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Original Articles
Associations of Workplace Violence With Cardiovascular Disease Among United States Workers: Findings From a National Survey
Zheyu Hu, Jian Li
J Prev Med Public Health. 2023;56(4):368-376.   Published online July 10, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.23.032
  • 1,318 View
  • 74 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
Recent research indicates a potential association between workplace violence and an increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in the working-age population. However, the relevant evidence in the United States is sparse. Thus, this study was conducted to explore the possible relationship between workplace violence and CVD among United States workers.
Methods
We utilized cross-sectional data from the 2015 National Health Interview Survey, which included a representative sample of 18 380 workers, to investigate the associations between workplace violence and the prevalence of CVD using logistic regression. Workplace violence was determined based on self-reported threats, bullying, or harassment at work over the past 12 months, supplemented with additional information regarding frequency. CVD included all forms of heart disease and stroke.
Results
A total of 1334 workers reported experiences of workplace violence, and 1336 workers were diagnosed with CVD. After adjustment for covariates, participants who reported any instance of workplace violence had significantly higher odds of having CVD (odds ratio [OR], 1.76; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.35 to 2.30) than those who reported no such violence. Furthermore, the highest odds of CVD (OR, 1.80; 95% CI, 1.23 to 2.63) were observed among those frequently exposed to workplace violence. Even occasional exposure to workplace violence was associated with 74% excess odds of CVD.
Conclusions
Our study indicates an association between workplace violence and CVD in United States workers, exhibiting a dose-response pattern.
Summary
Social Intelligence Counseling Intervention to Reduce Bullying Behaviors Among Thai Lower Secondary School Students: A Mixed-method Study
Samith Jueajinda, Orapin Stiramon, Chatchai Ekpanyaskul
J Prev Med Public Health. 2021;54(5):340-351.   Published online August 26, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.21.110
  • 6,202 View
  • 142 Download
  • 4 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
To develop and investigate the effectiveness of an integrative counseling intervention for enhancing social intelligence and reducing bullying behaviors among lower secondary school students in Bangkok, Thailand.
Methods
An interventional mixed-method design was employed in 2 phases. Phase 1 involved the development of a qualitative method-based integrative counseling program from key informants using the eclecticism technique. In phase 2, a randomized controlled trial with a wait-list control was conducted and qualitative research was performed with students who demonstrated bullying behaviors. Demographic data, Social Intelligence Scale (SIS) scores, and Bullying-Behavior Scale (BBS) scores were collected at baseline. Changes in SIS scores and qualitative findings obtained from in-depth interviews were examined after counseling ended, and BBS scores were collected again 1 month later.
Results
The developed social intelligence counseling program included eight 1-hour weekly sessions consisting of 3 components: (1) social awareness, (2) social information processing, and (3) social skills. After receiving this intervention, scores for the SIS overall (p<0.001) and all of its components (p<0.05) were significantly enhanced in the experimental group compared to the control group. Moreover, the mean BBS scores in the experimental group significantly decreased 1 month after counseling (p=0.001). With regard to the qualitative research results, the experimental students demonstrated improvements in all components of social intelligence.
Conclusions
The results indicated that a preventive counseling program may enhance social intelligence, decrease bullying behaviors among lower secondary school students, and prevent further incidents of school violence. However, further studies in various population subgroups should also be performed.
Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • The Effectiveness of School-Based Programs on Aggressive Behaviors among Children and Adolescents: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis
    Liangqi Shen, Shan Jiang, Shilin Tan
    Research on Social Work Practice.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Promoting Kindness Through the Positive Theatrical Arts: Assessing Kuwait’s Boomerang Programme
    Louise Lambert, Mohsen Joshanloo, Meg A. Warren, Kayla Christiani, Tim Lomas, Brettjet Cody, Intisar Al Sabah, Ali El Chalabi, Gaya Kruchlik
    Psychological Studies.2023; 68(1): 101.     CrossRef
  • The Relationship between Noise Exposure, Annoyance, and Loudness Perception and Cognitive-Social Performance of Mine Workers in 2022: A Descriptive study
    Rohollah Fallah Madvari, Hanie Dameshghi, Hamideh Bidel, Reyhane Sefidkar, Milad Abbasi, Ehsan Abouee, Mahdi Jafari Nodoushan
    Journal of Rafsanjan University of Medical Sciences.2023; 22(5): 507.     CrossRef
  • Hemispheric Cortical, Cerebellar and Caudate Atrophy Associated to Cognitive Impairment in Metropolitan Mexico City Young Adults Exposed to Fine Particulate Matter Air Pollution
    Lilian Calderón-Garcidueñas, Jacqueline Hernández-Luna, Partha S. Mukherjee, Martin Styner, Diana A. Chávez-Franco, Samuel C. Luévano-Castro, Celia Nohemí Crespo-Cortés, Elijah W. Stommel, Ricardo Torres-Jardón
    Toxics.2022; 10(4): 156.     CrossRef
School Violence, Depressive Symptoms, and Help-seeking Behavior: A Gender-stratified Analysis of Biethnic Adolescents in South Korea
Ji-Hwan Kim, Ja Young Kim, Seung-Sup Kim
J Prev Med Public Health. 2016;49(1):61-68.   Published online January 21, 2016
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.15.060
  • 11,842 View
  • 159 Download
  • 19 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
In South Korea (hereafter Korea), the number of adolescent offspring of immigrants has rapidly increased since the early 1990s, mainly due to international marriage. This research sought to examine the association between the experience of school violence and mental health outcomes, and the role of help-seeking behaviors in the association, among biethnic adolescents in Korea.
Methods
We analyzed cross-sectional data of 3627 biethnic adolescents in Korea from the 2012 National Survey of Multicultural Families. Based on the victim’s help-seeking behavior, adolescents who experienced school violence were classified into three groups: ‘seeking help’ group; ‘feeling nothing’ group; ‘not seeking help’ group. Multivariate logistic regression was applied to examine the associations between the experience of school violence and depressive symptoms for males and females separately.
Results
In the gender-stratified analysis, school violence was associated with depressive symptoms in the ‘not seeking help’ (odds ratio [OR], 7.05; 95% confidence interval [CI], 3.76 to 13.23) and the ‘seeking help’ group (OR, 2.77; 95% CI, 1.73 to 4.44) among male adolescents after adjusting for potential confounders, including the nationality of the immigrant parent and Korean language fluency. Similar associations were observed in the female groups. However, in the ‘feeling nothing’ group, the association was only significant for males (OR, 8.34; 95% CI, 2.82 to 24.69), but not females (OR, 0.77; 95% CI, 0.18 to 3.28).
Conclusions
This study suggests that experience of school violence is associated with depressive symptoms and that the role of victims’ help-seeking behaviors in the association may differ by gender among biethnic adolescents in Korea.
Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Meta-analysis of the relationship between bullying and depressive symptoms in children and adolescents
    Zixiang Ye, Dongmei Wu, Xiaoyan He, Qin Ma, Jianyan Peng, Guoju Mao, Lanling Feng, Yuhao Tong
    BMC Psychiatry.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Akran Şiddetine Maruz Kalma ve Öğrenmede Öz Düzenleme Değişkenleri Açısından Okul Öncesinde Okula Uyum
    Hülya GÜLAY OGELMAN, Seda SARAC, Döne KAHVECİ, Selay AKDOĞAN
    Ulusal Eğitim Akademisi Dergisi.2022; 6(1): 102.     CrossRef
  • The Moderating Effect of Help-Seeking on the Relationship between Experience of School Violence and Internalizing Behaviors
    Seon Ok Son, Hyunyong Park
    STRESS.2022; 30(1): 15.     CrossRef
  • The prevalence of sexual violence against female children: A systematic review and meta-analysis
    Xianguo Qu, Xin Shen, Ruihong Xia, Ji Wu, Yilei Lao, Min Chen, Yong Gan, Chunming Jiang
    Child Abuse & Neglect.2022; 131: 105764.     CrossRef
  • Association between parents’ country of birth and smoking risks in South Korean adolescents
    Minah Park, Seung Hoon Kim, Fatima Nari, Bich Na Jang, Eun-Cheol Park
    Scientific Reports.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Perceived friend support buffers against symptoms of depression in peer victimized adolescents: Evidence from a population-based cohort in South Korea
    L.C. Perret, M. Ki, M. Commisso, D. Chon, S. Scardera, W. Kim, R. Fuhrer, G. Gariépy, I. Ouellet-Morin, M-C. Geoffroy
    Journal of Affective Disorders.2021; 291: 24.     CrossRef
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    Anne Williford, Julia L. Sharp, Alex Fout, Casey Schafer, Xiaosong Shi, Debbie Isen
    Children and Youth Services Review.2021; 128: 106161.     CrossRef
  • An Investigation into Causes of Violence at Secondary Schools in Da Nang, Vietnam
    Phuong Thi Hang Nguyen, Dung My Le, Loan Thi Phuong Le
    International Journal Of Pharmaceutical Research And Allied Sciences.2021; 10(3): 112.     CrossRef
  • Gender differences in under-reporting hiring discrimination in Korea: a machine learning approach
    Jaehong Yoon, Ji-Hwan Kim, Yeonseung Chung, Jinsu Park, Glorian Sorensen, Seung-Sup Kim
    Epidemiology and Health.2021; 43: e2021099.     CrossRef
  • Sexual Violence against Children and Adolescents Taking Place in Schools: An Integrative Review
    Charlene de Oliveira Pereira, Renata Macedo Martins Pimentel, Francisco Naildo Cardoso Leitão, Sandra Dircinha Texeira de Araújo Moraes, Paula Christianne Gomes Gouveia Souto Maia, Everson Vagner de Lucena Santos, Maria Nathallya Rodrigues de Freitas, Gil
    Children.2020; 7(12): 258.     CrossRef
  • Associations between peer victimization and school climate: The impact of form and the moderating role of gender
    Anne Williford, Paula J. Fite, Debbie Isen, Jonathan Poquiz
    Psychology in the Schools.2019; 56(8): 1301.     CrossRef
  • Comparative Study of Mental Health States Among Adolescents in Multicultural Versus Monocultural Families, Using the 13th Korean Youth Risk Behavior Web-Based Survey, 2017
    Hae Jeong Lee, Cheol Hong Kim, Intae Han, Sung Hoon Kim
    Iranian Journal of Pediatrics.2019;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Association between Parents' Country of Birth and Adolescent Depressive Symptoms: the Early Stages of Multicultural Society
    Jieun Jang, Eun-Cheol Park, Sang Ah Lee, Young Choi, Yoon Soo Choy, Woorim Kim, Sung-In Jang
    Journal of Korean Medical Science.2018;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Taekwondo Training Improves Mood and Sociability in Children from Multicultural Families in South Korea: A Randomized Controlled Pilot Study
    Hee-Tae Roh, Su-Youn Cho, Wi-Young So
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    Subin Park, Minji Lee, Se Jin Park, Min Geu Lee
    Psychiatry Research.2018; 268: 373.     CrossRef
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    Jinwook Bahk, Agnus M. Kim, Young-Ho Khang
    BMC Public Health.2017;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Subin Park, Yeeun Lee, Hyesue Jang, Minkyung Jo
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JPMPH : Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health