Skip Navigation
Skip to contents

JPMPH : Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health

OPEN ACCESS
SEARCH
Search

Search

Page Path
HOME > Search
4 "Occupations"
Filter
Filter
Article category
Keywords
Publication year
Authors
Funded articles
Original Articles
Analysis of Differences in Preterm Birth Rates According to Household Occupation in Japan From 2007 to 2019
Tasuku Okui, Naoki Nakashima
J Prev Med Public Health. 2022;55(4):371-378.   Published online June 20, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.22.178
  • 2,546 View
  • 97 Download
  • 3 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
No studies have examined the association between preterm birth rates and socioeconomic factors in Japan using nationwide statistical data. We analyzed the association between preterm birth rates and household occupation using Vital Statistics data.
Methods
Aggregated Vital Statistics data from Japan from 2007 to 2019 were obtained from the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare. From the data, the number of births according to year, age group, gestational period, number of pregnancies, and household occupation were used in this study. Crude preterm birth rates and preterm birth rates adjusted by maternal age according to household occupation were calculated for each year. Poisson regression analysis was conducted to evaluate the association between household occupation and preterm births.
Results
Unemployed households had the highest preterm birth rate, and households with an occupation classification of “full-time worker 2” (an employee at a large company, civil servant, or board member) had the lowest preterm birth rate throughout each period. Poisson regression analysis revealed that unemployed households were statistically significantly associated with a high preterm birth risk. In contrast, the preterm birth rate adjusted by maternal age remained stable throughout each period regardless of household occupation, and preterm birth rates were found not to have increased in recent years in Japan.
Conclusions
Unemployed households had higher preterm birth rates than other household occupations. Further studies investigating the characteristics of unemployed households are needed to identify the reasons for this disparity.
Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Analysis of an Association between Preterm Birth and Parental Educational Level in Japan Using National Data
    Tasuku Okui
    Children.2023; 10(2): 342.     CrossRef
  • Association of maternal nationality with preterm birth and low birth weight rates: analysis of nationwide data in Japan from 2016 to 2020
    Tasuku Okui, Yoko Sato, Seiichi Morokuma, Naoki Nakashima
    Maternal Health, Neonatology and Perinatology.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Does the father’s job matter? Parental occupation and preterm birth in South Korea
    Taemi Kim, Eunseon Gwak, Erdenetuya Bolormaa, Jeong-Won Oh, Jung-won Yoon, Myoung-Hee Kim, Jia Ryu, Seung-Ah Choe
    Epidemiology and Health.2023; : e2023078.     CrossRef
Effects of Socio-demographic Factors on the Decreasing Trend in the Sex Ratio at Birth in Korea, 1997-2017
Jisuk Bae
J Prev Med Public Health. 2020;53(5):371-380.   Published online August 7, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.20.282
  • 3,225 View
  • 102 Download
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Objectives
This study investigated the effects of socio-demographic factors on the decreasing trend in the sex ratio at birth from 1997 to 2017 in Korea.
Methods
Data from 10 349 602 live births registered with Statistics Korea from 1997 to 2017 were analyzed. The secondary sex ratio (SSR), defined as the ratio of male to female live births, during the study period (1997-1999 [phase I], 2000-2002 [phase II], 2003-2005 [phase III], 2006-2008 [phase IV], 2009-2011 [phase V], 2012-2014 [phase VI], and 2015-2017 [phase VII]) was calculated according to selected socio-demographic factors, such as parental age, education, occupation, and birth order. Logistic regression models were used to estimate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals for a male birth after adjusting for potential confounders.
Results
The SSR gradually decreased from 1.10 (in 1998-2000 and 2002) to 1.05 (in 2013-2016). While a decreasing trend in the SSR was not noted among first births, male-biased sex ratios were prominent among third and higher-order births, for which the highest SSR was 1.46 in 1998. Higher birth order was significantly associated with an excess of male births in phases I-VI (≥third vs. first, OR range, 1.03 to 1.35). Advanced maternal age was significantly associated with an excess of female births in phases II, III, and V (≥40 vs. 20-24 years, OR range, 0.92 to 0.95).
Conclusions
This study demonstrated that advanced maternal age and reduction of the artificially-biased SSR among third and higher-order births may partially explain the decreasing trend in the SSR from 1997 to 2017 in Korea.
Summary
Review
A Review on Socioeconomic Position Indicators in Health Inequality Research.
Yong Jun Choi, Baek Geun Jeong, Sung Il Cho, Kyunghee Jung-Choi, Soong Nang Jang, Minah Kang, Young Ho Khang
J Prev Med Public Health. 2007;40(6):475-486.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2007.40.6.475
  • 5,522 View
  • 134 Download
  • 16 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
Socioeconomic position (SEP) refers to the socioeconomic factors that influence which position an individual or group of people will hold within the structure of a society. In this study, we provide a comprehensive review of various indicators of SEP, including education level, occupation-based SEP, income and wealth, area SEP, lifecourse SEP, and SEP indicators for women, elderly and youth. METHODS AND RESULTS: This report provides a brief theoretical background and discusses the measurement, interpretation issues, advantages and limitations associated with the use of each SEP indicator. We also describe some problems that arise when selecting SEP indicators and highlight the indicators that appear to be appropriate for health inequality research. Some practical information for use in health inequality research in South Korea is also presented. CONCLUSIONS: Investigation into the associations between various SEP indicators and health outcomes can provide a more complete understanding of mechanisms between SEP and health. The relationship between specific SEP indicators and specific health outcomes can vary by country due to the differences in the historical, socioeconomic, and cultural contexts of the SEP indicators.
Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • How does subjective social status at school at the age of 15 affect the risk of depressive symptoms at the ages of 18, 21, and 28? A longitudinal study
    Marie Kjærgaard Lange, Vivi Just-Nørregaard, Trine Nøhr Winding, Chung-Ying Lin
    PLOS ONE.2023; 18(12): e0296349.     CrossRef
  • Educational level and colorectal cancer risk: the mediating roles of lifestyle and dietary factors
    Lei Li, Yu-Jing Fang, Alinuer Abulimiti, Chu-Yi Huang, Kai-Yan Liu, Yu-Ming Chen, Cai-Xia Zhang
    European Journal of Cancer Prevention.2022; 31(2): 137.     CrossRef
  • Socioeconomic disparities in self-rated health in two East Asian countries: Comparative study between Japan and Korea
    Shiho Kino, Soong-nang Jang, Shuko Takahashi, Daniel K. Ebner, Ichiro Kawachi
    Social Science & Medicine.2020; 253: 112945.     CrossRef
  • Income Difference in Attitudes towards Cancer in General Population: Findings from a National Survey
    Hye Sook Min, Jinsil Park, Young Ae Kim, Hyung Kook Yang, Keeho Park
    Journal of Korean Medical Science.2018;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Place of death and associated gender difference in Korea 2006–2014: Evidence from exit interviews of the Korean Longitudinal Study of Ageing
    Ja-kyung Lee, Soong-nang Jang
    Archives of Gerontology and Geriatrics.2018; 78: 196.     CrossRef
  • The mediation effect of individual eating behaviours on the relationship between socioeconomic status and dietary quality in children: the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey
    Hye Ah Lee, Hyesook Park
    European Journal of Nutrition.2017; 56(3): 1339.     CrossRef
  • Domestic Civil Support Missions Can Aggravate Negative Mental Health Outcomes Among National Guardsmen: The Moderating Role of Economic Difficulties
    Dale W. Russell, Josh B. Kazman, David M. Benedek, Robert J. Ursano, Cristel A. Russell
    Journal of Traumatic Stress.2017; 30(2): 195.     CrossRef
  • Household and area income levels are associated with smoking status in the Korean adult population
    Woo-Jun Yun, Jung-Ae Rhee, Sun A Kim, Sun-Seog Kweon, Young-Hoon Lee, So-Yeon Ryu, Soon-Woo Park, Dong Hyun Kim, Min-Ho Shin
    BMC Public Health.2015;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Socioeconomic disparities of periodontitis in Koreans based on the KNHANES IV
    D‐W Kim, J‐C Park, TH‐T Rim, U‐W Jung, C‐S Kim, N Donos, I‐H Cha, S‐H Choi
    Oral Diseases.2014; 20(6): 551.     CrossRef
  • Children's Mental Health in the Area Affected by the Hebei Spirit Oil Spill Accident
    Mina Ha, Woo-Chul Jeong, Myungho Lim, Hojang Kwon, Yeyong Choi, Seung-Jin Yoo, Su Ryun Noh, Hae-Kwan Cheong
    Environmental Health and Toxicology.2013; 28: e2013010.     CrossRef
  • The Relationship between Smoking, Alcohol Drinking, and Parenting Behavior Perceived by Adolescents
    Yun Ho Roh, Eun Joo Kim
    Korean Journal of Health Education and Promotion.2013; 30(2): 71.     CrossRef
  • Socioeconomic Indicators Associated with Initiation and Cessation of Smoking among Women in Seoul
    Yu-Na Kim, Young-Gyu Cho, Cheol-Hwan Kim, Jae-Heon Kang, Hyun-Ah Park, Kyoung-Woo Kim, Yang-Im Hur, Su-Hyun Lee, Yun-Min Na, No-Yai Park
    Korean Journal of Family Medicine.2012; 33(1): 1.     CrossRef
  • Association between Household Income and Asthma Symptoms among Elementary School Children in Seoul
    Won-Jun Choi, In-Yong Um, Soyoung Hong, Hye Yung Yum, Hyunjung Kim, Hojang Kwon
    Environmental Health and Toxicology.2012; 27: e2012020.     CrossRef
  • Socio-economic disparities in behavioural risk factors for cancer and use of cancer screening services in Korean adults aged 30 years and older: The Third Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 2005 (KNHANES III)
    K. Lee, H.T. Lim, S.-S. Hwang, D.W. Chae, S.M. Park
    Public Health.2010; 124(12): 698.     CrossRef
  • Socioeconomic Inequity in Self-Rated Health Status and Contribution of Health Behavioral Factors in Korea
    Minkyung Kim, Woojin Chung, Seungji Lim, Soojin Yoon, Jakyoung Lee, Eunkyung Kim, Lanju Ko
    Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health.2010; 43(1): 50.     CrossRef
  • Associations of Income and Wealth with Health Status in the Korean Elderly
    Bo-Hyun Park, Minsoo Jung, Tae-Jin Lee
    Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health.2009; 42(5): 275.     CrossRef
English Abstract
Occupational Differentials in Cigarette Smoking in South Korea: Findings from the 2003 Social Statistics Survey.
Hong Jun Cho, Young Ho Khang, Sung Cheol Yun
J Prev Med Public Health. 2006;39(4):365-370.
  • 2,342 View
  • 80 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
The purpose of this study was to investigate the differences in smoking rates according to the major occupational categories in South Korea. METHODS: The study subjects were a weighted sample of 24,495 men and 26,121 women aged 25-64 from the 2003 Social Statistics Survey, which was conducted by the Korea National Statistical Office. Occupation was classified according to the Korean Standard Occupation Classification. We computed the age-standardized smoking rates according to gender and occupations after adjusting for the education level, marital status, and self-rated health. RESULTS: For men, the smoking rate in elementary occupations was two times higher than that of clerks (OR= 1.98, 95% CI=1.74-2.26). In general, a more prestigious job(professionals) correlated with lower smoking rates, and less prestigious jobs correlated with higher smoking rates, except for legislators, senior officials and managers. For women, smoking among service workers was 4.1 times higher than among clerical workers (OR=4.11, 95% CI= 2.87-5.88). For women, their occupations, except elementary workers, and the unemployed, the retired and the armed forces, failed to show significant differences in smoking compared with the clerical workers. After adjusting for education, occupational differences in the smoking rate for men were attenuated in most occupations, except for legislators, professionals, and technicians. Further adjustment for marital status and self-rated health had a minimal effect on the occupational differences in the smoking rate for men. For women workers with service or elementary occupations, the ORs of smoking were attenuated with adjustment of the educational levels. However, the ORs of smoking were increased in workers with service, sales or elementary occupations, as well as for legislators, and the unemployed, the retired and the armed forces, after additionally adjusting for marital status. CONCLUSIONS: More prestigious jobs generally correlated with lower smoking rates in both sexes. The anti-tobacco policy should consider smoking rate differentials by occupations.
Summary

JPMPH : Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health