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Original Article
The Association Between Oxidative Stress and Depressive Symptom Scores in Elderly Population: A Repeated Panel Study
Changwoo Han, Youn-Hee Lim, Yun-Chul Hong
J Prev Med Public Health. 2016;49(5):260-274.   Published online August 23, 2016
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.16.029
  • 9,031 View
  • 212 Download
  • 12 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Objectives
Previous epidemiological studies about oxidative stress and depression are limited by hospital-based case-control design, single-time measurements of oxidative stress biomarkers, and the small number of study participants. Therefore, in this study, we analyzed the association between biomarker of oxidative stress and depressive symptom scores using repeatedly measured panel data from a community-dwelling elderly population.
Methods
From 2008 to 2010, a total of 478 elderly participants residing in Seoul, Korea, were evaluated three times. Participants underwent the Korean version of the Short Form Generic Depression Scale (SGDS-K) test for screening depression, and urinary malondialdehyde (MDA) levels were measured as an oxidative stress biomarker. We used a generalized estimating equation with a compound symmetry covariance structure to estimate the effects of oxidative stress on depressive symptom scores.
Results
A two-fold increase in urinary MDA concentration was significantly associated with a 33.88% (95% confidence interval [CI], 21.59% to 47.42%) increase in total SGDS-K scores. In subgroup analyses by gender, a two-fold increase in urinary MDA concentration was significantly associated with increased SGDS-K scores in both men and women (men: 30.88%; 95% CI, 10.24% to 55.37%; women: 34.77%; 95% CI, 20.09% to 51.25%). In bivariate analysis after an SGDS-K score ≥8 was defined as depression, the third and the fourth urinary MDA quartiles showed a significantly increased odds ratio(OR) of depression compared to the lowest urinary MDA quartile (third quartile OR, 6.51; 95% CI, 1.77 to 24.00; fourth quartile OR, 7.11; 95% CI, 1.99 to 25.42).
Conclusions
Our study suggests a significant association between oxidative stress and depressive symptoms in the elderly population.
Summary

Citations

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    Neurochemical Research.2023; 48(6): 1798.     CrossRef
  • Evaluation of the Physical Health and Dietary Intake of the Low-Income Elderly with Impaired Mobility for the Design of a Health Meals-on-Wheels Intervention Program in Seoul
    Hyeja Chang, Junghyun Kim, Chaewon Park
    Journal of the Korean Society of Food Science and Nutrition.2023; 52(7): 740.     CrossRef
  • Can tailored home-delivered meal services alleviate self-rated frailty of the low-income older adults in Korea?
    Junghyun Kim, Hyeja Chang
    Nutrition Research and Practice.2023; 17(5): 1007.     CrossRef
  • Exploring urinary biomarkers to assess oxidative DNA damage resulting from BTEX exposure in street children
    Ata Rafiee, Juana Maria Delgado-Saborit, Peter D. Sly, Hoda Amiri, Mohammad Hoseini
    Environmental Research.2022; 203: 111725.     CrossRef
  • Association of ambient air pollution with depressive and anxiety symptoms in pregnant women: A prospective cohort study
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  • Effects of cholecalciferol on behavior and production of reactive oxygen species in female mice subjected to corticosterone-induced model of depression
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    Naunyn-Schmiedeberg's Archives of Pharmacology.2020; 393(1): 111.     CrossRef
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    Environment International.2020; 136: 105448.     CrossRef
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    Neurology, Psychiatry and Brain Research.2020; 36: 65.     CrossRef
  • Changes in the concentrations of inflammatory and oxidative status biomediators (MIP-1 α, PMN elastase, MDA, and IL-12) in depressed patients with and without posttraumatic stress disorder
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    Pharmacological Reports.2018; 70(1): 110.     CrossRef
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    Journal of Epidemiology.2018; 28(6): 292.     CrossRef
  • Elevated serum levels of malondialdehyde and cortisol are associated with major depressive disorder: A case-control study
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    SAGE Open Medicine.2018; 6: 205031211877395.     CrossRef
  • Conditional Human Immunodeficiency Virus Transactivator of Transcription Protein Expression Induces Depression-like Effects and Oxidative Stress
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    Biological Psychiatry: Cognitive Neuroscience and Neuroimaging.2017; 2(7): 599.     CrossRef
Evaluation Studies
Stability and Intra-Individual Variation of Urinary Malondialdehyde and 2-Naphthol.
Kyoung Ho Lee, Daehee Kang
J Prev Med Public Health. 2008;41(3):195-199.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2008.41.3.195
  • 5,198 View
  • 82 Download
  • 10 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
Malondialdehyde (MDA), a lipid peroxidation by-product, has been widely used as an indicator of oxidative stress. Urinary 2-naphthol, a urinary PAH metabolite, is used as a marker of ambient particulate exposure and is associated with lung cancer and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. However, the stability and intra-individual variation associated with urinary MDA and 2-naphthol have not been thoroughly addressed. The objective of this study was to assess the stability and intraindividual variation associated with urinary MDA and 2-naphthol. METHODS: Urine samples were collected from 10 healthy volunteers (mean age 34, range 27~42 years old). Each sample was divided into three aliquots and stored under three different conditions. The levels of urinary MDA and 2-naphthol were analyzed 1) just after sampling, 2) after storage at room temperature (21degrees C) for 16 hours, and 3) after storage in a -20degrees C freezer for 16 hours. In addition, an epidemiological study was conducted in 44 Chinese subjects over a period of 3 weeks. The urinary MDA and 2-naphthol were measured by HPLC three times. RESULTS: There was no difference in the levels of urinary MDA and 2-naphthol between the triplicate measurements (n=10, p=0.84 and p=0.83, respectively). The intra-class correlation coefficients (ICC) for urinary MDA and 2-naphthol were 0.74 and 0.42, respectively. However, the levels of PM2.5 in the air were well correlated with the levels of both MDA and 2-naphthol in the epidemiological study. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that urinary MDA and 2-naphthol remain stable under variable storage conditions, even at room temperature for 16 hours, and indicate that these markers can be used in epidemiological studies involving various sample storage conditions. The intra-CC of urinary 2-naphthol and MDA were acceptable for application to epidemiological studies.
Summary

Citations

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  • Analysis of urinary metabolites of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and cotinine in pooled urine samples to determine the exposure to PAHs in an Australian population.
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    Environmental Research.2020; 182: 109048.     CrossRef
  • Urinary markers of oxidative stress respond to infection and late-life in wild chimpanzees
    Nicole Thompson González, Emily Otali, Zarin Machanda, Martin N. Muller, Richard Wrangham, Melissa Emery Thompson, Emmanuel Serrano
    PLOS ONE.2020; 15(9): e0238066.     CrossRef
  • Levels of malondialdehyde in the gastric juice: Its association with Helicobacter pylori infection and stomach diseases
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    Helicobacter.2018;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Mechanism of oxidative DNA damage induced by metabolites of carcinogenic naphthalene
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    Mutation Research/Genetic Toxicology and Environmental Mutagenesis.2018; 827: 42.     CrossRef
  • Simultaneous pentafluorobenzyl derivatization and GC-ECNICI-MS measurement of nitrite and malondialdehyde in human urine: Close positive correlation between these disparate oxidative stress biomarkers
    Erik Hanff, Michele F. Eisenga, Bibiana Beckmann, Stephan J.L. Bakker, Dimitrios Tsikas
    Journal of Chromatography B.2017; 1043: 167.     CrossRef
  • A longitudinal study of atrazine and 2,4‐D exposure and oxidative stress markers among iowa corn farmers
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  • Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (1-OHPG and 2-naphthol) and oxidative stress (malondialdehyde) biomarkers in urine among Korean adults and children
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    International Journal of Hygiene and Environmental Health.2012; 215(4): 458.     CrossRef
  • Determination of urinary malondialdehyde by isotope dilution LC-MS/MS with automated solid-phase extraction: A cautionary note on derivatization optimization
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    Free Radical Biology and Medicine.2011; 51(9): 1823.     CrossRef
  • Breast Cancer and Urinary Biomarkers of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon and Oxidative Stress in the Shanghai Women's Health Study
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JPMPH : Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health