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Special Article
Statin Intake and Gastric Cancer Risk: An Updated Subgroup Meta-analysis Considering Immortal Time Bias
Jong-Myon Bae
J Prev Med Public Health. 2022;55(5):424-427.   Published online August 18, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.22.209
  • 2,575 View
  • 92 Download
  • 1 Web of Science
  • 1 Crossref
AbstractAbstract AbstractSummary PDF
A retrospective record-linkage study (RLS) based on medical records containing drug prescription histories involves immortal time bias (ITB). Thus, it is necessary to control for this bias in the research planning and analysis stages. Furthermore, a summary of a metaanalysis including RLSs that did not control for ITB showed that specific drugs had a preventive effect on the occurrence of the disease. Previous meta-analytic results of three systematic reviews evaluating the association between statin intake and gastric cancer risk showed that the summary hazard ratio (sHR) of the RLSs was lower than 1 and was statistically significant. We should consider the possibility of ITB in the sHR of RLSs and interpret the results carefully.
Summary
Korean summary
이차자료를 활용하여 구축한 코호트 추적연구는 immortal time bias가 개입될 개연성을 염두에 두어야 한다. 이들 연구결과들을 제외한 메타분석 결과 스타닌 복용에 따른 위암발생 위험 감소는 관련성이 없다는 결과를 도출하였다.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Sodium-glucose cotransporter-2 inhibitors use and the risk of gout: a systematic review and meta-analysis
    Shih-Wei Lai, Bing-Fang Hwang, Yu-Hung Kuo, Chiu-Shong Liu, Kuan-Fu Liao
    Frontiers in Endocrinology.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
Original Article
Level of Agreement and Factors Associated With Discrepancies Between Nationwide Medical History Questionnaires and Hospital Claims Data
Yeon-Yong Kim, Jong Heon Park, Hee-Jin Kang, Eun Joo Lee, Seongjun Ha, Soon-Ae Shin
J Prev Med Public Health. 2017;50(5):294-302.   Published online July 20, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.17.024
  • 6,789 View
  • 177 Download
  • 13 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
The objectives of this study were to investigate the agreement between medical history questionnaire data and claims data and to identify the factors that were associated with discrepancies between these data types. Methods: Data from self-reported questionnaires that assessed an individual’s history of hypertension, diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia, stroke, heart disease, and pulmonary tuberculosis were collected from a general health screening database for 2014. Data for these diseases were collected from a healthcare utilization claims database between 2009 and 2014. Overall agreement, sensitivity, specificity, and kappa values were calculated. Multiple logistic regression analysis was performed to identify factors associated with discrepancies and was adjusted for age, gender, insurance type, insurance contribution, residential area, and comorbidities. Results: Agreement was highest between questionnaire data and claims data based on primary codes up to 1 year before the completion of self-reported questionnaires and was lowest for claims data based on primary and secondary codes up to 5 years before the completion of self-reported questionnaires. When comparing data based on primary codes up to 1 year before the completion of self-reported questionnaires, the overall agreement, sensitivity, specificity, and kappa values ranged from 93.2 to 98.8%, 26.2 to 84.3%, 95.7 to 99.6%, and 0.09 to 0.78, respectively. Agreement was excellent for hypertension and diabetes, fair to good for stroke and heart disease, and poor for pulmonary tuberculosis and dyslipidemia. Women, younger individuals, and employed individuals were most likely to under-report disease. Conclusions: Detailed patient characteristics that had an impact on information bias were identified through the differing levels of agreement.
Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • The agreement between diagnoses as stated by patients and those contained in routine health insurance data—results of a data linkage study
    Felicitas Vogelgesang, Roma Thamm, Timm Frerk, Thomas G. Grobe, Joachim Saam, Catharina Schumacher, Julia Thom
    Deutsches Ärzteblatt international.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Immeasurable Time Bias in Self-controlled Designs: Case-crossover, Case-time-control, and Case-case-time-control Analyses
    Han Eol Jeong, Hyesung Lee, In-Sun Oh, Kristian B. Filion, Ju-Young Shin
    Journal of Epidemiology.2023; 33(2): 82.     CrossRef
  • Feasibility of continuous distal body temperature for passive, early pregnancy detection
    Azure Grant, Benjamin Smarr, Dukyong Yoon
    PLOS Digital Health.2022; 1(5): e0000034.     CrossRef
  • Comparing self-reports to national register data in the detection of disabling mental and musculoskeletal disorders among ageing women
    Jeremi Heikkinen, Risto J. Honkanen, Lana J. Williams, Shae Quirk, Heikki Kröger, Heli Koivumaa-Honkanen
    Maturitas.2022; 164: 46.     CrossRef
  • Analytical Approaches to Reduce Selection Bias in As-Treated Analyses with Missing In-Hospital Drug Information
    Yeon-Hee Baek, Yunha Noh, In-Sun Oh, Han Eol Jeong, Kristian B. Filion, Hyesung Lee, Ju-Young Shin
    Drug Safety.2022; 45(10): 1057.     CrossRef
  • Trajectory and determinants of agreement between parental and physicians' reports of childhood atopic dermatitis
    Zhuoxin Peng, Stefanie Braig, Deborah Kurz, Johannes M. Weiss, Stephan Weidinger, Hermann Brenner, Dietrich Rothenbacher, Jon Genuneit
    Pediatric Allergy and Immunology.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • New methodological approaches were able to effectively reduce immeasurable time bias in case-only designs
    Han Eol Jeong, In-Sun Oh, Hyesung Lee, Kristian B. Filion, Ju-Young Shin
    Journal of Clinical Epidemiology.2021; 131: 1.     CrossRef
  • Association between domperidone use and adverse cardiovascular events: A nested case‐control and case‐time‐control study
    Sun Mi Shin, Han Eol Jeong, Hyesung Lee, Ju‐Young Shin
    Pharmacoepidemiology and Drug Safety.2020; 29(12): 1636.     CrossRef
  • Feasibility of continuous fever monitoring using wearable devices
    Benjamin L. Smarr, Kirstin Aschbacher, Sarah M. Fisher, Anoushka Chowdhary, Stephan Dilchert, Karena Puldon, Adam Rao, Frederick M. Hecht, Ashley E. Mason
    Scientific Reports.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Clinical outcomes of COVID-19 following the use of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin-receptor blockers among patients with hypertension in Korea: a nationwide study
    Ju Hwan Kim, Yeon-Hee Baek, Hyesung Lee, Young June Choe, Hyun Joon Shin, Ju-Young Shin
    Epidemiology and Health.2020; 43: e2021004.     CrossRef
  • The agreement between chronic diseases reported by patients and derived from administrative data in patients undergoing joint arthroplasty
    Bélène Podmore, Andrew Hutchings, Sujith Konan, Jan van der Meulen
    BMC Medical Research Methodology.2019;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Metformin combined with dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors or metformin combined with sulfonylureas in patients with type 2 diabetes: A real world analysis of the South Korean national cohort
    Yeon Young Cho, Sung-Il Cho
    Metabolism.2018; 85: 14.     CrossRef
  • Stroke at baseline of the Brazilian Longitudinal Study of Adult Health (ELSA-Brasil): a cross-sectional analysis
    Fernanda Gabriela de Abreu, Alessandra Carvalho Goulart, Marina Gabriela Birck, Isabela Martins Benseñor
    Sao Paulo Medical Journal.2018; 136(5): 398.     CrossRef
English Abstract
Strengthening Causal Inference in Studies using Non-experimental Data: An Application of Propensity Score and Instrumental Variable Methods.
Myoung Hee Kim, Young Kyung Do
J Prev Med Public Health. 2007;40(6):495-504.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2007.40.6.495
  • 4,922 View
  • 86 Download
  • 8 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
This study attempts to show how studies using non-experimental data can strengthen causal inferences by applying propensity score and instrumental variable methods based on the counterfactual framework. For illustrative purposes, we examine the effect of having private health insurance on the probability of experiencing at least one hospital admission in the previous year. METHODS: Using data from the 4th wave of the Korea Labor and Income Panel Study, we compared the results obtained using propensity score and instrumental variable methods with those from conventional logistic and linear regression models, respectively. RESULTS: While conventional multiple regression analyses fail to identify the effect, the results estimated using propensity score and instrumental variable methods suggest that having private health insurance has positive and statistically significant effects on hospital admission. CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrates that propensity score and instrumental variable methods provide potentially useful alternatives to conventional regression approaches in making causal inferences using non-experimental data.
Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Association between private health insurance and medical use by linking subjective health and chronic diseases
    Jeong Min Yang, Su bin Lee, Ye ji Kim, Douk young Chon, Jong Youn Moon, Jae Hyun Kim
    Medicine.2022; 101(32): e29865.     CrossRef
  • Gender-related difference in the relationship between smoking status and periodontal diseases: the propensity score matching approach
    Eun-Sil Choi, Hae-Young Kim
    Journal of Korean Academy of Oral Health.2017; 41(2): 122.     CrossRef
  • The Effect of Obesity on Medical Costs and Health Service Uses
    Da-Yang Kim, Jin-Mi Kwak, So-Young Choi, Kwang-Soo Lee
    The Korean Journal of Health Service Management.2017; 11(3): 65.     CrossRef
  • Effect of private health insurance on health care utilization in a universal public insurance system: A case of South Korea
    Boyoung Jeon, Soonman Kwon
    Health Policy.2013; 113(1-2): 69.     CrossRef
  • Health Disparities among Wage Workers Driven by Employment Instability in the Republic of Korea
    Minsoo Jung
    International Journal of Health Services.2013; 43(3): 483.     CrossRef
  • Survey of Editors and Reviewers of High-Impact Psychology Journals: Statistical and Research Design Problems in Submitted Manuscripts
    Alex Harris, Rachelle Reeder, Jenny Hyun
    The Journal of Psychology.2011; 145(3): 195.     CrossRef
  • Limitations of the SEER Database for Demonstrating Causal Relationships Between Treatments and Outcomes in Pediatric Intestinal Tumors
    Alysandra Lal, Dave R. Lal
    Journal of Surgical Research.2010; 161(2): 237.     CrossRef
  • Common statistical and research design problems in manuscripts submitted to high-impact psychiatry journals: What editors and reviewers want authors to know
    Alex H.S. Harris, Rachelle Reeder, Jenny K. Hyun
    Journal of Psychiatric Research.2009; 43(15): 1231.     CrossRef
Original Article
A Cohort Study on Risk Factors for Chronic Liver Disease: Analytic Strategies Excluding Potentially Incident Subjects.
Moo Song Lee, Dae Sung Kim, Dong Hyun Kim, Jong Myun Bae, Myung Hee Shin, Yoon Ok Ahn
Korean J Prev Med. 1999;32(4):452-458.
  • 2,086 View
  • 27 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
The authors conducted the study to evaluate bias when potentially diseased subjects were included in cohort members while analyzing risk factors of chronic liver diseases. METHODS: Total of 14,529 subjects were followed up for the incidence of liver diseases from January 1993 to June 1997. We have used databases of insurance company with medical records, cancer registry, and death certificate data to identify 102 incident cases. The cohort members were classified into potentially diseased group(n=2,217) when they were HBsAg positive, serum GPT levels higher than 40 units, or had or has liver diseases in baseline surveys. Cox' model were used for potentially diseased group, other members, and total subjects, respectively. RESULTS: The risk factors profiles were similar for total and potentially diseased subjects: HBsAg positivity, history of acute liver disease, and recent quittance of smoking or drinking increased the risk, while intake of pork and coffee decreased it. For the potentially diseased, obesity showed marginally significant protective effect. Analysis of subjects excluding the potentially diseased showed distinct profiles: obesity increased the risk, while quitting smoking or drinking had no association. For these intake of raw liver or processed fish or soybean paste stew increased risk; HBsAg positivity, higher levels of liver enzymes and history of acute liver diseases increased the risk. CONCLUSIONS: The results suggested the potential bias in risk ratio estimates when potentially diseased subjects were included in cohort study on chronic liver diseases, especially for lifestyles possibly modified after disease onset. The analytic strategy excluding potentially diseased subjects was considered appropriate for identifying risk factors for chronic liver diseases.
Summary

JPMPH : Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health