Skip Navigation
Skip to contents

JPMPH : Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health

OPEN ACCESS
SEARCH
Search

Search

Page Path
HOME > Search
7 "Blood glucose"
Filter
Filter
Article category
Keywords
Publication year
Authors
Original Article
Determinants of Adherence to Diabetes Screening in Iranian Adults With a Positive Family History of Diabetes
Narges Malih, Mohammad-Reza Sohrabi, Alireza Abadi, Shahnam Arshi
J Prev Med Public Health. 2021;54(3):190-198.   Published online April 7, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.20.496
  • 3,223 View
  • 164 Download
  • 2 Web of Science
  • 4 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Objectives
Insufficient evidence exists regarding factors that affect screening adherence among people with a family history of diabetes, who comprise roughly half of all patients with diabetes. Therefore, we aimed to identify the determinants of diabetes screening adherence in adults with a family history of diabetes who had not yet been diagnosed with diabetes.
Methods
This cross-sectional study was conducted at selected urban primary healthcare facilities in Tehran, Iran. The study population was clinically non-diabetic adults above 20 years of age with a family history of diabetes in at least 1 first-degree relative. All eligible people identified on randomly-selected days of the month were invited to join the study.
Results
Among 408 participants, 128 (31.4%) had received a fasting blood glucose check during the last year. Using binary logistic regression, the independent predictors of screening adherence were knowledge of adverse effects of diabetes such as sexual disorders (odds ratio [OR], 3.05) and renal failure (OR, 2.73), the impact of family members’ advice on receiving diabetes screening (OR, 2.03), recommendation from a healthcare provider to have a fasting blood glucose check (OR, 2.61), and intention to have a fasting blood glucose check within the next 6 months (OR, 2.85). Other variables that predicted screening adherence were age (OR, 1.05), job (being a housekeeper; OR, 3.39), and having a college degree (OR, 3.55).
Conclusions
Knowledge of the adverse effects of diabetes, physicians’ and healthcare providers’ advice about the benefits of early disease detection, and family members’ advice were independent predictors of screening adherence.
Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Socio-personal factors affecting adherence to treatment in patients with type 2 diabetes: A systematic review and meta-analysis
    Nahid Shahabi, Yadolah Fakhri, Teamur Aghamolaei, Zahra Hosseini, Atefeh Homayuni
    Primary Care Diabetes.2023; 17(3): 205.     CrossRef
  • Clinical traits and systemic risks of familial diabetes mellitus according to age of onset and quantity: an analysis of data from the community-based KoGES cohort study
    Ju-Yeun Lee, Kyungsik Kim, Sangjun Lee, Woo Ju An, Sue K. Park
    Epidemiology and Health.2023; 45: e2023029.     CrossRef
  • BİR ÜNİVERSİTE AKADEMİSYENLERİNİN SAĞLIK DAVRANIŞLARINA VE TARAMA PROGRAMLARINA UYUMU: KESİTSEL BİR ÇALIŞMA
    Hatice İKİIŞIK, Sibel SAKARYA
    ESTÜDAM Halk Sağlığı Dergisi.2022; 7(1): 98.     CrossRef
  • Association between a family history of diabetes and carotid artery atherosclerosis in Korean adults
    Sun Young Shim, Ga Bin Lee, Jee-Seon Shim, Sun Jae Jung, Hyeon Chang Kim
    Epidemiology and Health.2021; 43: e2021049.     CrossRef
English Abstracts
A Factor of Fasting Blood Glucose and Dietary Patterns in Korean Adults Using Data From the 2007, 2008 and 2009 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey.
Kyung Won Paek, Ki Hong Chun, Soo Jin Lee
J Prev Med Public Health. 2011;44(2):93-100.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2011.44.2.93
  • 5,569 View
  • 60 Download
  • 9 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
This study was performed to identify the socioeconomic factors, health behavior factors and dietary patterns that have an influence on the fasting blood glucose in adults. METHODS: This study used data collected from the 2007, 2008, 2009 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. The final sample included 4163 subjects who were 30-59 years old and who had completed the necessary health examinations, the health behaviors survey and nutrition survey. RESULTS: Eleven dietary patterns emerged from the factor analysis with different factor loading. After controlling for potential confounders, multiple regression analysis of the dietary patterns showed that 'fruits', 'alcohols', and 'starchy foods' affected the fasting blood. Lower consumption of 'fruits' and higher consumption of 'alcohols' and 'starch foods' were significantly associated only with an increased risk of high blood glucose. CONCLUSIONS: In the light of the results of this study, it appears pretty likely that the risk of developing high blood glucose can be reduced by changing a person's dietary patterns.
Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Clinical Study on the Effects of AmorePacific Green Tea Extract (AP GTE) on Postprandial Blood Glucose and Insulin after a High-Fat/High-Carbohydrate Meal
    Jae-Heon Kang, Hyun-Jin Nam, Kyoungmi Jung, Gyeyoung Choi, Ji-Hae Lee, Hyun Woo Jeong, Jonghwa Roh, Wangi Kim
    Food Supplements and Biomaterials for Health.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Intake of Fruits for Diabetics: Why and How Much?
    Eun Young Lee
    The Journal of Korean Diabetes.2019; 20(2): 106.     CrossRef
  • Relationship between fruit and fish intakes and cardiovascular disease risk factors in Korean women with type 2 diabetes mellitus: Based on the 4th and 5th Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys
    Ji Soo Oh, Hyesook Kim, Ki Nam Kim, Namsoo Chang
    Journal of Nutrition and Health.2016; 49(5): 304.     CrossRef
  • Association between flavonoid intake and diabetes risk among the Koreans
    Jee-Young Yeon, Yun Jung Bae, Eun-Young Kim, Eun-Ju Lee
    Clinica Chimica Acta.2015; 439: 225.     CrossRef
  • Association of dietary pattern with biochemical blood profiles and bodyweight among adults with Type 2 diabetes mellitus in Tehran, Iran
    Nasrin Darani Zad, Rokiah Mohd Yusof, Haleh Esmaili, Rosita Jamaluddin, Fariba Mohseni
    Journal of Diabetes & Metabolic Disorders.2015;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • A factor of periodontal disease and dietary patterns in Korean adults using data from Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey V
    Kyung Won Paek, Soojin Lee, Joung Hwan Back
    Journal of Korean Academy of Oral Health.2015; 39(4): 280.     CrossRef
  • Less Healthy Dietary Pattern is Associated with Smoking in Korean Men According to Nationally Representative Data
    Sang-Yeon Suh, Ju Hyun Lee, Sang Shin Park, Ah-Ram Seo, Hong-Yup Ahn, Woo Kyung Bae, Yong Joo Lee, Eunji Yim
    Journal of Korean Medical Science.2013; 28(6): 869.     CrossRef
  • Prevalence of Diabetes and Impaired fasting glucose according to Food frequency Similarity in Korea
    So-Hye Jeon, Nam-Hyun Kim
    Journal of the Korea Academia-Industrial cooperation Society.2013; 14(2): 751.     CrossRef
  • Diabetes Risk Analysis Model with Personalized Food Intake Preference
    So-Hye Jeon, Nam-Hyun Kim
    Journal of the Korea Academia-Industrial cooperation Society.2013; 14(11): 5771.     CrossRef
The Association of Central Obesity with Type 2 Diabetes among Koreans according to the Serum Gamma-Glutamyltransferase Level: Korean Genome and Epidemiology Study.
Ji Yeon Shin, Jun Hyun Hwang, Jin Young Jeong, Sung Hi Kim, Jai Dong Moon, Sang Chul Roh, Young Wook Kim, Yangho Kim, Jong Han Leem, Young Su Ju, Young Seoub Hong, Eun Hee Ha, Yong Hwan Lee, Duk Hee Lee, Dong Hyun Kim
J Prev Med Public Health. 2009;42(6):386-391.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2009.42.6.386
  • 5,403 View
  • 64 Download
  • 3 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
This cross-sectional study was performed to examine if the serum gamma-glutamyltransferase (GGT) level that is within its normal range is associated with the risk of type 2 diabetes and if the association between the waist hip ratio (WHR) and type 2 diabetes is different depending on the serum GGT levels. METHODS: The study subjects were 23,436 persons aged 40 years or older and who participated in regular health check-ups at 11 hospitals (males: 5,821, females: 17,615). The gender-specific quintiles of the serum GGT and WHR were used to examine the associations with type 2 diabetes. RESULTS: The serum GGT levels within their normal range were positively associated with type 2 diabetes only in women. The adjusted odds ratios (ORs) were 1.0, 1.0, 1.4, 2.1, and 2.5 according to the quintiles of the serum GGT (p(trend)<0.01). The WHR was more strongly associated with the prevalence of diabetes among the women with a high-normal serum GGT level as compared with those with a low-normal serum GGT level (p for interaction=0.02). For example, the adjusted ORs for women with a low normal serum GGT level were 1.0, 1.2, 1.5, 2.2, and 2.4 according to the quintiles of the WHR, while those figures were 1.0, 2.4, 3.6, 5.0, and 8.3 among the women with a high normal serum GGT level. However, in men, the serum GGT was very weakly associated with type 2 diabetes and the association between the WHR and type 2 diabetes was not different depending on the serum GGT level. CONCLUSIONS: Serum GGT within its normal range was positively associated with type 2 diabetes, and central obesity was more strongly associated with the prevalence of type 2 diabetes when the serum GGT level was high-normal. However, these associations were observed only in women, which is different from the previous findings. The stronger relation between central obesity and type 2 diabetes among women with a high-normal serum GGT level can be useful for selecting a group that is at high risk for type 2 diabetes irregardless of whatever the underlying mechanism is.
Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Serum gamma-glutamyl transferase and risk of type 2 diabetes in the general Korean population: a Mendelian randomization study
    Youn Sue Lee, Yoonsu Cho, Stephen Burgess, George Davey Smith, Caroline L. Relton, So-Youn Shin, Min-Jeong Shin
    Human Molecular Genetics.2016; 25(17): 3877.     CrossRef
  • Different associations between obesity and impaired fasting glucose depending on serum gamma-glutamyltransferase levels within normal range: a cross-sectional study
    Nam Soo Hong, Jeong-Gook Kim, Yu-Mi Lee, Hyun-Woo Kim, Sin Kam, Keon-Yeop Kim, Ki-Su Kim, Duk-Hee Lee
    BMC Endocrine Disorders.2014;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Endobiogeny: A Global Approach to Systems Biology (Part 1 of 2)
    Jean-Claude, Lapraz, Kamyar M. Hedayat
    Global Advances in Health and Medicine.2013; 2(1): 64.     CrossRef
The Effect of Smoking Status upon Occurrence of Impaired Fasting Glucose or Type 2 Diabetes in Korean Men.
Chang Hae Park, Hyuk Ga, Jong Han Leem, Seung Min Kwak, Hwan Cheol Kim, Ji Ho Choi
J Prev Med Public Health. 2008;41(4):249-254.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2008.41.4.249
  • 5,161 View
  • 68 Download
  • 8 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
To investigate whether smoking and the smoking status are predictors of the incident impaired fasting glucose (IFG) or type 2 diabetes in Korean men. METHODS: A cohort of 1,717 Korean men without IFG or diabetes, who underwent annual periodic health examinations for 4 years (2002-2006), were retrospectively investigated. IFG and diabetes were defined as a serum fasting glucose concentration of 100-125 mg/dL and more than 126 mg/dL, respectively. Cox's proportional hazards model was used to evaluate the association between smoking and development of IFG or type 2 diabetes. RESULTS: A total of 558 cases (32.5%) of incident IFG and 50 cases (2.9%) of diabetes occurred. After controlling for the potential predictors of diabetes, the relative risk for IFG, compared with the never smokers, was 1.02 (95% CI=0.88 to 1.19) for the ever-smokers, 0.96 (95% CI=0.79-1.16) for those who smoked 1-9 cigarettes/d, 1.15 (95% CI=1.01 to 1.30) for those who smoked 10-19 cigarettes/d, and 1.31 (95% CI=1.10 to 1.57) for those who smoked 20 or more cigarettes/d (the P value for the current smokers was only p<0.002). The respective multivariate adjusted relative risks for type 2 diabetes, compared with the neversmokers, were 1.07 (95% CI=0.64 to 1.92), 1.47 (95% CI=0.71 to 3.04), 1.84 (95% CI=0.92-3.04), and 1.87 (95% CI=1.13-3.67), respectively (the P value for the current smokers was only p=0.004). CONCLUSIONS: The smoking status and the number of cigarettes smoked daily are associated with an increased risk for developing IFG or type 2 diabetes in Korean men.
Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Health effects associated with smoking: a Burden of Proof study
    Xiaochen Dai, Gabriela F. Gil, Marissa B. Reitsma, Noah S. Ahmad, Jason A. Anderson, Catherine Bisignano, Sinclair Carr, Rachel Feldman, Simon I. Hay, Jiawei He, Vincent Iannucci, Hilary R. Lawlor, Matthew J. Malloy, Laurie B. Marczak, Susan A. McLaughlin
    Nature Medicine.2022; 28(10): 2045.     CrossRef
  • Systematic review with meta-analysis of the epidemiological evidence relating smoking to type 2 diabetes
    Peter N Lee, Katharine J Coombs
    World Journal of Meta-Analysis.2020; 8(2): 119.     CrossRef
  • The 2016 global and national burden of diabetes mellitus attributable to PM 2·5 air pollution
    Benjamin Bowe, Yan Xie, Tingting Li, Yan Yan, Hong Xian, Ziyad Al-Aly
    The Lancet Planetary Health.2018; 2(7): e301.     CrossRef
  • The impact of smoking on the development of diabetes and its complications
    Mariola Śliwińska-Mossoń, Halina Milnerowicz
    Diabetes and Vascular Disease Research.2017; 14(4): 265.     CrossRef
  • Effects of Nutrition Education on Improvement of Blood Glucose in Type 2 Diabetic Patients with Low Income
    Eun-Jin Lim, Mi Jeong Kim, Ji-Sook Han
    Journal of the Korean Society of Food Science and Nutrition.2014; 43(1): 141.     CrossRef
  • Associated Factors of Impaired Fasting Glucose in Some Korean Rural Adults
    Hye Eun Yun, Mi-ah Han, Ki Soon Kim, Jong Park, Myeng Guen Kang, So Yeon Ryu
    Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health.2010; 43(4): 309.     CrossRef
  • Association of passive and active smoking with incident type 2 diabetes mellitus in the elderly population: the KORA S4/F4 cohort study
    Bernd Kowall, Wolfgang Rathmann, Klaus Strassburger, Margit Heier, Rolf Holle, Barbara Thorand, Guido Giani, Annette Peters, Christine Meisinger
    European Journal of Epidemiology.2010; 25(6): 393.     CrossRef
  • Diabetes and impaired fasting glucose in Mongolian population, Inner Mongolia, China
    Shaoyan Zhang, Weijun Tong, Tan Xu, Burenbatu Wu, Yonghong Zhang
    Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice.2009; 86(2): 124.     CrossRef
Fasting Serum Glucose and Subsequent Liver Cancer Risk in a Korean Prospective Cohort.
Jin Gwack, Seung Sik Hwang, Kwang Pil Ko, Jae Kwan Jun, Sue Kyung Park, Soung Hoon Chang, Hai Rim Shin, Keun Young Yoo
J Prev Med Public Health. 2007;40(1):23-28.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2007.40.1.23
  • 5,513 View
  • 82 Download
  • 16 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
Chronic infections with hepatitis B or C and alcoholic cirrhosis are three well-known major risk factors for liver cancer. Diabetes has also been suggested as a potential risk factor. However, the findings of previous studies have been controversial in terms of the causal association. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the association between serum glucose levels and liver cancer development in a Korean cohort. METHODS: Thirty-six liver cancer cases were identified in the Korean Multi-Center Cancer Cohort (KMCC). Baseline information on lifestyle characteristics was obtained via questionnaire. Serum glucose levels were measured at the study's enrollment. Relative risks (RRs) were estimated using a Cox proportional hazard regression model. The adjusting variables included age, gender, smoking history, alcohol consumption, body mass index, and hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) seropositivity. RESULTS: The RRs of serum glucose for liver caner were 1.20 (95% CI=0.48-2.99) for the category of 100 to 125 mg/dL of serum glucose and 2.77 (95% CI=1.24-6.18) for the >126 mg/dL serum glucose category (both compared to the <100 mg/dL category). In a subgroup analysis, the RR of serum glucose among those who were both HBsAg seronegative and non-drinkers was 4.46 (95% CI=1.09-18.28) for those with glucose levels >100 mg/dL. CONCLUSIONS: The results of this study suggest that a high level of serum glucose can increase liver cancer risk independently of hepatitis infection and drinking history in Koreans. This study implies that glucose intolerance may be an independent risk factor for liver cancer.
Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Association Between Prediabetes and Risk, Mortality of Hepatocellular Carcinoma: A Meta-Analysis
    Xin Ding, Li Deng, Chuan Cen, Yuyu Yang
    Endocrine Research.2024; : 1.     CrossRef
  • Associations between serum glucose, insulin, insulin resistance and the risk of incident primary liver cancer or chronic liver disease mortality: a nested case–control study
    Jian Yin, Neal D. Freedman, Yiwei Liu, Sanford M. Dawsey, Huan Yang, Philip R. Taylor, Liangyu Yin, Bin Liu, Jianfeng Cui, Jinhu Fan, Wen Chen, Youlin Qiao, Christian C. Abnet
    British Journal of Cancer.2023; 128(2): 275.     CrossRef
  • Environmental contributions to gastrointestinal and liver cancer in the Asia–Pacific region
    Kwang‐Pil Ko, Aesun Shin, Sooyoung Cho, Sue K Park, Keun‐Young Yoo
    Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology.2018; 33(1): 111.     CrossRef
  • Recognition criteria for occupational cancers in relation to hepatitis B virus and hepatitis C virus in Korea
    Hogil Kim, Yun Kyung Chung, Inah Kim
    Annals of Occupational and Environmental Medicine.2018;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • The association between fasting blood glucose and the risk of primary liver cancer in Chinese males: a population-based prospective study
    Xiaoshuang Feng, Gang Wang, Ni Li, Zhangyan Lyu, Shuohua Chen, Luopei Wei, Yuheng Chen, Shuanghua Xie, Wenjing Yang, Jian Yin, Hong Cui, Hongda Chen, Jiansong Ren, Jufang Shi, Shouling Wu, Min Dai, Jie He
    British Journal of Cancer.2017; 117(9): 1405.     CrossRef
  • Fasting glucose and risk of colorectal cancer in the Korean Multi-center Cancer Cohort
    Hyeree Park, Sooyoung Cho, Hyeongtaek Woo, Sue K. Park, Hai-Rim Shin, Soung-Hoon Chang, Keun-Young Yoo, Aesun Shin, Cheng Hu
    PLOS ONE.2017; 12(11): e0188465.     CrossRef
  • Blood glucose concentration and risk of liver cancer: systematic review and meta-analysis of prospective studies
    Hedong Han, Tianyi Zhang, Zhichao Jin, Honglei Guo, Xin Wei, Yuzhou Liu, Qi Chen, Jia He
    Oncotarget.2017; 8(30): 50164.     CrossRef
  • European Code against Cancer 4th Edition: Alcohol drinking and cancer
    Chiara Scoccianti, Michele Cecchini, Annie S. Anderson, Franco Berrino, Marie-Christine Boutron-Ruault, Carolina Espina, Timothy J. Key, Michael Leitzmann, Teresa Norat, Hilary Powers, Martin Wiseman, Isabelle Romieu
    Cancer Epidemiology.2016; 45: 181.     CrossRef
  • European Code against Cancer 4th Edition: Alcohol drinking and cancer
    Chiara Scoccianti, Michele Cecchini, Annie S. Anderson, Franco Berrino, Marie-Christine Boutron-Ruault, Carolina Espina, Timothy J. Key, Michael Leitzmann, Teresa Norat, Hilary Powers, Martin Wiseman, Isabelle Romieu
    Cancer Epidemiology.2015; 39: S67.     CrossRef
  • Cohort Profile: Community-based prospective cohort from the National Cancer Center, Korea
    Jin-Kyoung Oh, Min Kyung Lim, E Hwa Yun, Min-Ho Choi, Sung-Tae Hong, Soung-Hoon Chang, Sue Kyung Park, Sung-Il Cho, Dong-Hyun Kim, Keun-Young Yoo, Hai-Rim Shin
    International Journal of Epidemiology.2015; : dyv302.     CrossRef
  • Attributable fraction of alcohol consumption on cancer using population-based nationwide cancer incidence and mortality data in the Republic of Korea
    Sohee Park, Hai-Rim Shin, Boram Lee, Aesun Shin, Kyu-Won Jung, Duk-Hee Lee, Sun Ha Jee, Sung-Il Cho, Sue Kyung Park, Mathieu Boniol, Paolo Boffetta, Elisabete Weiderpass
    BMC Cancer.2014;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Prediabetes and the risk of cancer: a meta-analysis
    Yi Huang, Xiaoyan Cai, Miaozhen Qiu, Peisong Chen, Hongfeng Tang, Yunzhao Hu, Yuli Huang
    Diabetologia.2014; 57(11): 2261.     CrossRef
  • Serum glucose and risk of cancer: a meta-analysis
    Danielle J Crawley, Lars Holmberg, Jennifer C Melvin, Massimo Loda, Simon Chowdhury, Sarah M Rudman, Mieke Van Hemelrijck
    BMC Cancer.2014;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Recent Evidence on Alcohol and Cancer Epidemiology
    Chiara Scoccianti, Kurt Straif, Isabelle Romieu
    Future Oncology.2013; 9(9): 1315.     CrossRef
  • Multiplicative synergistic risk of hepatocellular carcinoma development among hepatitis B and C co-infected subjects in HBV endemic area: a community-based cohort study
    Jin-Kyoung Oh, Hai-Rim Shin, Min Kyung Lim, Heeyoun Cho, Dong-Il Kim, Youngmee Jee, Haesun Yun, Keun-Young Yoo
    BMC Cancer.2012;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Coinfection of hepatitis B and C viruses and risk of hepatocellular carcinoma: Systematic review and meta‐analysis
    Lisa Y. Cho, Jae Jeong Yang, Kwang‐Pil Ko, Boyoung Park, Aesun Shin, Min Kyung Lim, Jin‐Kyoung Oh, Sohee Park, Yoon Jun Kim, Hai‐Rim Shin, Keun‐Young Yoo, Sue K. Park
    International Journal of Cancer.2011; 128(1): 176.     CrossRef
Original Articles
Relationship of Serum Uric Acid to Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Korean Male Workers.
So Yeon Ryu, Jong Gab Oh, Chul Gab Lee, Ki Soon Kim
Korean J Prev Med. 2002;35(3):214-220.
  • 2,223 View
  • 29 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
To investigate the relationship of serum uric acid to cardiovascular risk factors in Korean male workers. METHODS: We screened 522 male workers at an electrical manufacturing company by a periodic health examination and a questionnaire survey in 2000. We collected data relating to age, smoking status, alcohol drinking status, body mass index (BMI), blood pressure, serum lipid, fasting blood glucose and serum uric acid. The data were analyzed using a variety of methods, including ANOVA, Pearson's correlation, and multivariate regression analyses, to examine the association between uric acid and cardiovascular risk factors with a cross-sectional study design. RESULTS: The concentration of serum uric acid showed positive associations with BMI, total cholesterol, triglyceride, and LDL-cholesterol; it was also significantly correlated to systolic and diastolic blood pressures. Life-style characteristics, such as smoking and alcohol drinking showed no significant association. From the multivariate regression analyses, BMI, total cholesterol and fasting blood glucose levels were found to be independent positive predictors of uric acid; while age, blood pressure and smoking status give no independent contribution explaining the variability of serum uric acid levels. Conclusions : This study demonstrates that serum uric acid level have a significant association with cardiovascular risk factors, such as BMI, total cholesterol and blood glucose in some Korean male workers.
Summary
Mean fasting blood glucose level and an estimated prevalence of diabetes mellitus among a representative adult Korean population.
Jung Soon Kim, Young Joon Kim, Sun Ill Park, Young Pyo Hong
Korean J Prev Med. 1993;26(3):311-320.
  • 3,020 View
  • 36 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
This study was carried out along with the 1990 6th National Tuberculosis Prevalence Survey in order to estimated the prevalence rate of diabetes mellitus among a representative adult Korean population. Fasting blood glucose was measured by diastix(Ames) using glucometer II for seventy seven percent of the population(30 years old or above) residing in 190 enumeration districts randomly sampled from 146,944 general ED. The prevalence of diabetes mellitus of the population was estimated by projecting the ratio of > or = 200 mg/dl PP2 of fasting blood sugar level below 120 by sex to the study population. Fasting blood glucose and 2hr. postprandial blood glucose were measured on about 3000 subsampled individuals, and diabetes mellitus was defined by the WHO criteria-FBG > or = 120 mg/dl or PP2 > or = 200 mg/dl when FBG is below 120 mg/dl. The results obtained are as follows: 1. Estimated prevalence(age adjusted) of diabetes mellitus was 4.6% for male 8.1% for female. The age adjusted mean FBG was 93.9+/-26.2mg/dl for male and 102.9+/-31.5mg/dl for female. 2. The prevalence increased as age advanced with peak in 60~69 years old age group for both sexes. 3. The mean FBG and estimated prevalence rate of diabetes mellitus varied considerably among the populations of fifteen cities and provinces ; it varied from 87.0+/-17.7 to 104.6+/-34.5mg/dl and 1.2% to 8.9% for males, and from 93.3+/-25.3 to 116.7+/-38.6 mg/dl and 3.4% to 20.8% for females. 4. The mean FBG and prevalence rates were higher among the rural population than those residing in metropolitan areas. 5. The proportion of the people previously treated among the diabetics was estimated to be a little less than one fifth. 6. Factors strongly associated with FBG were age, sex, family history of D. M., BMI, area and educational level among eleven variables.
Summary

JPMPH : Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health