Skip Navigation
Skip to contents

JPMPH : Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health

OPEN ACCESS
SEARCH
Search

Search

Page Path
HOME > Search
6 "Won Mo Jang"
Filter
Filter
Article category
Keywords
Publication year
Authors
Original Article
Changes in the Hospital Standardized Mortality Ratio Before and During the COVID-19 Pandemic: A Disaggregated Analysis by Region and Hospital Type in Korea
EunKyo Kang, Won Mo Jang, Min Sun Shin, Hyejin Lee, Jin Yong Lee
J Prev Med Public Health. 2023;56(2):180-189.   Published online March 20, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.22.479
  • 1,732 View
  • 85 Download
AbstractAbstract AbstractSummary PDF
Objectives
The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has led to a global shortage of medical resources; therefore, we investigated whether COVID-19 impacted the quality of non-COVID-19 hospital care in Korea by comparing hospital standardized mortality rates (HSMRs) before and during the pandemic.
Methods
This retrospective cohort study analyzed Korean National Health Insurance discharge claim data obtained from January to June in 2017, 2018, 2019, and 2020. Patients’ in-hospital deaths were classified according to the most responsible diagnosis categories. The HSMR is calculated as the ratio of expected deaths to actual deaths. The time trend in the overall HSMR was analyzed by region and hospital type.
Results
The final analysis included 2 252 824 patients. In 2020, the HSMR increased nationwide (HSMR, 99.3; 95% confidence interval [CI], 97.7 to 101.0) in comparison to 2019 (HSMR, 97.3; 95% CI, 95.8 to 98.8). In the COVID-19 pandemic zone, the HSMR increased significantly in 2020 (HSMR, 112.7; 95% CI, 107.0 to 118.7) compared to 2019 (HSMR, 101.7; 95% CI, 96.9 to 106.6). The HSMR in all general hospitals increased significantly in 2020 (HSMR, 106.4; 95% CI, 104.3 to 108.5) compared to 2019 (HSMR, 100.3; 95% CI, 98.4 to 102.2). Hospitals participating in the COVID-19 response had a lower HSMR (HSMR, 95.6; 95% CI, 93.9 to 97.4) than hospitals not participating in the COVID-19 response (HSMR, 124.3; 95% CI, 119.3 to 129.4).
Conclusions
This study suggests that the COVID-19 pandemic may have negatively impacted the quality of care in hospitals, especially general hospitals with relatively few beds. In light of the COVID-19 pandemic, it is necessary to prevent excessive workloads in hospitals and to properly employ and coordinate the workforce.
Summary
Korean summary
코로나19 대유행 지역은 비감염 지역과 달리 2019년에 비해 2020년에 HSMR이 크게 증가했고, 상대적으로 병상 수가 적은 종합병원에서 HSMR이 증가했다. 코로나19 대응에 참여하는 병원은 병원 규모와 관계없이 HSMR이 낮은 경향을 보였다. 감염병 유행 시 병원의 과도한 업무량이 부여되지 않게하고 인력을 적절하게 고용하여 조정하는 것이 필요하다.
COVID-19: Perspective
New Obligations of Health Insurance Review and Assessment Service: Taking Full-fledged Action Against the COVID-19 Pandemic
Seung Mi Yoo, Seol Hee Chung, Won Mo Jang, Kyoung Chang Kim, Jin Yong Lee, Sun Min Kim
J Prev Med Public Health. 2021;54(1):17-21.   Published online January 26, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.20.594
  • 3,978 View
  • 183 Download
  • 3 Web of Science
  • 3 Crossref
AbstractAbstract AbstractSummary PDF
In 2020, the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has caused unprecedented disruptions to global health systems. The Korea has taken full-fledged actions against this novel infectious disease, swiftly implementing a testing-tracing-treatment strategy. New obligations have therefore been given to the Health Insurance Review and Assessment Service (HIRA) to devote the utmost effort towards tackling this global health crisis. Thanks to the universal national health insurance and state-of-the-art information communications technology (ICT) of the Korea, HIRA has conducted far-reaching countermeasures to detect and treat cases early, prevent the spread of COVID-19, respond quickly to surging demand for the healthcare services, and translate evidence into policy. Three main factors have enabled HIRA to undertake pandemic control preemptively and systematically: nationwide data aggregated from all healthcare providers and patients, pre-existing ICT network systems, and real-time data exchanges. HIRA has maximized the use of data and pre-existing network systems to conduct rapid and responsive measures in a centralized way, both of which have been the most critical tactics and strategies used by the Korean healthcare system. In the face of new obligations, our promise is to strive for a more responsive and resilient health system during this prolonged crisis.
Summary
Korean summary
건강보험심사평가원은 전 국민과 전체 요양기관의 축적된 정보, 전체 요양기관과 연결된 네트워크, 실시간 데이터 공유를 통해 이번 코로나19 위기 대응에 기여했다. 건강보험심사평가원은 1) 진단검사∙약제 등재, 2) 요양기관 내 고위험군 감지, 3) 마스크 중복구매 방지 시스템 구축, 4) 주요 보건의료자원 가동현황 모니터링 시스템 구축, 5) 환자관리 정보시스템 구축 및 익명화된 환자 데이터 공개로 국제협력연구 촉진의 다섯 가지 전략을 성공적으로 수행했다. 건강보험심사평가원은 현재의 보건위기 상황을 극복하고, 코로나19 시대 이후로도 새롭게 주어진 위기대응의 역할과 소명을 다할 것이다.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Precision public-health intervention for care coordination: a real-world study
    Andre Q Andrade, Jean-Pierre Calabretto, Nicole L Pratt, Lisa M Kalisch-Ellett, Vanessa T Le Blanc, Elizabeth E Roughead
    British Journal of General Practice.2023; 73(728): e220.     CrossRef
  • Effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on cardiovascular disease financing in Indonesia (JKN claims data analysis 2019–2020)
    Wahyu Pudji Nugraheni, Ekowati Retnaningsih, Rofingatul Mubasyiroh, Tety Rachmawati
    Frontiers in Public Health.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Detecting mpox infection in the early epidemic: an epidemiologic investigation of the third and fourth cases in Korea
    Taeyoung Kim, Eonjoo Park, Jun Suk Eun, Eun-young Lee, Ji Won Mun, Yunsang Choi, Shinyoung Lee, Hansol Yeom, Eunkyoung Kim, Jongmu Kim, Jihyun Choi, Jinho Ha, Sookkyung Park
    Epidemiology and Health.2023; 45: e2023040.     CrossRef
Original Article
Improving the Performance of Risk-adjusted Mortality Modeling for Colorectal Cancer Surgery by Combining Claims Data and Clinical Data
Won Mo Jang, Jae-Hyun Park, Jong-Hyock Park, Jae Hwan Oh, Yoon Kim
J Prev Med Public Health. 2013;46(2):74-81.   Published online March 28, 2013
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2013.46.2.74
  • 9,496 View
  • 75 Download
  • 6 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives

The objective of this study was to evaluate the performance of risk-adjusted mortality models for colorectal cancer surgery.

Methods

We investigated patients (n=652) who had undergone colorectal cancer surgery (colectomy, colectomy of the rectum and sigmoid colon, total colectomy, total proctectomy) at five teaching hospitals during 2008. Mortality was defined as 30-day or in-hospital surgical mortality. Risk-adjusted mortality models were constructed using claims data (basic model) with the addition of TNM staging (TNM model), physiological data (physiological model), surgical data (surgical model), or all clinical data (composite model). Multiple logistic regression analysis was performed to develop the risk-adjustment models. To compare the performance of the models, both c-statistics using Hanley-McNeil pair-wise testing and the ratio of the observed to the expected mortality within quartiles of mortality risk were evaluated to assess the abilities of discrimination and calibration.

Results

The physiological model (c=0.92), surgical model (c=0.92), and composite model (c=0.93) displayed a similar improvement in discrimination, whereas the TNM model (c=0.87) displayed little improvement over the basic model (c=0.86). The discriminatory power of the models did not differ by the Hanley-McNeil test (p>0.05). Within each quartile of mortality, the composite and surgical models displayed an expected mortality ratio close to 1.

Conclusions

The addition of clinical data to claims data efficiently enhances the performance of the risk-adjusted postoperative mortality models in colorectal cancer surgery. We recommended that the performance of models should be evaluated through both discrimination and calibration.

Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Estimating postoperative mortality in colorectal surgery- a systematic review of risk prediction models
    Alexios Dosis, Jack Helliwell, Aron Syversen, Jim Tiernan, Zhiqiang Zhang, David Jayne
    International Journal of Colorectal Disease.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Modified Tumor Budding as a Better Predictor of Lymph Node Metastasis in Early Gastric Cancer: Possible Real-World Applications
    Kwangil Yim, Won Mo Jang, Sung Hak Lee
    Cancers.2021; 13(14): 3405.     CrossRef
  • Investigación epidemiológica en cáncer colorrectal: perspectiva, prospectiva y retos bajo la óptica de explotación del Big-Data
    J.M. García Torrecillas, M. Ferrer Márquez, Á. Reina Duarte, F. Rubio-Gil
    SEMERGEN - Medicina de Familia.2016; 42(8): 509.     CrossRef
  • Variation between Hospitals with Regard to Diagnostic Practice, Coding Accuracy, and Case-Mix. A Retrospective Validation Study of Administrative Data versus Medical Records for Estimating 30-Day Mortality after Hip Fracture
    Jon Helgeland, Doris Tove Kristoffersen, Katrine Damgaard Skyrud, Anja Schou Lindman, Alanna M Chamberlain
    PLOS ONE.2016; 11(5): e0156075.     CrossRef
  • Model for risk adjustment of postoperative mortality in patients with colorectal cancer
    K Walker, P J Finan, J H van der Meulen
    British Journal of Surgery.2015; 102(3): 269.     CrossRef
  • Problems With Public Reporting of Cancer Quality Outcomes Data
    Paul Goldberg, Rena M. Conti
    Journal of Oncology Practice.2014; 10(3): 215.     CrossRef
Special Article
Korean National Health Insurance Value Incentive Program: Achievements and Future Directions
Sun Min Kim, Won Mo Jang, Hyun Ah Ahn, Hyang Jeong Park, Hye Sook Ahn
J Prev Med Public Health. 2012;45(3):148-155.   Published online May 31, 2012
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2012.45.3.148
  • 9,959 View
  • 101 Download
  • 26 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF

Since the reformation of the National Health Insurance Act in 2000, the Health Insurance Review and Assessment Service (HIRA) in the Republic of Korea has performed quality assessments for healthcare providers. The HIRA Value Incentive Program (VIP), established in July 2007, provides incentives for excellent-quality institutions and disincentives for poor-quality ones. The program is implemented based on data collected between July 2007 and December 2009. The goal of the VIP is to improve the overall quality of care and decrease the quality gaps among healthcare institutions. Thus far, the VIP has targeted acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and Caesarian section (C-section) care. The incentives and disincentives awarded to the hospitals by their composite quality scores of the AMI and C-section scores. The results of the VIP showed continuous and marked improvement in the composite quality scores of the AMI and C-section measures between 2007 and 2010. With the demonstrated success of the VIP project, the Ministry of Health and Welfare expanded the program in 2011 to include general hospitals. The HIRA VIP was deemed applicable to the Korean healthcare system, but before it can be expanded further, the program must overcome several major concerns, as follows: inclusion of resource use measures, rigorous evaluation of impact, application of the VIP to the changing payment system, and expansion of the VIP to primary care clinics.

Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Relationship between patient outcomes and patterns of fragmented cancer care in older adults with gastric cancer: A nationwide cohort study in South Korea
    Dong-Woo Choi, Seungju Kim, Sun Jung Kim, Dong Wook Kim, Kwang Sun Ryu, Jae Ho Kim, Yoon-Jung Chang, Kyu-Tae Han
    Journal of Geriatric Oncology.2024; 15(2): 101685.     CrossRef
  • Effects of intensive care unit quality assessment on changes in medical staff in medical institutions and in-hospital mortality
    Seungju Kim, Gui Ok Kim, Syalrom Lee, Yong Uk Kwon
    Human Resources for Health.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Beta-blocker therapy in patients with acute myocardial infarction: not all patients need it
    Seung-Jae Joo
    Acute and Critical Care.2023; 38(3): 251.     CrossRef
  • Patient Perspectives of Chronic Disease Management and Unmet Care Needs in South Korea: A Qualitative Study
    Kyunghee Yi, Sujin Kim
    Journal of Patient Experience.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Epidemiological changes in cytomegalovirus end-organ diseases in a developed country: A nationwide, general-population-based study
    Seul Gi Yoo, Kyung Do Han, Kyoung Hwa Lee, Joohee Lim, Yeonju La, Da Eun Kwon, Sang Hoon Han
    Journal of Microbiology, Immunology and Infection.2022; 55(5): 812.     CrossRef
  • Improvement in Age at Mortality and Changes in Causes of Death in the Population with Diabetes: An Analysis of Data from the Korean National Health Insurance and Statistical Information Service, 2006 to 2018
    Eugene Han, Sun Ok Song, Hye Soon Kim, Kang Ju Son, Sun Ha Jee, Bong-Soo Cha, Byung-Wan Lee
    Endocrinology and Metabolism.2022; 37(3): 466.     CrossRef
  • Feasibility of Capturing Adverse Events From Insurance Claims Data Using International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision, Codes Coupled to Present on Admission Indicators
    Juyoung Kim, Eun Young Choi, Won Lee, Hae Mi Oh, Jeehee Pyo, Minsu Ock, So Yoon Kim, Sang-il Lee
    Journal of Patient Safety.2022; 18(5): 404.     CrossRef
  • Trends and disparities in avoidable, treatable, and preventable mortalities in South Korea, 2001-2020: comparison of capital and non-capital areas
    Sang Jun Eun
    Epidemiology and Health.2022; 44: e2022067.     CrossRef
  • Performance and Challenges in Implementing the National Quality Assessment Program
    Bo Yeon Kim
    Health Insurance Review & Assessment Service Research.2021; 1(1): 23.     CrossRef
  • The effect of pay for performance on income inequality between medical and non-medical staff
    Mohammad Mohammadi, Mehdi Yousefi, Amin Mohammadi, Elahe Pourahmadi, Hossein Ebrahimipour, Saeed Malek Sadati
    Journal of Health Administration.2021; 24(3): 43.     CrossRef
  • Cardiovascular and Bleeding Risks Associated With Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs After Myocardial Infarction
    Dong Oh Kang, Hyonggin An, Geun U Park, Yunjin Yum, Eun Jin Park, Yoonjee Park, Won Young Jang, Woohyeun Kim, Jah Yeon Choi, Seung-Young Roh, Jin Oh Na, Jin Won Kim, Eung Ju Kim, Seung-Woon Rha, Chang Gyu Park, Hong Seog Seo, Cheol Ung Choi
    Journal of the American College of Cardiology.2020; 76(5): 518.     CrossRef
  • Dilemmas Within the Korean Health Insurance System
    Donghwi Park, Min Cheol Chang
    Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health.2020; 53(4): 285.     CrossRef
  • Performance Pay in Hospitals: An Experiment on Bonus–Malus Incentives
    Nadja Kairies-Schwarz, Claudia Souček
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2020; 17(22): 8320.     CrossRef
  • Increased Age of Death and Change in Causes of Death Among Persons With Diabetes Mellitus From the Korean National Health Insurance and Statistical Information Service, 2006 to 2018
    Eugene Han, Sun Ok Song, Hye Soon Kim, Kang Ju Son, Sun Ha Jee, Bong-Soo Cha, Byung-Wan Lee
    SSRN Electronic Journal .2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Design and effects of outcome-based payment models in healthcare: a systematic review
    F. P. Vlaanderen, M. A. Tanke, B. R. Bloem, M. J. Faber, F. Eijkenaar, F. T. Schut, P. P. T. Jeurissen
    The European Journal of Health Economics.2019; 20(2): 217.     CrossRef
  • Accuracy of an administrative database for pancreatic cancer by international classification of disease 10th codes: A retrospective large-cohort study
    Young-Jae Hwang, Seon Mee Park, Soomin Ahn, Jong-Chan Lee, Young Soo Park, Nayoung Kim
    World Journal of Gastroenterology.2019; 25(37): 5619.     CrossRef
  • Relationship between nurse staffing level and adult nursing-sensitive outcomes in tertiary hospitals of Korea: Retrospective observational study
    Chul-Gyu Kim, Kyun-Seop Bae
    International Journal of Nursing Studies.2018; 80: 155.     CrossRef
  • Designing a Framework for “Iranian Pay for Performance” Program for Non-Medical Workforce in Hospitals
    Serajaddin Gray, Alireza Olyaee Manesh, Iraj Harirchi, Saharnaz Nedjat
    Health Scope.2018;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Caesarean Section Rates and Activity-Based Funding in Northern Norway: A Model-Based Study Using the World Health Organization’s Recommendation
    Jan Norum, Tove Elisabeth Svee
    Obstetrics and Gynecology International.2018; 2018: 1.     CrossRef
  • Pay-for-performance reduces healthcare spending and improves quality of care: Analysis of target and non-target obstetrics and gynecology surgeries
    Seung Ju Kim, Kyu-Tae Han, Sun Jung Kim, Eun-Cheol Park
    International Journal for Quality in Health Care.2017; 29(2): 222.     CrossRef
  • Impact of health insurance status changes on healthcare utilisation patterns: a longitudinal cohort study in South Korea
    Jae-Hyun Kim, Sang Gyu Lee, Kwang-Soo Lee, Sung-In Jang, Kyung-Hee Cho, Eun-Cheol Park
    BMJ Open.2016; 6(4): e009538.     CrossRef
  • Pay for performance in the inpatient sector: A review of 34 P4P programs in 14 OECD countries
    Ricarda Milstein, Jonas Schreyoegg
    Health Policy.2016; 120(10): 1125.     CrossRef
  • Association Between Results of Quality Assessment of Long‐Term Care Facilities and Hospital‐Acquired Pneumonia in Individuals with Stroke or Neurodegenerative Disease in Korea
    Seung J. Kim, Kyu‐Tae Han, Sun J. Kim, Eun‐Cheol Park
    Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.2016;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Association between human resources and risk of hospitalisation in end-stage renal disease outpatients receiving haemodialysis: a longitudinal cohort study using claim data during 2013–2014
    Hoon-Hee Choi, Kyu-Tae Han, Chung Mo Nam, Ki Tae Moon, Woorim Kim, Eun-Cheol Park
    BMJ Open.2016; 6(8): e011319.     CrossRef
  • Changes in Saturday outpatient volume and billings after introducing the Saturday incentive programme to clinics in South Korea: a longitudinal cohort study using claims data from 2012 to 2014
    Hyun Ji Ha, Kyu-Tae Han, Sun Jung Kim, Tae Yong Sohn, Byungyool Jeon, Eun-Cheol Park
    BMJ Open.2016; 6(6): e011248.     CrossRef
  • The Possibility of Expanding Pay-for-Performance Program as a Provider Payment System
    Byongho Tchoe, Suehyung Lee
    Health Policy and Management.2013; 23(1): 3.     CrossRef
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Effect of Repeated Public Releases on Cesarean Section Rates.
Won Mo Jang, Sang Jun Eun, Chae Eun Lee, Yoon Kim
J Prev Med Public Health. 2011;44(1):2-8.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2011.44.1.2
  • 5,325 View
  • 94 Download
  • 13 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
Public release of and feedback (here after public release) on institutional (clinics and hospitals) cesarean section rates has had the effect of reducing cesarean section rates. However, compared to the isolated intervention, there was scant evidence of the effect of repeated public releases (RPR) on cesarean section rates. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the effect of RPR for reducing cesarean section rates. METHODS: From January 2003 to July 2007, the nationwide monthly institutional cesarean section rates data (1 951 303 deliveries at 1194 institutions) were analyzed. We used autoregressive integrated moving average (ARIMA) time-series intervention models to assess the effect of the RPR on cesarean section rates and ordinal logistic regression model to determine the characteristics of the change in cesarean section rates. RESULTS: Among four RPR, we found that only the first one (August 29, 2005) decreased the cesarean section rate (by 0.81 percent) and continued to have an impact period through the last observation in May 2007. Baseline cesarean section rates (OR, 4.7; 95% CI, 3.1 to 7.1) and annual number of deliveries (OR, 2.8; 95% CI, 1.6 to 4.7) of institutions in the upper third of each category at before first intervention had a significant contribution to the decrease of cesarean section rates. CONCLUSIONS: We could not found the evidence that RPR has had the significant effect of reducing cesarean section rates. Institutions with upper baseline cesarean section rates and annual number of deliveries were more responsive to RPR.
Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Changes in cesarean section rate before and after the end of the Korean Value Incentive Program
    YouHyun Park, Jae-hyun Kim, Kwang-soo Lee
    Medicine.2022; 101(33): e29952.     CrossRef
  • Mechanisms and impact of public reporting on physicians and hospitals’ performance: A systematic review (2000–2020)
    Khic-Houy Prang, Roxanne Maritz, Hana Sabanovic, David Dunt, Margaret Kelaher, Lamberto Manzoli
    PLOS ONE.2021; 16(2): e0247297.     CrossRef
  • Ordinal classification of the affectation level of 3D-images in Parkinson diseases
    Antonio M. Durán-Rosal, Julio Camacho-Cañamón, Pedro Antonio Gutiérrez, Maria Victoria Guiote Moreno, Ester Rodríguez-Cáceres, Juan Antonio Vallejo Casas, César Hervás-Martínez
    Scientific Reports.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Is a hospital quality policy based on a triad of accreditation, public reporting and inspection evidence-based? A narrative review
    Astrid Van Wilder, Luk Bruyneel, Dirk De Ridder, Deborah Seys, Jonas Brouwers, Fien Claessens, Bianca Cox, Kris Vanhaecht
    International Journal for Quality in Health Care.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Impact of public release of performance data on the behaviour of healthcare consumers and providers
    David Metcalfe, Arturo J Rios Diaz, Olubode A Olufajo, M. Sofia Massa, Nicole ABM Ketelaar, Signe A. Flottorp, Daniel C Perry
    Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews.2018;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Non-clinical interventions for reducing unnecessary caesarean section
    Innie Chen, Newton Opiyo, Emma Tavender, Sameh Mortazhejri, Tamara Rader, Jennifer Petkovic, Sharlini Yogasingam, Monica Taljaard, Sugandha Agarwal, Malinee Laopaiboon, Jason Wasiak, Suthit Khunpradit, Pisake Lumbiganon, Russell L Gruen, Ana Pilar Betran
    Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews.2018;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Impact of State Reporting Laws on Central Line–Associated Bloodstream Infection Rates in U.S. Adult Intensive Care Units
    Hangsheng Liu, Carolyn T. A. Herzig, Andrew W. Dick, E. Yoko Furuya, Elaine Larson, Julie Reagan, Monika Pogorzelska‐Maziarz, Patricia W. Stone
    Health Services Research.2017; 52(3): 1079.     CrossRef
  • Effects of Korean hand acupressure on opioid-related nausea and vomiting, and pain after caesarean delivery using spinal anaesthesia
    Na Young Ahn, Hye-Ja Park
    Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice.2017; 28: 101.     CrossRef
  • Ordinal Regression Methods: Survey and Experimental Study
    Pedro Antonio Gutierrez, Maria Perez-Ortiz, Javier Sanchez-Monedero, Francisco Fernandez-Navarro, Cesar Hervas-Martinez
    IEEE Transactions on Knowledge and Data Engineering.2016; 28(1): 127.     CrossRef
  • Exploring the transparency mechanism and evaluating the effect of public reporting on prescription: a protocol for a cluster randomized controlled trial
    Xin Du, Dan Wang, Xuan Wang, Shiru Yang, Xinping Zhang
    BMC Public Health.2015;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Application of propensity scores to explore the effect of public reporting of medicine use information on rational drug use in China: a quasi-experimental design
    Xiaopeng Zhang, Lijun Wang, Xinping Zhang
    BMC Health Services Research.2014;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Changes in the Cesarean Section Rate in Korea (1982-2012) and a Review of the Associated Factors
    Sung-Hoon Chung, Hyun-Joo Seol, Yong-Sung Choi, Soo-young Oh, Ahm Kim, Chong-Woo Bae
    Journal of Korean Medical Science.2014; 29(10): 1341.     CrossRef
  • Managing the Primary Cesarean Delivery Rate
    DAVID WARE BRANCH, ROBERT M. SILVER
    Clinical Obstetrics & Gynecology.2012; 55(4): 946.     CrossRef
English Abstract
The Change in Readmission Rate, Length of Stay and Hospital Charge after Performance Reporting of Hip Hemiarthroplasty.
Won Mo Jang, Sang Jun Eun, Pilyoung Sagong, Chae Eun Lee, Moo Kyung Oh, Juhwan Oh, Yoon Kim
J Prev Med Public Health. 2010;43(6):523-534.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2010.43.6.523
  • 5,035 View
  • 46 Download
  • 1 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
We assessed impact of performance reporting information about the readmission rate, length of stay and cost of hip hemiarthroplasty. METHODS: The data are from a nationwide claims database, National Quality Improvement Project database, of Health Insurance Review & Assessment Service in Korea. From January 2006 to April 2008, we received information of length of stay, readmission within 30 days, cost of 22 851 hip hemiarthroplasty episodes. Each episodes has retained the diagnoses of comorbidities and demographics. We used time-series analysis to assess the shifting of patients selections, between high volume(over 16 operations in a year) and low volume institutions, after performance reporting (december 2007). The changes of quality (readmission, length of stay) and cost were evaluated by multilevel analysis with adjustment of patient's factors and institutional factors after performance reporting. RESULTS: As compared with the before performance reporting, the proportion of patients who choose the high volume institution, increased 3.45% and the trends continued 4 months at marginal significance (p=0.059). After performance reporting, national average readmission rate, length of stay were decreased by 0.49 OR (95% CI=0.25-0.95) and 10% (beta=-0.102 p<0.01) and cost was not changed (beta=-0.01, p<0.27). The high volume institutions were more decreased than low volume in length of stay. CONCLUSIONS: After performance reporting, readmission rate, length of stay were decreased and the patient selections were marginal shifted from low volume institutions to high volume institutions.
Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • The factors influencing variation by local areas in antibiotics prescription rate according to the public reporting
    Yu-Jin Chun, Chang-Yup Kim
    Health Policy and Management.2012; 22(3): 427.     CrossRef

JPMPH : Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health