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Validity of Self-reported Hypertension and Factors Related to Discordance Between Self-reported and Objectively Measured Hypertension: Evidence From a Cohort Study in Iran
Farid Najafi, Yahya Pasdar, Ebrahim Shakiba, Behrooz Hamzeh, Mitra Darbandi, Mehdi Moradinazar, Jafar Navabi, Bita Anvari, Mohammad Reza Saidi, Shahrzad Bazargan-Hejazi
J Prev Med Public Health. 2019;52(2):131-139.   Published online March 29, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.18.257
  • 6,858 View
  • 137 Download
  • 18 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
Self-reporting can be used to determine the incidence and prevalence of hypertension (HTN). The present study was conducted to determine the validity of self-reported HTN and to identify factors affecting discordance between self-reported and objectively measured HTN in participants in the Ravansar Non-Communicable Diseases (RaNCD) cohort.
Methods
The RaNCD cohort included permanent residents of Ravansar, Iran aged 35-65 years. Self-reported data were collected before clinical examinations were conducted by well-trained staff members. The gold standard for HTN was anti-hypertensive medication use and blood pressure measurements. The sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values, and overall accuracy of self-reporting were calculated. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression were used to examine the discordance between self-reported HTN and the gold standard.
Results
Of the 10 065 participants in the RaNCD, 4755 (47.4%) were male. The prevalence of HTN was 16.8% based on self-reporting and 15.7% based on medical history and HTN measurements. Of the participants with HTN, 297 (18.8%) had no knowledge of their disease, and 313 (19.9%) had not properly controlled their HTN despite receiving treatment. The sensitivity, specificity, and kappa for self-reported HTN were 75.5%, 96.4%, and 73.4%, respectively. False positives became more likely with age, body mass index (BMI), low socioeconomic status, and female sex, whereas false negatives became more likely with age, BMI, high socioeconomic status, smoking, and urban residency.
Conclusions
The sensitivity and specificity of self-reported HTN were acceptable, suggesting that this method can be used for public health initiatives in the absence of countrywide HTN control and detection programs.
Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Self-Reported Hypertension and Associated Factors Among Adults in Butambala District, Central Uganda: A Community-Based Prevalence Study
    Alex Kato, Winnie Kibone, Jerom Okot, Joseph Baruch Baluku, Felix Bongomin
    Integrated Blood Pressure Control.2023; Volume 16: 71.     CrossRef
  • Validity of self‐reported hypertension and related factors in the adult population: Preliminary results from the cohort in the west of Iran
    Negar Piri, Yousef Moradi, Reza Ghanei Gheshlagh, Mahsa Abdullahi, Eghbal Fattahi, Farhad Moradpour
    The Journal of Clinical Hypertension.2023; 25(2): 146.     CrossRef
  • Sex-Specific Contributions of Alcohol and Hypertension on Everyday Cognition in Middle-Aged and Older Adults
    Madison Musich, Amy N. Costa, Victoria Salathe, Mary Beth Miller, Ashley F. Curtis
    Journal of Women's Health.2023; 32(10): 1086.     CrossRef
  • National and regional prevalence rates of hypertension in Saudi Arabia: A descriptive analysis using the national survey data
    Aqeel M. Alenazi, Bader A. Alqahtani
    Frontiers in Public Health.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Psychotic-like experiences are associated with physical disorders in general population: A cross-sectional study from the NESARC II
    David Sleurs, Caroline Dubertret, Baptiste Pignon, Sarah Tebeka, Yann Le Strat
    Journal of Psychosomatic Research.2023; 165: 111128.     CrossRef
  • Understanding Cognitive Deficits in People with High Blood Pressure
    Weixi Kang, Sònia Pineda Hernández
    Journal of Personalized Medicine.2023; 13(11): 1592.     CrossRef
  • Validity of self-reported hypertension and associated factors among Vietnamese adults: a cross-sectional study
    Hoang Thi Hai Van, Dang Thi Huong, Tran Ngoc Anh
    Blood Pressure.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Validity of self‐reported hypertension in India: Evidence from nationally representative survey of adult population over 45 years
    Mrigesh Bhatia, Priyanka Dixit, Manish Kumar, Laxmi Kant Dwivedi
    The Journal of Clinical Hypertension.2022; 24(11): 1506.     CrossRef
  • Socioeconomic inequalities in prevalence, awareness, treatment and control of hypertension: evidence from the PERSIAN cohort study
    Mahin Amini, Mahdi Moradinazar, Fatemeh Rajati, Moslem Soofi, Sadaf G. Sepanlou, Hossein Poustchi, Sareh Eghtesad, Mahmood Moosazadeh, Javad Harooni, Javad Aghazadeh-Attari, Majid Fallahi, Mohammad Reza Fattahi, Alireza Ansari-Moghaddam, Farhad Moradpour,
    BMC Public Health.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Barriers to effective hypertension management in rural Bihar, India: A cross-sectional, linked supply- and demand-side study
    Michael A. Peters, Olakunle Alonge, Anbrasi Edward, Yvonne Commodore-Mensah, Japneet Kaur, Navneet Kumar, Krishna D. Rao, Roopa Shivashankar
    PLOS Global Public Health.2022; 2(10): e0000513.     CrossRef
  • Risk factors, ethnicity and dementia: A UK Biobank prospective cohort study of White, South Asian and Black participants
    Naaheed Mukadam, Louise Marston, Gemma Lewis, Gill Livingston, Gyaneshwer Chaubey
    PLOS ONE.2022; 17(10): e0275309.     CrossRef
  • Maternal perinatal hypertensive disorders and parenting in infancy
    Lindsay Huffhines, Margaret H. Bublitz, Jesse L. Coe, Ronald Seifer, Stephanie H. Parade
    Infant Behavior and Development.2022; 69: 101781.     CrossRef
  • Determinants of self-reported hypertension among women in South Africa: evidence from the population-based survey
    Peter Austin Morton Ntenda, Walaa Mamdouh Reyad El-Meidany, Fentanesh Nibret Tiruneh, Mfundi President Sebenele Motsa, Joyce Nyirongo, Gowokani Chijere Chirwa, Arnold Kapachika, Owen Nkoka
    Clinical Hypertension.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Identifying factors associated with of blood pressure using Structural Equation Modeling: evidence from a large Kurdish cohort study in Iran
    Farid Najafi, Mehdi Moradinazar, Shahab Rezayan, Reza Azarpazhooh, Parastoo Jamshidi
    BMC Endocrine Disorders.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Examining elevated blood pressure and the effects of diabetes self-management education on blood pressure among a sample of Marshallese with type 2 diabetes in Arkansas
    Pearl A. McElfish, Christopher R. Long, Zoran Bursac, Aaron J. Scott, Harish E. Chatrathi, Ka‘imi A. Sinclair, Nirav Nagarsheth, Mikaila Calcagni, Jay Patolia, Marie-Rachelle Narcisse, Solveig A. Cunningham
    PLOS ONE.2021; 16(4): e0250489.     CrossRef
  • Food insecurity and hypertension: A systematic review and meta-analysis
    Sourik Beltrán, Marissa Pharel, Canada T. Montgomery, Itzel J. López-Hinojosa, Daniel J. Arenas, Horace M. DeLisser, Ronpichai Chokesuwattanaskul
    PLOS ONE.2020; 15(11): e0241628.     CrossRef
  • Treatment of amphetamine abuse/use disorder: a systematic review of a recent health concern
    Mansour Khoramizadeh, Mohammad Effatpanah, Alireza Mostaghimi, Mehdi Rezaei, Alireza Mahjoub, Sara Shishehgar
    DARU Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences.2019; 27(2): 743.     CrossRef
  • Racial/Ethnic Differences in Cardiometabolic Risk in a Community Sample of Sexual Minority Women
    Billy A. Caceres, Cindy B. Veldhuis, Tonda L. Hughes
    Health Equity.2019; 3(1): 350.     CrossRef
Level of Agreement and Factors Associated With Discrepancies Between Nationwide Medical History Questionnaires and Hospital Claims Data
Yeon-Yong Kim, Jong Heon Park, Hee-Jin Kang, Eun Joo Lee, Seongjun Ha, Soon-Ae Shin
J Prev Med Public Health. 2017;50(5):294-302.   Published online July 20, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.17.024
  • 6,775 View
  • 177 Download
  • 13 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
The objectives of this study were to investigate the agreement between medical history questionnaire data and claims data and to identify the factors that were associated with discrepancies between these data types. Methods: Data from self-reported questionnaires that assessed an individual’s history of hypertension, diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia, stroke, heart disease, and pulmonary tuberculosis were collected from a general health screening database for 2014. Data for these diseases were collected from a healthcare utilization claims database between 2009 and 2014. Overall agreement, sensitivity, specificity, and kappa values were calculated. Multiple logistic regression analysis was performed to identify factors associated with discrepancies and was adjusted for age, gender, insurance type, insurance contribution, residential area, and comorbidities. Results: Agreement was highest between questionnaire data and claims data based on primary codes up to 1 year before the completion of self-reported questionnaires and was lowest for claims data based on primary and secondary codes up to 5 years before the completion of self-reported questionnaires. When comparing data based on primary codes up to 1 year before the completion of self-reported questionnaires, the overall agreement, sensitivity, specificity, and kappa values ranged from 93.2 to 98.8%, 26.2 to 84.3%, 95.7 to 99.6%, and 0.09 to 0.78, respectively. Agreement was excellent for hypertension and diabetes, fair to good for stroke and heart disease, and poor for pulmonary tuberculosis and dyslipidemia. Women, younger individuals, and employed individuals were most likely to under-report disease. Conclusions: Detailed patient characteristics that had an impact on information bias were identified through the differing levels of agreement.
Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • The agreement between diagnoses as stated by patients and those contained in routine health insurance data—results of a data linkage study
    Felicitas Vogelgesang, Roma Thamm, Timm Frerk, Thomas G. Grobe, Joachim Saam, Catharina Schumacher, Julia Thom
    Deutsches Ärzteblatt international.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Immeasurable Time Bias in Self-controlled Designs: Case-crossover, Case-time-control, and Case-case-time-control Analyses
    Han Eol Jeong, Hyesung Lee, In-Sun Oh, Kristian B. Filion, Ju-Young Shin
    Journal of Epidemiology.2023; 33(2): 82.     CrossRef
  • Feasibility of continuous distal body temperature for passive, early pregnancy detection
    Azure Grant, Benjamin Smarr, Dukyong Yoon
    PLOS Digital Health.2022; 1(5): e0000034.     CrossRef
  • Comparing self-reports to national register data in the detection of disabling mental and musculoskeletal disorders among ageing women
    Jeremi Heikkinen, Risto J. Honkanen, Lana J. Williams, Shae Quirk, Heikki Kröger, Heli Koivumaa-Honkanen
    Maturitas.2022; 164: 46.     CrossRef
  • Analytical Approaches to Reduce Selection Bias in As-Treated Analyses with Missing In-Hospital Drug Information
    Yeon-Hee Baek, Yunha Noh, In-Sun Oh, Han Eol Jeong, Kristian B. Filion, Hyesung Lee, Ju-Young Shin
    Drug Safety.2022; 45(10): 1057.     CrossRef
  • Trajectory and determinants of agreement between parental and physicians' reports of childhood atopic dermatitis
    Zhuoxin Peng, Stefanie Braig, Deborah Kurz, Johannes M. Weiss, Stephan Weidinger, Hermann Brenner, Dietrich Rothenbacher, Jon Genuneit
    Pediatric Allergy and Immunology.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Han Eol Jeong, In-Sun Oh, Hyesung Lee, Kristian B. Filion, Ju-Young Shin
    Journal of Clinical Epidemiology.2021; 131: 1.     CrossRef
  • Association between domperidone use and adverse cardiovascular events: A nested case‐control and case‐time‐control study
    Sun Mi Shin, Han Eol Jeong, Hyesung Lee, Ju‐Young Shin
    Pharmacoepidemiology and Drug Safety.2020; 29(12): 1636.     CrossRef
  • Feasibility of continuous fever monitoring using wearable devices
    Benjamin L. Smarr, Kirstin Aschbacher, Sarah M. Fisher, Anoushka Chowdhary, Stephan Dilchert, Karena Puldon, Adam Rao, Frederick M. Hecht, Ashley E. Mason
    Scientific Reports.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Clinical outcomes of COVID-19 following the use of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin-receptor blockers among patients with hypertension in Korea: a nationwide study
    Ju Hwan Kim, Yeon-Hee Baek, Hyesung Lee, Young June Choe, Hyun Joon Shin, Ju-Young Shin
    Epidemiology and Health.2020; 43: e2021004.     CrossRef
  • The agreement between chronic diseases reported by patients and derived from administrative data in patients undergoing joint arthroplasty
    Bélène Podmore, Andrew Hutchings, Sujith Konan, Jan van der Meulen
    BMC Medical Research Methodology.2019;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Metformin combined with dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors or metformin combined with sulfonylureas in patients with type 2 diabetes: A real world analysis of the South Korean national cohort
    Yeon Young Cho, Sung-Il Cho
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  • Stroke at baseline of the Brazilian Longitudinal Study of Adult Health (ELSA-Brasil): a cross-sectional analysis
    Fernanda Gabriela de Abreu, Alessandra Carvalho Goulart, Marina Gabriela Birck, Isabela Martins Benseñor
    Sao Paulo Medical Journal.2018; 136(5): 398.     CrossRef
The Accuracy of ICD codes for Cerebrovascular Diseases in Medical Insurance Claims.
Jong Ku Park, Ki Soon Kim, Chun Bae Kim, Tae Yong Lee, Kang Sook Lee, Duk Hee Lee, Sunhee Lee, Sun Ha Jee, Il Suh, Kwang Wook Koh, So Yeon Ryu, Kee Ho Park, Woonje Park, Seungjun Wang, Hwasoon Lee, Yoomi Chae, Hyensook Hong, Jin Sook Suh
Korean J Prev Med. 2000;33(1):76-82.
  • 3,229 View
  • 148 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
We attempted to assess the accuracy of ICD codes for cerebrovascular diseases in medical insurance claims (ICMIC) and to investigate the reasons for error. This study was designed as a preliminary study to establish a nationwide surveillance system. METHODS: A total of 626 patients with medical insurance claims who indicated a diagnosis of cerebrovascular diseases during the period from 1993 to 1997 was selected from the Korea Medical Insurance Corporation cohort (KMIC cohort: 115,600 persons). The KMIC cohort was 10% of those insured who had taken health examinations in 1990 and 1992 consecutively. The registered medical record administrators were trained in the survey technique and gathered data from March to May 1999. The definition of cerebrovascular diseases in this study included cases which met one of two criteria (Minnesota, WHO) or 'definite stroke' in CT/MRI finding. We questioned the medical record administrators to explain the error if the final diagnoses were not coded as stroke. RESULTS: The accuracy rate of the ICMIC was 83.0% (425 cases). Medical records were not available for 8.2% (51 cases) due to the closing of hospitals, the absence of a computer system or omission of medical record, etc. Sixty-three cases (10.0%) were classified as impossible to interpret due to insufficient records in 'major clinical symptoms' or 'neurological deficits'. The most common reason was 'to meet review criteria of medical insurance benefits (52.9%)'. The department where errors in the ICMIC occurred most frequently was the department for medical insurance claims in the hospital. CONCLUSION: The accuracy rate of the ICMIC was 83.0%.
Summary
Estimation of Disease Code Accuracy of National Medical Insurance Data and the Related Factors.
Euichul Shin, Yong Mun Park, Yong Gyu Park, Byung Sung Kim, Ki Dong Park, Kwang Ho Meng
Korean J Prev Med. 1998;31(3):471-480.
  • 2,276 View
  • 34 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
This study was undertaken in order to estimate the accuracy of disease code of the Korean National Medical Insurance Data and disease the characteristics related to the accuracy. To accomplish these objectives, 2,431 cases coded as notifiable acute communicable diseases (NACD) were randomly selected from 1994 National Medical Insurance data file and family medicine specialists reviewed the medical records to confirm the diagnostic accuracy and investigate the related factors. Major findings obtained from this study are as follows: 1. The accuracy rate of disease code of NACD in National Medical Insurance data was very low, 10.1% (95% C.I.: 8.8-11.4). 2. The reasons of inaccuracy in disease code were 1) claiming process related administrative error by physician and non-physician personnel in medical institutions (47.0%), 2) input error of claims data by key punchers of National Medical Insurer (31.3%) and 3) diagnostic error by physicians (21.7%). 3. Characteristics significantly related with lowering the accuracy of disease code were location and level of the medical institutions in multiple logistic regression analysis. Medical institutions in Seoul showed lower accuracy than those in Kyonngi, and so did general hospitals, hospitals and clinics than tertiary hospitals. Physician related characteristics significantly lowering disease code accuracy of insurance data were sex, age group and specialty. Male physicians showed significantly lower accuracy than female physicians; thirties and forties age group also showed significantly lower accuracy than twenties, and so did general physicians and other specialists than internal medicine/pediatric specialists. This study strongly suggests that a series of policies like 1) establishment of peer review organization of National Medical Insurance data, 2) prompt nation-wide expansion of computerized claiming network of National Medical Insurance and 3) establishment and distribution of objective diagnostic criteria to physicians are necessary to set up a national disease surveillance system utilizing National Medical Insurance claims data.
Summary
Birth Registration Rate and Accuracy of Reported Birth Date in Rural Area.
Jung Han Park, Chang Yik Lee, Jang Rak Kim, Jung Hup Song, Min Hae Yeh, Seong Eok Cho
Korean J Prev Med. 1988;21(1):70-81.
  • 2,075 View
  • 21 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
To measure the birth registration rate and the validity of birth registration data in rural area, all of the 4,014 married women under 49 years of age who had not been sterilized in Gunwee county of Kyungpook province were followed by Myun health workers for 2 years from April 1, 1985 to March 31, 1987 and 766 births were detected. All of the birth registration records of Myun offices were reviewed on September 30, 1987 and 944 births which occurred within the above mentioned period were found. Actual birth date obtained by follow-up study were compared with the birth date on registration card. Among 766 births detected by follow-up study, 576 births(75.2%) which were reported within 6 months after birth were ascertained on the official registration records and 96 births(12.5%) were not found on the records although mother stated that the birth was registered. The registration rate within legal due date was 61.3% among 576 births detected by follow-up study and also ascertained on the official records. The registration rate within legal due date was lower in mothers under 20 years of age and above 35 years and in mothers who had only primary education. It was decreased as the birth order increased. The registration rate was higher in births occurred from October to March than births occurred from April to September. All of the births of 7 neonatal deaths were not reported. The registered birth date was consistent with the actual birth date in 78.0%. Birth date on record was earlier than the actual birth date in 6.8% and later in 15.3%. The consistency rate was lower in mothers above 35 years of age(54.5%), and in infants of 4th birth order and above(56.3%). The rate was increased as the maternal education level increased. The rate of boys was higher than that of girls. A higher percentage(17.4%) of infants born in March was registered with earlier date than the actual birth date and most of these registered birth dates were lunar calendar date. This might be related with the age for entering the primary school. The study findings revealed that the birth registration rate within legal due date and accuracy of report have been increased in recent years, but the infant mortality rate derived from the birth registration seems to be very inaccurate. It is suggested to let the medical personnel who delivered the baby report the birth by mail directly to the current address of parent while infants delivered at home without professional attendant may comply with the present registration system.
Summary

JPMPH : Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health