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Volume 42(5); September 2009
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Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov'ts
Associations of Income and Wealth with Health Status in the Korean Elderly.
Bo Hyun Park, Minsoo Jung, Tae Jin Lee
J Prev Med Public Health. 2009;42(5):275-282.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2009.42.5.275
  • 5,458 View
  • 77 Download
  • 20 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
This study aimed to verify the association between wealth or income level and health status after adjusting for other socio-economic position (SEP) indicators among Korean adults aged 45 and over. METHODS: Data were obtained from the 1st wave of Korean Longitudinal Study of Ageing (households: 6,171, persons: 10,254). We used self-rated health status and activities of daily living (ADLs) as dependent variables. Explanatory variables included both net wealth measured by savings, immovables, the other valuated assets and total income including pay, transfer, property and so on. Binary logistic regression was conducted to examine the relationships. Also, in order to determine the relative health inequality across economic groups, we estimated the relative index of inequality (RII). RESULTS: The inequality of health status was evident among various wealth and income groups. The wealthiest group (5th quintile) was much healthier than the poorest group, and this differential increased with age. Likewise, higher income was associated with better health status among the elderly. However, these effects, as measured by the odds ratio and RII, showed that wealth was more important in determining health status of elderly people. CONCLUSIONS: This study suggests that economic capability plays a significant role in determining the health status and other health-related problems among the elderly. Particularly, our results show that health status of the aged is related more closely to the individual's wealth than income.
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    Priandhita Sukowidyanti Asmoro
    Business: Theory and Practice.2023; 24(1): 123.     CrossRef
  • Household Wealth and Individuals’ Mental Health: Evidence from the 2012–2018 China Family Panel Survey
    Rui Zhang, Chenglei Zhang, Jiahui Xia, Dawei Feng, Shaoyong Wu
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2022; 19(18): 11569.     CrossRef
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    Sumeet Lal, Trinh Xuan Thi Nguyen, Abdul-Salam Sulemana, Mostafa Saidur Rahim Khan, Yoshihiko Kadoya
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    Vanessa Tan, Cynthia Chen, Reshma Aziz Merchant, Alok Ranjan
    PLOS ONE.2022; 17(11): e0277290.     CrossRef
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    Shashi Kant Srivastava, Ashish Rastogi
    Journal of Public Affairs.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Gaceta Sanitaria.2020; 34(3): 297.     CrossRef
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    Yeong Jun Ju, Kyu‐Tae Han, Hyo Jung Lee, Joo Eun Lee, Jae Woo Choi, In Seon Hyun, Eun‐Cheol Park
    Geriatrics & Gerontology International.2017; 17(8): 1205.     CrossRef
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    FELICIA V. WHEATON, EILEEN M. CRIMMINS
    Ageing and Society.2016; 36(06): 1136.     CrossRef
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    Chia‐Lun Kuo, I.‐Chia Chien, Ching‐Heng Lin
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    Yeong Jun Ju, Kyu-Tae Han, Tae-Hoon Lee, Woorim Kim, Juyeong Kim, Eun-Cheol Park
    Health and Quality of Life Outcomes.2016;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Ki Dong Ko, BeLong Cho, Won Chul Lee, Hae Won Lee, Hyun Ki Lee, Bum Jo Oh
    Asia Pacific Journal of Public Health.2015; 27(2): NP630.     CrossRef
  • Functional Independence of Community-Dwelling Older Adults in China and South Korea
    Othelia Eun-Kyoung Lee, Qingwen Xu, Jungui Lee
    Journal of Social Service Research.2014; 40(4): 440.     CrossRef
  • The Incidence of Stroke by Socioeconomic Status, Age, Sex, and Stroke Subtype: A Nationwide Study in Korea
    Su Ra Seo, Su Young Kim, Sang-Yi Lee, Tae-Ho Yoon, Hyung-Geun Park, Seung Eun Lee, Chul-Woung Kim
    Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health.2014; 47(2): 104.     CrossRef
  • How do life-course trajectories of socioeconomic position affect quality of life in patients with diabetes mellitus?
    Hye Ah Lee, Ko Eun Lee, Yool Won Jeong, Jaeseon Ryu, Minkyung Kim, Jung Won Min, Young Sun Hong, Kyunghee Jung-Choi, Hyesook Park
    Quality of Life Research.2014; 23(4): 1337.     CrossRef
  • Cross-national insights into the relationship between wealth and wellbeing: a comparison between Australia, the United States of America and South Korea
    SARANG KIM, KERRY A. SARGENT-COX, DAVINA J. FRENCH, HAL KENDIG, KAARIN J. ANSTEY
    Ageing and Society.2012; 32(1): 41.     CrossRef
  • Gender differences in the association between socioeconomic status (SES) and depressive symptoms in older adults
    Joung Hwan Back, Yunhwan Lee
    Archives of Gerontology and Geriatrics.2011; 52(3): e140.     CrossRef
  • Does Socioeconomic Inequality in Health Persist among Older People Living in Resource-Poor Urban Slums?
    Jane C. Falkingham, Gloria Chepngeno-Langat, Catherine Kyobutungi, Alex Ezeh, Maria Evandrou
    Journal of Urban Health.2011; 88(S2): 381.     CrossRef
Assessment of Community Capacity Building Ability of Health Promotion Workers in Public Health Centers.
Jung Min Kim, Kwang Wook Koh, Byeng Chul Yu, Man Joong Jeon, Yoon Ji Kim, Yun Hee Kim
J Prev Med Public Health. 2009;42(5):283-292.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2009.42.5.283
  • 4,421 View
  • 80 Download
  • 5 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
This study was performed to assess the community capacity building ability of health promotion workers of public health centers and to identify influential factors to the ability. METHODS: The subjects were 43 public officers from 16 public health centers in Busan Metropolitan City. Questionnaire was developed based on 'Community Capacity Building Tool' of Public Health Agency of Canada which consists of 9 feathers. Each feather of capacity was assessed in 4 point rating scale. Univariate analysis by characteristics of subjects and multivariate analysis by multiple regression was done. RESULTS: The mean score of the 9 features were 2.35. Among the 9 feathers, 'Obtaining resources' scored 3.0 point which was the highest but 'Community structure' scored 2.1 which was the lowest. The mean score of the feathers was relatively lower than that of Canadian data. The significant influential factors affecting community capacity building ability were 'Service length', 'Heath promotion skill level', 'Existence of an executive department' and 'Cooperative partnership for health promotion'. According to the result of multiple linear regression, the 'Existence of an executive department' had significant influence. CONCLUSIONS: Community capacity building ability of subjects showed relatively lower scores in general. Building and activating an executive department and cooperative partnerships for health promotion may be helpful to achieve community capacity building ability.
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    Vera Birgel, Lea Decker, Dominik Röding, Ulla Walter
    Systematic Reviews.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Vesa Saaristo
    International Journal of Health Promotion and Education.2021; 59(2): 93.     CrossRef
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    Yeojoo Chae, Yeongmi Ha
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2021; 18(22): 12238.     CrossRef
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    Vesa Saaristo, Pia Hakamäki, Hanna Koskinen, Kirsi Wiss, Timo Ståhl
    Global Health Promotion.2020; 27(1): 24.     CrossRef
  • Japanese development and testing of the Network Establishment Practices Scale for Community and Public Health Nurses
    Mihoko Koshida, Takae Morita
    Nursing & Health Sciences.2013; 15(1): 22.     CrossRef
Original Article
Workplace Smoking Ban Policy and Smoking Behavior.
Beomsoo Kim
J Prev Med Public Health. 2009;42(5):293-297.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2009.42.5.293
  • 5,437 View
  • 89 Download
  • 18 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
To evaluate the impact of the workplace smoking ban in South Korea, where the male smoking rate is high (57%), on smoking behavior and secondhand smoke exposure. METHODS: A workplace smoking ban legislation implemented in April 2003 requires offices, meeting rooms, and lobbies located in larger than 3,000 square meter buildings (or 2,000 square meter multipurpose buildings) should be smoke free. A representative cross-sectional survey, the third wave (2005) of health supplements in the National Health Nutrition Survey of South Korea, was used to measure the impact of the 2003 workplace smoking ban implementation on smoking behavior. It contained 3,122 observations of adults 20 to 65 years old (excluding self-employed and non-working populations). A multivariate statistical model was used. The self-reported workplace smoking ban policy (full workplace ban, partial workplace ban, and no workplace ban) was used as the key measure. RESULTS: A full workplace smoking ban reduced the current smoking rate by 6.4 percentage points among all workers and also decreased the average daily consumption among smokers by 3.7 cigarettes relative to no smoking ban. Secondhand smoke showed a dramatic decrease of 86 percent (= -1.74/2.03)from the sample mean for full workplace ban. However, public anti-smoking campaign did not show any significant impact on smoking behavior. CONCLUSIONS: The full workplace ban policy is effective in South Korea. Male group showed bigger impact of smoking ban policy than female group. The public antismoking campaign did not show any effectiveness.
Summary

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  • Association between temporary employment and current smoking and change in smoking behaviors: A prospective cohort study from South Korea (2009–2018)
    Seong-Uk Baek, Min-Seok Kim, Myeong-Hun Lim, Taeyeon Kim, Jin-Ha Yoon, Yu-Min Lee, Jong-Uk Won
    Journal of Epidemiology.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Molecules.2023; 28(23): 7685.     CrossRef
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    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2022; 19(13): 7971.     CrossRef
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    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2022; 19(19): 12147.     CrossRef
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English Abstracts
Association of Blood Pressure Levels with Carotid Intima-Media Thickness and Plaques.
Young Hoon Lee, Sun Seog Kweon, Jin Su Choi, Jung Ae Rhee, Sung Woo Choi, So Yeon Ryu, Min Ho Shin
J Prev Med Public Health. 2009;42(5):298-304.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2009.42.5.298
  • 5,015 View
  • 63 Download
  • 2 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
The aim of this study was to investigate the association of blood pressure levels with the common carotid artery intima-media thickness (CCA-IMT) and carotid plaques. METHODS: Data were obtained from 2,635 subjects, aged 50 years and over, who participated in the Community Health Survey (a population-based, cross-sectional study) in Dong-gu, Gwangju city between 2007 and 2008. Participants were categorized into three groups according to blood pressure levels; normotensives (<120/80 mmHg), prehypertensives (120-139/80-89 mmHg), and hypertensives (> or =140/90 mmHg). Prehypertensives were further categorized as low prehypertensives (120-129/80-84 mmHg) and high prehypertensives (130-139/85-89 mmHg). Carotid intima-media thickness and plaques were evaluated with a high-resolution B-mode ultrasound. Statistical analyses were performed using chi-square test, ANOVA, and multiple logistic regression. RESULTS: Prehypertensives had significantly greater maximal CCA-IMT values than normotensives, with a multivariate adjusted odds ratio of 1.78 (95% CI=1.36-2.32) for abnormal CCA-IMT (maximal CCA-IMT > or =1.0 mm), and 1.45 (95% CI=1.19-1.77) for carotid plaques. The multivariate adjusted odds ratio of low prehypertensives was 1.64 (95% CI=1.21-2.21) for abnormal CCA-IMT, and 1.30 (95% CI=1.04-1.63) for carotid plaques compared with normotensives. Subject with hypertension had higher frequency of abnormal CCA-IMT (odds ratio, 2.18; 95% CI=1.49-3.18), and carotid plaques (odds ratio, 1.98; 95% CI=1.46-2.67) compared with normotensives after adjustment for other cardiovascular risk factors. CONCLUSIONS: Our results indicate that there is a significant increase in the prevalence of carotid atherosclerosis in subjects with prehypertension (even in low prehypertensives) compared with normotensive subjects. Further studies are required to confirm the benefits and role of carotid ultrasonography in persons with prehypertension.
Summary

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  • Association Between Serum Uric Acid and Carotid Intima-Media Thickness in Different Fasting Blood Glucose Patterns: A Case-Control Study
    Yuanyuan Gao, Baofeng Xu, Yanyan Yang, Mei Zhang, Tian Yu, Qiujuan Zhang, Jianwei Sun, Rui Liu
    Frontiers in Endocrinology.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Zeljka Milincic, Dejan Nikolic, Slavko Simeunovic, Ivana Novakovic, Ivana Petronic, Dijana Risimic, Dejan Simeunovic
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Association between the Physical Activity of Korean Adolescents and Socioeconomic Status.
In Hwan Oh, Goeun Lee, Chang Mo Oh, Kyung Sik Choi, Bong Keun Choe, Joong Myung Choi, Tai Young Yoon
J Prev Med Public Health. 2009;42(5):305-314.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2009.42.5.305
  • 5,769 View
  • 61 Download
  • 16 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
The physical activity of Korean adolescents and its distribution based on social characteristics have not yet been fully assessed. This study intends to reveal the distribution of physical activity by its subgroups and offer possible explanatory variables. METHODS: The 3rd Korea Youth Risk Behavior Web-based Survey was analyzed for this study. The appropriateness of physical activity was defined by Korea's Health Plan 2010 and physical inactivity was assessed independently. Family affluence scale, parents' education levels, subjective economic status, grade, and school location were considered explanatory variables. All statistical analysis was conducted using SAS ver. 9.1. RESULTS: The proportion of participants engaging in vigorous physical activity was high in males (41.6%), at a low grade (38.5%), within the high family affluence scale group (35.5%). The distribution of participants engaging in moderate physical activity showed similar patterns, but the overall proportion was lower (9.8%). Low family affluence and students with lower subjective economic status reported a higher prevalence of physical inactivity. In multiple logistic regression analysis for physical activity, significant factors included family affluence scale (p<0.05). For physical inactivity, family affluence scale, parents education levels, and subjective economic status were included as significant factors (p<0.05). CONCLUSIONS: The results suggest that the physical activity and inactivity of adolescents may be affected by socioeconomic variables, such as family affluence scale. This implies the need to take proper measures to address these socio-economic inequalities.
Summary

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    Supportive Care in Cancer.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Hee Soon Kim
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    Goeun Lee, Hyoung-Ryoul Kim
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    Gyeong-Suk Jeon, Yeongmi Ha, Eunsook Choi
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    Mi-Hyun Kim
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    Young-Ho Kim, Bradley J. Cardinal
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Management of Diabetic Mellitus in Low-income Rural Patients.
Hye Yeon Kim, Woo Jun Yun, Min Ho Shin, Sun Seong Kweon, Hye Ran Ahn, Seong Woo Choi, Young Hoon Lee, Dong Hyeok Cho, Jung Ae Rhee
J Prev Med Public Health. 2009;42(5):315-322.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2009.42.5.315
  • 5,544 View
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  • 4 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
Knowledge about the management status of diabetic melitus (DM) is essential to improve diabetic management. Moreover, low income is associated with poor adherence to treatment and increased mortality. This study was performed to evaluate the management status of DM in low-income patients in a rural area. METHODS: We enrolled 370 patients with type 2 DM living in Gokseong county, JeollaNamdo. A well-trained examiner measured the height, weight, waist circumference, blood pressure, total cholesterol, triglyceride, high density lipoprotein cholesterol, fasting blood sugar and glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) levels. Carotid ultrasonography was used to measure carotid artery carotid artery intima media thickness (IMT) and plaque. ankle-brachial index (ABI) was used to evaluate peripheral artery disease. A fundoscopic examination was performed to evaluate diabetic retinopathy. A history of diabetes complications and health-related questionnaires were also completed. RESULTS: The age of diabetic subjects was 68.7+/-8.7 years and the duration of diabetes was 8.9+/-8.2 years. Most (63.5%) had hypertension, and 45.7% had triglycerides below 150 mg/dl, 38.1% had low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL) cholesterol below 100 mg/dl, 48.7% had urine albumin to creatinine ratio (UACR) below 30 mg/g. Less than half (45.9%) achieved the goal of HbA1c less than 7% suggested by the American Diabetes Association (ADA). 10.6% had peripheral vascular disease, 11.9% had retinopathy, and 60.8% had chronic kidney disease. CONCLUSIONS: DM management in low income patients is very poor and requires further work to improve.
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Employment and Married Women's Health in Korea; Beneficial or Harmful?.
Il Ho Kim, Heeran Chun
J Prev Med Public Health. 2009;42(5):323-330.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2009.42.5.323
  • 4,909 View
  • 49 Download
  • 8 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
The aim of this study was to investigate whether working married women in different occupational classes affected diverse health outcomes. METHODS: We used data for married women aged 25-59 (N=2,273) from the 2005 National Health and Nutritional Examination Survey. Outcome measures included physical/mental and subjective/objective indicators (self-rated poor health, chronic diseases, depression, and suicidal ideation from reported results; metabolic syndrome and dyslipidemia from health examination results). Age-standardized prevalence and logistic regression were employed to assess health status according to three types of working groups (housewives, married women in manual jobs, married women in non-manual jobs). Sociodemographic factors (age, numbers of children under 7, education, household income) and health behaviors (health examination, sleep, rest, exercise, smoking, drinking) and a psychological factor (stress) were considered as covariates. RESULTS: Non-manual married female workers in Korea showed better health status in all five health outcomes than housewives. The positive health effect for the non-manual group persisted in absolute (age-adjusted prevalence) and relative (odds ratio) measures, but multivariate analyses showed an insignificant association of the non-manual group with dyslipidemia. Manual female workers showed significantly higher age-adjusted prevalence of almost all health outcomes than housewives except chronic disease, but the associations disappeared after further adjustment for covariates regarding sleep, rest, and stress. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that examining the health impact of work on married women requires the consideration of occupational class.
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Lifestyle and Metabolic Syndrome among Male Workers in an Electronics Research and Development Company.
Jun Pyo Myong, Hyoung Ryoul Kim, Yong Kyu Kim, Jung Wan Koo, Chung Yill Park
J Prev Med Public Health. 2009;42(5):331-336.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2009.42.5.331
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AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
The objectives of this study were to determine the relationship between lifestyle-implementation and metabolic syndrome in an electronics research and development company, and to provide a foundation for health providers of health management programs for setting priorities. METHODS: From July 1 to July 16, 2008 we carried out a descriptive cross-sectional survey. Consecutive workers of one R & D company in Seoul, Korea (N=2,079) were enrolled in study. A checklist for lifestyle (from the National Health Insurance Corporation) consisted of questions regarding diet, drinking, smoking and exercise. After the survey, researchers obtained data from health profiles for metabolic syndrome(waist-circumference, triglycerides, HDL cholesterol, blood pressure and fasting blood sugar level). Lifestyle was recorded as good or not good. Statistical analysis of metabolic syndrome and the lifestyle of subjects was done using multiple logistic regression analysis. RESULTS: The prevalence of metabolic syndrome in our study gropu was 13.3% (N=277). After adjustment for age, the adjusted odds ratios (odds ratio, 95% confidence intervals) for metabolic syndrome increased in proportion to the number of bad habits: two (1.72, 1.23-2.44), three (2.47, 1.73-3.56), and four (3.63, 2.03-6.34). Relative to subjects eating both vegetables and meat', the OR for 'meat' eaters was 1.66 (1.18-2.31). Compared with 'non-smokers and ever-smoker', the OR for 'current-smoker' was 1.62 (1.25-2.10). Compared with 'Healthy drinker', the OR for 'unhealthy drinker' was 1.38 (1.05-1.83). CONCLUSIONS: Poor lifestyle was associated with an increased likelihood of metabolic syndrome. These findings suggest that lifestyle-based occupational health interventions for young employees should include a specific diet, smoking cessation, and healthy-drinking programs.
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Prevalence of Hyperhomocysteinemia and Related Factors in a Community-based Health Examination Survey: A Cross-sectional Study.
Soo Jeong Kim, Kyung Sook Lim, Mi Sook Song, Yeonji Kang, Soon Young Lee
J Prev Med Public Health. 2009;42(5):337-342.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2009.42.5.337
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AbstractAbstract PDF
BACKGROUND
Many previous studies have shown that elevated homocysteine in the serum is a well known risk factor for cardiovascular disease and this is associated with other risk factors for cardiovascular disease, but any Korean data on this is limited. OBJECTIVES: This study aimed to calculate the prevalence of hyperhomocysteinemia and to analyze the relation between elevated homocysteine and the lifestyle factors of Korean adults. METHODS: We conducted a cross-sectional survey that included 650 men and 743 women (age range, 20 to 79 years) who were residents of Gwangju City in Gyeonggi-do. These subjects participated in the health interview and examination survey from November to December 2005. The total homocysteine, total cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol, and triglyceride in the serum were measured. All the participants had their body composition measured such as height and weight, and we obtained health-related behavioral information through the self-entry questionnaire. RESULTS: Very right-handed skewed distributions of homocysteine were shown in men and women. The prevalence of hyperhomocysteinemia was 22.6% in men and 13.7% in women in Gwangju city. On the multiple logistic regression analysis, hyperhomocysteinemia was associated with age (OR=1.02, 95% CI=1.01-1.04), male gender (OR=1.60, 95% CI=1.02-2.52), severe general physical activity (OR=0.32, 95% CI=0.15-0.69) and nutrient consumption (OR=0.49, 95% CI=0.31-0.76). CONCLUSIONS: There is a great prevalence of hyperhomocysteinemia in adults of Gwangju City, Korea and it was associated with both genetic factors and lifestyle risk factors. This study can suggest that comprehensive lifestyle modification is needed in order to diminish the prevalence of hyperhomocysteinemia and to prevent CVD.
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JPMPH : Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health