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Analysis of the Incidence of Macrosomia in Japan by Parental Nationalities at 5-year Intervals From 1995 to 2020
Tasuku Okui
J Prev Med Public Health. 2023;56(4):348-356.   Published online July 3, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.23.133
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  • 70 Download
  • 1 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Objectives
We investigated trends in the incidence rate of macrosomia and its association with parental nationalities using Vital Statistics data in Japan.
Methods
We used singleton birth data every 5 years from 1995 to 2020. The incidence rate of macrosomia was calculated according to specific attributes (maternal age, infant’s sex, parental nationalities, parity, and household occupation) over time (years). In addition, a log-binomial model was used to investigate the relationship between the incidence of macrosomia and the attributes. This study compared Korea, China, the Philippines, Brazil, and other countries with Japan in terms of parental nationalities. “Other countries” indicates countries except for Japan, Korea, China, the Philippines, and Brazil.
Results
The study included 6 180 787 births. The rate of macrosomia in Japan decreased from 1.43% in 1995 to 0.88% in 2020, and the decrease was observed across all parental nationalities. The rates for Japanese parents were the lowest values among parental nationalities during the timespan investigated. Multivariate regression analysis showed that mothers from Korea, China, the Philippines, Brazil, and other countries had a significantly higher risk of macrosomia than those from Japan (risk ratio, 1.91, 2.82, 1.59, 1.74, and 1.64, respectively). Furthermore, fathers from China, the Philippines, Brazil, and other countries had a significantly higher risk of macrosomia than those from Japan (risk ratio, 1.66, 1.38, 1.88, and 3.02, respectively).
Conclusions
The rate of macrosomia decreased from 1995 to 2020 in Japan for parents of all nationalities, and the risk of macrosomia incidence was associated with parental nationality.
Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Comparisons of the Rates of Large-for-Gestational-Age Newborns between Women with Diet-Controlled Gestational Diabetes Mellitus and Those with Non-Gestational Diabetes Mellitus
    Sirida Pittyanont, Narongwat Suriya, Sirinart Sirilert, Theera Tongsong
    Clinics and Practice.2024; 14(2): 536.     CrossRef
Socioeconomic Predictors of Diabetes Mortality in Japan: An Ecological Study Using Municipality-specific Data
Tasuku Okui
J Prev Med Public Health. 2021;54(5):352-359.   Published online August 14, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.21.215
  • 3,471 View
  • 139 Download
  • 3 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Objectives
The aim of this study was to examine the geographic distribution of diabetes mortality in Japan and identify socioeconomic factors affecting differences in municipality-specific diabetes mortality.
Methods
Diabetes mortality data by year and municipality from 2013 to 2017 were extracted from Japanese Vital Statistics, and the socioeconomic characteristics of municipalities were obtained from government statistics. We calculated the standardized mortality ratio (SMR) of diabetes for each municipality using the empirical Bayes method and represented geographic differences in SMRs in a map of Japan. Multiple linear regression was conducted to identify the socioeconomic factors affecting differences in SMR. Statistically significant socioeconomic factors were further assessed by calculating the relative risk of mortality of quintiles of municipalities classified according to the degree of each socioeconomic factor using Poisson regression analysis.
Results
The geographic distribution of diabetes mortality differed by gender. Of the municipality-specific socioeconomic factors, high rates of single-person households and unemployment and a high number of hospital beds were associated with a high SMR for men. High rates of fatherless households and blue-collar workers were associated with a high SMR for women, while high taxable income per-capita income and total population were associated with low SMR for women. Quintile analysis revealed a complex relationship between taxable income and mortality for women. The mortality risk of quintiles with the highest and lowest taxable per-capita income was significantly lower than that of the middle-income quintile.
Conclusions
Socioeconomic factors of municipalities in Japan were found to affect geographic differences in diabetes mortality.
Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Worldwide burden and trends of diabetes among people aged 70 years and older, 1990–2019: A systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2019
    Shimin Jiang, Tianyu Yu, Dingxin Di, Ying Wang, Wenge Li
    Diabetes/Metabolism Research and Reviews.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • The Effect of Neighborhood Deprivation on Mortality in Newly Diagnosed Diabetes Patients: A Countrywide Population-Based Korean Retrospective Cohort Study, 2002–2013
    Kyoung-Hee Cho, Juyeong Kim, Young Choi, Tae-Hyun Kim
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2022; 19(7): 4324.     CrossRef
  • Depression, cognitive dysfunction and other factors associated with 5-year overall mortality in type 2 diabetes mellitus: a pilot prospective observational study
    E. G. Starostina, M. N. Volodina, I. V. Starostin
    Diabetes mellitus.2022; 25(4): 327.     CrossRef
Accuracy of the Registered Cause of Death in a County and its Related Factors.
Eun Kyung Chung, Hee Young Shin, Jun Ho Shin, Hae Sung Nam, So Yeon Ryu, Jeong Soo Im, Jung Ae Rhee
Korean J Prev Med. 2002;35(2):153-159.
  • 2,217 View
  • 36 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
To evaluate the accuracy of the registered cause of death in a county and its related factors. METHODS: The data used in this study was based on 504 cases, in a county of Chonnam province, registered between January and December 1998. Study subjects consisted of 388 of the 504 cases, and their causes of death were established by an interview survey of the next of kin or neighbor and medical record surveys. We compared the registered cause of death with the confirmed cause of death, determined by surveys and medical records, and evaluated the factors associated with the accuracy of the registered cause of death. RESULTS: 62.6% of the deaths were concordant with 19 Chapters classification of cause of death. external causes of mortality, endocrine, nutritional and metabolic diseases, neoplasms and diseases of the circulatory system showed the good agreement between the registered cause of death and the confirmed cause of death. The factors relating to the accuracy of the registered cause of death were the doctors' diagnosis for the cause of death (adjusted Odds Ratio: 2.67, 95% Confidence Interval: 1.21-5.89) and the grade of the public officials in charge of the death registry (adjusted Odds Ratio: 0.30, 95% CI= 0.12-0.78). CONCLUSIONS: The accuracy of the registered cause of death was not high. It could be improved by using the doctors' diagnosis for death and improving the job specification for public officials who deal with death registration.
Summary

JPMPH : Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health