Skip Navigation
Skip to contents

JPMPH : Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health

OPEN ACCESS
SEARCH
Search

Search

Page Path
HOME > Search
4 "Tobacco control"
Filter
Filter
Article category
Keywords
Publication year
Authors
Funded articles
Perspective
Epidemiological Model for Conventional Tobacco Control Measures and Tobacco Endgame Policies
Heewon Kang, Sung-il Cho
J Prev Med Public Health. 2023;56(5):481-484.   Published online September 26, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.23.239
  • 686 View
  • 73 Download
  • 1 Crossref
AbstractAbstract AbstractSummary PDFSupplementary Material
Epidemiological models, also known as host-agent-vector-environment models, are utilized in public health to gain insights into disease occurrence and to formulate intervention strategies. In this paper, we propose an epidemiological model that incorporates both conventional measures and tobacco endgame policies. Our model suggests that conventional measures focus on relationships among agent-vector-host-environment components, whereas endgame policies inherently aim to change or eliminate those components at a fundamental level. We also found that the vector (tobacco industry) and environment (physical and social surroundings) components were insufficiently researched or controlled by both conventional measures and tobacco endgame policies. The use of an epidemiological model for tobacco control and the tobacco endgame is recommended to identify areas that require greater effort and to develop effective intervention measures.
Summary
Korean summary
이 연구는 기존의 담배규제와 관련된 역학 모형을 확장하여 담배 수요를 줄이기 위한 조치인 MPOWER 정책과 담배 종결전의 주요 정책을 아우르는 개념적 모형을 제시하였다. 각 정책을 개념적 모형 내 배치한 결과, MPOWER 정책은 모형 내 구성요소 간의 연결을 끊는 것을 목표로 하는 반면, 종결전 정책은 모형 내 요소들을 영구적으로 변화시키거나 제거하려는 특성을 가지고 있는 것으로 나타났다. 담배규제정책이 개체, 병원체, 벡터 및 환경 요소에 대한 균형 잡힌 포트폴리오를 갖추고 있는지 평가하기 위해 이 개념적 모형을 활용할 수 있다.
Key Message
We extended the conceptual epidemiological model for tobacco control by incorporating measures to reduce the demand for tobacco (MPOWER measures) and key endgame policies. The model suggests that MPOWER measures focus on disconnecting the relationships between model components, while endgame policies aim to permanently change or eliminate the components themselves. This model can be used to examine whether a country or jurisdiction's tobacco control policy maintains a balanced portfolio across agent, host, vector, and environmental factors.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Public support for tobacco endgame policies in South Korea: Findings from the 2020 International Tobacco Control Korea Survey
    Heewon Kang, Wonjeong Yoon, Hong Gwan Seo, Sungkyu Lee, Sujin Lim, Gil-yong Kim, Su Young Kim, Steve S Xu, Mi Yan, Anne C K Quah, Janet Chung-Hall, Lorraine V Craig, Coral E Gartner, Geoffrey T Fong, Sung-il Cho
    Tobacco Control.2024; : tc-2023-058454.     CrossRef
Original Article
Tobacco Control Stakeholder Perspectives on the Future of Tobacco Marketing Regulation in Indonesia: A Modified Delphi Study
Putu Ayu Swandewi Astuti, Mary Assunta, Becky Freeman
J Prev Med Public Health. 2021;54(5):330-339.   Published online August 26, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.21.181
  • 4,083 View
  • 110 Download
  • 1 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Objectives
Tobacco control in Indonesia is very lenient compared to international standards. This study explored the perspectives of tobacco control stakeholders (TCSs) on the likelihood of advancing tobacco marketing regulation in Indonesia.
Methods
Data were collected from TCSs who were members of the Indonesia Tobacco Control Network group in a modified Delphi study. We collected the data in 2 waves using a questionnaire that comprised a set of closed and open-ended questions. For this paper, we analysed 2 of the 3 sections of the questionnaire: (1) tobacco advertising, promotions, and sponsorship (TAPS) bans, and (2) marketing and retailing regulations. We conducted a descriptive analysis of the scores using Stata/IC.13 and summarised the comments for each item.
Results
The TCSs viewed the measures/strategies across all aspects of TAPS and tobacco marketing regulation as highly desirable, but provided varied responses on their feasibility. They rated political feasibility lower than technical feasibility for most measures. Advancing TAPS measures and prohibition of selling to minors were considered more attainable by sub-national governments, while prohibition of tobacco corporate social responsibility was considered as the least feasible measure in the next 5 years.
Conclusions
Despite little optimism for substantial national-level change, there is a positive expectation that sub-national governments will strengthen their tobacco control regulation. It is paramount that the government reduce tobacco industry leverage by implementing Article 5.3 of the World Health Organization Framework Convention on Tobacco Control. Extending advocacy networks beyond tobacco control groups and framing tobacco control more effectively are necessary steps.
Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Achieving a tobacco-free Bangladesh by 2040: a qualitative analysis of the tobacco advertising environment and prohibitions in Bangladesh
    Arsenios Tselengidis, Sally Adams, Becky Freeman, Syed Mahbubul Alam, Putu Ayu Swandewi Astuti, Jo Cranwell
    BMJ Open.2023; 13(5): e069620.     CrossRef
Brief Report
Monitoring Compliance and Examining Challenges of a Smoke-free Policy in Jayapura, Indonesia
Wahyuti Wahyuti, Suci Hasairin, Sherly Mamoribo, Abdillah Ahsan, Dian Kusuma
J Prev Med Public Health. 2019;52(6):427-432.   Published online November 22, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.19.240
  • 5,796 View
  • 140 Download
  • 11 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
In Indonesia, 61 million adults smoked in 2018 and 59 million were exposed to secondhand smoke at offices or restaurants in 2011. The Presidential Decree 109/2012 encouraged local governments to implement smoke-free policy (SFP) with Jayapura city enacted a local bill (1/2015) in 2015. Objective: This study aims to evaluate the compliance and explore the challenges in implementing. Methods: We conducted a mixed-methods study. The quantitative method assessed the compliance to six criteria (as per the bill) including having signage, no smoking activity, no selling, no advertisement, no smoke, and no ashtray at SFP facilities. We surveyed 192 facilities including health facilities, educational facilities, places of worship, government offices, and indoor/outdoor public facilities. The qualitative method explored challenges in implementing through by interviewing 19 informants (government officers, students and community). Results: The compliance rate to all six criteria was 17% overall, ranging from 0% at outdoor public facilities to 50% at health facilities. We found no spatial patterning as shown by similar compliance rates between SFP facilities within and outside of 1-kilometer around the provincial and city health offices. Implementation challenges included (a) limited budget for enforcement, (b) lack of support from local non-government organizations and universities, (c) lack of public awareness at facilities, and (c) lack of examples from local leaders. Conclusion: The overall compliance was low in Jayapura city due to many challenges. This provides lessons learnt for tobacco control policy in the areas that are least developed and farthest from the central government.
Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • State of the literature discussing smoke-free policies globally: A narrative review
    Jacqueline A. Teed, Meagan O. Robichaud, Michelle Duren, Hebe N. Gouda, Ryan David Kennedy
    Tobacco Induced Diseases.2024; 22(January): 1.     CrossRef
  • Barriers and opportunities for improving smoke-free area implementation in Banda Aceh city, Indonesia: a qualitative study
    Sofyan Sufri, Nurhasanah Nurhasanah, Abdillah Ahsan, Irwan Saputra, Misbahul Jannah, Cut Meurah Yeni, Ainal Mardhiah, Saiful Bakri, Said Usman
    BMJ Open.2023; 13(12): e072312.     CrossRef
  • Compliance With Tobacco Control Policy and Visibility of Cigarette Retailers Around Educational Facilities in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
    Hala AlJishi, Dian Kusuma, Alaa AlQurashi, Ali AlFaiz, Abdulaziz AlSaad, Maha Aljishi
    Frontiers in Public Health.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • The Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (FCTC) and implementation of tobacco control policies: Lessons learned from Indonesia and Thailand
    Faizal Rahmanto Moeis, Renny Nurhasana, Fandy Rahardi, Danty Novitasari, Ni Made Shellasih, Inayati, Murwendah, Paibul Suriyawongpaisal, Roengrudee Patanavanich, Suci Puspita Ratih
    World Medical & Health Policy.2022; 14(4): 750.     CrossRef
  • Worshippers smoking in mosques: Violation of fatwas of ulemas and governor regulation
    Watni Marpaung, Muhammad A. Adly, Rustam Rustam, Akmaluddin Syahputra, Putra A. Siregar, Syahrial Arif Hutagalung, Muhammad S.A. Nasution, Fitri Hayati, Rahmad Efendi, Dhiauddin Tanjung
    HTS Teologiese Studies / Theological Studies.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Impact of price and non-price policies on household cigarette consumption and nutrient intake in smoking-tolerant Indonesia
    Triasih Djutaharta, Nachrowi Djalal Nachrowi, Aris Ananta, Drajat Martianto
    BMJ Open.2021; 11(1): e039211.     CrossRef
  • Is Youth Smoking Related to the Density and Proximity of Outdoor Tobacco Advertising Near Schools? Evidence from Indonesia
    Sri Handayani, Enny Rachmani, Kriswiharsi Kun Saptorini, Yusthin Merianti Manglapy, Nurjanah, Abdillah Ahsan, Dian Kusuma
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2021; 18(5): 2556.     CrossRef
  • Impact of an Inner-City Smoke-Free Zone on Outdoor Smoking Patterns: A Before–After Study
    Leonieke J Breunis, Metehan Bebek, Nazmi Dereci, Marlou L A de Kroon, Márta K Radó, Jasper V Been
    Nicotine & Tobacco Research.2021; 23(12): 2075.     CrossRef
  • Effect of tobacco outlet density on quit attempts in Korea: a multi-level analysis of the 2015 Korean Community Health Survey
    Jaehyung Kong, Sung-il Cho
    Epidemiology and Health.2021; 43: e2021048.     CrossRef
  • Removal of point-of-sale tobacco displays in Bogor city, Indonesia: A spatial analysis
    Bambang Priyono, Balqis Hafidhah, Wihardini Wihardini, Ramadhani Nuryunawati, Fathi Rahmadi, Dian Kusuma
    Tobacco Prevention & Cessation.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Improvement in Compliance With Smoke-Free Environment Regulations at Hotels and Restaurants in Vietnam After an Administrative Intervention
    Kim Bao Giang, Pham Bich Diep, Hoang Van Minh, Nguyen Thi Diem Huong, Nguyen Tuan Lam, Pham Quynh Nga, Momoe Takeuchi, Kidong Park
    Environmental Health Insights.2020; 14: 117863022093992.     CrossRef
Review
Cancer Control Programs in East Asia: Evidence From the International Literature
Malcolm A. Moore
J Prev Med Public Health. 2014;47(4):183-200.   Published online July 31, 2014
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2014.47.4.183
  • 14,913 View
  • 177 Download
  • 15 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Cancer is a major cause of mortality and morbidity throughout the world, including the countries of North-East and South-East Asia. Assessment of burden through cancer registration, determination of risk and protective factors, early detection and screening, clinical practice, interventions for example in vaccination, tobacco cessation efforts and palliative care all should be included in comprehensive cancer control programs. The degree to which this is possible naturally depends on the resources available at local, national and international levels. The present review concerns elements of cancer control programs established in China, Taiwan, Korea, and Japan in North-East Asia, Viet Nam, Thailand, Malaysia, and Indonesia as representative larger countries of South-East Asia for comparison, using the published literature as a guide. While major advances have been made, there are still areas which need more attention, especially in South-East Asia, and international cooperation is essential if standard guidelines are to be generated to allow effective cancer control efforts throughout the Far East.
Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Providing a framework for evaluation disease registry and health outcomes Software: Updating the CIPROS checklist
    Fatemeh Shafiee, Masoume Sarbaz, Parviz Marouzi, Alireza Banaye Yazdipour, Khalil Kimiafar
    Journal of Biomedical Informatics.2024; 149: 104574.     CrossRef
  • Cancer functional states-based molecular subtypes of gastric cancer
    Qi Zhou, Yiwu Yuan, Hao Lu, Xueqin Li, Ziyang Liu, Jinheng Gan, Zhenqi Yue, Jiping Wu, Jie Sheng, Lin Xin
    Journal of Translational Medicine.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Impact of interventions on the quality of life of cancer patients: a systematic review and meta-analysis of longitudinal research
    Long Bao Nguyen, Linh Gia Vu, Thanh Thien Le, Xuan Thanh Nguyen, Nam Gia Dao, Duy Cao Nguyen, Trang Huyen Thi Dang, Thuc Minh Thi Vu, Laurent Boyer, Guillaume Fond, Pascal Auquier, Carl A. Latkin, Melvyn W.B. Zhang, Roger C.M. Ho, Cyrus S.H. Ho
    Health and Quality of Life Outcomes.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Barriers to early detection and management of oral cancer in the Asia Pacific region
    Sin Wi Ng, Sharifah Nur Syamim Syed Mohd Sobri, Rosnah binti Zain, Thomas George Kallarakkal, Rahmi Amtha, Felix A Wiranata Wong, Jyotsna Rimal, Callum Durward, Chanbora Chea, Ruwan Duminda Jayasinghe, Patravoot Vatanasapt, Nor Saleha binti Ibrahim Tamin,
    Journal of Health Services Research & Policy.2022; 27(2): 133.     CrossRef
  • Diagnostic work-up and systemic treatment for advanced non-squamous non-small-cell lung cancer in four Southeast Asian countries
    R. Soo, L. Mery, A. Bardot, R. Kanesvaran, T.C. Keong, D. Pongnikorn, N. Prasongsook, S.H. Hutajulu, C. Irawan, A. Ab Manan, M. Thiagarajan, P. Sripan, S. Peters, H. Storm, F. Bray, R. Stahel
    ESMO Open.2022; 7(5): 100560.     CrossRef
  • Non-communicable disease policy implementation in Libya: A mixed methods assessment
    Luke N. Allen, Cervantée E. K. Wild, Giulia Loffreda, Mohini Kak, Mohamed Aghilla, Taher Emahbes, Atousa Bonyani, Arian Hatefi, Christopher Herbst, Haider M. El Saeh, Madhukar Pai
    PLOS Global Public Health.2022; 2(11): e0000615.     CrossRef
  • An analysis of policy and funding priorities of global actors regarding noncommunicable disease in low- and middle-income countries
    Kanykey Jailobaeva, Jennifer Falconer, Giulia Loffreda, Stella Arakelyan, Sophie Witter, Alastair Ager
    Globalization and Health.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Identification of gastric cancer subtypes based on pathway clustering
    Lin Li, Xiaosheng Wang
    npj Precision Oncology.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Evaluation of Absorbed Dose According to Nanoparticle Density During the Breast Cancer Brachytherapy
    Deuk-Hee Lee, Ji-Hee Nam, Jung-Hoon Kim
    Journal of Radiological Science and Technology.2019; 42(2): 131.     CrossRef
  • Cancers in Vietnam—Burden and Control Efforts: A Narrative Scoping Review
    Tung Pham, Linh Bui, Giang Kim, Dong Hoang, Thuan Tran, Minh Hoang
    Cancer Control.2019; 26(1): 107327481986380.     CrossRef
  • Undaria pinnatifida a Rich Marine Reservoir of Nutritional and Pharmacological Potential: Insights into Growth Signaling and Apoptosis Mechanisms in Cancer
    Abdul Rehman Phull, Song Ja Kim
    Nutrition and Cancer.2018; 70(6): 956.     CrossRef
  • Low prevalence of human mammary tumor virus (HMTV) in breast cancer patients from Myanmar
    Thar Htet San, Masayoshi Fujisawa, Soichiro Fushimi, Teizo Yoshimura, Toshiaki Ohara, Lamin Soe, Ngu Wah Min, Ohnmar Kyaw, Xu Yang, Akihiro Matsukawa
    Infectious Agents and Cancer.2017;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Molecular Phylogenetic Screening of Withania somnifera Relative From Indonesia Based on Internal Transcribed Spacer Region
    Topik Hidayat, Didik Priyandoko, Putri Yunitha Wardiny, Dina Karina Islami
    HAYATI Journal of Biosciences.2016; 23(2): 92.     CrossRef
  • Gastric Cancer in Asian American Populations: a Neglected Health Disparity
    Victoria M. Taylor, Linda K. Ko, Joo Ha Hwang, Mo-Kyung Sin, John M. Inadomi
    Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention.2015; 15(24): 10565.     CrossRef
  • Toward the Cure of All Children With Cancer Through Collaborative Efforts: Pediatric Oncology As a Global Challenge
    Carlos Rodriguez-Galindo, Paola Friedrich, Patricia Alcasabas, Federico Antillon, Shripad Banavali, Luis Castillo, Trijn Israels, Sima Jeha, Mhammed Harif, Michael J. Sullivan, Thuan Chong Quah, Catherine Patte, Ching-Hon Pui, Ronald Barr, Thomas Gross
    Journal of Clinical Oncology.2015; 33(27): 3065.     CrossRef

JPMPH : Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health