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Original Articles
Probability of Early Retirement Among Emergency Physicians
Jaemyeong Shin, Yun Jeong Kim, Jong Kun Kim, Dong Eun Lee, Sungbae Moon, Jae Young Choe, Won Kee Lee, Hyung Min Lee, Kwang Hyun Cho
J Prev Med Public Health. 2018;51(3):154-162.   Published online May 17, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.18.079
  • 6,723 View
  • 141 Download
  • 13 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Objectives
Early retirement occurs when one’s job satisfaction suffers due to employment mismatch resulting from factors such as inadequate compensation. Medical doctors report high levels of job stress and burnout relative to other professionals. These levels are highest among emergency physicians (EPs), and despite general improvements in their working conditions, early retirement continues to become more common in this population. The purpose of this study was to identify the factors influencing EPs intention to retire early and to develop a probability equation for its prediction.
Methods
A secondary analysis of data from the 2015 Korean Society of Emergency Physicians Survey was performed. The variables potentially influencing early retirement were organized into personal characteristics, extrinsic factors, and intrinsic factors. Logistic regression analysis was performed to identify risk factors and to develop a probability equation; these findings were then arranged in a nomogram.
Results
Of the 377 survey respondents included in the analysis, 48.0% intended to retire early. Risk factors for early retirement included level of satisfaction with the specialty and its outlook, slanderous reviews, emergency room safety, health status, workload intensity, age, and hospital type. Intrinsic factors (i.e., slanderous reviews and satisfaction with the specialty and its outlook) had a stronger influence on early retirement than did extrinsic factors.
Conclusions
To promote career longevity among EPs, it is vital to improve emergency room safety and workload intensity, to enhance medical professionalism through a stronger vision of emergency medicine, and to strengthen the patient-doctor relationship.
Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Determining the research priorities for emergency care within the Western Cape province of South Africa: A consensus study
    Robert Holliman, Lee Wallis, Colleen Saunders
    African Journal of Emergency Medicine.2024; 14(1): 1.     CrossRef
  • Emergency physician professionalism versus wellness: A conceptual model
    Jay M. Brenner, Chadd Kraus, Rebecca R. Goett, Monisha Dilip, Elizabeth P. Clayborne, Nick Kluesner
    Journal of the American College of Emergency Physicians Open.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Working in value‐discrepant environments inhibits clinicians’ ability to provide compassion and reduces well‐being: A cross‐sectional study
    Alina Pavlova, Sarah‐Jane Paine, Shane Sinclair, Anne O'Callaghan, Nathan S. Consedine
    Journal of Internal Medicine.2023; 293(6): 704.     CrossRef
  • Clinical adaptations for advanced career emergency physicians: an approach to support practice transition
    Riyad B. Abu-Laban, Nicholas G. W. Rose, David Migneault, Erin Fukushima, Kerry E. Walker, Jill McEwen
    Canadian Journal of Emergency Medicine.2023; 25(12): 931.     CrossRef
  • Won't you stay just a little bit longer? A discrete choice experiment of UK doctors’ preferences for delaying retirement
    Jennifer Cleland, Terry Porteous, Ourega-Zoé Ejebu, Mandy Ryan, Diane Skåtun
    Health Policy.2022; 126(1): 60.     CrossRef
  • Early-Career Physician Burnout
    Leelach Rothschild, Ciera Ward
    Anesthesiology Clinics.2022; 40(2): 315.     CrossRef
  • Retiring From Pediatric Emergency Medicine Too Soon?
    Bharati Beatrix Bansal, Matthew Sunil Mathew, Quiera Booker-Nubie, Sarah E. Messiah, Vincent J. Wang
    Pediatric Emergency Care.2022; 38(6): 253.     CrossRef
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  • The age‐old question: Thematic analysis of focus groups on physician experiences of aging in emergency medicine
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    Journal of the American College of Emergency Physicians Open.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Identifying contemporary early retirement factors and strategies to encourage and enable longer working lives: A scoping review
    Donna M. Wilson, Begoña Errasti‐Ibarrondo, Gail Low, Pauline O'Reilly, Fiona Murphy, Anne Fahy, Jill Murphy
    International Journal of Older People Nursing.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • ‘Should I stay or should I go now?’: A qualitative study of why UK doctors retire
    Jennifer Cleland, Terry Porteous, Ourega‐Zoe Ejebu, Diane Skåtun
    Medical Education.2020; 54(9): 821.     CrossRef
  • Breaking the Gender Gap: A Two-part Observational Study of the Gender Disparity Among Korean Academic Emergency Physicians
    Mi Jin Lee, ChangHo Kim
    Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health.2020; 53(5): 362.     CrossRef
  • Just when I thought I was out, they pull me back in: the older physician in the COVID-19 pandemic
    Carmelle Peisah, Peter Hockey, Susan Mary Benbow, Betsy Williams
    International Psychogeriatrics.2020; 32(10): 1211.     CrossRef
Changes in Dietary Behavior Among Adolescents and Their Association With Government Nutrition Policies in Korea, 2005-2009
Sang Geun Bae, Jong Yeon Kim, Keon Yeop Kim, Soon Woo Park, Jisuk Bae, Won Kee Lee
J Prev Med Public Health. 2012;45(1):47-59.   Published online January 31, 2012
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2012.45.1.47
  • 12,471 View
  • 107 Download
  • 35 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives

This study was conducted to observe recent changes in adolescents' dietary behavior and indirectly evaluate the effects of the government's nutritional policies in Korea.

Methods

We analyzed the secular trends in seven dietary behaviors using the Korea Youth Risk Behavior Web-based Survey data from 2005 to 2009. Through literature review, we included the policies implemented for the improvement of adolescents'dietary behaviors during the same periods.

Results

The significant linear trends were observed in all dietary behaviors (p<0.05). Overall, all behaviors except the fruit intake rate were desirably changed during five years but undesirable changes were observed between 2008 and 2009 in all behaviors. Within those periods, several policies were implemented including 'Ban on carbonated-beverages in school', 'Green Food Zone', etc. Despite confirmed evidence of their effects, the policies on individual behavior such as nutrition education didn't influence the prevalence of dietary behaviors because they were conducted to too limited persons. Polices on the school environmental improvement, such as ban on carbonated beverage in school, were more effective because they decreased the exposure of undesirable food environment. However, for effect of Green Food Zone improving community environment we couldn't come to a conclusion because of too short period after full implementation.

Conclusions

Among government nutrition policies conducted from 2005 to 2009, those on environmental improvement, especially in school, were more effective than those on individual behavior. Therefore, the development and implement of policies on school environmental improvement are needed in Korea.

Summary

Citations

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    Jaqueline Aragoni da Silva, Kelly Samara da Silva, Mônica Costa Silva, Pablo Magno da Silveira, Giovâni Firpo Del Duca, Jucemar Benedet, Markus Vinicius Nahas
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Trends in Cigarette Use Behaviors Among Adolescents by Region in Korea
Nam Soo Hong, Keon Yeop Kim, Soon-Woo Park, Jong-Yeon Kim, Jisuk Bae, Won Kee Lee, Ki Su Kim
J Prev Med Public Health. 2011;44(4):176-184.   Published online July 29, 2010
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2011.44.4.176
  • 10,324 View
  • 63 Download
  • 8 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives

Understanding recent trends in cigarette smoking among adolescents is important in order to develop strategies to prevent cigarette smoking. The aim of this study was to compare recent trends in cigarette smoking for adolescents living in rural areas, small towns and metropolitan cities in Korea.

Methods

The raw data from the Korea Youth Risk Behavior Web-based Survey (KYRBWS) from 2005 to 2009 were used. Data were analyzed by using the method of complex survey data analysis considering complex sampling design. Logistic regression models were used to evaluate significant linear time trends in cigarette smoking. The indicators of cigarette use behaviors were 'current smoking rate', 'frequent smoking rate', 'heavy smoking rate' and 'smoking experience rate before 13 years of age'. All analyses were conducted according to gender.

Results

Statistically significant increasing trends in current smoking rate and frequent smoking rate were observed and borderline significant increasing trends in heavy smoking rate were shown among rural boys. Among metropolitan city boys, statistically significant increasing trends were also seen for frequent smoking. Statistically significant decreasing trends in current smoking rate were observed among small town and metropolitan city girls. Smoking experience rate before 13 years of age for rural girls decreased significantly.

Conclusions

Cigarette smoking prevalence among adolescents in the rural areas has increased in the last five years especially among boys. Our findings suggest that anti-tobacco program for adolescents should be conducted primarily for those in rural areas.

Summary

Citations

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    Joshua D. Lee, Colleen Guimond, Irene M. Yee, Carles Vilariño-Güell, Zhi-Ying Wu, Anthony L. Traboulsee, A. Dessa Sadovnick
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Evaluation Studies
The Factors Implicated When an Individual Starts to Smoke Again After a 6 Month Cessation.
Hyo Kyung Son, Un Young Jung, Ki Soo Park, Sin Kam, Sun Kyun Park, Won Kee Lee
J Prev Med Public Health. 2009;42(1):42-48.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2009.42.1.42
  • 4,803 View
  • 67 Download
  • 12 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
This study was conducted to examine the factors implicated when people start smoking again after a 6 month cessation, and was carried out at the smoking cessation clinic of a public health center. METHODS: The study subjects were 191 males who had attended the smoking cessation clinic of a public health center for 6 months in an attempt to quit smoking. Data was collected, by phone interview, regarding individual smoking habits, if any, over the 6 month study period. The factors which may have caused an individual to smoke again were examined. This study employed a health belief model as it theoretical basis. RESULTS: Following a 6 month cessation, 24.1% of the study group began to smoke again during the 6 month test period. In a simple analysis, the factors related to individuals relapsing and smoking again included barriers of stress reduction, body weight gain and induction of smoking by surroundings among perceived barriers factor of our health belief model (p<0.05). In multiple logistic regression analysis for relapsed smoking, significant factors included barriers of stress reduction and induction of smoking by surroundings (p<0.05). The most important reason of for an individual to relapse into smoking was stress (60.9%) and the most likely place for a relapse to occur was a drinking establishment (39.1%). CONCLUSIONS: Our results indicate that both regular consultations and a follow-up management program are important considerations in a public health center program geared towards maintaining smoking cessation.
Summary

Citations

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English Abstract
Estimation of Smoking Prevalence among Adolescents in a Community by Design-based Analysis.
Soon Woo Park, Jong Yeon Kim, Sang Won Lee, Jung Han Park, Yeon Oh Yun, Won Kee Lee
J Prev Med Public Health. 2006;39(4):317-324.
  • 2,149 View
  • 27 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
This study was conducted to estimate the unbiased smoking prevalence and its standard errors among adolescents in a large city in Korea, by designbased analysis. METHODS: All the students in Daegu city were stratified by grade, gender and region, and then schools as primary sampling units (PSU) were selected by probability proportional to size (PPS) sampling. One or two classes were sampled randomly from each grade, from 5th grade in elementary schools to the 3rd grade in high schools. The students anonymously completed a standardized selfadministered questionnaire from October to December 2004. The total number of respondents was 8,480 in the final analysis, excluding the third graders in the general high schools because of incomplete sampling. The sampling weight was calculated for each student after poststratification adjustment, with adjustment being made for the missing cases. The data were analyzed with Stata 8.0 with consideration of PSU, weighting and the strata variables. RESULTS: The smoking prevalence (%) and standard errors for male students from the fifth grade in elementary schools to the second grade in high schools were 0.93[0.47, 1.83[ 0.74, 3.16[1.00, 5.12[1.02, 10.86[1.13, 15.63[2.44 and 17.96[2.67, and those for the female students were 0.28[ 0.28, 1.17[0.73, 3.13[0.60, 1.45[0.58, 3.94[0.92, 8.75 [1.86 and 10.04[1.70, sequentially. CONCLUSIONS: The smoking prevalence from this study was much higher than those from the other conventional studies conducted in Korea. The point estimates and standard errors from the design-based analysis were different from those of the model-based analysis. These findings suggest the importance of design-based analysis to estimate unbiased prevalence and standard errors in complex survey data and this method is recommended to apply to future surveys for determining the smoking prevalence for specific population.
Summary

JPMPH : Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health