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Original Articles
The Effect of the Physical Factors of Parents and Children on Stunting at Birth Among Newborns in Indonesia
Kencana Sari, Ratu Ayu Dewi Sartika
J Prev Med Public Health. 2021;54(5):309-316.   Published online August 29, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.21.120
  • 5,248 View
  • 444 Download
  • 7 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
This study examined stunting at birth and its associations with physical factors of parents and children in Indonesia.
Methods
This study analyzed secondary data from the national cross-sectional Indonesian Basic Health Survey 2018, conducted across 34 provinces and 514 districts/cities. Birth length data were available for 756 newborns. Univariable, bivariable, and multivariable logistic regression analyses were performed to determine associations between the physical factors of parents and children and stunting at birth.
Results
In total, 10.2% of children aged 0 months were stunted at birth (10.7% of males and 9.5% of females). Stunting at birth was associated with the mother’s age at first pregnancy, parity, parents’ heights, parents’ ages, and gestational age. Children from mothers with short statures (height <145.0 cm) and fathers with short statures (height <161.9 cm) had an almost 6 times higher likelihood of being stunted at birth (adjusted odds ratio, 5.93; 95% confidence interval, 5.53 to 6.36). A higher maternal age at first pregnancy had a protective effect against stunting. However, other variables (firstborn child, preterm birth, and both parents’ ages being <20 or >35 years) corresponded to a 2-fold higher likelihood of stunting at birth compared to the reference.
Conclusions
These findings provide evidence that interventions to reduce stunting aimed at pregnant females should also consider the parents’ stature, age, and parity, particularly if it is the first pregnancy and if the parents are short in stature or young. Robust programs to support pregnant females and monitor children’s heights from birth will help prevent intergenerational stunting.
Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • How do household living conditions and gender-related decision-making influence child stunting in Rwanda? A population-based study
    Jean Nepo Utumatwishima, Ingrid Mogren, Aline Umubyeyi, Ali Mansourian, Gunilla Krantz, Olutosin Ademola Otekunrin
    PLOS ONE.2024; 19(3): e0290919.     CrossRef
  • Understanding Pediatric Health Trends in Papua: Insights From SUSENAS, RISKESDAS, Remote Sensing, and Its Relevance to Prabowo and Gibran’s Free Lunch and Milk Program
    Rezzy Eko Caraka, Khairunnisa Supardi, Puspita Anggraini Kaban, Robert Kurniawan, Prana Ugiana Gio, Yunho Kim, Syihabuddin Ahmad Mufti, Rung-Ching Chen, Muhammad Khahfi Zuhanda, Avia Enggar Tyasti, Noor Ell Goldameir, Bens Pardamean
    IEEE Access.2024; 12: 51536.     CrossRef
  • Stunting predictors among children aged 0-24 months in Southeast Asia: a scoping review
    Via Eliadora Togatorop, Laili Rahayuwati, Raini Diah Susanti, Julianus Yudhistira Tan
    Revista Brasileira de Enfermagem.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Stunting at birth: linear growth failure at an early age among newborns in Hawassa city public health hospitals, Sidama region, Ethiopia: a facility-based cross-sectional study
    Haileyesus Ejigu, Zelalem Tafese
    Journal of Nutritional Science.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Socio-economic and agricultural factors associated with stunting of under 5-year children: findings from surveys in mountains, dry zone and delta regions of rural Myanmar (2016–2017)
    Min Kyaw Htet, Tran Thanh Do, Thet Wah, Thant Zin, Myat Pan Hmone, Shahreen Raihana, Elizabeth Kirkwood, Lwin Mar Hlaing, Michael J Dibley
    Public Health Nutrition.2023; 26(8): 1644.     CrossRef
  • Predictor of Stunting Among Children 0-24 Months Old in Indonesia: A Scoping Review
    Via Eliadora Togatorop, Laili Rahayuwati, Raini Diah Susanti
    Jurnal Obsesi : Jurnal Pendidikan Anak Usia Dini.2023; 7(5): 5654.     CrossRef
  • Determinants of Incident Stunting in Elementary School Children in Endemic Area Iodine Deficiency Disorders Enrekang Regency
    Nur Abri, Saifuddin Sirajuddin, Burhanuddin Bahar, Nurhaedar Jafar, Syamsiar S. Russeng, Zakaria Zakaria, Veni Hadju, Abdul Salam, Abdul Razak Thaha
    Open Access Macedonian Journal of Medical Sciences.2022; 10(E): 161.     CrossRef
Factors Determining Children’s Private Health Insurance Enrolment and Healthcare Utilization Patterns: Evidence From the 2008 to 2011 Health Panel Data
Jawoon Shin, Tae-Jin Lee, Sung-il Cho, Seung Ah Choe
J Prev Med Public Health. 2015;48(6):319-329.   Published online November 16, 2015
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.15.057
  • 9,201 View
  • 104 Download
  • 4 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
Parental socioeconomic status (SES) exerts a substantial influence on children’s health. The purpose of this study was to examine factors determining children’s private health insurance (PHI) enrolment and children’s healthcare utilization according to PHI coverage.
Methods
Korea Health Panel data from 2011 (n=3085) was used to explore the factors determining PHI enrolment in children younger than 15 years of age. A logit model contained health status and SES variables for both children and parents. A fixed effects model identified factors influencing healthcare utilization in children aged 10 years or younger, using 2008 to 2011 panel data (n=9084).
Results
The factors determining children’s PHI enrolment included children’s age and sex and parents’ educational status, employment status, and household income quintile. PHI exerted a significant effect on outpatient cost, inpatient cost, and number of admissions. Number of outpatient visits and total length of stay were not affected by PHI status. The interaction between PHI and age group increased outpatient cost significantly.
Conclusions
Children’s PHI enrolment was influenced by parents’ SES, while healthcare utilization was affected by health and disability status. Therefore, the results of this study suggest disparities in healthcare utilization according to PHI enrollment.
Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Uptake and determinants of private health insurance enrollment in a country with heavily subsidised public healthcare: A cross-sectional survey in East Coast Malaysia
    Mohd Adli Abd Khalim, Surianti Sukeri, Gopal Ashish Sharma
    PLOS ONE.2023; 18(1): e0278404.     CrossRef
  • Equity in the public social healthcare protection in Tanzania: does it matter on household healthcare financing?
    Felician Andrew Kitole, Robert Michael Lihawa, Eliaza Mkuna
    International Journal for Equity in Health.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Does health insurance solve health care utilization puzzle in Tanzania?
    Felician Andrew Kitole, Robert Michael Lihawa, Thobias Edward Nsindagi, Felister Y. Tibamanya
    Public Health.2023; 219: 91.     CrossRef
  • Enrollment in Private Medical Insurance and Utilization of Medical Services Among Children and Adolescents: Data From the 2009-2012 Korea Health Panel Surveys
    Dong Hee Ryu, Sin Kam, Young-Taek Doo
    Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health.2016; 49(2): 118.     CrossRef
English Abstracts
Experience of Parent-related Negative Life Events, Mental Health, and Delinquent Behavior among Korean Adolescents.
Dong Sik Kim
J Prev Med Public Health. 2007;40(3):218-226.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2007.40.3.218
  • 4,970 View
  • 51 Download
  • 10 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
This study examined the relationship of parent-related negative life events with mental health and delinquent behaviors among Korean adolescents. METHODS: A total of 2,976 high school first-grade pupils (1,498 boys & 1,478 girls) taking part in the third wave of Korean Youth Panel Survey completed a self-administered questionnaire regarding parent-related life events, depressive feelings, suicidal ideation, delinquent behaviors, demographic characteristics, parental socioeconomic status, social support, and social capital. Data analyses were conducted using multivariate logistic regression. RESULTS: After adjusting for all covariates, the more parent-related negative life events adolescents experienced throughout their whole life, the more likely adolescent were to have mental and behavioral problems. A significant dose-response relationship between them was more clearly observed in girls than in boys. The experience of parentrelated negative events during childhood was significantly associated with suicidal ideation and delinquent behaviors for boys, and with depressive feelings for girls during adolescence. Indeed, parental social support, social capital, and having a close friend with delinquent behaviors, especially for girls, partially mediated the relationship between parent-related negative life events and both outcomes. CONCLUSIONS: The study showed a clear dose-response relationship of frequency of parent-related negative life events with poor mental and behavioral health for both genders. The residual effect of being exposed to parentrelated events during childhood on mental health and delinquent behaviors during adolescence still remained.
Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Inequalities in oral health among adolescents in Gangneung, South Korea
    Se-Hwan Jung, Myoung-Hee Kim, Jae-In Ryu
    BMC Oral Health.2018;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • The effects of negative life events in pre-adulthood on adulthood depression: Mediator effect of interpersonal maladjustment
    Joo Won Jung
    Korean Journal of Human Ecology.2014; 23(6): 999.     CrossRef
  • Parenting and Youth Psychosocial Well- Being in South Korea using Fixed-Effects Models
    Yoonsun Han, Andrew Grogan-Kaylor
    Journal of Family Issues.2013; 34(5): 689.     CrossRef
  • Alcohol and tobacco use among South Korean adolescents: An ecological review of the literature
    Jun Sung Hong, Na Youn Lee, Andrew Grogan-Kaylor, Hui Huang
    Children and Youth Services Review.2011; 33(7): 1120.     CrossRef
  • Intergenerational integration, social capital and health: a theoretical framework and results from a qualitative study
    Elza Maria de Souza
    Ciência & Saúde Coletiva.2011; 16(3): 1733.     CrossRef
  • Early Initiation of Alcohol Drinking, Cigarette Smoking, and Sexual Intercourse Linked to Suicidal Ideation and Attempts: Findings from the 2006 Korean Youth Risk Behavior Survey
    Dong-Sik Kim, Hyun-Sun Kim
    Yonsei Medical Journal.2010; 51(1): 18.     CrossRef
  • Differences in Knowledge and Attitudes Toward Hepatitis B Infection and Vaccination Between Adolescents in Juvenile Detention Centers and in Schools in South Korea
    Ok Lee, Hae Ok Lee, Susie Kim, Young Woo Kang, Moo Sik Lee, Su Jeong Han, Moon Sook Shim, Nam Yeong Yang
    Journal of Transcultural Nursing.2010; 21(1): 65.     CrossRef
  • Body Weight Perception, Unhealthy Weight Control Behaviors, and Suicidal Ideation Among Korean Adolescents
    Dong‐Sik Kim, Youngtae Cho, Sung‐Il Cho, In‐Sook Lim
    Journal of School Health.2009; 79(12): 585.     CrossRef
  • Body-Image Dissatisfaction as a Predictor of Suicidal Ideation Among Korean Boys and Girls in Different Stages of Adolescence: A Two-Year Longitudinal Study
    Dong-Sik Kim, Hyun-Sun Kim
    Journal of Adolescent Health.2009; 45(1): 47.     CrossRef
  • Body image dissatisfaction as an important contributor to suicidal ideation in Korean adolescents: Gender difference and mediation of parent and peer relationships
    Dong-Sik Kim
    Journal of Psychosomatic Research.2009; 66(4): 297.     CrossRef
Clustering of Metabolic Risk Factors and Its Related Risk Factors in Young Schoolchildren.
Kyoung Ae Kong, Bo Hyun Park, Jung Won Min, Juhee Hong, Young Sun Hong, Bo Eun Lee, Namsoo Chang, Sun Hwa Lee, Eun Hee Ha, Hyesook Park
J Prev Med Public Health. 2006;39(3):235-242.
  • 2,498 View
  • 37 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
We wanted to determine the distribution of the clustering of the metabolic risk factors and we wanted to evaluate the related factors in young schoolchildren. METHODS: A cross-sectional study of metabolic syndrome was conducted in an elementary school in Seoul, Korea. We evaluated fasting glucose, triglyceride, HDL cholesterol, blood pressures and the body mass index, and we used parent-reported questionnaires to assess the potential risk factors in 261 children (136 boys, 125 girls). We defined the metabolic risk factors as obesity or at risk for obesity (> or = 85th percentile for age and gender), a systolic or diastolic blood pressure at > or = 90th percentile for age and gender, fasting glucose at > or = 110 mg/dl, triglyceride at > or = 110 mg/dl and HDL cholesterol at @40 mg/dl. RESULTS: There were 15.7% of the subjects who showed clustering of two or more metabolic risk factors, 2.3% of the subjects who showed clustering for three or more risk factors, and 0.8% of the subjects who showed clustering for four or more risk factors. A multivariate analysis revealed that a father smoking more than 20 cigarettes per day, a mother with a body mass index of = 25 kg/m2, and the child eating precooked or frozen food more than once per day were associated with clustering of two or more components, with the odds ratios of 3.61 (95% CI=1.24-10.48), 5.50 (95% CI=1.39-21.73) and 8.04 (95% CI=1.67-38.81), respectively. CONCLUSIONS: This study shows that clustering of the metabolic risk factors is present in young schoolchildren in Korea, with the clustering being associated with parental smoking and obesity as well as the child's eating behavior. These results suggest that evaluation of metabolic risk factors and intervention for lifestyle factors may be needed in both young Korean children and their parents.
Summary

JPMPH : Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health