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Volume 47(4); July 2014
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Review
Cancer Control Programs in East Asia: Evidence From the International Literature
Malcolm A. Moore
J Prev Med Public Health. 2014;47(4):183-200.   Published online July 31, 2014
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2014.47.4.183
  • 15,121 View
  • 177 Download
  • 15 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Cancer is a major cause of mortality and morbidity throughout the world, including the countries of North-East and South-East Asia. Assessment of burden through cancer registration, determination of risk and protective factors, early detection and screening, clinical practice, interventions for example in vaccination, tobacco cessation efforts and palliative care all should be included in comprehensive cancer control programs. The degree to which this is possible naturally depends on the resources available at local, national and international levels. The present review concerns elements of cancer control programs established in China, Taiwan, Korea, and Japan in North-East Asia, Viet Nam, Thailand, Malaysia, and Indonesia as representative larger countries of South-East Asia for comparison, using the published literature as a guide. While major advances have been made, there are still areas which need more attention, especially in South-East Asia, and international cooperation is essential if standard guidelines are to be generated to allow effective cancer control efforts throughout the Far East.
Summary

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  • Providing a framework for evaluation disease registry and health outcomes Software: Updating the CIPROS checklist
    Fatemeh Shafiee, Masoume Sarbaz, Parviz Marouzi, Alireza Banaye Yazdipour, Khalil Kimiafar
    Journal of Biomedical Informatics.2024; 149: 104574.     CrossRef
  • Cancer functional states-based molecular subtypes of gastric cancer
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    Journal of Translational Medicine.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
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  • Barriers to early detection and management of oral cancer in the Asia Pacific region
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    Journal of Health Services Research & Policy.2022; 27(2): 133.     CrossRef
  • Diagnostic work-up and systemic treatment for advanced non-squamous non-small-cell lung cancer in four Southeast Asian countries
    R. Soo, L. Mery, A. Bardot, R. Kanesvaran, T.C. Keong, D. Pongnikorn, N. Prasongsook, S.H. Hutajulu, C. Irawan, A. Ab Manan, M. Thiagarajan, P. Sripan, S. Peters, H. Storm, F. Bray, R. Stahel
    ESMO Open.2022; 7(5): 100560.     CrossRef
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    PLOS Global Public Health.2022; 2(11): e0000615.     CrossRef
  • An analysis of policy and funding priorities of global actors regarding noncommunicable disease in low- and middle-income countries
    Kanykey Jailobaeva, Jennifer Falconer, Giulia Loffreda, Stella Arakelyan, Sophie Witter, Alastair Ager
    Globalization and Health.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Identification of gastric cancer subtypes based on pathway clustering
    Lin Li, Xiaosheng Wang
    npj Precision Oncology.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Deuk-Hee Lee, Ji-Hee Nam, Jung-Hoon Kim
    Journal of Radiological Science and Technology.2019; 42(2): 131.     CrossRef
  • Cancers in Vietnam—Burden and Control Efforts: A Narrative Scoping Review
    Tung Pham, Linh Bui, Giang Kim, Dong Hoang, Thuan Tran, Minh Hoang
    Cancer Control.2019; 26(1): 107327481986380.     CrossRef
  • Undaria pinnatifida a Rich Marine Reservoir of Nutritional and Pharmacological Potential: Insights into Growth Signaling and Apoptosis Mechanisms in Cancer
    Abdul Rehman Phull, Song Ja Kim
    Nutrition and Cancer.2018; 70(6): 956.     CrossRef
  • Low prevalence of human mammary tumor virus (HMTV) in breast cancer patients from Myanmar
    Thar Htet San, Masayoshi Fujisawa, Soichiro Fushimi, Teizo Yoshimura, Toshiaki Ohara, Lamin Soe, Ngu Wah Min, Ohnmar Kyaw, Xu Yang, Akihiro Matsukawa
    Infectious Agents and Cancer.2017;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Molecular Phylogenetic Screening of Withania somnifera Relative From Indonesia Based on Internal Transcribed Spacer Region
    Topik Hidayat, Didik Priyandoko, Putri Yunitha Wardiny, Dina Karina Islami
    HAYATI Journal of Biosciences.2016; 23(2): 92.     CrossRef
  • Gastric Cancer in Asian American Populations: a Neglected Health Disparity
    Victoria M. Taylor, Linda K. Ko, Joo Ha Hwang, Mo-Kyung Sin, John M. Inadomi
    Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention.2015; 15(24): 10565.     CrossRef
  • Toward the Cure of All Children With Cancer Through Collaborative Efforts: Pediatric Oncology As a Global Challenge
    Carlos Rodriguez-Galindo, Paola Friedrich, Patricia Alcasabas, Federico Antillon, Shripad Banavali, Luis Castillo, Trijn Israels, Sima Jeha, Mhammed Harif, Michael J. Sullivan, Thuan Chong Quah, Catherine Patte, Ching-Hon Pui, Ronald Barr, Thomas Gross
    Journal of Clinical Oncology.2015; 33(27): 3065.     CrossRef
Original Articles
Mean Sojourn Time of Preclinical Gastric Cancer in Korean Men: A Retrospective Observational Study
Jong-Myon Bae, Sang Yop Shin, Eun Hee Kim
J Prev Med Public Health. 2014;47(4):201-205.   Published online July 31, 2014
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2014.47.4.201
  • 12,724 View
  • 100 Download
  • 11 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
This retrospective cohort study aimed to estimate the mean sojourn time (MST) of preclinical gastric cancer in Korean men.
Methods
The subjects consisted of voluntary male screenees aged 40 to 69 years who underwent subsequent screening gastroscopies after testing negative at a baseline screening performed between January 2007 and December 2011. A new case was defined if gastric cancer cells were present in the biopsy specimens obtained from gastroscopy. The follow-up period was calculated as the number of person-years between the date of baseline screening gastroscopy and positive findings at a subsequent screening. The MST was calculated using transition rates of gastric cancer to determine the best screening interval.
Results
Of the 171 979 voluntary male screenees, 61 688 (36%) underwent subsequent screening gastroscopies between January 2007 and December 2011. A total of 91 incident cases were found during 19 598 598 person-years of follow-up. The MST of gastric cancer was 2.37 years (95% confidence intervals, 1.92 to 2.96), and those aged 40 to 49 years had a shorter MST than those 50 to 69 years did.
Conclusions
These findings support the 2-year interval of screening recommended by the nationwide gastric cancer screening program in Korea. Further studies for the age-specific MST among women are needed.
Summary

Citations

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  • The Clinical Impact and Cost-Effectiveness of Surveillance of Incidentally Detected Gastric Intestinal Metaplasia: A Microsimulation Analysis
    Nikhil R. Thiruvengadam, Shashank Gupta, Seth Buller, Imad Awad, Devika Gandhi, Allison Ibarra, Gonzalo Latorre, Arnoldo Riquelme, Michael L. Kochman, Gregory Cote, Shailja C. Shah, Monica Saumoy
    Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology.2024; 22(1): 51.     CrossRef
  • Gastric Cancer Incidence and Mortality After Endoscopic Resection of Gastric Adenoma: A Nationwide Cohort Study
    Jae Myung Park, Songhee Cho, Ga-Yeong Shin, Jayoun Lee, Minjee Kim, Hyeon Woo Yim
    American Journal of Gastroenterology.2023; 118(12): 2166.     CrossRef
  • Effect and cost-effectiveness of national gastric cancer screening in Japan: a microsimulation modeling study
    Hsi-Lan Huang, Chi Yan Leung, Eiko Saito, Kota Katanoda, Chin Hur, Chung Yin Kong, Shuhei Nomura, Kenji Shibuya
    BMC Medicine.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Potential of non-invasive breath tests for preselecting individuals for invasive gastric cancer screening endoscopy
    Agne Krilaviciute, Christian Stock, Marcis Leja, Hermann Brenner
    Journal of Breath Research.2018; 12(3): 036009.     CrossRef
  • Screening Upper Endoscopy for Early Detection of Gastric Cancer
    Jeong Seop Moon
    Journal of Korean Medical Science.2018;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Occurrence of gastric cancer in patients with atrophic gastritis during long-term follow-up
    Liming Zhang, Yulan Liu, Peng You, Guijian Feng
    Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology.2018; 53(7): 843.     CrossRef
  • Ischemic Gastritis Improved by Supportive Care
    Yun Sun Choi, Chan Soo So, Dong Hee Koh, Min Ho Choi, Hyun Joo Jang, Sea Hyub Kae, Jin Lee, Young Hee Choi
    The Korean Journal of Helicobacter and Upper Gastrointestinal Research.2017; 17(2): 103.     CrossRef
  • Optimal Interval for Repeated Gastric Cancer Screening in Normal-Risk Healthy Korean Adults: A Retrospective Cohort Study
    Jong-Myon Bae, Sang Yop Shin, Eun Hee Kim
    Cancer Research and Treatment.2015; 47(4): 564.     CrossRef
  • Methodological issues for determining intervals of subsequent cancer screening
    Jong-Myon Bae
    Epidemiology and Health.2014; 36: e2014010.     CrossRef
  • Endoscopic Gastric Cancer Screening and Surveillance in High-Risk Groups
    Il Ju Choi
    Clinical Endoscopy.2014; 47(6): 497.     CrossRef
  • Distribution of Dense Breasts using Screening Mammography in Korean Women: a Retrospecitive Observational Study
    Jong-Myon Bae, Sang Yop Shin, Eun Hee Kim, Yoon-Nma Kim, Chung Mo Nam
    Epidemiology and Health.2014; : e2014027.     CrossRef
Variations in the Hospital Standardized Mortality Ratios in Korea
Eun-Jung Lee, Soo-Hee Hwang, Jung-A Lee, Yoon Kim
J Prev Med Public Health. 2014;47(4):206-215.   Published online July 31, 2014
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2014.47.4.206
  • 10,328 View
  • 109 Download
  • 2 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
The hospital standardized mortality ratio (HSMR) has been widely used because it allows for robust risk adjustment using administrative data and is important for improving the quality of patient care.
Methods
All inpatients discharged from hospitals with more than 700 beds (66 hospitals) in 2008 were eligible for inclusion. Using the claims data, 29 most responsible diagnosis (MRDx), accounting for 80% of all inpatient deaths among these hospitals, were identified, and inpatients with those MRDx were selected. The final study population included 703 571 inpatients including 27 718 (3.9% of all inpatients) in-hospital deaths. Using logistic regression, risk-adjusted models for predicting in-hospital mortality were created for each MRDx. The HSMR of individual hospitals was calculated for each MRDx using the model coefficients. The models included age, gender, income level, urgency of admission, diagnosis codes, disease-specific risk factors, and comorbidities. The Elixhauser comorbidity index was used to adjust for comorbidities.
Results
For 26 out of 29 MRDx, the c-statistics of these mortality prediction models were higher than 0.8 indicating excellent discriminative power. The HSMR greatly varied across hospitals and disease groups. The academic status of the hospital was the only factor significantly associated with the HSMR.
Conclusions
We found a large variation in HSMR among hospitals; therefore, efforts to reduce these variations including continuous monitoring and regular disclosure of the HSMR are required.
Summary

Citations

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  • Differences in trends in discharge location in a cohort of hospitalized patients with cancer and non-cancer diagnoses receiving specialist palliative care: A retrospective cohort study
    Michael Bonares, Kalli Stillos, Lise Huynh, Debbie Selby
    Palliative Medicine.2023; 37(8): 1241.     CrossRef
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The Prevalence of Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors and the Framingham Risk Score in Patients Undergoing Percutaneous Intervention Over the Last 17 Years by Gender: Time-trend Analysis From the Mayo Clinic PCI Registry
Moo-Sik Lee, Andreas J. Flammer, Hyun-Soo Kim, Jee-Young Hong, Jing Li, Ryan J. Lennon, Amir Lerman
J Prev Med Public Health. 2014;47(4):216-229.   Published online July 31, 2014
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2014.47.4.216
  • 13,552 View
  • 109 Download
  • 14 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
This study aims to investigate trends of cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factor profiles over 17 years in percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) patients at the Mayo Clinic. Methods: We performed a time-trend analysis within the Mayo Clinic PCI Registry from 1994 to 2010. Results were the incidence and prevalence of CVD risk factors as estimate by the Framingham risk score. Results: Between 1994 and 2010, 25 519 patients underwent a PCI. During the time assessed, the mean age at PCI became older, but the gender distribution did not change. A significant trend towards higher body mass index and more prevalent hypercholesterolemia, hypertension, and diabetes was found over time. The prevalence of current smokers remained unchanged. The prevalence of ever-smokers decreased among males, but increased among females. However, overall CVD risk according to the Framingham risk score (FRS) and 10-year CVD risk significantly decreased. The use of most of medications elevated from 1994 to 2010, except for β-blockers and angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors decreased after 2007 and 2006 in both baseline and discharge, respectively. Conclusions: Most of the major risk factors improved and the FRS and 10-year CVD risk declined in this population of PCI patients. However, obesity, history of hypercholesterolemia, hypertension, diabetes, and medication use increased substantially. Improvements to blood pressure and lipid profile management because of medication use may have influenced the positive trends.
Summary

Citations

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    Remya Sudevan
    European Journal of Preventive Cardiology.2023; 30(3): 241.     CrossRef
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    Arthur Shiyovich, Tal Ovdat, Robert Klempfner, Roy Beigel, Majdi Halabi, Avinoam Shiran, Keren Skalsky, Avital Porter, Katia Orvin, Ran Kornowski, Alon Eisen
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    Frontiers in Cardiovascular Medicine.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Ayman J. Hammoudeh, Imad A. Alhaddad, Yousef Khader, Ramzi Tabbalat, Eyas Al-Mousa, Akram Saleh, Mohamad Jarrah, Assem Nammas, Mahmoud Izraiq
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    Shikhar Agarwal, Karan Sud, Badal Thakkar, Venu Menon, Wael A. Jaber, Samir R. Kapadia
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    PeerJ.2016; 4: e1736.     CrossRef
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Analysis of the Change of Health Status Among the Republic of Korea Air Force Soldiers During Military Service
Seok-Ju Yoo, Won-Ju Park, Kwan Lee, Hyun-Sul Lim, Hyun-Jin Kim, Suk-Ho Lee
J Prev Med Public Health. 2014;47(4):230-235.   Published online July 31, 2014
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2014.47.4.230
  • 8,453 View
  • 75 Download
  • 2 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
The aim of this study was to investigate whether the health status of Republic of Korea Air Force (ROKAF) soldiers changed after one year of military service. Methods: We selected 483 ROKAF soldiers from the 11 749 recruits who participated in the 2011 physical examination. The selected soldiers underwent another physical examination in 2012 for advancement to senior airman. Data from 2011 and 2012 were merged. To collect data on lifestyle, a questionnaire was sent to all included subjects via the military intranet e-mail service. Results: The percentage of recruits with an abnormal alanine transaminase level (normal range <40 IU/L) decreased from recruitment (13.7%) to the following year (2.7%). Moreover, the percentage of obese soldiers (body mass index ≥25 kg/m2) decreased from recruitment (20.5%) to the following year (10.4%). There was a significant change in mean duration of exercise carried out each day before (0.8±1.3 hours) and after (1.0±0.7 hours) joining the ROKAF service. Conclusions: These ROKAF soldiers were generally in good health before and after joining the armed service. After one year of military service, the health status of most soldiers improved, especially with respect to body mass index and alanine transaminase level.
Summary

Citations

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  • Behavioral impact of national health campaigns on healthy lifestyle practices among young adults in Singapore: a cross-sectional study
    Yong Zhi Khow, Talia Li Yin Lim, Jarret Shoon Phing Ng, Jiaxuan Wu, Chuen Seng Tan, Kee Seng Chia, Nan Luo, Wei Jie Seow
    BMC Public Health.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Military Medicine.2018; 183(7-8): e223.     CrossRef
Older Adults’ Perception of Chronic Illness Management in South Korea
Minah Kang, Jaiyong Kim, Sang-Soo Bae, Yong-Jun Choi, Dong-Soo Shin
J Prev Med Public Health. 2014;47(4):236-243.   Published online July 31, 2014
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2014.47.4.236
  • 11,018 View
  • 119 Download
  • 11 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
Despite the recent emphasis on a patient-centered chronic care model, few studies have investigated its use in older adults in South Korea. We explored how older Korean adults perceive and cope with their chronic illness. Methods: We conducted focus group interviews in Seoul, Korea in January 2010. Focus groups were formed by disease type (hypertension and type 2 diabetes) and gender using purposive sampling. Inclusion criteria were patients aged 60 and over who had been diagnosed with diabetes or hypertension and received care at a community health center for at least six months prior to participation. Interview data were analyzed through descriptive content analysis. Results: Among personal factors, most participants felt overwhelmed when they received their diagnosis. However, with time and control of their acute symptoms using medication, their worry diminished and participants tended to denying being identified as a patient or sick person. Among socio-familial factors, participants reported experiencing stigma with their chronic illness and feeling it was a symbol of weakness. Instead of modifying their lifestyles, which might interfere with their social relationships, they resorted to only following their medicine regime prescribed by their doctor. Participants also reported feeling that their doctor only prescribed medications and acted in an authoritative and threatening manner to induce and reinforce participants’ compliance with treatment. Conclusions: For successful patient-centered management of chronic illnesses, supportive environments that include family, friends, and healthcare providers should be established.
Summary

Citations

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    Asuka Kato
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JPMPH : Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health