Skip Navigation
Skip to contents

JPMPH : Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health

OPEN ACCESS
SEARCH
Search

Previous issues

Page Path
HOME > Browse Articles > Previous issues
8 Previous issues
Filter
Filter
Article category
Keywords
Authors
Funded articles
Volume 50(3); May 2017
Prev issue Next issue
Special Article
Origins and Evolution of Social Medicine and Contemporary Social Medicine in Korea
Dal Sun Han, Sang-Soo Bae, Dong-Hyun Kim, Yong-jun Choi
J Prev Med Public Health. 2017;50(3):141-157.   Published online April 16, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.16.106
  • 8,128 View
  • 238 Download
  • 7 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Social medicine is recognized as one of medical specialties in many countries. However, social medicine has never been formally introduced to Korea, presumably because the term and its principles were not accepted for some years in the past in American medicine, which has strongly influenced Korean medicine. This paper describes the origins and evolution of social medicine and briefly discusses contemporary social medicine in Korea. Social medicine was initiated in France and Germany in 1848. Since then, it has expanded globally and developed in diverse ways. Included in core principles of social medicine is that social and economic conditions have important effects on health and disease, and that these relationships must be subjected to scientific investigation. The term ‘social medicine’ is rarely used in Korea, but many of its subject matters are incorporated into preventive medicine which, besides prevention, deals with population health that is inescapably social. However, the Korean preventive medicine directs little attention to the basic concepts and principles of social medicine, upon which systematic development of social medicine can be based. Thus, it is necessary to supplement the social medicine contents of preventive medicine through formalizing the linkages between the two fields. One way of doing so would be to change the title of ‘preventive medicine’ course in medical colleges to ‘preventive and social medicine,’ as in many other countries, and to adjust the course contents accordingly.
Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Is it about time to develop social surgery?
    Christos Tsagkaris, Marios Papadakis, Lolita Matiashova
    The American Journal of Surgery.2023; 225(1): 151.     CrossRef
  • Students or medical professionals: whose knowledge improved after social-medicine training? Results from a quasi-experimental evaluation study
    Beate Muschalla, Stefanie Baron, Theresa Klevers
    Social Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology.2022; 57(7): 1505.     CrossRef
  • Undergraduate Education in Forensic Medicine in Germany, Japan, and Korea
    Gi Yeong Huh
    Korean Journal of Legal Medicine.2022; 46(4): 95.     CrossRef
  • Rockefeller Foundation Philanthropy and Modern Public Health in China and India
    Tiasangla Longkumer
    Crossroads.2022; 21(1-2): 90.     CrossRef
  • Use and impact of social prescribing: a mixed-methods feasibility study protocol
    Anant Jani, Harshana Liyanage, Uy Hoang, Lucy Moore, Filipa Ferreira, Ivelina Yonova, Victoria Tzortziou Brown, Simon de Lusignan
    BMJ Open.2020; 10(9): e037681.     CrossRef
  • Making social prescriptions mainstream
    Anant Jani, Muir Gray
    Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine.2019; 112(11): 459.     CrossRef
  • Influence of an art museum visit on individuals’ psychological and physiological indicators of stress
    Kristina Ter-Kazarian, Jessica J. Luke
    Museums & Social Issues.2019; 14(1-2): 45.     CrossRef
Original Articles
Bacterial Contamination and Disinfection Status of Laryngoscopes Stored in Emergency Crash Carts
Jae Hyung Choi, Young Soon Cho, Jung Won Lee, Hee Bong Shin, In Kyung Lee
J Prev Med Public Health. 2017;50(3):158-164.   Published online April 4, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.17.013
  • 23,098 View
  • 209 Download
  • 7 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
To identify bacterial contamination rates of laryngoscope blades and handles stored in emergency crash carts by hospital and area according to the frequency of intubation attempts.
Methods
One hundred forty-eight handles and 71 blades deemed ready for patient use from two tertiary hospitals were sampled with sterile swabs using a standardized rolling technique. Samples were considered negative (not contaminated) if no colonies were present on the blood agar plate after an 18-hour incubation period. Samples were stratified by hospital and according to the frequency of intubation attempts (10 attempts per year) using the χ2-test and Fisher exact test.
Results
One or more species of bacteria were isolated from 4 (5.6%) handle tops, 20 (28.2%) handles with knurled surfaces, and 27 (18.2%) blades. No significant differences were found in microbial contamination levels on the handle tops and blades between the two hospitals and two areas according to the frequency of intubation attempts. However, significant differences were found between the two hospitals and two areas in the level of microbial contamination on the handles with knurled surfaces (p<0.05).
Conclusions
Protocols and policies must be reviewed to standardize procedures to clean and disinfect laryngoscope blades and handles; handles should be re-designed to eliminate points of contact with the blade; and single-use, one-piece laryngoscopes should be introduced.
Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • A cost comparison between reusable flexible and disposable laryngoscopes
    James Ellis, Albert H Park, Aaron Prussin
    American Journal of Otolaryngology.2022; 43(2): 103321.     CrossRef
  • Current practice of anesthetic equipment disinfection in the University of Gondar Comprehensive Specialized Hospital, 2020: a cross sectional study
    Seid A. Ahmed, Demeke Y. Fentie
    International Journal of Surgery: Global Health.2021; 4(3): e54.     CrossRef
  • Moving towards green anaesthesia: Are patient safety and environmentally friendly practices compatible? A focus on single-use devices
    Thibault Reynier, Mathilde Berahou, Pierre Albaladejo, Hélène Beloeil
    Anaesthesia Critical Care & Pain Medicine.2021; 40(4): 100907.     CrossRef
  • Economic and Epidemiological Impact of an Improvement Plan for the Decrease of Ventilator-Associated Pneumonia in a Tertiary Hospital in Mexico
    Oscar Sosa-Hernández, Bernardina Matías-Téllez, Yefté Efraín Silva-López, Verónica Alarcón-Hernández, Juan Manuel Bello-López, Mónica Alethia Cureño-Díaz, Gustavo Esteban Lugo-Zamudio
    Journal of Patient Safety.2021; 17(8): e1889.     CrossRef
  • Food poisoning: an underestimated cause of Boerhaave syndrome
    Karl Dichtl, Martin B. Koeppel, Claus-Peter Wallner, Thomas Marx, Johannes Wagener, Ludwig Ney
    Infection.2020; 48(1): 125.     CrossRef
  • Contamination and Disinfection of Rigid Laryngoscopes: A Literature Review
    Sharon Ann Van Wicklin
    AORN Journal.2019; 110(1): 49.     CrossRef
  • Infection Prevention for the Emergency Department
    Stephen Y. Liang, Madison Riethman, Josephine Fox
    Emergency Medicine Clinics of North America.2018; 36(4): 873.     CrossRef
Risk of Hemorrhage Attributed to Underlying Chronic Diseases and Uninterrupted Aspirin Therapy of Patients Undergoing Minor Oral Surgical Procedures: A Retrospective Cohort Study
Chanapong Rojanaworarit, Soontaree Limsawan
J Prev Med Public Health. 2017;50(3):165-176.   Published online April 7, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.16.121
  • 6,552 View
  • 262 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
This study aimed to estimate the risk of bleeding following minor oral surgical procedures and uninterrupted aspirin therapy in high-risk patients or patients with existing chronic diseases compared to patients who did not use aspirin during minor oral surgery at a public hospital.
Methods
This retrospective cohort study analyzed the data of 2912 patients, aged 20 years or older, who underwent 5251 minor oral surgical procedures at a district hospital in Thailand. The aspirin group was comprised of patients continuing aspirin therapy during oral surgery. The non-aspirin group (reference) included all those who did not use aspirin during surgery. Immediate and late-onset bleeding was evaluated in each procedure. The risk ratio of bleeding was estimated using a multilevel Poisson regression.
Results
The overall cumulative incidence of immediate bleeding was 1.3% of total procedures. No late-onset bleeding was found. A significantly greater incidence of bleeding was found in the aspirin group (5.8% of procedures, p<0.001). After adjusting for covariates, a multilevel Poisson regression model estimated that the bleeding risk in the aspirin group was 4.5 times higher than that of the non-aspirin group (95% confidence interval, 2.0 to 10.0; p<0.001). However, all bleeding events were controlled by simple hemostatic measures.
Conclusions
High-risk patients or patients with existing chronic diseases who continued aspirin therapy following minor oral surgery were at a higher risk of hemorrhage than general patients who had not used aspirin. Nonetheless, bleeding complications were not life-threatening and could be promptly managed by simple hemostatic measures. The procedures could therefore be provided with an awareness of increased bleeding risk, prepared hemostatic measures, and postoperative monitoring, without the need for discontinuing aspirin, which could lead to more serious complications.
Summary
Assessment of Tobacco Habits, Attitudes, and Education Among Medical Students in the United States and Italy: A Cross-sectional Survey
Grayson W. Armstrong, Giacomo Veronese, Paul F. George, Isacco Montroni, Giampaolo Ugolini
J Prev Med Public Health. 2017;50(3):177-187.   Published online April 14, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.15.061
  • 7,107 View
  • 235 Download
  • 25 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Objectives
Medical students represent a primary target for tobacco cessation training. This study assessed the prevalence of medical students’ tobacco use, attitudes, clinical skills, and tobacco-related curricula in two countries, the US and Italy, with known baseline disparities in hopes of identifying potential corrective interventions.
Methods
From September to December 2013, medical students enrolled at the University of Bologna and at Brown University were recruited via email to answer survey questions assessing the prevalence of medical students’ tobacco use, attitudes and clinical skills related to patients’ smoking, and elements of medical school curricula related to tobacco use.
Results
Of the 449 medical students enrolled at Brown and the 1426 enrolled at Bologna, 174 Brown students (38.7%) and 527 Bologna students (36.9%) participated in this study. Italian students were more likely to smoke (29.5% vs. 6.1%; p<0.001) and less likely to receive smoking cessation training (9.4% vs. 80.3%; p<0.001) than their American counterparts, even though the majority of students in both countries desired smoking cessation training (98.6% at Brown, 85.4% at Bologna; p<0.001). Additionally, negative beliefs regarding tobacco usage, the absence of formal training in smoking cessation counseling, and a negative interest in receiving specific training on smoking cessation were associated with a higher risk of not investigating a patient’s smoking status during a routine history and not offering tobacco cessation treatment to patients.
Conclusions
Medical curricula on tobacco-related health hazards and on smoking cessation should be mandatory in order to reduce smoking among medical students, physicians, and patients, thereby improving tobacco-related global health.
Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Smoking and Depression among Medical School Students: A Cross-Sectional Study from Turkey’s Largest Province
    Bahar Ürün Ünal, Kamile Marakoğlu
    Healthcare.2024; 12(11): 1130.     CrossRef
  • Prevalence and Assessment of Knowledge, Attitudes, and Practices of Tobacco Use Among Medical and Dental Students in Bhubaneswar, Odisha
    Nancy Satpathy, Himanshu S Pradhan, Swapna Sarangi, Venkatarao Epari, Pratap K Jena, Samarendra Dash, Debi P Mohanty, Pratisha Mishra
    Cureus.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • The Role Of Medical Education in Struggle Against Smoking: The Prevalance of Smoking And Related Factors in Medical Students, Çanakkale
    Buse YÜKSEL, Esen GOKCE, Coşkun BAKAR, Demet Güleç ÖYEKÇİN, Yagmur DUVA
    Türkiye Halk Sağlığı Dergisi.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Prevalence of Use and Knowledge about Tobacco Products and Their Harmful Effects among University Students in Southern Croatia
    Dora Istenic, Lidia Gavic, Antonija Tadin
    Healthcare.2023; 11(5): 771.     CrossRef
  • Tobacco Cessation Curriculum in Medical Schools: a Scoping Review
    Sufian Elfandi, Hemant Poudyal
    Journal of Cancer Education.2023; 38(5): 1614.     CrossRef
  • Knowledge and Awareness of Smoking Effects and Its Cessation Methods among Medical Students in Telangana: A Questionnaire Study
    Prashanth Panta, Archana Andhavarapu, Tejaswini R Gurram, Santhi P Ravada
    World Journal of Dentistry.2023; 14(5): 447.     CrossRef
  • Prevalence of Cigarette Smoking and Influence of Associated Factors among Students of the University of Banja Luka: A Cross-Sectional Study
    Ivana Todorović, Feng Cheng, Stela Stojisavljević, Sonja Marinković, Stefan Kremenović, Pane Savić, Ana Golić-Jelić, Nataša Stojaković, Svjetlana Stoisavljević-Šatara, Rajko Igić, Ranko Škrbić
    Medicina.2022; 58(4): 502.     CrossRef
  • Cigarette Smoking among Medical Students from the Western Balkan
    Miloš Ilić, Maja Grujičić, Budimka Novaković, Aleksandra Vrkatić, Zagorka Lozanov-Crvenković
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2022; 19(5): 3055.     CrossRef
  • Training Tobacco Treatment Specialists through Virtual Asynchronous Learning
    Audrey Darville, Kathy Rademacher, Amanda T. Wiggins, Mary Grace Lenhof, Ellen J. Hahn
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2022; 19(6): 3201.     CrossRef
  • Perceptions and preparedness toward tobacco cessation counseling amongst clinical medical students in Chongqing, Southwest China: A cross-sectional study
    Chuang Yang, Wenjin He, Ruihang Deng, Mohan Giri, Haiyun Dai
    Frontiers in Public Health.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Tobacco Consumption Among Young Population in Rural Indonesia: Prevalence and Associated Factors
    Diyan Ermawan Effendi, Arief Priyo Nugroho, Sri Handayani, Risqa Novita, Sidiq Purwoko, Zulfa Auliyati Agustina
    Open Access Macedonian Journal of Medical Sciences.2022; 10(E): 1178.     CrossRef
  • Assessment of Knowledge, Attitude, and Practice among Subjects Visiting the Tobacco Cessation Clinic
    Aiswarya Vijayakrishna, Sharad Chand, U. P. Nandakumar, Santosh Prabhu, Manoj S. Dikkatwar, B. C. Vinay, Juno J. Joel
    Global Journal of Medical, Pharmaceutical, and Biomedical Update.2022; 17: 19.     CrossRef
  • Assessing Smoking Habits, Attitudes, Knowledge, and Needs among University Students at the University of Milan, Italy
    Laura Campo, Silvia Lumia, Silvia Fustinoni
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2022; 19(19): 12527.     CrossRef
  • Tobacco Smoking and Smokeless Tobacco Use among Domestic and International Medical Students in Hungary
    Erika Balogh, Zoltán Wagner, Nóra Faubl, Henna Riemenschneider, Karen Voigt, András Terebessy, Ferenc Horváth, Zsuzsanna Füzesi, István Kiss
    Substance Use & Misuse.2021; 56(4): 493.     CrossRef
  • Tobacco use and related behaviors among staff and students in a university hospital: A large cross-sectional survey
    Emmanuel Grolleau, Véronique Fonteille, Caroline Lebourgeois, Marie Darrason, Philippe Michel, Delphine Ragonnet, Gilles Freyer, Amélie Deculty, Carine Gippet, Céline Leclerq, Carole Neugnot, Radoudja Malek, Odile Perdriolat, Michele Rigaud, Séverine Torr
    Tobacco Prevention & Cessation.2021; 7(July): 1.     CrossRef
  • Knowledge and attitudes towards smoking cessation counselling: an Italian cross-sectional survey on tertiary care nursing staff
    Laura Maniscalco, Salvatore Barretta, Giuseppe Pizzo, Domenica Matranga
    PeerJ.2021; 9: e12213.     CrossRef
  • Validation of a Questionnaire to Assess Smoking Habits, Attitudes, Knowledge, and Needs among University Students: A Pilot Study among Obstetrics Students
    Laura Campo, Francesca Vecera, Silvia Fustinoni
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2021; 18(22): 11873.     CrossRef
  • First-year French medical students consume antidepressants and anxiolytics while second-years consume non-medical drugs.
    G. Fond, A. Bourbon, M. Boucekine, M. Messiaen, V. Barrow, P. Auquier, C. Lançon, L. Boyer
    Journal of Affective Disorders.2020; 265: 71.     CrossRef
  • Mental Health Disturbances and Related Problems in Italian University Medical Students from 2000 to 2020: An Integrative Review of Qualitative and Quantitative Studies
    Gaia Sampogna, Giovanni Marcos Lovisi, Francesca Zinno, Valeria Del Vecchio, Mario Luciano, Érika Gonçalves Loureiro Sol, Roberto José Gervásio Unger, Antonio Ventriglio, Andrea Fiorillo
    Medicina.2020; 57(1): 11.     CrossRef
  • Apprentissage de l’aide au sevrage tabagique dans les formations médicales au Liban
    Hala El Kahi, Fady Haddad, Sani Hlais
    Santé Publique.2020; Vol. 32(1): 57.     CrossRef
  • Preferences in Sleep Position Correlate With Nighttime Paresthesias in Healthy People Without Carpal Tunnel Syndrome
    Carrie L. Roth Bettlach, Jessica M. Hasak, Emily M. Krauss, Jenny L. Yu, Gary B. Skolnick, Greta N. Bodway, Lorna C. Kahn, Susan E. Mackinnon
    HAND.2019; 14(2): 163.     CrossRef
  • Perception of health professions students of their role model status in Toombak cessation: A cross-sectional study from Sudan
    Hatim Mohammed Almahdi, Raouf Wahab Ali, Anne Nordrehaug Åstrøm, Elwalid Fadul Nasir, Pranil Man Singh Pradhan
    PLOS ONE.2019; 14(2): e0210837.     CrossRef
  • Anxiolytic consumption is associated with tobacco smoking and severe nicotine dependence. Results from the national French medical students (BOURBON) study
    A. Bourbon, L. Boyer, P. Auquier, M. Boucekine, V. Barrow, C. Lançon, G. Fond
    Progress in Neuro-Psychopharmacology and Biological Psychiatry.2019; 94: 109645.     CrossRef
  • Psychiatry: A discipline at specific risk of mental health issues and addictive behavior? Results from the national BOURBON study
    G. Fond, A. Bourbon, J-A. Micoulaud-Franchi, P. Auquier, L. Boyer, C. Lançon
    Journal of Affective Disorders.2018; 238: 534.     CrossRef
  • Estudio de corte transversal sobre el estado de conocimientos, actitudes y prácticas de médicos colombianos ante el tabaquismo
    Claudia Ximena Robayo-González, Juan Carlos Uribe-Caputi
    MedUNAB.2018; 20(3): 327.     CrossRef
Perceived Environmental Pollution and Its Impact on Health in China, Japan, and South Korea
Akiko Kamimura, Bianca Armenta, Maziar Nourian, Nushean Assasnik, Kimiya Nourian, Alla Chernenko
J Prev Med Public Health. 2017;50(3):188-194.   Published online April 27, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.17.044
  • 10,523 View
  • 248 Download
  • 24 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
Environmental pollution is a significant global issue. Both objective (scientifically measured) environmental pollution and perceived levels of pollution are important predictors of self-reported health. The purpose of this study was to compare the associations between perceived environmental pollution and health in China, Japan, and South Korea.
Methods
Data were obtained from the East Asian Social Survey and the Cross-National Survey Data Sets: Health and Society in East Asia, 2010 (n=7938; China, n=3866; Japan, n=2496; South Korea, n=1576).
Results
South Koreans perceived environmental pollution to be the most severe, while Japanese participants perceived environmental pollution to be the least severe. Although the Japanese did not perceive environmental pollution to be very severe, their self-rated physical health was significantly related to perceived environmental pollution, while the analogous relationships were not significant for the Chinese or Korean participants. Better mental health was related to lower levels of perceived air pollution in China, as well as lower levels of perceived all types of pollution in Japan and lower levels of perceived noise pollution in South Korea.
Conclusions
Physical and mental health and individual socio-demographic characteristics were associated with levels of perceived environmental pollution, but with different patterns among these three countries.
Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Associations between neighborhood environments and health status among Chinese older people during the pandemic: Exploring mediation effects of physical activity
    Jiahang Liu, Chun Yin, Bindong Sun
    Journal of Transport & Health.2024; 35: 101757.     CrossRef
  • Assessment of air pollution and air quality perception mismatch using mobility-based real-time exposure
    Wanying Song, Mei-Po Kwan, Jianwei Huang, Tai Ming Wut
    PLOS ONE.2024; 19(2): e0294605.     CrossRef
  • Does Internet Use Increase Public Perception of Environmental Pollution?—Evidence from China
    Chengzhi Yi, Jiajun Han, Cuihong Long
    Social Indicators Research.2023; 166(3): 665.     CrossRef
  • Associations between direct contact with the oil and worsened health indicators after Deepwater Horizon oil spill: Results from Gulf States Population Survey
    Bingxue Han
    Qeios.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Climate change and mental health in Korea: A scoping review
    Jiyoung Shin, Juha Baek, Sumi Chae
    Journal of Climate Change Research.2023; 14(6-2): 989.     CrossRef
  • The impact of perceived air pollution on labour supply: Evidence from China
    Xiaoqin Li, Yonghui Li
    Journal of Environmental Management.2022; 306: 114455.     CrossRef
  • Development and validation of a new scale to assess air quality knowledge (AQIQ)
    Alessandro Del Ponte, Lina Ang, Lianjun Li, Noah Lim, Wilson Wai San Tam, Wei Jie Seow
    Environmental Pollution.2022; 299: 118750.     CrossRef
  • Exposures, Symptoms and Risk Perception among Office Workers in Relation to Nanoparticles in the Work Environment
    Hans Orru, Henrik Olstrup, Annika Hagenbjörk, Steven Nordin, Kati Orru
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2022; 19(10): 5789.     CrossRef
  • Boron removal by glucamine-functionalized inverse vulcanized sulfur polymer
    Amin Abbasi, Wan Zaireen Nisa Yahya, Mohamed Mahmoud Nasef, Muhammad Moniruzzaman, Ali Shaan Manzoor Ghumman, Haruna Kolawole Afolabi
    Reactive and Functional Polymers.2022; 177: 105311.     CrossRef
  • Association between perceived environmental pollution and poor sleep quality: results from nationwide general population sample of 162,797 people
    Yeong Jun Ju, Joo Eun Lee, Dong-Woo Choi, Kyu-Tae Han, Soon Young Lee
    Sleep Medicine.2021; 80: 236.     CrossRef
  • Perceived environmental pollution and subjective cognitive decline (SCD) or SCD-related functional difficulties among the general population
    Yeong Jun Ju, Joo Eun Lee, Soon Young Lee
    Environmental Science and Pollution Research.2021; 28(24): 31289.     CrossRef
  • Evidence for Environmental Noise Effects on Health for the United Kingdom Policy Context: A Systematic Review of the Effects of Environmental Noise on Mental Health, Wellbeing, Quality of Life, Cancer, Dementia, Birth, Reproductive Outcomes, and Cognition
    Charlotte Clark, Clare Crumpler, Hilary Notley
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2020; 17(2): 393.     CrossRef
  • The analysis of creative thinking skills of junior high school students in learning natural science on environmental pollution materials with different academic skills
    N Maharani, Suratno, Sudarti
    Journal of Physics: Conference Series.2020; 1465(1): 012032.     CrossRef
  • Relationship of economic development, family income and health status in China: The moderating role of environmental pollution perception
    Lijuan Chen, Youqing Fan, Wei Guo
    Journal of Health Psychology.2020; 25(13-14): 2499.     CrossRef
  • Transcriptome sequencing reveals the effects of cadmium toxicity on the cold tolerance of the wolf spider Pirata subpiraticus
    Bo Lv, Juan Wang, Junzhe Zhuo, Huilin Yang, Sufang Yang, Zhi Wang, Qisheng Song
    Chemosphere.2020; 254: 126802.     CrossRef
  • Innovative Methods of Air Pollution Exposure Assessment for Environmental Safety
    Susymary J, Deepalakshmi Perumalsamy
    Procedia Computer Science.2020; 171: 689.     CrossRef
  • Working Conditions and Mental Health Status Related With Occupational Injury of Korean Outdoor Workers
    Wanhyung Lee, Junhyeong Lee, Ui-Jin Kim, Jin-Ha Yoon, Won-Jun Choi, Seunghon Ham, Eun Kyo Chung, Seong-Kyu Kang
    Journal of Occupational & Environmental Medicine.2020; 62(7): e334.     CrossRef
  • Associations between perceived environmental pollution and health-related quality of life in a Chinese adult population
    Bingxue Han
    Health and Quality of Life Outcomes.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Impact of Credit Constraints from Formal Financial Institutions on Rural Residents’ Health in China
    Fan Yang, Yao Jiang, Krishna P. Paudel
    Healthcare.2020; 9(1): 6.     CrossRef
  • Sulfur-based polymers by inverse vulcanization: a novel path to foster green chemistry
    Amin Abbasi, Mohamed Mahmoud Nasef, Wan Zaireen Nisa Yahya
    Green Materials.2020; 8(4): 172.     CrossRef
  • Patterns of Life Lost to Cancers with High Risk of Death in China
    Yan, Chen, Jia, Liu, Ding, Wang, Hu, Ma, Zhang, Li
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2019; 16(12): 2175.     CrossRef
  • The Impact of Air Pollution, Including Asian Sand Dust, on Respiratory Symptoms and Health-related Quality of Life in Outpatients With Chronic Respiratory Disease in Korea: A Panel Study
    Motoyuki Nakao, Yoko Ishihara, Cheol-Hong Kim, In-Gyu Hyun
    Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health.2018; 51(3): 130.     CrossRef
  • A Multilevel Analysis of Perceived Noise Pollution, Geographic Contexts and Mental Health in Beijing
    Jing Ma, Chunjiang Li, Mei-Po Kwan, Yanwei Chai
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2018; 15(7): 1479.     CrossRef
  • Neighborhood environments and self-rated health in Mainland China, Japan and South Korea
    Jing Liu, Ye Luo, William Haller, Brenda Vander Mey, Ellen Granberg, Michael L. Goodman
    PLOS ONE.2018; 13(9): e0204910.     CrossRef
Seroreactivity to Q Fever Among Slaughterhouse Workers in South Korea
Hyuk Chu, Seok-Ju Yoo, Kyu-Jam Hwang, Hyun-Sul Lim, Kwan Lee, Mi-Yeoun Park
J Prev Med Public Health. 2017;50(3):195-200.   Published online May 11, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.17.017
  • 6,456 View
  • 167 Download
  • 12 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
Q fever is a zoonotic disease that occurs worldwide; however, little is known about its prevalence in South Korea. We attempted to determine the prevalence of Q fever seroreactivity among Korean slaughterhouse workers and the risk factors for seroreactivity according to the type of work.
Methods
The study was conducted among 1503 workers at a total of 73 slaughterhouses and 62 residual-product disposal plants. During the study period, sites were visited and surveys were administered to employees involved in slaughterhouse work, and serological tests were performed on blood samples by indirect immunofluorescence assays. Serological samples were grouped by job classification into those of slaughter workers, residual-product handlers, inspectors and inspection assistants, and grading testers and testing assistants. Employee risk factors were analyzed according to the type of work.
Results
Out of 1481 study subjects who provided a blood sample, 151 (10.2%) showed reactive antibodies. When these results were analyzed in accordance with the type of work, the result of slaughter workers (11.3%) was similar to the result of residual-product handlers (11.4%), and the result of inspectors and assistants (5.3%) was similar to the result of grading testers and assistants (5.4%). Among those who answered in the affirmative to the survey question, “Has there been frequent contact between cattle blood and your mouth while working?” the proportions were 13.4 and 4.6%, respectively, and this was identified as a risk factor that significantly varied between job categories among slaughterhouse workers.
Conclusions
This study found a Q fever seroreactivity rate of 10.2% for slaughterhouse workers, who are known to be a high-risk population. Contact with cattle blood around the mouth while working was the differential risk factor between job categories among slaughterhouse workers.
Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Prevalence and risk factors associated with Q fever infection in slaughterhouse workers in Fars province, Iran
    Alireza Zakeri, Maryam Montaseri, Seyed Shahram Shekarforoush
    International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health.2023; 96(4): 597.     CrossRef
  • First report of an outbreak of “Q” fever IN an abattoir from Argentina
    Natalia Marina Cardillo, Reginaldo Bastos, Araceli García, Rosendo Pérez, Ezequiel García, Susana Lloveras, Carlos Suarez
    Zoonoses and Public Health.2023; 70(8): 674.     CrossRef
  • Seroepidemiologic evidence of Q fever and associated factors among workers in veterinary service laboratory in South Korea
    Dilaram Acharya, Ji-Hyuk Park, Jeong-Hoon Chun, Mi Yeon Kim, Seok-Ju Yoo, Antoine Lewin, Kwan Lee, José Reck
    PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases.2022; 16(2): e0010054.     CrossRef
  • Exposure of South African Abattoir Workers to Coxiella burnetii
    Liesl De Boni, Sumaya Mall, Veerle Msimang, Alex de Voux, Jennifer Rossouw, John Frean
    Tropical Medicine and Infectious Disease.2022; 7(2): 28.     CrossRef
  • Seroprevalence of Coxiella burnetii in a dairy cattle herd from the Al Ain region, United Arab Emirates
    Robert Barigye, Nabeeha Abdelgaleel D. Hassan, Ibrahim M. Abdalla Alfaki, Mike B. Barongo, Mohamed Elfatih H. Mohamed, Khaja Mohteshamuddin
    Tropical Animal Health and Production.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Seroreactivity to Coxiella burnetii in an Agricultural Population and Prevalence of Coxiella burnetii Infection in Ticks of a Non-Endemic Region for Q Fever in South Korea
    Jeong-Rae Yoo, Mi-Sun Kim, Sang-Taek Heo, Hyun-Joo Oh, Jung-Hwan Oh, Seo-Young Ko, Jeong-Ho Kang, Sung-Kgun Lee, Woo-Seong Jeong, Gil-Myeong Seong, Hyun-Jung Lee, Chul-Hoo Kang, Ji-Hyun Moon, Keun-Hwa Lee, Sung-Wook Song
    Pathogens.2021; 10(10): 1337.     CrossRef
  • Isolation of Coxiella burnetii in patients with nonspecific febrile illness in South Korea
    Seung Hun Lee, Jae Hoon Lee, Sungdo Park, Hae Kyung Lee, Seon Do Hwang, Hye Won Jeong, Jung Yeon Heo, Yeong Seon Lee
    BMC Infectious Diseases.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Coxiella burnetiiinfection in humans: to what extent do cattle in infected areas free from small ruminants play a role?
    M. Pouquet, N. Bareille, R. Guatteo, L. Moret, F. Beaudeau
    Epidemiology and Infection.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Hepatitis in slaughterhouse workers
    Hassan Tariq, Muhammad Umar Kamal, Jasbir Makker, Sara Azam, Usman Ali Pirzada, Vaniza Mehak, Kishore Kumar, Harish Patel
    World Journal of Hepatology.2019; 11(1): 37.     CrossRef
  • Clinical characteristics of acute Q fever patients in South Korea and time from symptom onset to serologic diagnosis
    Jung Yeon Heo, Young Wha Choi, Eun Jin Kim, Seung Hun Lee, Seung Kwan Lim, Seon Do Hwang, Ju Young Lee, Hye Won Jeong
    BMC Infectious Diseases.2019;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Serologic Survey and Risk Factors forCoxiella burnetiiInfection among Dairy Cattle Farmers in Korea
    Ji-Hyuk Park, Hyuk Chu, Seok-Ju Yoo, Kyu-Jam Hwang, Hyun-Sul Lim
    Journal of Korean Medical Science.2018;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Seroreactivity and Risk Factors Associated with Coxiella burnetii Infection among Cattle Slaughterhouse Workers in South Korea
    Ji-Hyuk Park, Seon Hwang, Dilaram Acharya, Seung Lee, Kyu Hwang, Seok-Ju Yoo, Kwan Lee
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2018; 15(10): 2264.     CrossRef
Socioeconomic Inequality in Malnutrition in Under-5 Children in Iran: Evidence From the Multiple Indicator Demographic and Health Survey, 2010
Abdollah Almasian Kia, Aziz Rezapour, Ardeshir Khosravi, Vajiheh Afzali Abarghouei
J Prev Med Public Health. 2017;50(3):201-209.   Published online May 10, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.17.028
  • 8,368 View
  • 275 Download
  • 14 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
The aim of this study was to assess the socioeconomic inequality in malnutrition in under-5 children in Iran in order to help policymakers reduce such inequality.
Methods
Data on 8443 under-5 children were extracted from the Iran Multiple Indicator Demographic and Health Survey. The wealth index was used as proxy for socioeconomic status. Socioeconomic inequality in stunting, underweight, and wasting was calculated using the concentration index. The concentration index was calculated for the whole sample, as well as for subcategories defined in terms of categories such as area of residence (urban and rural) and the sex of children.
Results
Stunting was observed to be more prevalent than underweight or wasting. The results of the concentration index at the national level, as well as in rural and urban areas and in terms of children’s sex, showed that inequality in stunting and underweight was statistically significant and that children in the lower quintiles were more malnourished. The wasting index was not sensitive to socioeconomic status, and its concentration index value was not statistically significant.
Conclusions
This study showed that it can be misleading to assess the mean levels of malnutrition at the national level without knowledge of the distribution of malnutrition among socioeconomic groups. Significant socioeconomic inequalities in stunting and underweight were observed at the national level and in both urban and rural areas. Regarding the influence of nutrition on the health and economic well-being of preschool-aged children, it is necessary for the government to focus on taking targeted measures to reduce malnutrition and to focus on poorer groups within society who bear a greater burden of malnutrition.
Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Prediction and analysis of trends in the nutritional status of children under 5 years in Iran: reanalysis of the results of national surveys conducted between 1998 and 2020
    Delaram Ghodsi, Hamid Rasekhi, Zahra Yari, Roshanak Roustaee, Bahereh Nikooyeh, Ayoub Faramarzi, Hassan Eini-Zinab, Tirang R. Neyestani
    Frontiers in Nutrition.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Improvement in Anthropometric Measurements of Malnourished Children by Means of Complementary Food and Nutritional Education in Fars Province, Iran: A Community-Based Intervention
    Razieh Shenavar, Seyedeh Forough Sajjadi, Azam Farmani, Mina Zarmehrparirouy, Leila Azadbakht
    Frontiers in Nutrition.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Factor associated with anthropometric failure among under-five Bengali children: A comparative study between Bangladesh and India
    Ramendra Nath Kundu, Md. Golam Hossain, Md. Ahshanul Haque, Subir Biswas, Md. Monimul Huq, Md. Kamal Pasa, Md. Sabiruzzaman, Premananda Bharati, Lai Kuan Lee
    PLOS ONE.2022; 17(8): e0272634.     CrossRef
  • Breastfeeding Practices, Infant Formula Use, Complementary Feeding and Childhood Malnutrition: An Updated Overview of the Eastern Mediterranean Landscape
    Carla Ibrahim, Khlood Bookari, Yonna Sacre, Lara Hanna-Wakim, Maha Hoteit
    Nutrients.2022; 14(19): 4201.     CrossRef
  • Trends in inequalities in childhood stunting in Ethiopia from 2000 to 2016: a cross sectional study
    Betregiorgis Zegeye, Gebretsadik Shibre, Dina Idriss-Wheeler, Sanni Yaya
    Journal of Public Health.2021; 43(3): 655.     CrossRef
  • Relationship of Malnutrition in Children with Food and Nutrition Insecurity in Fars Province, Iran
    Razieh Shenavar, Mohsen Moghaddami, Soheila Shaghaghian, Mohsen Ali Akbarpoor, Mansore Nowrospour, Mahdieh Farid
    Shiraz E-Medical Journal.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Economic inequality in malnutrition: a global systematic review and meta-analysis
    Rotimi Alao, Hayaan Nur, Emily Fivian, Bhavani Shankar, Suneetha Kadiyala, Helen Harris-Fry
    BMJ Global Health.2021; 6(12): e006906.     CrossRef
  • The prevalence of stunting among children and adolescents living in the Middle East and North Africa region (MENA): A systematic review and meta-analysis
    Hassan Joulaei, Parisa Keshani, Mahkameh Ashourpour, Peyman Bemani, Sanaz Amiri, Jamileh Rahimi, Mohsen Aliakbarpour, Amin Salehi-Abargouei
    Journal of Global Health.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Prevalence and risk factors of childhood hypertension from birth through childhood: a retrospective cohort study
    Xiaohua Liang, Lun Xiao, Yetao Luo, Jiapei Xu
    Journal of Human Hypertension.2020; 34(2): 151.     CrossRef
  • Smartphone-Based Maternal Education for the Complementary Feeding of Undernourished Children Under 3 Years of Age in Food-Secure Communities: Randomised Controlled Trial in Urmia, Iran
    Navisa Seyyedi, Bahlol Rahimi, Hamid Reza Farrokh Eslamlou, Hadi Lotfnezhad Afshar, Armin Spreco, Toomas Timpka
    Nutrients.2020; 12(2): 587.     CrossRef
  • Effect of a newly developed ready-to-use supplementary food on growth indicators in children with mild to moderate malnutrition
    F. Azimi, A. Esmaillzadeh, E. Alipoor, M. Moslemi, M. Yaseri, M.J. Hosseinzadeh-Attar
    Public Health.2020; 185: 290.     CrossRef
  • Measurement components of socioeconomic status in health-related studies in Iran
    Sediqe Shafiei, Shahram Yazdani, Mohammad-Pooyan Jadidfard, A. Hamid Zafarmand
    BMC Research Notes.2019;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Determinants of stunting among under-five children in Ethiopia: a multilevel mixed-effects analysis of 2016 Ethiopian demographic and health survey data
    K. Fantay Gebru, W. Mekonnen Haileselassie, A. Haftom Temesgen, A. Oumer Seid, B. Afework Mulugeta
    BMC Pediatrics.2019;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Prevalence of underweight and wasting in Iranian children aged below 5 years: a systematic review and meta-analysis
    Yousef Moradi, Fatemeh Khosravi Shadmani, Kamyar Mansori, Shiva Mansouri Hanis, Rozhin Khateri, Hossein Mirzaei
    Korean Journal of Pediatrics.2018; 61(8): 231.     CrossRef
Epidemiology of Animal Bites and Factors Associated With Delays in Initiating Post-exposure Prophylaxis for Rabies Prevention Among Animal Bite Cases: A Population-based Study
Firooz Esmaeilzadeh, Abdolhalim Rajabi, Sajad Vahedi, Mohammad Shamsadiny, Mousa Ghelichi Ghojogh, Nahid Hatam
J Prev Med Public Health. 2017;50(3):210-216.   Published online May 10, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.17.027
  • 8,161 View
  • 247 Download
  • 22 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
One way to prevent deaths due to rabies is the timely utilization of post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP). Therefore, in addition to an understanding of the epidemiological distribution of animal bites, it is necessary to explore the factors leading to delays in PEP initiation.
Methods
This cross-sectional study was conducted in Iran in 2011, and included 7097 cases of animal bites recorded at the Rabies Treatment Center of the Shiraz University of Medical Sciences using the census method. Logistic regression was used to identify factors associated with delays in PEP.
Results
Among the patients studied, 5387 (75.9%) were males. The prevalence of animal bites in Fars province was 154.4 per 100 000 people. Dogs were the most frequent source of exposure (67.1%), and the most common bitten part of the body was the hands (45.5%). A delay in the initiation of PEP was found among 6.8% of the studied subjects. This delay was more likely in housewives (odds ratio [OR], 4.66; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.12 to 10.23) and less likely in people with deep wounds (OR, 0.65; 95% CI, 0.43 to 0.97).
Conclusions
Although all animal bite victims received complete PEP, in some cases, there were delays. Further, the type of animal involved, the depth of the bite, and the patient’s occupation were the major factors associated with a delay in the initiation of PEP for rabies prevention.
Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Rabies in Morocco: Epidemiological Aspects and Post-exposure Prophylaxis Management
    Kenza El Bazi, Touria El Bardi, Mouhcine Miloudi, Said Zouhair, Lamiae Arsalane, Youssef El Kamouni
    Cureus.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Dog bites as a zoonotic risk in Ecuador: Need for the implementation of a One Health approach
    G. Joselyn Calderón, Silvia Poveda, Ariana León Sosa, Naomi Mora, Manel López Bejar, Solón Alberto Orlando, Miguel Angel Garcia-Bereguiain
    One Health.2023; 16: 100544.     CrossRef
  • Delays in initiating rabies post-exposure prophylaxis among dog bite victims in Wakiso and Kampala districts, Uganda
    Stevens Kisaka, Fredrick Makumbi, Samuel Majalija, Gloria Bahizi, SM Thumbi
    Open Research Africa.2022; 4: 49.     CrossRef
  • Epidemiology of Dog Bite Incidents in Chile: Factors Related to the Patterns of Human-Dog Relationship
    Carmen Luz Barrios, Carlos Bustos-López, Carlos Pavletic, Alonso Parra, Macarena Vidal, Jonathan Bowen, Jaume Fatjó
    Animals.2021; 11(1): 96.     CrossRef
  • Incidence of Animal-Bite Injuries Registered in Public Hospitals of Post-Conflict Swat District, Pakistan in 2014
    Munibullah, Habibullah, Hamad Bin Rashid, Muhammad Hassan Mushtaq, Shakera Sadiq, Saima Hasan, Mamoona Chaudhry
    The American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.2021; 104(1): 329.     CrossRef
  • Delays in initiating rabies post-exposure prophylaxis among dog bite victims in Wakiso and Kampala districts, Uganda
    Stevens Kisaka, Fredrick Makumbi, Samuel Majalija, Gloria Bahizi, SM Thumbi
    AAS Open Research.2021; 4: 49.     CrossRef
  • Delays in initiating rabies post-exposure prophylaxis among dog bite victims in Wakiso and Kampala districts, Uganda
    Stevens Kisaka, Fredrick Makumbi, Samuel Majalija, Gloria Bahizi, SM Thumbi
    Open Research Africa.2021; 4: 49.     CrossRef
  • Factors Influencing Treatment of Animal Bite and Prevailing Practices RegardingWound Care among Cases Attending Referral Hospital of Ahmedabad City, Gujarat
    Bhavna Puwar
    Healthline.2021; 12(3): 68.     CrossRef
  • Epidemiological study on animal bite cases referred to Haji Daii health Center in Kermanshah province, Iran during 2013–2017
    Maryam Janatolmakan, Mojtaba Delpak, Alireza Abdi, Sabah Mohamadi, Bahare Andayeshgar, Alireza Khatony
    BMC Public Health.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Epidemiological Patterns of Animal Bites in the Najafabad, Center of Iran (2012–2017)
    Sanaz Amiri, Zahra Maleki, Hossein-Ali Nikbakht, Soheil Hassanipour, Hamid Salehiniya, Ali-Reza Ghayour, Hamid Kazemi, Haleh Ghaem
    Annals of Global Health.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Pattern of Animal Bites and Delays in Initiating Rabies Postexposure Prophylaxis among Clients Receiving Care in Korle-Bu Teaching Hospital
    Joyce A. Addai, Benjamin D. Nuertey
    Journal of Tropical Medicine.2020; 2020: 1.     CrossRef
  • Factors influencing delay in initiating post-exposure prophylaxis for rabies prevention among animal bite victims: a cross sectional study
    RabbanieTariq Wani, IqraNisar Chowdri, Hibba Dar
    Journal of Family Medicine and Primary Care.2020; 9(9): 4751.     CrossRef
  • Epidemiological characterization of bites: A retrospective study of dog bites to humans in Chile during 2009
    C.L. Barrios, M. Vidal, A. Parra, C. Valladares, C. González, C. Pavletic
    Journal of Veterinary Behavior.2019; 33: 31.     CrossRef
  • Rabies post-exposure prophylaxis initiation and adherence among patients in Vietnam, 2014–2016
    Cuc H. Tran, Doris O. Afriyie, Thach N. Pham, Satoko Otsu, Maho Urabe, Anh D. Dang, Huong G.T. Tran, Hoang V. Nguyen, Ha T. Le, Huong T.T. Nguyen
    Vaccine.2019; 37: A54.     CrossRef
  • Some epidemiological aspects of rabies in animals in the Republic of Moldova
    M. Starchuk, N. Osadchi, A. Manchu, V. Enchu
    Bulletin "Veterinary biotechnology".2019; 34: 146.     CrossRef
  • Forecasting delay times in post-exposure prophylaxis to human animal bite injuries in Central Iran: A decision tree analysis
    Amir Hamta, Abedin Saghafipour, Seyed Abbas Hosseinalipour, Fatemeh Rezaei
    Veterinary World.2019; 12(7): 965.     CrossRef
  • Dog Ecology, Bite Incidence, and Disease Awareness: A Cross-Sectional Survey among a Rabies-Affected Community in the Democratic Republic of the Congo
    Céline Mbilo, Jean-Baptiste Kabongo, Pati Patient Pyana, Léon Nlonda, Raymond Williams Nzita, Bobo Luntadila, Badivé Badibanga, Jan Hattendorf, Jakob Zinsstag
    Vaccines.2019; 7(3): 98.     CrossRef
  • Characteristics and factors associated with post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP) treatment of dog and cat bites among left-behind children: a cross-sectional study in two cities of China
    Shuzhen Yan, Ying Chen, Wanbao Ye, Fuxiang Chen, Liping Li
    BMJ Open.2019; 9(5): e024764.     CrossRef
  • Animal-related injuries and fatalities: evidence from a large-scale population-based cross-sectional survey in rural Bangladesh
    Md Al Amin Bhuiyan, Priyanka Agrawal, Shirin Wadhwaniya, Qingfeng Li, O Alonge, AKM Fazlur Rahman, Aminur Rahman
    BMJ Open.2019; 9(11): e030039.     CrossRef
  • Epidemiology of Animal Bites and Associated Factors with Delay in Post-Exposure Prophylaxis; A Cross-Sectional Study
    Salman Khazaei, Manoochehr Karami, Yousef Veisani, Manoochehr Solgi, Shahram Goodarzi
    Bulletin of Emergency and Trauma.2018; 6(3): 239.     CrossRef
  • A Perspective on Rabies in the Middle East—Beyond Neglect
    Hossein Bannazadeh Baghi, Farbod Alinezhad, Ivan Kuzmin, Charles Rupprecht
    Veterinary Sciences.2018; 5(3): 67.     CrossRef
  • Rabies vaccine initiation and adherence among animal-bite patients in Haiti, 2015
    Cuc H. Tran, Maxwell Kligerman, Lesly L. Andrecy, Melissa D. Etheart, Paul Adrien, Jesse D. Blanton, Max Millien, Ryan M. Wallace, Charles E. Rupprecht
    PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases.2018; 12(11): e0006955.     CrossRef

JPMPH : Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health