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Volume 48(5); September 2015
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Review
Hormone Replacement Therapy and Risk of Breast Cancer in Korean Women: A Quantitative Systematic Review
Jong-Myon Bae, Eun Hee Kim
J Prev Med Public Health. 2015;48(5):225-230.   Published online September 16, 2015
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.15.046
  • 12,790 View
  • 163 Download
  • 17 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
The epidemiological characteristics of breast cancer incidence by age group in Korean women are unique. This systematic review aimed to investigate the association between hormone replacement therapy (HRT) and breast cancer risk in Korean women.
Methods
We searched electronic databases such as KoreaMed, KMbase, KISS, and RISS4U as well as PubMed for publications on Korean breast cancer patients. We also conducted manual searching based on references and citations in potential papers. All of the analytically epidemiologic studies that obtained individual data on HRT exposure and breast cancer occurrence in Korean women were selected. We restricted the inclusion of case-control studies to those that included age-matched controls. Estimates of summary odds ratio (SOR) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using random effect models.
Results
One cohort and five case-control studies were finally selected. Based on the heterogeneity that existed among the six studies (I-squared=70.2%), a random effect model was applied. The summary effect size of HRT history from the six articles indicated no statistical significance in breast cancer risk (SOR, 0.983; 95% CI, 0.620 to 1.556).
Conclusions
These facts support no significant effect of HRT history in the risk of breast cancer in Korean women. It is necessary to conduct a pooled analysis.
Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Attitude, Practices, and Barriers to Menopausal Hormone Therapy Among Physicians in Saudi Arabia
    Rayan A Qutob, Abdullah Alaryni, Eysa N Alsolamy, Khalid Al Harbi, Yousef Alammari, Abdulrahman Alanazi, Mohanad Khalid Almaimani, Enad Alsolami, Osamah A Hakami, Asail Ahmed Alammar, Raghad Z Abuthyab, Lana Hesham Alabdulkarim, Razan Khaled Aldeham, Noor
    Cureus.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Menopoz-Sonrası Dönemde Meme Kanseri Gelişiminde Beslenme Alışkanlıkları ve Yaşam Kalitesi Etkili mi?
    Burçak ÇUBUKÇU, Fatma TAYHAN KARTAL, Gözde EDE
    Gümüşhane Üniversitesi Sağlık Bilimleri Dergisi.2023; 12(3): 1301.     CrossRef
  • Expansion of chemical space based on a pyrrolo[1,2-a]pyrazine core: Synthesis and its anticancer activity in prostate cancer and breast cancer cells
    Yohan Seo, Jeong Hwa Lee, So-hyeon Park, Wan Namkung, Ikyon Kim
    European Journal of Medicinal Chemistry.2020; 188: 111988.     CrossRef
  • Validating Breast Cancer Risk Prediction Models in the Korean Cancer Prevention Study-II Biobank
    Yon Ho Jee, Chi Gao, Jihye Kim, Seho Park, Sun Ha Jee, Peter Kraft
    Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention.2020; 29(6): 1271.     CrossRef
  • Breast cancer risk factors in Iran: a systematic review & meta-analysis
    Amir Shamshirian, Keyvan Heydari, Zahra Shams, Amir Reza Aref, Danial Shamshirian, Omid Reza Tamtaji, Zatollah Asemi, Layla Shojaie, Hamed Mirzaei, Neda Mohammadi, Behdad Zibaee, Keyvan Karimifar, Bahman Zarandi, Akbar Hedayatizadeh-Omran, Reza Alizadeh-N
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    Journal of the Korean Medical Association.2019; 62(8): 424.     CrossRef
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  • Bsm1 Gene polymorphism of the vitamin D receptor in breast cancer patients: influence of obesity and relevant drugs
    Noha Mohammed Ali Haikal, Mona Abo-Bakr El-Hussiny, Omar Farouk, Ekbal Mohammed Abo Hashem
    Comparative Clinical Pathology.2017; 26(1): 127.     CrossRef
  • Breast Cancer Status in Iran: Statistical Analysis of 3010 Cases between 1998 and 2014
    Mohammad Esmaeil Akbari, Soheila Sayad, Saed Sayad, Maryam Khayamzadeh, Leila Shojaee, Zeynab Shormeji, Mojtaba Amiri
    International Journal of Breast Cancer.2017; 2017: 1.     CrossRef
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    Oncology Letters.2017; 13(6): 4201.     CrossRef
  • Epstein-Barr Virus and Gastric Cancer Risk: A Meta-analysis With Meta-regression of Case-control Studies
    Jong-Myon Bae, Eun Hee Kim
    Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health.2016; 49(2): 97.     CrossRef
  • Helicobacter pylori Infection and Risk of Gastric Cancer in Korea: A Quantitative Systematic Review
    Jong-Myon Bae, Eun Hee Kim
    Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health.2016; 49(4): 197.     CrossRef
  • The Risk of Breast Cancer in Women Using Menopausal Hormone Replacement Therapy in Taiwan
    Jui-Yao Liu, Tzeng-Ji Chen, Shinn-Jang Hwang
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2016; 13(5): 482.     CrossRef
Original Articles
A Study of Predictive Factors Affecting Health: Promoting Behaviors of North Korean Adolescent Refugees
Jin-Won Noh, Hyo-Young Yun, Hyunchun Park, Shi-Eun Yu
J Prev Med Public Health. 2015;48(5):231-238.   Published online September 6, 2015
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.14.045
  • 10,360 View
  • 122 Download
  • 16 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
The present study aimed to analyze the factors that could affect the health-promoting behaviors of North Korean adolescent refugees residing in South Korea.
Methods
Questions about their sociodemographic variables, subjective health status, healthy living habits, and health-promoting behaviors were asked.
Results
Statistically significant differences were found in religion (t=2.30, p<0.05), having family members in South Korea (t=2.02, p<0.05), and subjective health status (t=4.96, p<0.01). Scores on health-responsible behaviors were higher with higher age (t=2.90, p<0.01) and for subjects without family or friends (t=2.43, p<0.05). Higher physical-activity behaviors were observed in males (t=3.32, p<0.01), in those with better subjective health status (t=3.46, p<0.05) and lower body mas index (t=3.48, p<0.05), and in smokers (t=3.17, p<0.01). Nutritional behaviors were higher in those who followed a religion (t=2.17, p<0.05). Spiritual growth behaviors were higher in those who followed a religion (t=4.21, p<0.001), had no family in South Korea (t=2.04, p<0.05), and had higher subjective health status (t=5.74, p<0.01). Scores on interpersonal relationships and stress-management behaviors were higher for those with higher subjective health status. A multiple regression analysis showed greater effects on health-promoting behaviors when subjective health status was better. Older people and non-smokers exhibited more health-responsible behaviors, while more physical-activity behaviors and spiritual growth activities were observed when subjective health status was better. Interpersonal relationship behaviors had positive effects on those with good subjective heath status and on non-smokers.
Conclusions
Based on the results of the current study, an alternative was suggested for promoting health in North Korean adolescent refugees.
Summary

Citations

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  • Assessment of diet quality of adults from North Korea: using nutrition quotient (NQ) for Korean adults
    SaeByeol Kwon, Kyoung-Nam Kim, Moon-Kyung Shin
    Journal of Nutrition and Health.2023; 56(2): 217.     CrossRef
  • Factors affecting quality of life in low‐income overweight and obese women: The mediating effects of health‐promoting behaviors
    Ju‐Hee Nho, Hye Young Kim, Eun Jin Kim
    Worldviews on Evidence-Based Nursing.2022; 19(3): 201.     CrossRef
  • Development of the Korean Health Behavior for Dementia Prevention Scale for Older Adults
    Hyukjoon Kim, Moonjoo Oh, Hyangsuk Kwon, Seohee Jeong, Hyangsoon Cho, Hye Young Kim
    Journal of Korean Academy of Fundamentals of Nursing.2022; 29(3): 363.     CrossRef
  • Health Promotion Behaviors, Subjective Health Status, and Job Satisfaction in Shift Work Nurses based on Type D Personality Pattern
    Nah-Mee Shin, Young Ha Kim
    Journal of Korean Academy of Nursing Administration.2021; 27(1): 12.     CrossRef
  • Effects of a Lifestyle Intervention on Health-Promoting Behavior, Psychological Distress and Reproductive Health of Overweight and Obese Female College Students
    Ju-Hee Nho, Soo-Wan Chae
    Healthcare.2021; 9(3): 309.     CrossRef
  • Influence of Type D Personality on Health Promoting Behaviours and Quality of Life in Stroke Patients: A Cross-Sectional Study in South Korea
    Sung Reul Kim, Sunho Kim, Bang-Hoon Cho, Sungwook Yu, Kyung-Hee Cho
    Journal of Stroke and Cerebrovascular Diseases.2021; 30(5): 105721.     CrossRef
  • Reciprocal Prediction between Impulsivity and Problematic Internet Use among North Korean Refugee Youths in South Korea by Gender and Adverse Childhood Experience
    Eun-Sun Lee, Minji Lee, Jin Yong Jun, Subin Park
    Psychiatry Investigation.2021; 18(3): 225.     CrossRef
  • A Study on the Relationship Between Mental Health Variables and Physical Activity Variables in the Clinical Group of North Korean Defectors: A Pilot Study
    Sung Soo Shim, So Hee Lee, Jung Been Lee, Yae Eun Seo, Heon Jeong Lee
    Journal of Korean Neuropsychiatric Association.2021; 60(3): 204.     CrossRef
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    Sung Reul Kim, Ju‐Hee Nho, Hye Young Kim
    Psychology in the Schools.2020; 57(5): 768.     CrossRef
  • Influence of lifestyle, depression, and marital intimacy on quality of life in breast cancer survivors
    Su-Jin Seo, Ju-Hee Nho, Myoungha Lee, Youngsam Park
    Korean Journal of Women Health Nursing.2020; 26(1): 28.     CrossRef
  • Effects of a Lifestyle Intervention Based on Type D Personality in Overweight and Obese Middle‐Aged Women: A Feasibility Study
    Sung Reul Kim, Ju‐Hee Nho, Ji Young Kim, Joon Hur
    Worldviews on Evidence-Based Nursing.2020; 17(5): 393.     CrossRef
  • Gender Differences and Relationships among Lifestyle and Reproductive Health in University Students
    Ju-Hee Nho, Hee Sun Kim
    Korean Journal of Women Health Nursing.2019; 25(4): 446.     CrossRef
  • Effects of Multidisciplinary Lifestyle Modification Program on Health-promoting Behavior, Psychological Distress, Body Composition and Reproductive Symptoms among Overweight and Obese Middle-aged Women
    Ju-Hee Nho, Eun Suk Hwang
    Korean Journal of Adult Nursing.2019; 31(6): 663.     CrossRef
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    Ju-Hee Nho, Sung-Hee Yoo
    Korean Journal of Women Health Nursing.2018; 24(1): 80.     CrossRef
  • The Role of Stress Management in the Relationship between Purpose in Life and Self-Rated Health in Teachers: A Mediation Analysis
    Fei Li, Jieyu Chen, Lin Yu, Yuan Jing, Pingping Jiang, Xiuqiong Fu, Shengwei Wu, Xiaomin Sun, Ren Luo, Hiuyee Kwan, Xiaoshan Zhao, Yanyan Liu
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2016; 13(7): 719.     CrossRef
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    Sun Wook Cho, So Hee Lee, Eun Sil Koh, Si Eun Kim, Seok Joong Kim
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Assessing Reliability of Medical Record Reviews for the Detection of Hospital Adverse Events
Minsu Ock, Sang-il Lee, Min-Woo Jo, Jin Yong Lee, Seon-Ha Kim
J Prev Med Public Health. 2015;48(5):239-248.   Published online September 11, 2015
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.14.049
  • 9,331 View
  • 112 Download
  • 12 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Objectives
The purpose of this study was to assess the inter-rater reliability and intra-rater reliability of medical record review for the detection of hospital adverse events.
Methods
We conducted two stages retrospective medical records review of a random sample of 96 patients from one acute-care general hospital. The first stage was an explicit patient record review by two nurses to detect the presence of 41 screening criteria (SC). The second stage was an implicit structured review by two physicians to identify the occurrence of adverse events from the positive cases on the SC. The inter-rater reliability of two nurses and that of two physicians were assessed. The intra-rater reliability was also evaluated by using test-retest method at approximately two weeks later.
Results
In 84.2% of the patient medical records, the nurses agreed as to the necessity for the second stage review (kappa, 0.68; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.54 to 0.83). In 93.0% of the patient medical records screened by nurses, the physicians agreed about the absence or presence of adverse events (kappa, 0.71; 95% CI, 0.44 to 0.97). When assessing intra-rater reliability, the kappa indices of two nurses were 0.54 (95% CI, 0.31 to 0.77) and 0.67 (95% CI, 0.47 to 0.87), whereas those of two physicians were 0.87 (95% CI, 0.62 to 1.00) and 0.37 (95% CI, -0.16 to 0.89).
Conclusions
In this study, the medical record review for detecting adverse events showed intermediate to good level of inter-rater and intra-rater reliability. Well organized training program for reviewers and clearly defining SC are required to get more reliable results in the hospital adverse event study.
Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • The Korea National Patient Safety Incidents Inquiry Survey: Feasibility of Medical Record Review for Detecting Adverse Events in Regional Public Hospitals
    Min Ji Kim, Hee Jung Seo, Hong Mo Koo, Minsu Ock, Jee-In Hwang, Sang-Il Lee
    Journal of Patient Safety.2022; 18(5): 389.     CrossRef
  • The Korea National Patient Safety Incidents Inquiry Survey: Characteristics of Adverse Events Identified Through Medical Records Review in Regional Public Hospitals
    Min Ji Kim, Hee Jung Seo, Hong Mo Koo, Minsu Ock, Jee-In Hwang, Sang-Il Lee
    Journal of Patient Safety.2022; 18(5): 382.     CrossRef
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    Journal of Patient Safety.2022; 18(5): 404.     CrossRef
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    Tammy L. Pham, Allan Garland
    CMAJ Open.2021; 9(2): E570.     CrossRef
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    Dorthe O. Klein, Roger J.M.W. Rennenberg, Richard P. Koopmans, Martin H. Prins
    Journal of Patient Safety.2021; 17(8): e1234.     CrossRef
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    Minsu Ock, Min-Woo Jo, Eun Young Choi, Sang-Il Lee
    Journal of Patient Safety.2020; 16(2): e90.     CrossRef
  • Perceptions of Hospital Health Information Managers Regarding Present on Admission Indicators in Korea: A Qualitative Study
    Jee-Hee Pyo, Eun-Young Choi, Hae-Mi Oh, Won Lee, Ju-Young Kim, Min-Su Ock, So-Yoon Kim, Sang-Il Lee
    Quality Improvement in Health Care.2020; 26(1): 23.     CrossRef
  • Variation between hospitals and reviewers in detection of adverse events identified through medical record review in Korea
    Sukyeong Kim, Ho Gyun Shin, A E Jeong Jo, Ari Min, Minsu Ock, Jee-In Hwang, Youngjin Jeong, Moon Sung Park, Jong Bouk Lee, Tae I K Chang, Eunhyang Song, Heungseon Kim, Sang-Il Lee
    International Journal for Quality in Health Care.2020; 32(8): 495.     CrossRef
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    Prabha Lakhan, Deborah Askew, Noel Hayman, Leigh‐anne Pokino, Cheryl Sendall, Paul J. Clark
    Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health.2019; 43(3): 228.     CrossRef
  • Patient and hospital characteristics that influence incidence of adverse events in acute public hospitals in Portugal: a retrospective cohort study
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Interaction of Vitamin D and Smoking on Inflammatory Markers in the Urban Elderly
Hyemi Lee, Kyoung-Nam Kim, Youn-Hee Lim, Yun-Chul Hong
J Prev Med Public Health. 2015;48(5):249-256.   Published online September 17, 2015
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.15.042
  • 9,832 View
  • 132 Download
  • 12 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Objectives
Epidemiological studies have reported that vitamin D deficiency is associated with inflammatory disease. Smoking is a well-known risk factor for inflammation. However, few studies have investigated the interactive effect of vitamin D deficiency and smoking on inflammation. This study aims to investigate the interaction of vitamin D and smoking with inflammatory markers in the urban elderly.
Methods
We used data from the Korean Elderly Environmental Panel Study, which began in August 2008 and ended in August 2010, and included 560 Koreans ≥60 years old living in Seoul. Data was collected via questionnaires that included items about smoking status at the first visit. Vitamin D levels, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), and white blood cell (WBC) counts were repeatedly measured up to three times.
Results
The association of vitamin D and hs-CRP was significant after adjusting for known confounders (β=-0.080, p=0.041). After separate analysis by smoking status, the association of vitamin D deficiency and hs-CRP in smokers was stronger than that in nonsmokers (smokers: β=-0.375, p=0.013; non-smokers: β=-0.060, p=0.150). Smoking status was an effect modifier that changed the association between vitamin D deficiency and hs-CRP (interaction estimate: β=-0.254, p=0.032). Vitamin D was not significantly associated with WBC count (β=0.003, p=0.805).
Conclusions
Vitamin D deficiency was associated with hs-CRP in the urban elderly. Smoking status was an effect modifier of this association. Vitamin D deficiency was not significantly associated with WBC count.
Summary

Citations

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Prevalence of Depressive Disorder of Outpatients Visiting Two Primary Care Settings
Sun-Jin Jo, Hyeon Woo Yim, Hyunsuk Jeong, Hoo Rim Song, Sang Yhun Ju, Jong Lyul Kim, Tae-Youn Jun
J Prev Med Public Health. 2015;48(5):257-263.   Published online September 21, 2015
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.15.009
  • 8,993 View
  • 104 Download
  • 7 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
Although the prevalence of depressive disorders in South Korea’s general population is known, no reports on the prevalence of depression among patients who visit primary care facilities have been published. This preliminary study was conducted to identify the prevalence of depressive disorder in patients that visit two primary care facilities.
Methods
Among 231 consecutive eligible patients who visited two primary care settings, 184 patients consented to a diagnostic interview for depression by psychiatrists following the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-IV criteria. There were no significant differences in sociodemographic characteristics such as gender, age, or level of education between the groups that consented and declined the diagnostic examination. The prevalence of depressive disorder and the proportion of newly diagnosed patients among depressive disorder patients were calculated.
Results
The prevalence of depressive disorder of patients in the two primary care facilities was 14.1% (95% confidence interval [CI], 9.1 to 19.2), with major depressive disorder 5.4% (95% CI, 2.1 to 8.7), dysthymia 1.1% (95% CI, 0.0 to 2.6), and depressive disorder, not otherwise specified 7.6% (95% CI, 3.7 to 11.5). Among the 26 patients with depressive disorder, 19 patients were newly diagnosed.
Conclusions
As compared to the general population, a higher prevalence of depressive disorders was observed among patients at two primary care facilities. Further study is needed with larger samples to inform the development of a primary care setting-based depression screening, management, and referral system to increase the efficiency of limited health care resources.
Summary

Citations

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JPMPH : Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health