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Volume 40(2); March 2007
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English Abstracts
Strategy Considerations in Genome Cohort Construction in Korea.
Joohon Sung, Sung Il Cho
J Prev Med Public Health. 2007;40(2):95-101.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2007.40.2.95
  • 3,772 View
  • 32 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Focusing on complex diseases of public health significance, strategic issues regarding the on-going Korean Genome Cohort were reviewed: target size and diseases, measurements, study design issues, and followup strategy of the cohort. Considering the epidemiologic characteristics of Korean population as well as strengths and drawbacks of current research environment, we tried to tailor the experience of other existing cohorts into proposals for this Korean study. Currently 100,000 individuals have been participating the new Genome Cohort in Korea. Target size of de novo collection is recommended to be set as between 300,000 to 500,000. This target size would allow acceptable power to detect genetic and environmental factors of moderate effect size and possible interactions between them. Family units and/or special subgroups are recommended to parallel main body of adult individuals to increase the overall efficiency of the study. Given that response rate to the conventional re-contact method may not be satisfactory, successful follow-up is the main key to the achievement of the Korean Genome Cohort. Access to the central database such as National Health Insurance data can provide enormous potential for near-complete case detection. Efforts to build consensus amongst scientists from broad fields and stakeholders are crucial to unleash the centralized database as well as to refine the commitment of this national project.
Summary
High Throughput Genotyping for Genomic Cohort Study.
Woong Yang Park
J Prev Med Public Health. 2007;40(2):102-107.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2007.40.2.102
  • 3,287 View
  • 23 Download
  • 2 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Human Genome Project (HGP) could unveil the secrets of human being by a long script of genetic codes, which enabled us to get access to mine the cause of diseases more efficiently. Two wheels for HGP, bioinformatics and high throughput technology are essential techniques for the genomic medicine. While microarray platforms are still evolving, we can screen more than 500,000 genotypes at once. Even we can sequence the whole genome of an organism within a day. Because the future medicne will focus on the genetic susceptibility of individuals, we need to find genetic variations of each person by efficient genotyping methods.
Summary

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  • A novel protein chip for simultaneous detection of antibodies against four epidemic swine viruses in China
    Yue Wu, Xudan Wu, Jing Chen, Jingfei Hu, Xiaobo Huang, Bin Zhou
    BMC Veterinary Research.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Detection and Differentiation of Four Poultry Diseases Using Asymmetric Reverse Transcription Polymerase Chain Reaction in Combination with Oligonucleotide Microarrays
    Qimeng Tao, Xiurong Wang, Hongmei Bao, Jianan Wu, Lin Shi, Yanbing Li, Chuanling Qiao, Samuilenko Anatolij Yakovlevich, Poukhova Nina Mikhaylovna, Hualan Chen
    Journal of Veterinary Diagnostic Investigation.2009; 21(5): 623.     CrossRef
Statistical Issues in Genomic Cohort Studies.
Sohee Park
J Prev Med Public Health. 2007;40(2):108-113.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2007.40.2.108
  • 3,286 View
  • 26 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
When conducting large-scale cohort studies, numerous statistical issues arise from the range of study design, data collection, data analysis and interpretation. In genomic cohort studies, these statistical problems become more complicated, which need to be carefully dealt with. Rapid technical advances in genomic studies produce enormous amount of data to be analyzed and traditional statistical methods are no longer sufficient to handle these data. In this paper, we reviewed several important statistical issues that occur frequently in large-scale genomic cohort studies, including measurement error and its relevant correction methods, cost-efficient design strategy for main cohort and validation studies, inflated Type I error, gene-gene and gene-environment interaction and time-varying hazard ratios. It is very important to employ appropriate statistical methods in order to make the best use of valuable cohort data and produce valid and reliable study results.
Summary
A Review of Power and Sample Size Estimation in Genomewide Association Studies.
Ae Kyung Park, Ho Kim
J Prev Med Public Health. 2007;40(2):114-121.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2007.40.2.114
  • 4,510 View
  • 73 Download
  • 2 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Power and sample size estimation is one of the crucially important steps in planning a genetic association study to achieve the ultimate goal, identifying candidate genes for disease susceptibility, by designing the study in such a way as to maximize the success possibility and minimize the cost. Here we review the optimal two-stage genotyping designs for genomewide association studies recently investigated by Wang et al(2006). We review two mathematical frameworks most commonly used to compute power in genetic association studies prior to the main study: Monte-Carlo and non-central chi-square estimates. Statistical powers are computed by these two approaches for case-control genotypic tests under one-stage direct association study design. Then we discuss how the linkagedisequilibrium strength affects power and sample size, and how to use empirically-derived distributions of important parameters for power calculations. We provide useful information on publicly available softwares developed to compute power and sample size for various study designs.
Summary

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  • Sample Size and Statistical Power Calculation in Genetic Association Studies
    Eun Pyo Hong, Ji Wan Park
    Genomics & Informatics.2012; 10(2): 117.     CrossRef
  • The Effect of Increasing Control-to-case Ratio on Statistical Power in a Simulated Case-control SNP Association Study
    Moon-Su Kang, Sun-Hee Choi, In-Song Koh
    Genomics & Informatics.2009; 7(3): 148.     CrossRef
Ethical Considerations in Genomic Cohort Study.
Eun Kyung Choi, Ock Joo Kim
J Prev Med Public Health. 2007;40(2):122-129.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2007.40.2.122
  • 4,507 View
  • 37 Download
  • 1 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
During the last decade, genomic cohort study has been developed in many countries by linking health data and genetic data in stored samples. Genomic cohort study is expected to find key genetic components that contribute to common diseases, thereby promising great advance in genome medicine. While many countries endeavor to build biobank systems, biobank-based genome research has raised important ethical concerns including genetic privacy, confidentiality, discrimination, and informed consent. Informed consent for biobank poses an important question: whether true informed consent is possible in populationbased genomic cohort research where the nature of future studies is unforeseeable when consent is obtained. Due to the sensitive character of genetic information, protecting privacy and keeping confidentiality become important topics. To minimize ethical problems and achieve scientific goals to its maximum degree, each country strives to build population-based genomic cohort research project, by organizing public consultation, trying public and expert consensus in research, and providing safeguards to protect privacy and confidentiality.
Summary

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  • Clinical trials and ethics
    Inae Lim, Sun Young Rha
    Journal of the Korean Medical Association.2010; 53(9): 774.     CrossRef
Impact of an Early Hospital Arrival on Treatment Outcomes in Acute Ischemic Stroke Patients.
Young Dae Kwon, Sung Sang Yoon, Hyejung Chang
J Prev Med Public Health. 2007;40(2):130-136.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2007.40.2.130
  • 4,505 View
  • 37 Download
  • 4 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
Recent educational efforts have concentrated on patient's early hospital arrival after symptom onset. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the time interval between symptom onset and hospital arrival and to investigate its relation with clinical outcomes for patients with acute ischemic stroke. METHODS: A prospective registry of patients with signs or symptoms of acute ischemic stroke, admitted to the OO Medical Center through emergency room, was established from September 2003 to December 2004. The interval betwee symptom onset and hospital arrival was recorded for each eligible patient and analyzed together with clinical characteristics, medication type, severity of neurologic deficits, and functional outcomes. RESULTS: Based on the data of 256 patients, the median interval between symptom onset and hospital arrival was 13 hours, and 22% of patients were admitted to the hospital within 3 hours after symptom onset. Patients of not-mild initial severity and functional status showed significant differences between arrival hours of 0-3 and later than 3 in terms of their functional outcomes on discharge. Logistic regression models also showed that arrival within 3 hours was a significant factor influencing functional outcome (OR=5.6; 95% CI=2.1, 15.0), in addition to patient's initial severity, old age, cardioembolism subtype, and referral to another hospital. CONCLUSIONS: The time interval between symptom onset and hospital arrival significantly influenced treatment outcome for patients with acute ischemic stroke, even after controlling for other significant clinical characteristics. The findings provided initiatives for early hospital arrival of patients and improvement of emergency medical system.
Summary

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  • Computer Aided Diagnosis Applications for the Differential Diagnosis of Infarction: Apply on Brain CT Image
    Hyong-Hu Park, Mun-Joo Cho, In-Chul Im, Jin-Soo Lee
    Journal of the Korean Society of Radiology.2016; 10(8): 645.     CrossRef
  • The Visiting Time of Acute Cerebral Stroke Patients in a City and Its Influencing Factors
    英 方
    Nursing Science.2016; 05(04): 81.     CrossRef
  • Stroke Education: Discrepancies among Factors Influencing Prehospital Delay and Stroke Knowledge
    Yvonne TeuschI, Michael Brainin
    International Journal of Stroke.2010; 5(3): 187.     CrossRef
  • Notfall Schlaganfall
    T. Steigleder
    Notfall + Rettungsmedizin.2008; 11(3): 166.     CrossRef
Association of Social Support and Social Activity with Physical Functioning in Older Persons.
Kyunghye Park, Yunhwan Lee
J Prev Med Public Health. 2007;40(2):137-144.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2007.40.2.137
  • 4,738 View
  • 74 Download
  • 11 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
According to Rowe and Kahn (1998), successful aging is the combination of a low probability of disease, high functioning, and active engagement with life. The purpose of this study was to assess the relationship between active engagement with life and functioning among the community-dwelling elderly. METHODS: Data were collected from Wave 2 of the Suwon Longitudinal Aging Study (SLAS), consisting of a sample of 645 persons aged 65 and older living in the community. A social activity checklist and social support inventory were used as measures of engagement with life, along with the Physical Functioning (PF) scale as a measure of functioning. The effects of social support and social activity on physical functioning, taking into account the covariates, were analyzed by hierarchical linear regression analysis. RESULTS: Maintenance of social activity and social support were significantly associated with higher physical function, after adjusting for sociodemographic and healthrelated covariates. Social support appeared to be more prominent than social activity in predicting physical functioning. CONCLUSIONS: Social support and social activity are potentially modifiable factors associated with physical function in older persons. Studies examining the role social engagement may play in preventing disability are warranted.
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  • Social participation perspectives of people with cognitive problems and their care-givers: a descriptive qualitative study
    HANNEKE DONKERS, MYRRA VERNOOIJ-DASSEN, DINJA VAN DER VEEN, MARIA NIJHUIS VAN DER SANDEN, MAUD GRAFF
    Ageing and Society.2019; 39(7): 1485.     CrossRef
  • Influence of social participation on life satisfaction and depression among Chinese elderly: Social support as a mediator
    Chunkai Li, Shan Jiang, Na Li, Qiunv Zhang
    Journal of Community Psychology.2018; 46(3): 345.     CrossRef
  • Age-Related Physical Function(ADL, IADL) and its Related Factors of Elderly People in Korea
    Young-Su Song, Nam-Kyou Bae, Young-Chae Cho
    Journal of the Korea Academia-Industrial cooperation Society.2015; 16(3): 2002.     CrossRef
  • Age and gender patterns in associations between lifestyle factors and physical performance in older Korean adults
    Eun Sil Koh, Soong-Nang Jang, Nam-Jong Paik, Ki Woong Kim, Jae-Young Lim
    Archives of Gerontology and Geriatrics.2014; 59(2): 338.     CrossRef
  • Physical Functioning and Related Factors in the Elderly People Admitted Long-term Home Care Insurance
    Seok-Han Yoon, Kwang-Sung Lee, Young-Chae Cho
    Journal of the Korea Academia-Industrial cooperation Society.2013; 14(5): 2338.     CrossRef
  • Physical activity among the elderly in China: a qualitative study
    Yanling Li, Xiaojing Du, Chunfang Zhang, Sibao Wang
    British Journal of Community Nursing.2013; 18(7): 340.     CrossRef
  • Status of Physical and Mental Function and, Its Related Factors Among the Elderly People Using from Long-Term Care Insurance Service
    Nam-Kyou Bae, Young-Soo Song, Eun-Sook Shin, Young-Chae Cho
    Journal of the Korea Academia-Industrial cooperation Society.2012; 13(12): 5976.     CrossRef
  • Needs Assessment for the Beneficiaries of Home-Based Cancer Patients Management Project
    Ju-Hyung Lee, Jung-Im Park, Ji-Hoon Kang, Jung-Ho Youm, Dai-Ha Koh, Keun-Sang Kwon
    Journal of agricultural medicine and community health.2011; 36(4): 238.     CrossRef
  • Factors Related to Perceived Life Satisfaction Among the Elderly in South Korea
    Minsoo Jung, Carles Muntaner, Mankyu Choi
    Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health.2010; 43(4): 292.     CrossRef
  • Certificate Education for Geriatric Physician: Satisfaction and Feasibility
    Sung-Chun Lee, Hwa-Joon Kim, Hyung-Joon Park, Jong-Lull Yun, Chang-Yup Kim, Ok-Ryun Moon, Soong-Nang Jang
    Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health.2008; 41(1): 10.     CrossRef
  • Impacts of Poor Social Support on General Health Status in Community-Dwelling Korean Elderly: The Results from the Korean Longitudinal Study on Health and Aging
    Jae Kyung Shin, Ki Woong Kim, Joon Hyuk Park, Jung Jae Lee, Yoonseok Huh, Seok Bum Lee, Eun Ae Choi, Dong Young Lee, Jong Inn Woo
    Psychiatry Investigation.2008; 5(3): 155.     CrossRef
Original Article
Using Tobit Regression Analysis to Further Understand the Association of Youth Alcohol Problems with Depression and Parental Factors among Korean Adolescent Females.
Jorge Delva, Andrew Grogan Kaylor, Emily Steinhoff, Dong Eok Shin, Kristine Siefert
J Prev Med Public Health. 2007;40(2):145-149.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2007.40.2.145
  • 4,694 View
  • 63 Download
  • 7 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
This study characterized the extent to which youth depressive symptoms, parental alcohol problems, and parental drinking account for differences in alcoholrelated problems among a large sample of adolescent females. METHODS: The stratified sample consists of 2077 adolescent females from twelve female-only high schools located in a large metropolitan city in the Republic of Korea. Students completed a questionnaire about alcohol use nd alcohol problems, their parents' alcohol problems, and a number of risk and protective factors. Data were analyzed using tobit regression analyses to better characterize the associations among variables. RESULTS: Almost two-thirds of students who consume alcohol had experienced at least one to two alcohol-related problems in their lives and 54.6% reported at least one current symptom of depression, with nearly one-third reporting two depressive symptoms. Two-thirds of the students indicated that at least one parent had an alcoholrelated problem, and that approximately 29% had experie nced several problems. Results of tobit regression analyses indicate that youth alcohol-related problems are positively associated with depressive symptoms (p<0.01) and parent drinking problems (p<0.05). Parental drinking is no longer significant when the variable parental attention is added to the model. Decomposition of the tobit parameters shows that for every unit of increase in depressive symptoms and in parent drinking problems, the probability of a youth experiencing alcohol problems increases by 6% and 1%, respectively. For every unit of increase in parental attention, the probability of youth experiencing drinking problems decreases by 5%. CONCLUSIONS: This study presents evidence that alcoholrelated problems and depressive symptoms are highly prevalent among adolescent females. Although a comprehensive public health approach is needed to address drinking and mental health problems, different interventions are needed to target factors associated with initiation of alcohol problems and those associated with increased alcohol problems among those who already began experiencing such problems.
Summary

Citations

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    Donna Cross, Therese Shaw, Melanie Epstein, Natasha Pearce, Amy Barnes, Sharyn Burns, Stacey Waters, Leanne Lester, Kevin Runions
    European Journal of Education.2018; 53(4): 495.     CrossRef
  • Parenting and Youth Psychosocial Well- Being in South Korea using Fixed-Effects Models
    Yoonsun Han, Andrew Grogan-Kaylor
    Journal of Family Issues.2013; 34(5): 689.     CrossRef
  • Alcohol and tobacco use among South Korean adolescents: An ecological review of the literature
    Jun Sung Hong, Na Youn Lee, Andrew Grogan-Kaylor, Hui Huang
    Children and Youth Services Review.2011; 33(7): 1120.     CrossRef
  • Tobit Model for Outcome Variable Is Limited by Censoring in Nursing Research
    Kuan-Chia Lin, Su-Fen Cheng
    Nursing Research.2011; 60(5): 354.     CrossRef
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    Jun‐Su Kim, Kayoung Lee
    Obesity.2010; 18(11): 2145.     CrossRef
  • The Difficulty of Maintaining Positive Intervention Effects: A Look at Disruptive Behavior, Deviant Peer Relations, and Social Skills During the Middle School Years
    John E. Lochman, Karen L. Bierman, John D. Coie, Kenneth A. Dodge, Mark T. Greenberg, Robert J. McMahon, Ellen E. Pinderhughes
    The Journal of Early Adolescence.2010; 30(4): 593.     CrossRef
  • Longitudinal tobit regression: A new approach to analyze outcome variables with floor or ceiling effects
    Jos Twisk, Frank Rijmen
    Journal of Clinical Epidemiology.2009; 62(9): 953.     CrossRef
English Abstract
The Determinants of Purchasing Private Health Insurance in Korean Cancer Patients.
Jin Hwa Lim, Sung Gyeong Kim, Eun Mi Lee, Sin Young Bae, Jae Hyun Park, Kui Son Choi, Myung Il Hahm, Eun Cheol Park
J Prev Med Public Health. 2007;40(2):150-154.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2007.40.2.150
  • 4,971 View
  • 55 Download
  • 13 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
The aim of this study is to identify factors determining the purchase of private health insurance under the mandatory National Health Insurance(NHI) system in Korea. METHODS: The data were collected by the National Cancer Center in Korea. It includes cancer patients who were newly diagnosed with stomach (ICD code, C16), lung(C33-C34), liver (C22), colorectal cancer(C18-C20) or breast(C50) cancer. Data were gathered from the hospital Order Communication System (OCS), medical records, and face-to-face interviews, using a structured questionnaire. Clinical, socio-demographic and private health insurance related factors were also gathered. RESULTS: Overall, 43.9% of patients had purchased one or more private health insurance schemes related to cancer, with an average monthly premium of won 65,311 and an average benefit amount of won 19 million. Females, younger aged, high income earners, national health insurers and metropolitan citizens were more likely to purchase private health insurance than their counterparts. CONCLUSIONS: About half of Korean people have supplementary private health insurance and their benefits are sufficient to cover the out-of-pocket fees required for cancer treatment, but inequality remains in the purchase of private health insurance. Further studies are needed to investigate the impacts of private health insurance on NHI, and the relationship between cancer patients' burden and benefits.
Summary

Citations

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  • Out-of-pocket costs in gastrointestinal cancer patients: Lack of a perfectly framed problem contributing to financial toxicity
    Roberto Bordonaro, Dario Piazza, Concetta Sergi, Stefano Cordio, Salvatore Tomaselli, Vittorio Gebbia
    Critical Reviews in Oncology/Hematology.2021; 167: 103501.     CrossRef
  • Assessing determinants of health care prepayment in China: Economic growth or government willingness? New evidence from the continuous wavelet analysis
    Ying Zhang, Rui Wang, Xinyi Yao
    The International Journal of Health Planning and Management.2019;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Abhijit Sharma, Diara Md Jadi, Damian Ward
    The Journal of Economic Asymmetries.2018; 18: e00102.     CrossRef
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    Ki-Bong Yoo, Jin-Won Noh, Young Dae Kwon, Kyoung Hee Cho, Young Choi, Jae-Hyun Kim
    Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention.2015; 16(17): 7981.     CrossRef
  • Equity in health care: current situation in South Korea
    Hong-Jun Cho
    Journal of the Korean Medical Association.2013; 56(3): 184.     CrossRef
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    Hyo-Jin Kim, Jae-Hee Lee
    The Journal of the Korea Contents Association.2012; 12(12): 683.     CrossRef
  • Comparison of Health Promotion Behavior in Middle aged Rural Residents by Cancer Screening Participation
    Myung Suk Lee
    Journal of Korean Academy of Community Health Nursing.2010; 21(1): 43.     CrossRef
  • The Effect of Catastrophic Health Expenditure on the Transition to Poverty and the Persistence of Poverty in South Korea
    Eun-Cheol Song, Young-Jeon Shin
    Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health.2010; 43(5): 423.     CrossRef
  • The Effect of Health Care Expenditure on Income Inequality
    Eun-Cheol Song, Chang-Yup Kim, Young-Jeon Shin
    Korean Journal of Health Policy and Administration.2010; 20(3): 36.     CrossRef
  • Impact of supplementary private health insurance on stomach cancer care in Korea: a cross-sectional study
    Dong Wook Shin, Kee-Taig Jung, Sung Kim, Jae-Moon Bae, Young-Woo Kim, Keun Won Ryu, Jun Ho Lee, Jae-Hyung Noh, Tae-Sung Sohn, Young Ho Yun
    BMC Health Services Research.2009;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Comparison of Cancer Survival by Age Group for 1997 and for 2002: Application of Period Analysis using the National Cancer Incidence Database
    Seon-Hee Yim, Kyu-Won Jung, Young-Joo Won, Hyun-Joo Kong, Hai-Rim Shin
    Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health.2008; 41(1): 17.     CrossRef
  • Strengthening Causal Inference in Studies using Non-experimental Data: An Application of Propensity Score and Instrumental Variable Methods
    Myoung-Hee Kim, Young Kyung Do
    Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health.2007; 40(6): 495.     CrossRef
  • Effects of Private Health Insurance on Health Care Utilization and Expenditures in Korean Cancer Patients: Focused on 5 Major Cancers in One Cancer Center
    Jin Hwa Lim, Kui Son Choi, Sung Gyeong Kim, Eun-Cheol Park, Jae Hyun Park
    Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health.2007; 40(4): 329.     CrossRef
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Developmental Toxicity by Exposure to Bisphenol A Diglycidyl Ether during Gestation and Lactation Period in Sprague-dawley Male Rats.
Un jun Hyoung, Yun Jung Yang, Su Kyoung Kwon, Jae Hyoung Yoo, Soon Chul Myoung, Sae Chul Kim, Yeon Pyo Hong
J Prev Med Public Health. 2007;40(2):155-161.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2007.40.2.155
  • 5,661 View
  • 92 Download
  • 33 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
Bisphenol A diglycidyl ether (BADGE) is the major component in commercial liquid epoxy resins, which are manufactured by co-reacting bisphenol A with epichlorohydrin. This study was performed to show the developmental effects of prenatal and postnatal exposures to BADGE in male rat offspring. METHODS: Mated female rats were divided into four groups, each containing 12 rats. The dosing solutions were prepared by thoroughly mixing BADGE in corn oil at the 0, 375, 1500 and 3000 mg/kg/day concentrations. Mated females were dosed once daily by oral gavage on gestation day (GD) 6 - 20 and postnatal day (PND) 0 - 21. Pregnant female dams were observed general symptoms and body weight. Also, male pups were observed the general symptoms, body weight, developmental parameters (e.g. anogenital distance, pina detachment, incisor eruption, nipple retention, eye opening, testis descent), organ pathologic changes and hormone levels of plasma. RESULTS: Pregnant rats treated with BADGE died at a rate of about 70% in the 1500 mg/kg/day group and all rats treated with 3000 mg/kg/day died. Body weight, for male pups treated with doses of 375 mg/kg/day, was significantly lower than in the control group at PND 42, 56, and 63 (p<0.05). Evaluation of body characteristics including; separation of auricle, eruption of incisor, separation of eyelid, nipple retention, descent of testis, and separation of the prepuce in the BADGE treated group showed no difference in comparisons with the control group. AGD and adjusted AGD (mm/kg) for general developmental items in BADGE 375 mg/kg/day treated pups tended to be longer than in controls, however, these differences were not statistically significant. Relative weights of adrenal gland, lung (p<0.05), brain, epididymis, prostate, and testis (p<0.01) were heavier than in control in measures at PND 9 weeks. There were no significant changes in comparisons of histological findings of these organs. Loss of spermatids was observed in the seminiferous tubule at PND 9 weeks, but no weight changes were observed. The plasma estrogen levels were similar in the control and treatment groups at PND 3, 6 and 9 weeks. The plasma testosterone levels in the control group tended to increase with age. However, in the BADGE 375 mg/kg/day treated male pups it did not tend to increase. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that BADGE is a chemical that has developmental effects consistent with it being an endocrine disruptor.
Summary

Citations

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    Isabella Karlsson, David J. Ponting, Miguel A. Ortega, Ida B. Niklasson, Lorena Ndreu, E. Johanna L. Stéen, Tina Seifert, Kristina Luthman, Ann-Therese Karlberg
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    Michael J. Williams, Hao Cao, Therese Lindkvist, Tobias J. Mothes, Helgi B. Schiöth
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    A Ullah, M Pirzada, S Jahan, H Ullah, S Razak, N Rauf, MJ Khan, SZ Mahboob
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    Jingchuan Xue, Wenbin Liu, Kurunthachalam Kannan
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English Abstracts
Change of Cognitive Function and Associated Factors among the Rural Elderly: A 5-Year Follow-up Study.
Sang Kyu Kim, Pock Soo Kang, Tae Yoon Hwang, Joon Sakong, Kyeong Soo Lee
J Prev Med Public Health. 2007;40(2):162-168.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2007.40.2.162
  • 4,551 View
  • 34 Download
  • 3 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
This prospective population-based cohort study was conducted to evaluate the risk factors of cognitive impairment and the degree of cognitive function change through a 5-year follow-up. METHODS: The baseline and follow-up surveys were conducted in 1998 and 2003, respectively. Among 176 subjects who had normal cognitive function in the baseline study, 136 were followed up for 5 years. The cognitive function was investigated using the Korean version of the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE-K). The collected data were analyzed using SPSS and Stata. RESULTS: Of the 136 subjects analyzed, 25 (18.4%) were cognitively impaired. Old age and low social support in the baseline survey were risk factors for cognitive impairment after 5 years. In the generalized estimating equation for 128 subjects except severe cognitive impairment about the contributing factors of cognitive function change, the interval of 5 years decreased MMSE-K score by 1.02 and the cognitive function was adversely affected with increasing age, decreasing education and decreasing social support. CONCLUSIONS: Although the study population was small, it was considered that the study results can be used to develop a community-based prevention system for cognitive impairment.
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  • Status of Physical and Mental Function and, Its Related Factors Among the Elderly People Using from Long-Term Care Insurance Service
    Nam-Kyou Bae, Young-Soo Song, Eun-Sook Shin, Young-Chae Cho
    Journal of the Korea Academia-Industrial cooperation Society.2012; 13(12): 5976.     CrossRef
  • Toxicities and functional consequences of systemic chemotherapy in elderly Korean patients with cancer: A prospective cohort study using Comprehensive Geriatric Assessment
    Dong-Yeop Shin, Jeong-Ok Lee, Yu Jung Kim, Myung-Sook Park, Keun-Wook Lee, Kwang-Il Kim, Soo-Mee Bang, Jong Seok Lee, Cheol-Ho Kim, Jee Hyun Kim
    Journal of Geriatric Oncology.2012; 3(4): 359.     CrossRef
  • Apolipoprotein E Polymorphism and Cognitive Function Change of the Elderly in a Rural Area, Korea
    Sang-Kyu Kim, Tae-Yoon Hwang, Kyeong-Soo Lee, Pock-Soo Kang, Hee-Soon Cho, Young-Kyung Bae
    Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health.2009; 42(4): 261.     CrossRef
General Population Time Trade-off Values for 42 EQ-5D Health States in South Korea.
Min Woo Jo, Sang Il Lee
J Prev Med Public Health. 2007;40(2):169-176.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2007.40.2.169
  • 4,863 View
  • 69 Download
  • 12 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
This study was conducted to elicit quality weights for 42 EQ-5D health states with the time trade-off (TTO) method from the general population of South Korea. METHODS: We selected the same EQ-5D health states as those in the UK MVH study. The Korean version of EQ-5D questionnaire and TTO method were used for the valuation process. We interviewed 500 people as a representative sample of the general population in Seoul and Gyeonggido. The result was compared with those from UK, Japan, and USA by Spearman's rank correlation and t-test. RESULTS: TTO values for 42 EQ-5D health states and 'unconscious' state were obtained from the general South Korean population. The best one was '11112' state and the worst one was 'unconscious' state. The states worse than death were '33323', '33333', and 'unconscious' states, which had negative TTO values. There was a strong correlation between TTO values of the EQ-5D health states and those of their corresponding states from UK, Japan, and USA (Spearman's correlation coefficient: 0.885, 0.882, and 0.944, respectively, p <0.001). However, absolute TTO values of most EQ-5D health states were significantly different from those of their corresponding states in other foreign studies (UK: 41/42, USA: 32/42, Japan: 15/17). CONCLUSIONS: We found that the Korean general population TTO values for EQ-5D health states were different from those of other foreign studies, suggesting that a specific Korean valuation set should be developed and used for economic evaluation studies in South Korea.
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  • Association Between Hearing Level and Mental Health and Quality of Life in Adults Aged >40 Years
    Yeonjoo Choi, Junyong Go, Jong Woo Chung
    Journal of Audiology and Otology.2024; 28(1): 52.     CrossRef
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    Mijung Jang, Heedong Park, Miyoung Kim, Galam Kang, Hayan Shin, Donghyun Shin, KyooSang Kim
    Brain & Neurorehabilitation.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Factors Affecting the Health-related Quality of Life of Older Adults with Unmet Healthcare Needs Based on the 2018 Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey: A Cross-Sectional Study
    Su-Jin Seo, Ju-Hee Nho
    Journal of Korean Academy of Fundamentals of Nursing.2022; 29(2): 258.     CrossRef
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    Sang-ho Kim, Bog-ja Jeoung
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    Ji-Yeon Kim
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    Jong Im Kim
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The Levels of Psychosocial Stress, Job Stress and Related Factors of Medical Doctors Practicing at Local Clinics.
Moon Kuk Kang, Yune Sik Kang, Jang Rak Kim, Baek Geun Jeong, Ki Soo Park, Sin Kam, Dae Yong Hong
J Prev Med Public Health. 2007;40(2):177-184.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2007.40.2.177
  • 5,339 View
  • 61 Download
  • 10 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
This study was conducted to investigate the levels of psychosocial stress, job stress and their related factors among medical doctors practicing at local clinics. METHODS: A survey using a self administered questionnaire was administered to 1,456 doctors practicing at private clinics via post for 2 months (2006. 1 - 2006. 3). Psychosocial stress, job stress,demographic factors, job related factors and health related behaviors were investigated. Among the eligible study population, the respondents were 428 doctors (29.4%). RESULTS: The average scores of psychosocial stress and job stress were 2.19 and 3.13, respectively. The levels of psychosocial stress and job stress were statistically lower in older respondents, those who worked shorter or who were more satisfied with their job, and those with higher socioeconomic status. The level of psychosocial stress was related with smoking status, drinking status and exercise. The level of job stress was related with smoking status and exercise. In multiple linear regression analysis using psychosocial stress as a dependent variable, age, working hours per day, job satisfaction and perception on socioeconomic status were significant independent variables. In analysis using job stress as a dependent variable, age, working hours per day and job satisfaction were significant independent variables. CONCLUSIONS: Stress affects the doctor-patient relationship, productivity and overall health level of people. Therefore, it is important to manage and relieve the stress of doctors. It is suggested that more advanced studies on stress level and related factors and ways to improve the stress and health related behaviors of medical doctors should be conducted.
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  • A Preliminary Study About Occupational Stress and Career Satisfaction of Korean Psychiatrists
    Dae yong Sim, Jong Hyuk Choi, Yeong Gi Kyeon
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    Eun Sun Jang, Seon Mee Park, Young Sook Park, Jong Chan Lee, Nayoung Kim
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    Yune Sik Kang
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    Yunesik Kang
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    Sang Baek Koh
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  • Job Satisfaction, Subjective Class Identification and Associated Factors of Professional Socialization in Korean Physicians
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The Current Trend of Avian Influenza Viruses in Bioinformatics Research.
Insung Ahn, Hyeon S Son
J Prev Med Public Health. 2007;40(2):185-190.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2007.40.2.185
  • 3,590 View
  • 46 Download
  • 1 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
Since the first human infection from avian influenza was reported in Hong Kong in 1997, many Asian countries have confirmed outbreaks of highly pathogenic H5N1 avian influenza viruses. In addition to Asian countries, the EU authorities also held an urgent meeting in February 2006 at which it was agreed that Europe could also become the next target for H5N1 avian influenza in the near future. In this paper, we provide the general and applicable information on the avian influenza in the bioinformatics field to assist future studies in preventive medicine. METHODS: We introduced some up-to-date analytical tools in bioinformatics research, and discussed the current trends of avian influenza outbreaks. Among the bioinformatics methods, we focused our interests on two topics: attern analysis using the secondary database of avian influenza, and structural analysis using the molecular dynamics simulations in vaccine design. RESULTS: Use of the public genome databases available in the bioinformatics field enabled intensive analysis of the genetic patterns. Moreover, molecular dynamic simulations have also undergone remarkable development on the basis of the high performance supercomputing infrastructure these days. CONCLUSIONS: The bioinformatics techniques we introduced in this study may be useful in preventive medicine, especially in vaccine and drug discovery.
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  • Identification of novel conserved functional motifs across most Influenza A viral strains
    Mahmoud ElHefnawi, Osama AlAidi, Nafisa Mohamed, Mona Kamar, Iman El-Azab, Suher Zada, Rania Siam
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Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
The Impacts of Obesity on Psychological Well-being: A Cross-sectional Study about Depressive Mood and Quality of Life.
Ji Yeong Kim, Dong Jae Oh, Tae Young Yoon, Joong Myung Choi, Bong Keun Choe
J Prev Med Public Health. 2007;40(2):191-195.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2007.40.2.191
  • 5,674 View
  • 116 Download
  • 18 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
The aim of this study was to assess whether individuals who visit clinics to ask medical help for obesity treatment depict comparable levels of depression, body dissatisfaction, eating psychopathology and lower quality of life. METHODS: This is a cross sectional study with 534 females who sought treatment for their obesity or overweight being recruited in seven clinical units in Seoul, Korea. The patients group was divided into two groups. The group 1 consisted of the patients with BMI >25 kg/m2. The women who showed BMI < or =25 kg/m2 among patients recruited for this study were classified as the group 2. The control group (group 3) was composed of 398 healthy females who have never tried to lose weight. RESULTS: We found that group 1 had higher frequency of more than moderate level of depression than group 2 and group3 did. Both patients groups showed greater eating disordered attitudes and behaviors regardless of obese condition than the control group. Group1 showed relatively lower level of quality of life than group2 and group3 in terms of the quality of life related to physical well-being. In addition, the control group reported higher quality of life in psychological health than both patients groups did. CONCLUSIONS: In conclusion, it is necessary for clinicians to make a careful evaluation of depressive tendency and eating disorders when obese women seek for medical help. The combination of medical treatment and psychological approach for obese women would result in higher quality of life.
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JPMPH : Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health