5인 이상 집합금지는 순응도와 유의한 상관관계를 보이지 않아 사람들이 모임 인원을 제한할 뿐 지속적으로 모임을 하는 것으로 해석된다. 연령, 성별, 직업 구분, 거주지와 같은 인구-사회학적 특성들이 순응도에 영향을 주는 것으로 나타났으므로, 낮은 순응도를 보이는 인구집단의 순응도를 고취시킬 수 있도록 세부적인 전략 (예: 재택근무, 온라인회의, 온라인 수업 권장 등)이 필요하다.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Behavioural Sciences Contribution to Suppressing Transmission of Covid-19 in the UK: A Systematic Literature Review
    Gill Hubbard, Chantal den Daas, Marie Johnston, Jennifer Dunsmore, Mona Maier, Rob Polson, Diane Dixon
    International Journal of Behavioral Medicine.2024; 31(1): 1.     CrossRef
  • Real-time forecasting of COVID-19 spread according to protective behavior and vaccination: autoregressive integrated moving average models
    Chieh Cheng, Wei-Ming Jiang, Byron Fan, Yu-Chieh Cheng, Ya-Ting Hsu, Hsiao-Yu Wu, Hsiao-Han Chang, Hsiao-Hui Tsou
    BMC Public Health.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • The Unequal Effects of Social Distancing Policy on Subway Ridership during the COVID-19 Pandemic in Seoul, South Korea
    Jaeyoung Ha, Suyoung Jo, Hee-kyoung Nam, Sung-il Cho
    Journal of Urban Health.2022; 99(1): 77.     CrossRef
  • Do the Self-Reported Changes in Physical Activity After the Emergence of the COVID-19 Pandemic Associate With Major Depression According to Moderate to Vigorous Physical Activity Status?
    Jeong Hyun Ahn, Jin Young Nam
    Journal of Physical Activity and Health.2022; 19(7): 518.     CrossRef
  • Different patterns of excess all-cause mortality by age and sex in Hungary during the 2nd and 3rd waves of the COVID-19 pandemic
    Vince Fazekas-Pongor, Zsófia Szarvas, Norbert D. Nagy, Anna Péterfi, Zoltán Ungvári, Viktor J. Horváth, Szilvia Mészáros, Adam G. Tabák
    GeroScience.2022; 44(5): 2361.     CrossRef
  • Generic Logic Model for Coronavirus Disease-2019 Responses Based on the South Korean Experience
    Hae-ryoung Chun, Kyuhyun Yoon, Hana Kim, Eunsil Cheon, Jaeyoung Ha, Sangwoo Tak, Sung-il Cho
    Risk Management and Healthcare Policy.2021; Volume 14: 4765.     CrossRef
COVID-19: Special Article
COVID-19 International Collaborative Research by the Health Insurance Review and Assessment Service Using Its Nationwide Real-world Data: Database, Outcomes, and Implications
Yeunsook Rho, Do Yeon Cho, Yejin Son, Yu Jin Lee, Ji Woo Kim, Hye Jin Lee, Seng Chan You, Rae Woong Park, Jin Yong Lee
J Prev Med Public Health. 2021;54(1):8-16.   Published online January 26, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.20.616
  • 4,449 View
  • 198 Download
  • 8 Web of Science
  • 7 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
This article aims to introduce the inception and operation of the COVID-19 International Collaborative Research Project, the world’s first coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) open data project for research, along with its dataset and research method, and to discuss relevant considerations for collaborative research using nationwide real-world data (RWD). COVID-19 has spread across the world since early 2020, becoming a serious global health threat to life, safety, and social and economic activities. However, insufficient RWD from patients was available to help clinicians efficiently diagnose and treat patients with COVID-19, or to provide necessary information to the government for policy-making. Countries that saw a rapid surge of infections had to focus on leveraging medical professionals to treat patients, and the circumstances made it even more difficult to promptly use COVID-19 RWD. Against this backdrop, the Health Insurance Review and Assessment Service (HIRA) of Korea decided to open its COVID-19 RWD collected through Korea’s universal health insurance program, under the title of the COVID-19 International Collaborative Research Project. The dataset, consisting of 476 508 claim statements from 234 427 patients (7590 confirmed cases) and 18 691 318 claim statements of the same patients for the previous 3 years, was established and hosted on HIRA’s in-house server. Researchers who applied to participate in the project uploaded analysis code on the platform prepared by HIRA, and HIRA conducted the analysis and provided outcome values. As of November 2020, analyses have been completed for 129 research projects, which have been published or are in the process of being published in prestigious journals.
Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Effect of changes in the hearing aid subsidy on the prevalence of hearing loss in South Korea
    Chul Young Yoon, Junhun Lee, Tae Hoon Kong, Young Joon Seo
    Frontiers in Neurology.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Scalable Infrastructure Supporting Reproducible Nationwide Healthcare Data Analysis toward FAIR Stewardship
    Ji-Woo Kim, Chungsoo Kim, Kyoung-Hoon Kim, Yujin Lee, Dong Han Yu, Jeongwon Yun, Hyeran Baek, Rae Woong Park, Seng Chan You
    Scientific Data.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Comparative risk of incidence and clinical outcomes of COVID-19 among proton pump inhibitor and histamine-2 receptor antagonist short-term users: a nationwide retrospective cohort study
    Jimyung Park, Seng Chan You, Jaehyeong Cho, Chan Hyuk Park, Woon Geon Shin, Rae Woong Park, Seung In Seo
    BMC Pharmacology and Toxicology.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Decreased patient visits for ankle sprain during the COVID-19 pandemic in South Korea: A nationwide retrospective study
    Youngsik Hwang, Dasom Kim, Sukhyun Ryu
    Preventive Medicine Reports.2022; 26: 101728.     CrossRef
  • Early Real-World Data to Assess Benefits and Risks of COVID-19 Vaccines: A Systematic Review of Methods
    Tatiane B. Ribeiro, Fátima Roque, Fidelia Ida, Ana I. Plácido, Mai Vu, Jose J. Hernández-Muñoz, Maria Teresa Herdeiro
    Vaccines.2022; 10(11): 1896.     CrossRef
  • Challenges in evaluating treatments for COVID-19: The case of in-hospital anticoagulant use and the risk of adverse outcomes
    Ya-Hui Yu, In-Sun Oh, Han Eol Jeong, Robert W. Platt, Antonios Douros, Ju-Young Shin, Kristian B. Filion
    Frontiers in Pharmacology.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Use of repurposed and adjuvant drugs in hospital patients with covid-19: multinational network cohort study
    Albert Prats-Uribe, Anthony G Sena, Lana Yin Hui Lai, Waheed-Ul-Rahman Ahmed, Heba Alghoul, Osaid Alser, Thamir M Alshammari, Carlos Areia, William Carter, Paula Casajust, Dalia Dawoud, Asieh Golozar, Jitendra Jonnagaddala, Paras P Mehta, Mengchun Gong, D
    BMJ.2021; : n1038.     CrossRef
Original Article
The Role of Social Support and the Neighborhood Environment on Physical Activity in Low-income, Mexican-American Women in South Texas
Jennifer J. Salinas, Marisol McDaniel, Deborah Parra-Medina
J Prev Med Public Health. 2018;51(5):234-241.   Published online July 25, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.18.052
  • 5,419 View
  • 146 Download
  • 8 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
To determine the relationships between physical activity (PA), the neighborhood environment support for PA, and social support for PA among Mexican-American women living in South Texas. The Enlace study was a randomized controlled trial that tested the effectiveness of a promotora-led PA intervention among low-income Mexican origin women (n=614) living in colonias.
Methods
The dependent measures included accelerometer-measured average moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA) and sedentary breaks and the Community Health Activities Model Program for Seniors PA 41-item questionnaire. The independent measures included the Physical Activity and Neighborhood Environment Scale (PANES) and the 13-item Physical Activity Social Support (PASS) scale.
Results
Enlace participants were on average 40.4 (standard deviation, 10.3) years old, born in Mexico (86.1%), and uninsured (83.1%). Adjusted linear regression results indicated that each 1-point increment in the PANES overall score was associated with 0.050 (p<0.001) unit increase in sedentary break and a −0.043 (p=0.001) unit decrease in sedentary break duration. Both PANES (β=0.296; p=0.002) and PASS scores (β=0.076; p<0.001) were associated with weekly average self-reported MVPA. Interaction effects were observed between PASS scores and accelerometer-measured frequency of sedentary breaks and sedentary time duration.
Conclusions
The findings of this study indicate that the relationships between PA and built environment and social support are measure-dependent and suggest that reducing sedentary time in this population may require a closer assessment of social support for PA.
Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Bridging the Built and Social Environments: A Systematic Review of Studies Investigating Influences on Physical Activity
    Tyler Prochnow, Laurel S. Curran, Christina Amo, Meg S. Patterson
    Journal of Physical Activity and Health.2023; : 1.     CrossRef
  • An ORBIT Phase 1: Design study of a citywide employer-based walking challenges in a predominantly Mexican American metropolitan area
    Jennifer J. Salinas, Roy Valenzuela, Jon Sheen, Malcolm Carlyle, Jennifer Gay, Alma Morales
    Journal of Health Psychology.2022; 27(4): 961.     CrossRef
  • Factors promoting collaboration between community sports leaders and guardians in urban areas of Japan: A cross-sectional study
    Yoshino Hosokawa, Hiroko Yako-Suketomo, Kaori Ishii, Koichiro Oka
    Frontiers in Public Health.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Long-term physical activity outcomes in the Seamos Activas II trial
    Bess H. Marcus, Britta A. Larsen, Sarah E. Linke, Sheri J. Hartman, Dori Pekmezi, Tanya Benitez, James Sallis, Andrea S. Mendoza-Vasconez, Shira I. Dunsiger
    Preventive Medicine Reports.2021; 24: 101628.     CrossRef
  • Associations of Partner Support and Acculturation With Physical Activity in Mexican American Women
    Neomie C. Congello, Deborah Koniak-Griffin, Mary-Lynn Brecht, Ron D. Hays, Mary-Sue V. Heilemann, Adeline M. Nyamathi
    Hispanic Health Care International.2020; 18(2): 98.     CrossRef
  • Correlates of walking among disadvantaged groups: A systematic review
    Toni A. Hilland, Matthew Bourke, Glen Wiesner, Enrique Garcia Bengoechea, Alexandra G. Parker, Michaela Pascoe, Melinda Craike
    Health & Place.2020; 63: 102337.     CrossRef
  • Predictors of Latinx Youth Health and Emotional Well-being: Social Determinants of Health Perspective
    Mary Lehman Held, Aubrey Jones, Shandra Forrest-Bank
    Journal of Racial and Ethnic Health Disparities.2020; 7(6): 1188.     CrossRef
  • Effects of Social Support, Family Support and Repulsion Related Nursing Home Use on the Well-Dying of Elderly
    Young Ju Oh, Kyeong In Cha, Young Hee Jeon
    Korean Journal of Adult Nursing.2020; 32(3): 235.     CrossRef
Brief Report
Citation Discovery Tools for Conducting Adaptive Meta-analyses to Update Systematic Reviews
Jong-Myon Bae, Eun Hee Kim
J Prev Med Public Health. 2016;49(2):129-133.   Published online March 14, 2016
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.15.074
  • 9,275 View
  • 109 Download
  • 18 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
The systematic review (SR) is a research methodology that aims to synthesize related evidence. Updating previously conducted SRs is necessary when new evidence has been produced, but no consensus has yet emerged on the appropriate update methodology. The authors have developed a new SR update method called ‘adaptive meta-analysis’ (AMA) using the ‘cited by’, ‘similar articles’, and ‘related articles’ citation discovery tools in the PubMed and Scopus databases. This study evaluates the usefulness of these citation discovery tools for updating SRs.
Methods
Lists were constructed by applying the citation discovery tools in the two databases to the articles analyzed by a published SR. The degree of overlap between the lists and distribution of excluded results were evaluated.
Results
The articles ultimately selected for the SR update meta-analysis were found in the lists obtained from the ‘cited by’ and ‘similar’ tools in PubMed. Most of the selected articles appeared in both the ‘cited by’ lists in Scopus and PubMed. The Scopus ‘related’ tool did not identify the appropriate articles.
Conclusions
The AMA, which involves using both citation discovery tools in PubMed, and optionally, the ‘related’ tool in Scopus, was found to be useful for updating an SR.
Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • The impacts of menopausal hormone therapy on longer-term health consequences of ovarian hormone deficiency
    B.-K. Yoon
    Climacteric.2023; 26(3): 193.     CrossRef
  • Citation tracking for systematic literature searching: A scoping review
    Julian Hirt, Thomas Nordhausen, Christian Appenzeller‐Herzog, Hannah Ewald
    Research Synthesis Methods.2023; 14(3): 563.     CrossRef
  • Circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels and hypertension risk after adjusting for publication bias
    Jong-Myon Bae
    Clinical Hypertension.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Coffee Consumption and Risk of Prostate Cancer in Local, Advanced, and Fatal Grades: A Meta-Epidemiological Study of Prospective Cohort Studies
    Jong-Myon Bae
    The Korean Journal of Urological Oncology.2021; 19(1): 16.     CrossRef
  • Sex as an effect modifier in the association between alcohol intake and gastric cancer risk
    Jong-Myon Bae
    World Journal of Gastrointestinal Oncology.2021; 13(5): 453.     CrossRef
  • Coffee consumption and risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus in Asians: A meta-epidemiological study of population-based cohort studies
    Jong-Myon Bae
    World Journal of Diabetes.2021; 12(6): 908.     CrossRef
  • Hormonal Replacement Therapy and Risk of Thyroid Cancer in Women: A Meta-Epidemiological Analysis of Prospective Cohort Studies
    Jong-Myon Bae
    Journal of Menopausal Medicine.2021; 27(3): 141.     CrossRef
  • History of Diabetes Mellitus and Risk of Breast Cancer in Asian Women: A Meta-Epidemiological Analysis of Population-Based Cohort Studies
    Jong-Myon Bae
    Journal of Menopausal Medicine.2020; 26(1): 29.     CrossRef
  • Body Mass Index and Risk of Gastric Cancer in Asian Adults: A Meta-Epidemiological Meta-Analysis of Population-Based Cohort Studies
    Jong-Myon Bae
    Cancer Research and Treatment.2020; 52(2): 369.     CrossRef
  • History of Coffee Consumption and Risk of Alzheimer's Disease: a Meta-epidemiological Study of Population-based Cohort Studies
    Jong-Myon Bae
    Dementia and Neurocognitive Disorders.2020; 19(3): 108.     CrossRef
  • History of Diabetes Mellitus and Risk of Prostate Cancer: A Meta-Epidemiological Study of Population-Based Cohort Studies in East Asian Men
    Jong-Myon Bae
    The Korean Journal of Urological Oncology.2019; 17(3): 119.     CrossRef
  • Prophylactic efficacy of probiotics on travelers’ diarrhea: an adaptive meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials
    Jong-Myon Bae
    Epidemiology and Health.2018; 40: e2018043.     CrossRef
  • The Role of Menopausal Hormone Therapy in Reducing All-cause Mortality in Postmenopausal Women Younger than 60 Years: An Adaptive Meta-analysis
    Jong-Myon Bae, Byung-Koo Yoon
    Journal of Menopausal Medicine.2018; 24(3): 139.     CrossRef
  • Is there evidence that Kudoa septempunctata can cause an outbreak of acute food poisoning?
    Young-Bae Chung, Jong-Myon Bae
    Epidemiology and Health.2017; 39: e2017004.     CrossRef
  • Human papillomavirus infection and risk of breast cancer: a meta-analysis of case-control studies
    Jong-Myon Bae, Eun Hee Kim
    Infectious Agents and Cancer.2016;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Epstein-Barr Virus Infection and Risk of Breast Cancer: An Adaptive Meta-Analysis for Case-Control Studies
    Jong-Myon Bae, Eun Hee Kim
    Archives of Clinical Infectious Diseases.2016;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Dietary intakes of citrus fruit and risk of gastric cancer incidence: an adaptive meta-analysis of cohort studies
    Jong-Myon Bae, Eun Hee Kim
    Epidemiology and Health.2016; 38: e2016034.     CrossRef
  • Breast Density and Risk of Breast Cancer in Asian Women: A Meta-analysis of Observational Studies
    Jong-Myon Bae, Eun Hee Kim
    Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health.2016; 49(6): 367.     CrossRef
Original Article
Medical Care Utilization During 1 Year Prior to Death in Suicides Motivated by Physical Illnesses
Jaelim Cho, Won Joon Lee, Ki Tae Moon, Mina Suh, Jungwoo Sohn, Kyoung Hwa Ha, Changsoo Kim, Dong Chun Shin, Sang Hyuk Jung
J Prev Med Public Health. 2013;46(3):147-154.   Published online May 31, 2013
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2013.46.3.147
  • 9,018 View
  • 94 Download
  • 18 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives

Many epidemiological studies have suggested that a variety of medical illnesses are associated with suicide. Investigating the time-varying pattern of medical care utilization prior to death in suicides motivated by physical illnesses would be helpful for developing suicide prevention programs for patients with physical illnesses.

Methods

Suicides motivated by physical illnesses were identified by the investigator's note from the National Police Agency, which was linked to the data from the Health Insurance Review and Assessment. We investigated the time-varying patterns of medical care utilization during 1 year prior to suicide using repeated-measures data analysis after adjustment for age, gender, area of residence, and socioeconomic status.

Results

Among 1994 suicides for physical illness, 1893 (94.9%) suicides contacted any medical care services and 445 (22.3%) suicides contacted mental health care during 1 year prior to suicide. The number of medical care visits and individual medical expenditures increased as the date of suicide approached (p<0.001). The number of medical care visits for psychiatric disorders prior to suicide significantly increased only in 40- to 64-year-old men (p=0.002), women <40 years old (p=0.011) and women 40 to 64 years old (p=0.021) after adjustment for residence, socioeconomic status, and morbidity.

Conclusions

Most of the suicides motivated by physical illnesses contacted medical care during 1 year prior to suicide, but many of them did not undergo psychiatric evaluation. This underscores the need for programs to provide psychosocial support to patients with physical illnesses.

Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Suicide risk of chronic diseases and comorbidities: A Korean case-control study
    Areum Song, Emily Jiali Koh, Weon-Young Lee, Shusen Chang, Jiseun Lim, Minjae Choi, Myung Ki
    Journal of Affective Disorders.2024; 349: 431.     CrossRef
  • Late-life suicide in an aging world
    Diego De Leo
    Nature Aging.2022; 2(1): 7.     CrossRef
  • Risk factors for suicidal behavior in older adults
    D.P. Ponomareva, M.S. Artemieva M.S. Artemieva
    Vestnik nevrologii, psihiatrii i nejrohirurgii (Bulletin of Neurology, Psychiatry and Neurosurgery).2022; (1): 18.     CrossRef
  • Innovating Technology-Enhanced Interventions for Youth Suicide: Insights for Measuring Implementation Outcomes
    Hannah S. Szlyk, Jia Tan, Rebecca Lengnick-Hall
    Frontiers in Psychology.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Suicide prevention in older adults
    Carlos Augusto de Mendonça Lima, Diego De Leo, Gabriel Ivbijaro, Igor Svab
    Asia-Pacific Psychiatry.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Suicide in late life: A viewpoint
    Diego De Leo, Andrea Viecelli Giannotti
    Preventive Medicine.2021; 152: 106735.     CrossRef
  • Understanding the impact of clinical characteristics and healthcare utilizations on suicide among cancer sufferers: a case-control study in Hong Kong
    Yu Vera Men, Tai-Chung Lam, Cheuk Yui Yeung, Paul Siu Fai Yip
    The Lancet Regional Health - Western Pacific.2021; 17: 100298.     CrossRef
  • Risk Factors for Suicide in a National Sample of Veterans With Multiple Sclerosis
    Quinn D. Kellerman, Narineh Hartoonian, Megan L. Beier, Steven L. Leipertz, Charles Maynard, Trisha A. Hostetter, Jodie K. Haselkorn, Aaron P. Turner
    Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation.2020; 101(7): 1138.     CrossRef
  • Wearing a happy mask: mother’s expressions of suicidality with postpartum depression
    Regina Praetorius, December Maxwell, Komal Alam
    Social Work in Mental Health.2020; 18(4): 429.     CrossRef
  • Adaptation of evidence‐based suicide prevention strategies during and after the COVID‐19 pandemic
    Danuta Wasserman, Miriam Iosue, Anika Wuestefeld, Vladimir Carli
    World Psychiatry.2020; 19(3): 294.     CrossRef
  • Contact with primary and mental health care prior to suicide: A systematic review of the literature from 2000 to 2017
    Kim Stene-Larsen, Anne Reneflot
    Scandinavian Journal of Public Health.2019; 47(1): 9.     CrossRef
  • Use of prescription medication prior to suicide in Norway
    Anne Reneflot, Silje L. Kaspersen, Lars Johan Hauge, Jorid Kalseth
    BMC Health Services Research.2019;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Use of primary healthcare services prior to suicide in Norway: a descriptive comparison of immigrants and the majority population
    Carine Øien-Ødegaard, Anne Reneflot, Lars Johan Hauge
    BMC Health Services Research.2019;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Clinical epidemiology of long-term suicide risk in a nationwide population-based cohort study in South Korea
    Hyewon Lee, Woojae Myung, Chunsoo Lee, Junbae Choi, Ho Kim, Bernard J. Carroll, Doh Kwan Kim
    Journal of Psychiatric Research.2018; 100: 47.     CrossRef
  • Areas of uncertainties and unmet needs in bipolar disorders: clinical and research perspectives
    Michael Bauer, Ole A Andreassen, John R Geddes, Lars Vedel Kessing, Ute Lewitzka, Thomas G Schulze, Eduard Vieta
    The Lancet Psychiatry.2018; 5(11): 930.     CrossRef
  • A study of people who attempted suicide referred to the emergency ward of Ali Ibn Abi Taleb hospital, Rafsanjan, Iran (2016)
    Alireza Taherifard, Hassan Ahmadinia, Reza Vazirinejad, Zahra Javadi, Seyed Zia Tabatabaei, Mohsen Rezaeian
    Journal of Occupational Health and Epidemiology.2018; 7(4): 201.     CrossRef
  • Towards Actualizing the Value Potential of Korea Health Insurance Review and Assessment (HIRA) Data as a Resource for Health Research: Strengths, Limitations, Applications, and Strategies for Optimal Use of HIRA Data
    Jee-Ae Kim, Seokjun Yoon, Log-Young Kim, Dong-Sook Kim
    Journal of Korean Medical Science.2017; 32(5): 718.     CrossRef
  • Effectiveness of Nursing Preventive Interventions in Suicide re- Attempts
    B Ghanbari, SK Malakouti, M Nojomi, K Alavi, SH Khaleghparast, A Sohrabzadeh
    Iran Journal of Nursing.2016; 29(99): 34.     CrossRef
English Abstracts
Power Estimation and Follow-Up Period Evaluation in Korea Radiation Effect and Epidemiology Cohort Study.
In Seong Cho, Minkyo Song, Yunhee Choi, Zhong Min Li, Yoon Ok Ahn
J Prev Med Public Health. 2010;43(6):543-548.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2010.43.6.543
  • 5,043 View
  • 70 Download
  • 2 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
The objective of this study was to calculate sample size and power in an ongoing cohort, Korea radiation effect and epidemiology cohort (KREEC). METHOD: Sample size calculation was performed using PASS 2002 based on Cox regression and Poisson regression models. Person-year was calculated by using data from '1993-1997 Total cancer incidence by sex and age, Seoul' and Korean statistical informative service. RESULTS: With the assumption of relative risk=1.3, exposure:non-exposure=1:2 and power=0.8, sample size calculation was 405 events based on a Cox regression model. When the relative risk was assumed to be 1.5 then number of events was 170. Based on a Poisson regression model, relative risk=1.3, exposure:non-exposure=1:2 and power=0.8 rendered 385 events. Relative risk of 1.5 resulted in a total of 157 events. We calculated person-years (PY) with event numbers and cancer incidence rate in the non-exposure group. Based on a Cox regression model, with relative risk=1.3, exposure:non-exposure=1:2 and power=0.8, 136 245PY was needed to secure the power. In a Poisson regression model, with relative risk=1.3, exposure:non-exposure=1:2 and power=0.8, person-year needed was 129517PY. A total of 1939 cases were identified in KREEC until December 2007. CONCLUSIONS: A retrospective power calculation in an ongoing study might be biased by the data. Prospective power calculation should be carried out based on various assumptions prior to the study.
Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Comparative Analysis of Driver Mutations and Transcriptomes in Papillary Thyroid Cancer by Region of Residence in South Korea
    Jandee Lee, Seonhyang Jeong, Hwa Young Lee, Sunmi Park, Meesson Jeong, Young Suk Jo
    Endocrinology and Metabolism.2023; 38(6): 720.     CrossRef
  • Cancer Risk in Adult Residents near Nuclear Power Plants in Korea - A Cohort Study of 1992-2010
    Yoon-Ok Ahn, Zhong Min Li
    Journal of Korean Medical Science.2012; 27(9): 999.     CrossRef
Current State and Challenges of Pharmacoeconomic Evaluation in Korea.
Sang Eun Choi
J Prev Med Public Health. 2008;41(2):74-79.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2008.41.2.74
  • 4,022 View
  • 46 Download
  • 3 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Since the positive listing system for prescription drug reimbursement has been introduced in Korea, the number of pharmacoeconomic evaluation studies has increased. However it is not clear if the quality of pharmacoeconomic evaluation study has improved. Due to the lack of randomized clinical studies in Korean health care setting, Korean economic evaluation studies have typically integrated the local cost data and foreign clinical data. Therefore methodological issues can be raised in regard to data coherence and consistency. But the quality of data was not questiened and the potential bias has not been investigated yet. Even though changes in policy have encouraged the undertaking of pharmacoeconomic evaluations, there is few public-side funding for validation study of cost-effectiveness models and data. Several companies perform economic evaluation studies to be submitted on behalf of their own products, but do not want the study results to be disclosed to the academic community or public. To improve the present conduct of pharmacoeconomic evaluations in Korea, various funding sources need to be developed, and, like other multidisciplinary areas, the experts in different fields of study should collaborate to ensure the validity and credibility of pharmacoeconomic evaluations.
Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Barriers and Facilitators of Pharmacoeconomic Studies: A Review of Evidence from the Middle Eastern Countries
    Abdulaziz Ibrahim Alzarea, Yusra Habib Khan, Abdullah Salah Alanazi, Muhammad Hammad Butt, Ziyad Saeed Almalki, Abdullah K. AlAhmari, Saud Alsahali, Tauqeer Hussain Mallhi
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2022; 19(13): 7862.     CrossRef
  • Barriers to implementing pharmacoeconomics: interview study
    Qais Alefan, Esra’a Hamdouni, Hamza Alhamad, Tareq Mukattash, Karen Rascati
    Expert Review of Pharmacoeconomics & Outcomes Research.2021; 21(1): 93.     CrossRef
  • Pharmaceutical Policy Reforms to Regulate Drug Prices in the Asia Pacific Region: The Case of Australia, China, India, Malaysia, New Zealand, and South Korea
    Syed Shahzad Hasan, Chia Siang Kow, Dalia Dawoud, Omneya Mohamed, Darrin Baines, Zaheer-Ud-Din Babar
    Value in Health Regional Issues.2019; 18: 18.     CrossRef
Strengthening Causal Inference in Studies using Non-experimental Data: An Application of Propensity Score and Instrumental Variable Methods.
Myoung Hee Kim, Young Kyung Do
J Prev Med Public Health. 2007;40(6):495-504.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2007.40.6.495
  • 4,821 View
  • 86 Download
  • 8 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
This study attempts to show how studies using non-experimental data can strengthen causal inferences by applying propensity score and instrumental variable methods based on the counterfactual framework. For illustrative purposes, we examine the effect of having private health insurance on the probability of experiencing at least one hospital admission in the previous year. METHODS: Using data from the 4th wave of the Korea Labor and Income Panel Study, we compared the results obtained using propensity score and instrumental variable methods with those from conventional logistic and linear regression models, respectively. RESULTS: While conventional multiple regression analyses fail to identify the effect, the results estimated using propensity score and instrumental variable methods suggest that having private health insurance has positive and statistically significant effects on hospital admission. CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrates that propensity score and instrumental variable methods provide potentially useful alternatives to conventional regression approaches in making causal inferences using non-experimental data.
Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Association between private health insurance and medical use by linking subjective health and chronic diseases
    Jeong Min Yang, Su bin Lee, Ye ji Kim, Douk young Chon, Jong Youn Moon, Jae Hyun Kim
    Medicine.2022; 101(32): e29865.     CrossRef
  • Gender-related difference in the relationship between smoking status and periodontal diseases: the propensity score matching approach
    Eun-Sil Choi, Hae-Young Kim
    Journal of Korean Academy of Oral Health.2017; 41(2): 122.     CrossRef
  • The Effect of Obesity on Medical Costs and Health Service Uses
    Da-Yang Kim, Jin-Mi Kwak, So-Young Choi, Kwang-Soo Lee
    The Korean Journal of Health Service Management.2017; 11(3): 65.     CrossRef
  • Effect of private health insurance on health care utilization in a universal public insurance system: A case of South Korea
    Boyoung Jeon, Soonman Kwon
    Health Policy.2013; 113(1-2): 69.     CrossRef
  • Health Disparities among Wage Workers Driven by Employment Instability in the Republic of Korea
    Minsoo Jung
    International Journal of Health Services.2013; 43(3): 483.     CrossRef
  • Survey of Editors and Reviewers of High-Impact Psychology Journals: Statistical and Research Design Problems in Submitted Manuscripts
    Alex Harris, Rachelle Reeder, Jenny Hyun
    The Journal of Psychology.2011; 145(3): 195.     CrossRef
  • Limitations of the SEER Database for Demonstrating Causal Relationships Between Treatments and Outcomes in Pediatric Intestinal Tumors
    Alysandra Lal, Dave R. Lal
    Journal of Surgical Research.2010; 161(2): 237.     CrossRef
  • Common statistical and research design problems in manuscripts submitted to high-impact psychiatry journals: What editors and reviewers want authors to know
    Alex H.S. Harris, Rachelle Reeder, Jenny K. Hyun
    Journal of Psychiatric Research.2009; 43(15): 1231.     CrossRef
Historical Article
Historical Advances in Health Inequality Research.
Young Ho Khang
J Prev Med Public Health. 2007;40(6):422-430.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2007.40.6.422
  • 4,876 View
  • 109 Download
  • 6 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
The socioeconomic inequalities in health have recently become an important public health concern in South Korea, and the issue has gained increasing attention from many South Korean researchers due to the increasing income inequality and widening social polarization following its economic crisis in the late 1990s. However, despite the mounting literature on health inequalities published in recent years, the history of research on health inequality in South Korea is premature in comparison to the long histories in several Western countries. Understanding the historical background underlying the issue of health inequality research may aid in establishing and accumulating scientifically solid evidence in South Korea. It may also direct the South Korean research community to develop research agendas that are more politically and academically appropriate for South Korean society. This paper describes the historical development of health inequality research in the West and introduces several important issues contributing to the advancement of health inequality research. Specifically, the major studies conducted before and after the UK Black Report are presented. In addition, the history and current status of health inequality research in South Korea are documented and evaluated. Finally, several research agendas for the quantitative and qualitative improvement of health inequality research in South Korea are proposed.
Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • The Gap in Community Sports: Utilization of Sports Facilities in South Korea
    Minuk Kang, Youngjik Lee
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2022; 19(8): 4495.     CrossRef
  • Regional Disparity of Cardiovascular Mortality and Its Determinants
    Hyeon Jin Kang, Soonman Kwon
    Health Policy and Management.2016; 26(1): 12.     CrossRef
  • The association between income inequality and all-cause mortality across urban communities in Korea
    Jong Park, So-Yeon Ryu, Mi-ah Han, Seong-Woo Choi
    BMC Public Health.2015;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • A Study on Factors Affecting Cancer Mortality in Busan
    Su-Kyung Song, Hye-Sook Kim, Kyoung-Min Lim
    The Korean Journal of Health Service Management.2014; 8(4): 81.     CrossRef
  • Socioeconomic inequalities in health status in Korea
    Kyunghee Jung-Choi, Yu-Mi Kim
    Journal of the Korean Medical Association.2013; 56(3): 167.     CrossRef
  • Health Inequalities Policy in Korea: Current Status and Future Challenges
    Young-Ho Khang, Sang-il Lee
    Journal of Korean Medical Science.2012; 27(Suppl): S33.     CrossRef
English Abstracts
Ethical Considerations in Genomic Cohort Study.
Eun Kyung Choi, Ock Joo Kim
J Prev Med Public Health. 2007;40(2):122-129.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2007.40.2.122
  • 4,410 View
  • 36 Download
  • 1 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
During the last decade, genomic cohort study has been developed in many countries by linking health data and genetic data in stored samples. Genomic cohort study is expected to find key genetic components that contribute to common diseases, thereby promising great advance in genome medicine. While many countries endeavor to build biobank systems, biobank-based genome research has raised important ethical concerns including genetic privacy, confidentiality, discrimination, and informed consent. Informed consent for biobank poses an important question: whether true informed consent is possible in populationbased genomic cohort research where the nature of future studies is unforeseeable when consent is obtained. Due to the sensitive character of genetic information, protecting privacy and keeping confidentiality become important topics. To minimize ethical problems and achieve scientific goals to its maximum degree, each country strives to build population-based genomic cohort research project, by organizing public consultation, trying public and expert consensus in research, and providing safeguards to protect privacy and confidentiality.
Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Clinical trials and ethics
    Inae Lim, Sun Young Rha
    Journal of the Korean Medical Association.2010; 53(9): 774.     CrossRef
A Review of Power and Sample Size Estimation in Genomewide Association Studies.
Ae Kyung Park, Ho Kim
J Prev Med Public Health. 2007;40(2):114-121.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2007.40.2.114
  • 4,446 View
  • 71 Download
  • 2 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Power and sample size estimation is one of the crucially important steps in planning a genetic association study to achieve the ultimate goal, identifying candidate genes for disease susceptibility, by designing the study in such a way as to maximize the success possibility and minimize the cost. Here we review the optimal two-stage genotyping designs for genomewide association studies recently investigated by Wang et al(2006). We review two mathematical frameworks most commonly used to compute power in genetic association studies prior to the main study: Monte-Carlo and non-central chi-square estimates. Statistical powers are computed by these two approaches for case-control genotypic tests under one-stage direct association study design. Then we discuss how the linkagedisequilibrium strength affects power and sample size, and how to use empirically-derived distributions of important parameters for power calculations. We provide useful information on publicly available softwares developed to compute power and sample size for various study designs.
Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Sample Size and Statistical Power Calculation in Genetic Association Studies
    Eun Pyo Hong, Ji Wan Park
    Genomics & Informatics.2012; 10(2): 117.     CrossRef
  • The Effect of Increasing Control-to-case Ratio on Statistical Power in a Simulated Case-control SNP Association Study
    Moon-Su Kang, Sun-Hee Choi, In-Song Koh
    Genomics & Informatics.2009; 7(3): 148.     CrossRef

JPMPH : Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health