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Jung Man Kim 11 Articles
The Relationship between ACE I/D Polymorphism and HDL Cholesterol.
Chang Hun You, Young Seoub Hong, Jong Young Kwak, Na Young Kim, Mee Sook Roh, Kap Yeol Jung, Yong Hwan Lee, Jung Man Kim, Joon Youn Kim
J Prev Med Public Health. 2006;39(6):505-510.
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OBJECTIVES
The purpose of this study is to evaluate the association of the angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) insertion/deletion (I/D) polymorphism with cardiovascular disease risk factors. METHODS: Out of a total of 608 middle-aged adults who visited local health centers, 424 subjects (104 male, 320 female) who had not been diagnosed with hypertension, diabetes mellitus, or hyperlipidemia were included in this study. ACE genotypes were determined in all subjects by polymerase chain reaction methods. RESULTS: Statistical differences in high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol levels according to ACE genotype were observed using ANOVA (p<0.05), but no differences were found in other cardiovascular risk factors. Specifically, men with the DD and DI genotypes had significantly lower HDL cholesterol levels than those with the II genotype based on the LSD multi-comparison test (p<0.05). CONCLUSIONS: In men, the D-allele of the ACE I/D polymorphism was significantly associated with reduced HDL cholesterol levels. In the future, larger studies are needed to confirm this relationship between ACE I/D polymorphism and HDL cholesterol.
Summary
Analysis of Repeated Measured VAS in a Clinical Trial for Evaluating a New NSAID with GEE Method.
Hoi Jeong Lim, Yooni Kim, Young Bok Jung, Sang Cheol Seong, Jin Hwan Ahn, Kwon Jae Roh, Jung Man Kim, Byung Joo Park
J Prev Med Public Health. 2004;37(4):381-389.   Published online November 30, 2014
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OBJECTIVE
: To compare the efficacy between SKI306X and Diclofenac by using generalized estimating equations (GEE) methodology in the analysis of correlated bivariate binary outcome data in Osteoarthritis (OA) diseases. METHODS: A randomized, double-blind, active comparator controlled, non-inferiority clinical trial was conducted at 5 institutions in Korea with the random assignment of 248 patients aged 35 to 75 years old with OA of the knee and clinical evidence of OA. Patients were enrolled in this study if they had at least moderate pain in the affected knee joint and a score larger than 35mm as assessed by VAS (Visual Analog Scale). The main exposure variable was treatment (SKI 306X vs. Diclofenac) and other covariates were age, sex, BMI, baseline VAS, center, operation history (Yes/No), NSAIDS (Y/N), acupuncture (Y/N), herbal medicine (Y/N), past history of musculoskeletal disease (Y/N), and previous therapy related with OA (Y/N). The main study outcome was the change of VAS pain scores from baseline to the 2nd and 4th weeks after treatment. Pain scores were obtained as baseline, 2nd and 4th weeks after treatment. We applied GEE approach with empirical covariance matrix and independent (or exchangeable) working correlation matrix to evaluate the relation of several risk factors to the change of VAS pain scores with correlated binary bivariate outcomes. RESULTS: While baseline VAS, age, and acupuncture variables had protective effects for reducing the OA pain, its treatment (Joins/Diclofenac) was not statistically significant through GEE methodology (ITT: aOR=1.37, 95% CI= (0.8200, 2.26), PP: aOR=1.47, 95% CI= (0.73, 2.95) ). The goodness-off it statistic for GEE (6.55, p=0.68) was computed to assess the adequacy of the fitted final model. CONCLUSIONS: Both ANCOVA and GEE methods yielded non statistical significance in the evaluation of non-inferiority of the efficacy between SKI306X and Diclofenac. While VAS outcome for each visit was applied in GEE, only VAS outcome for the fourth visit was applied in ANCOVA. So the GEE methodology is more accurate for the analysis of correlated outcomes.
Summary
Blood Lead, Manganese, Aluminium and Silicon Concentrations in Korean Adults.
Jung Man Kim, Jung Mo Ahn, Won Sul Kim, Jung Il Kim, Hai Rim Shin, Kap Yeol Jung, Joon Youn Kim
Korean J Prev Med. 2000;33(2):157-164.
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OBJECTIVES
This study was performed to determine the reference values of blood lead, manganese, aluminium, and silicon in healthy adults. METHODS: The subjects were 132 (67 male and 65 female), and classified to three age groups (< or =39, 40~49, and 50< or =). Blood lead, manganese and aluminium were analyzed by atomic absorption spectrophotometer, and blood silicon was analyzed by direct current plasma optical emission spectrometer. RESULTS: Blood lead levels(geometric mean, S.D) were (3.49, 1.70) microgram/dL in male and (3.04, 1.65) microgram/dL in female, but the difference is not significant, and there was no significant difference between age groups. Mean blood manganese level was 0.99+/-0.41 microgram/dL, and there was no significant difference between sex or age groups. Mean blood aluminium level was 0.59+/-0.35 microgram/dL, and there was no significant difference between sex or age groups. Mean blood silicon level was 54.41+/-27.64 microgram/dL in male and 43.34+/- 23.51 microgram/dL in female, and the level in male was significantly higher than that in female (p<0.05). There was significant difference between age groups, and the oldest showed the highest level in male (p<0.05), but no significant difference between age groups in female. CONCLUSIONS: Authors hope that this study would provide basic data for determining reference values and evaluating health effects.
Summary
A cohort study on blood zinc protoporphyrin concentration of workers in storage battery factory.
Man Joong Jeon, Joong Jeong Lee, Joon Sakong, Chang Yoon Kim, Jung Man Kim, Jong Hak Chung
Korean J Prev Med. 1998;31(1):112-126.
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To investigate the effectiveness of the interventions in working environment and personal hygiene for the occupational exposure to the lead, the blood zinc protoporphyrin(ZPP) concentrations of 131 workers ( 100 exposed subjects and 31 controls ) of a newly established battery factory were analyzed. They were measured in every 3 months up to 18 months. Air lead concentration (Pb-A) of the workplaces was also checked for 3 times in 6 months interval from August 1987. Environmental intervention included the local exhaust ventilation and vacuum cleaning of the floor. Intervention of the personal hygiene included the daily change of clothes, compulsory shower after work and hand washing before meal, prohibition of cigarette smoking and food consumption at the work site and wearing mask. Mean blood ZPP concentration of the controls was 16.45+/-4.83 microgram/dashliter at the preemployment examination and slightly increased to 17.77+/-5.59 microgram/dashliter after 6 months. Mean blood ZPP concentration of the exposed subjects who were employed before the factory was in operation (Group A) was 17.36+/-5.20 microgram/dashliter on employment and it was increased to 23.00+/-13.06 microgram/dashliter after 3 months. The blood ZPP concentration was increased to 27.25+/-6.40 microgram/dashliter on 6 months (p<0.01) after the employment which was 1 month after the initiation of intervention program. It did not increase thereafter and ranged between 25.48 microgram/dashliter and 26.61 microgram/dashliter in the subsequent 4 results. Mean blood ZPP concentration of the exposed subjects who were employed after the factory had been in operation but before the intervention program was initiated (Group B) was 14.34+/-6.10 microgram/dashliter on employment and it was increased to 28.97+/-7.14 microgram/dashliter (p<0.01) in 3 months later(1 month after the intervention). The values of subsequent 4 tests were maintained between 26.96 microgram/dashliter and 27.96 microgram/dashliter. Mean blood ZPP concentration of the exposed subjects who were employed after intervention program had been started (Group C) was 21.34+/-5.25 microgram/dashliter on employment and it was gradually increased to 23.37+/-3.86 microgram/dashliter (p<0.01) after 3 months, 23.93+/-3.64 microgram/dashliter after 6 months, 25.50+/-3.01 microgram/dashliter (p<0.01) after 9 months, and 25.50+/-3.10 microgram/dashliter after 12 months. Workplaces were classified into 4 parts according to Pb-A. The Pb-A of part I, the highest areas, were 0.365 microgram/m4, and after the intervention the levels were decreased to 0.216 microgram/m4 and 0.208 microgram/m4 in follow-up test. The Pb-A of part II which was resulted in lower value than part I was decreased from 0.232 microgram/m4 to 0.148 microgram/m4, and 0.120 microgram/m4 after the intervention. The Pb-A of part III was tested after the intervention and resulted in 0.124 microgram/m4 in January 1988 and 0.081 microgram/m4 in August 1988. The Pb-A of part IV was also tested after the intervention and resulted in 0.110 microgram/m4 in August 1988. There was no consistent relationship between Pb-A and blood ZPP concentration. The blood ZPP concentration of the group A and B workers in the part of the highest Pb-A were lower than those of the workers in the parts of lower Pb-A. The blood ZPP concentration of the workers in the part of the lowest Pb-A increased more rapidly. The blood ZPP concentration of the group C workers was the highest in part III. These findings suggest that the intervention in personal hygiene is more effective than environmental intervention, and it should be carried out from the first day of employment and to both the exposed subjects, blue color workers and the controls, white color workers.
Summary
Study on the Indoor-Outdoor NO2 Levels and Related Factors in Urban Aprtments.
Byung Seong Suh, Sung Hwan Kim, In Shik Kim, Yum Young Hur, Sou Young Do, Jung Man Kim, Joon Youn Kim
Korean J Prev Med. 1997;30(3):609-622.
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Nitrogen dioxide (NO2) has been regarded as one of the main elements among air pollutants, and we measured NO2levels of near gas range, kitchen, living room and outdoor on 489 apartments in Pusan area. NO2were sampled by using Palmes tubes (diffusion tube sampler) during August 16-25, 1995 (summer) and January 15-29, 1996 (winter), respectively. Authors wanted to know comparison of NO2levels in summer and winter, NO2 levels categorized by variables, and variables affected to NO2levels. According to this study, we conducted to establish the degree of indoor-outdoor air pollution of urban apartments in Korea and methods to reduce indoor air pollution. The results of this study were summarized as follows: 1) Mean NO2levels of near gas range, kitchen, living room, and outdoor were 25.9+/-10.0 ppb, 23.3+/-8.0 ppb, 19.9+/-6.1 ppb, and 19.0+/-6.0 ppb in summer, and 34.5+/-16.8 ppb, 28.2+/-13.4 ppb, 25.3+/-12.5 ppb, 21.8+/-9.8 ppb in winter, respectively. 2) Mean NO2levels according to the floor levels were not significantly different in summer, and in winter, NO2levels were decreased as the floor levels were increasing, but those were increased above 16th floor. 3) Variables showing significant correlation (p<0.05) with NO2levels were as follows; Summer: floor level, family size, number of family during a meal, number using gas range during rice cooking per day, and natural ventilation. Winter: floor level, family size, number of person who have been respiratory disease in a house, number of family during a meal, total number of meals, and number using gas range during rice or side-dish cooking per day. 4) We suggest that the methods of reducing indoor NO2levels are ventilation during cooking, complete combustion, decreasing number and time of cooking, and substitution of fuels.
Summary
Seroepidemiologic Study of Hepatitis B Virus(HBV) and Hepatitis C Virus(HCV) Infection among Koreans in Rural Area, Korea.
Hai Rim Shin, Joon Youn Kim, Jue Bok Song, Byung Seong Suh, Jung Man Kim, Bu Ok Lee, Su Ryang Kim, Mu Guan Yang, Chae Un Lee, Jin Ho Chun, Keun Young Yoo, Yoon Ok Ahn
Korean J Prev Med. 1997;30(1):17-30.
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AbstractAbstract PDF
To estimate the prevalence of hepatitis B virus(HBV) and hepatitis C virus(HCV) infection and to determine associated risk factors, a population-based seroepidemiologic study was carried out. In 1993, a health examination survey of the population was carried out in rural area known to have a high incidence of liver cancer. The study population were those who volunteered to participate in a health survey over 10 years of age. Examinees were interviewed by specially trained staffs. Sera from 1,033 study subjects were tested for hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) by reverse passive hemagglutinin (RPHA) estimation and for hepatitis C virus antibody (anti-HCV) by 2nd generation passive hemagglutinin (PHA) estimation, The age and sex standardized prevalence of HBsAg was 6.3% which was similar to national average, but that of anti-HCV was 5.1% which was 4 to 5 times higher than that of blood or other health examinees in Korea. In a multivariate analysis, transfusion history, surgical operative history, and acupuncture history were not associated with HBsAg positivity. In contrast, acupuncture history (adjusted odds ratio[OR]=2.2 : 95% Confidence interval[CI] 1.0-4.7) and surgical operative history(adjusted OR=2.0 : 95% CI 1.0-4.1) were associated with anti-HCV positivity. The present study suggest that there is an highly endemic area of HCV infection in Korea and probably this endemicity is associated with a parenteral source of HCV infection other than blood transfusion.
Summary
Nephropathy in Chronic Lead Poisoning.
Byoung Gwon Kim, Sung Ryul Kim, Young Seoub Hong, Seo Hee Rha, Jung Man Kim, Kap Yull Jung, Joon Youn Kim
Korean J Prev Med. 1996;29(1):43-50.
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AbstractAbstract PDF
We experienced a case of nephropathy in chronic lead poisoning. The patient was 43-year-old male who has been working in secondary lead smelting plant for ]4 years. On admission, blood pressure was 160/90 mmHg and the others were non-specific. In past history, he received chelating agent administration for lead poisoning irregularly and medicated for gout, and the blood lead concentration was 180.0 microgram/dl on 2 months before admission. Smoking habit has been 1 pack per day for 15 years and drinking habit has been 1 bottle of Soju per day but less now. In liver function test, AT/ALT were 27/28 IU/l and gamma-GT was 456 IU/l. In blood test, Hb:11. 5 g/dl , Hct: 34.0% and basophilic stipplings were found in peripheral blood smear. Chest PA was normal and abdominal ultrasonographic finding was non-specific except fatty liver. In the test of lead exposure indices, pbB: 83.0 microgram/dl, pbU: 28.3 microgram/l, and blood ZPP was 300.0 microgram/dl. And in renal function test, BUN: 31.4 mg/dl, blood creatinine: 2.7mg/dl, blood uric acid: 9.1 mg/dl, urinary albumin: 100.0 mg/g creatinine, urinary a alpha 1-microglobulin: 120.5 mg/g creatinine, urinary beta2-mioroglobulin: 183.8 microgram/g creatinine, and 24 hours urinary creatinine clearance was 31.9 ml/min. The ultasonoguided renal biopsy showed the global sclerosis of glomerulus, moderate atrophy and loss of tubule, and interstitial fibrosis in light microscopy. There were diffuse losses of brush border of proximal tubule in electronmicroscopy.
Summary
Study on the Pulmonary Function in Welding Fume Exposed Workers.
Young Seoub Hong, Byoung Gwon Kim, Sung Ryul Kim, Do Won Dam, Jung Man Kim, Kap Yull Jung, Joon Youn Kim
Korean J Prev Med. 1995;28(1):43-58.
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AbstractAbstract PDF
In order to study the effect of welding fume exposure upon the pulmonary function test, we examined 131 shielded arc welding workers, and 152 CO2 arc welding workers as cases and 172 control workers for their general characteristics, and forced vital capacity (FVC), forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1.0) forced expiratory volume in one second as a percent of FVC(FEV1.0%), and maximal mid-expiratory flow (MMF) were obtained from in the spirogram. In shielded arc welding group and CO2 arc welding group, FVC, FEV1.0, FEV1.0%, and MMF were significantly decreased than control group, especially marked in the MMF finding. The distribution of workers below normal range was as follows: in the shielded arc welding group, 2 workers(l.5%) for FVC, 17 workers(13.0%) for FEV1.0, 5 workers(3.8%) for FEV1.0%, 28 workers(21.4%) for MMF, and in the CO2 arc welding group, 3 workers(2.0%) for FVC, 25 workers(16.4%) for FEV1.0, 8 workers(5.3%) for FEV1.0% and 37 workers(24.3%) for MMF, and significant increase by exposure duration was found in MMF. The distribution of workers who had ventilation impairment was as follows: 5 workers(3.8%) for obstructive type, 2 workers(l.5%) for restrictive type in the shielded arc welding group and, workers(4.6%) for obstructive type. 2 workers(l.3%) for restriotive type, and 1 worker(0.6%) was combined type of the CO2 arc welding group. In the respect of these results the significant pulmonary function and ventilatory impairment were observed in welding fume exposed workers who had not abnormal finding in chest X-ray, and MMF considered as the most sensitive pulmonary function index by welding fume exposure. Therefore even if it is hard to doing pulmonary function test in the first health examination of workers according to the Industrial Safety Health Act in the welding fume exposure workers. it is desirable to consider doing PFT. Also evaluating the ventilation impairment, it is necessary, to observe the change of MMF that marker of effort-independent portion.
Summary
Relationship Between The Biological Lead Exposure Indices And Air Lead Concentrations Measured By Personal Air Samplers.
Haeng Ryeol Lee, Jung Man Kim, Kap Yull Jung, Joon Youn Kim
Korean J Prev Med. 1993;26(1):65-73.
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AbstractAbstract PDF
This study was carried out to evaluate the relationship between the biological lead exposure indices and air lead concentrations measured by personal air samplers. The 72 occupationally lead exposed workers were observed and the biological lead exposure indices chosen for this study were blood lead(PuB), urine lead(PbU), zinc protoporphyrin in whole blood(ZPP), gamma-aminolevulinic acid in urine(ALAU), gamma-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase activity(ALAD), coproporphyrin in urine(CPU) and hemoglobin(Hb). The workers were divided into four groups by air lead concentrations: Group I; under 0.05 mg/m3, Group II; 0.05-0.10 mg/m3, Group III; 0.10-0.15 mg/m3 and Group IV; and over 0.15 mg/m3. For evaluation the relationship between the biological lead exposure indices and air lead concentrations was used as correlation coefficients. The results obtained were as follows: 1. In Group I, II, III and IV, the mean value of PbB were 25.45+/-1.84 microgram/dl, 27.87+/-3.53 microgram/dl, 31.21+/-1.76 microgram/dl and 47.02+/-13.96 microgram/dl. Between Group IV and other groups showed statistically significant difference(p<0.05). 2. There was an increasing tendency of PbB, PbU, ALAU and ZPP according to the increase the mean air lead concentration, while ALAD has decreasing tendency. CPU and Hb did not show any constant tendency. 3. Correlation coefficients between PbB, PbU, ZPP, ALAU, ALAD, CPU, Hb and air lead concentration were 0.95, 0.83, 0.89, 0.72, -0.83, 0.51 and -0.45 respectively, and regression coefficient between PbB(Y) and PbA(X) was Y=126.8746X+16.9996(P<0.01).
Summary
The levels of blood lead and zinc protoporphyrin for healthy urban population in Korea.
Dong Il Kim, Yong Kyu Kim, Jung Man Kim, Kap Yull Jung, Joon Youn Kim
Korean J Prev Med. 1992;25(3):287-302.
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AbstractAbstract PDF
Hemoglobin(Hb), zinc protoporphyrin(ZPP) and blood lead(PbB) levels were determined for 1,851 blood samples collected from healthy urban population to establish reliable baselines for Hb, ZPP and PbB levels by age and sex. ZPP values were analyzed with a Hmatofluorometer and PbB determinations were concurrently carried out using flameless atomic absorption spectrophotometry. The blood sampling period was about 6 months from May, 1991 and the summarized results were as follows; 1. The mean value of Hb in male female were 14.55+/-1.81 g/dl and 12.61+/-1.81 g/dl respectively and there was statistically significant difference(p<0.05). 2. The mean value of ZPP in pre-schoolchildren was 37.49+/-13.31 microgram/dl for male, 35.77+/-11.85 microgram/dl for female and that of ZPP in after 7 years groups was 31.91+/-8.23 microgram/dl for male, 30.11+/-9.11 microgram/dl for female and there was statistically significant difference(p<0.05). 3. The mean value of PbB in pre-schoolchildren was 25.10+/-5.21 microgram/dl for male, 24.45+/-4.18 microgram/dl for female and that of PbB in after 7 years groups was 24.28+/-3.00 microgram/dl for male, 21.99+/-5.05 microgram/dl for female and there was statistically significant difference(p<0.05).
Summary
Cohort Observafion of Blood Lead Concentration of Storage Battery Workers.
Chang Yoon Kim, Jung Man Kim, Gu Wung Han, Jung Han Park
Korean J Prev Med. 1990;23(3):324-337.
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AbstractAbstract PDF
To assess the effectiveness of the interventions in working environment and personal hygiene for the occupational exposure to the lead, 156 workers (116 exposed subjects and 40 controls) of a newly established battery factory were examined for their blood lead concentration (Pb-B) in every 3 months up to 18 months. Air lean concentration (Pb-A) of the workplaces was also checked for 3 times in 6 months interval from August 1987. Environmental intervention included the local exhaust ventilation and vacuum cleaning of the floor. Intervention of the personal hygiene included the daily change of clothes, compulsory shower after work and hand washing before meal, prohibition of cigarette smoking and food consumption at the work site and wearing mask. Mean Pb-B of the controls was 21.97 +/- 33.6 microgram/dl at the preemployment examination and slightly increased to 22.75 +/- 3.38 microgram/dl after 6 months. Mean Pb-B of the workers who were employed before the factory was in operation (Group A) was 20.49 +/- 3.84 microgram/dl on employment and it was increased to 23.90 +/- 5.30 microgram/dl after 3 months <(P<0.01). Pb-B was increased to 28.84 +/- 5.76 microgram/dl 6 months after the employment which was 1 month after the initiation of intervention program. It did not increase thereafter and ranged between 26.83 microgram/dl and 28.28 microgram/dl in the subsequent 4 tests. Mean Pb-B of the workers who were employed after the factory had been operation but before the intervention program was initiated (Group B) was 16.58 +/- 4.53 microgram/dl before the exposure and it was increased to 28.82 +/- 5.66 microgram/dl (P<0.01) in 3 months later (1 month after the intervention). The values of subsequent 4 tests remained between 26.46 and 28.54 microgram/dl. Mean Pb-B of the workers who were employed after intervention program had been started (Group C) was 19.45 +/- 3.44 microgram/dl at the preemployment examination and gradually increased to 22.70 +/- 4.55 microgram/dl after 3 months (P<0.01), 23.68 +/- 4.18 microgram/dl after 6 months, and 24.42 +/- 3.60 microgram/dl after 9 months. Work stations were classified into 4 parts according to Pb-A. The Pb-A of part I, the highest areas, were 0.365 mg/m3, and after intervention the levels were decreased to 0.216 mg/m3 and 0.208 mg/m3 in follow-up tests. The Pb-A of part II was decreased from 0.232 mg/m3 to 0.148 mg/m3, and 0.120 mg/m3 after the invention. Pb-A of part III and IV was tested only after intervention and the Pb-A of part III were 0.124 mg/m3 in January 1988 and 0.081 mg/m3 in August 1988. The Pb-A of part IV, not stationed at one place but moving around, was 0.110 mg/m3 in August 1988. There was no consistent relationship between Pb-B and Pb-A. Pb-B of the group A and B workers in the part of the highest Pb-A were lower than those of the workers in the parts of lower Pb-A. Pb-B of the workers in the part of the lowest Pb-A increased more rapidly. Pb-B of group C workers was the highest in part I and the lowest in part IV. These findings suggest that Pb-B is more valid method than Pb-A for monitoring the health of lead workers and intervention in personal hygiene is more effective than environmental intervention.
Summary

JPMPH : Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health