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Original Article
Factors Influencing Vaccination in Korea: Findings From Focus Group Interviews
Bomi Park, Eun Jeong Choi, Bohyun Park, Hyejin Han, Su Jin Cho, Hee Jung Choi, Seonhwa Lee, Hyesook Park
J Prev Med Public Health. 2018;51(4):173-180.   Published online May 25, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.18.063
  • 10,652 View
  • 257 Download
  • 15 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
Immunization is considered one of the most successful and cost-effective public health interventions protecting communities from preventable infectious diseases. The Korean government set up a dedicated workforce for national immunization in 2003, and since then has made strides in improving vaccination coverage across the nation. However, some groups remain relatively vulnerable and require intervention, and it is necessary to address unmet needs to prevent outbreaks of communicable diseases. This study was conducted to characterize persistent challenges to vaccination.
Methods
The study adopted a qualitative method in accordance with the Consolidated Criteria for Reporting Qualitative Research checklist. Three focus group interviews were conducted with 15 professionals in charge of vaccination-related duties. The interviews were conducted according to a semi-structured guideline, and thematic analysis was carried out. Data saturation was confirmed when the researchers agreed that no more new codes could be found.
Results
A total of 4 main topics and 11 subtopics were introduced regarding barriers to vaccination. The main topics were vaccine hesitancy, personal circumstances, lack of information, and misclassification. Among them, vaccine hesitancy was confirmed to be the most significant factor impeding vaccination. It was also found that the factors hindering vaccination had changed over time and disproportionately affected certain groups.
Conclusions
The study identified ongoing unmet needs and barriers to vaccination despite the accomplishments of the National Immunization Program. The results have implications for establishing tailored interventions that target context- and group-specific barriers to improve timely and complete vaccination coverage.
Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Twenty Years of Progress and the Way Forward: Immunization Registry Information System in Korea
    Junghee Kim, Minju Song, Seohyeon Ahn, Seunghyun Lewis Kwon
    Journal of Korean Medical Science.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Parental intention to vaccinate daughters with the human papillomavirus vaccine in Korea: a nationwide cross-sectional survey
    Yejin Ha, Kyeongmin Lee, Bomi Park, Mina Suh, Jae Kwan Jun, Kui Son Choi
    Epidemiology and Health.2023; 45: e2023076.     CrossRef
  • Letter to the Editor: Effectiveness of the Varicella Vaccine Among Korean Children: Suggestions for Future Research
    BongKyoo Choi, Hyunjeong Cho, Younchul Shin, Eun-Kyoung Lee
    Journal of Korean Medical Science.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Vaccine hesitancy and emerging parental norms: A qualitative study in Taiwan
    Chen‐I Kuan
    Sociology of Health & Illness.2022; 44(3): 692.     CrossRef
  • Physical and mental health characteristics related to trust in and intention to receive COVID-19 vaccination: results from a Korean community-based longitudinal study
    Ye Jin Jeon, Youngrong Lee, Ji Su Yang, Young Su Park, Sun Jae Jung
    Epidemiology and Health.2022; 44: e2022064.     CrossRef
  • Vaccine Hesitancy and Concerns About Vaccine Safety and Effectiveness in Shanghai, China
    Abram L. Wagner, Zhuoying Huang, Jia Ren, Megan Laffoon, Mengdi Ji, Leah C. Pinckney, Xiaodong Sun, Lisa A. Prosser, Matthew L. Boulton, Brian J. Zikmund-Fisher
    American Journal of Preventive Medicine.2021; 60(1): S77.     CrossRef
  • Paradoxical health care utilization patterns among children in Korea who did not receive mandatory pneumococcal vaccination
    Sangho Sohn, Kwan Hong, Hari Hwang, Byung Chul Chun
    Vaccine.2021; 39(7): 1096.     CrossRef
  • Differential Demographic and Clinical Characteristics between MMR Vaccinated and Unvaccinated Children in South Korea: A Nationwide Study
    Dongwon Yoon, Juhwan Kim, Juyoung Shin
    Vaccines.2021; 9(6): 653.     CrossRef
  • Understanding parents’ views toward the newly enacted HPV vaccine school entry policy in Puerto Rico: a qualitative study
    Vivian Colón-López, Diana T. Medina-Laabes, Roxana Soto Abreu, Olga L. Díaz Miranda, Ana P. Ortiz, María E. Fernández, Pamela C. Hull
    BMC Public Health.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • The need for pertussis vaccination among older adults and high-risk groups: a perspective from advanced economies of the Asia Pacific region
    Leong Hoe Nam, Cheng-Hsun Chiu, Jung Yeon Heo, Margaret Ip, Ki-Suck Jung, Robert Menzies, Rodney Pearce, Philippe Buchy, Jing Chen, Michael Nissen, Kyu-Bin Oh
    Expert Review of Vaccines.2021; 20(12): 1603.     CrossRef
  • Comparison of the Seroprevalence of Measles Antibodies among Healthcare Workers in Two Korean Hospitals in 2019
    Yee Gyung Kwak, Je Eun Song, Gang-Bok Oh, In Hye Jeong, Chong Rae Cho, Namhee Kim, Hyeon Mi Yoo, Gyeong Min Yoo, Myung Jin Lee, Baek-Nam Kim
    Infection & Chemotherapy.2020; 52(1): 93.     CrossRef
  • Unvaccinated children as community parasites in National Qualitative Study from Turkey
    Sıddıka Songül Yalçin, Ayça Gelgeç Bakacak, Osman Topaç
    BMC Public Health.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Mapping global trends in vaccine confidence and investigating barriers to vaccine uptake: a large-scale retrospective temporal modelling study
    Alexandre de Figueiredo, Clarissa Simas, Emilie Karafillakis, Pauline Paterson, Heidi J Larson
    The Lancet.2020; 396(10255): 898.     CrossRef
  • Sustained Vaccination Coverage during the Coronavirus Disease 2019 Epidemic in the Republic of Korea
    Jeong Hee Yu, Hang jin Jeong, Seon Ju Kim, Jae Young Lee, Young June Choe, Eun Hwa Choi, En Hi Cho
    Vaccines.2020; 9(1): 2.     CrossRef
  • Why do some Korean parents hesitate to vaccinate their children?
    Kyujin Chang, Soon Young Lee
    Epidemiology and Health.2019; 41: e2019031.     CrossRef
English Abstract
Multiple Roles and Health among Korean Women.
Su Jin Cho, Soong Nang Jang, Sung Il Cho
J Prev Med Public Health. 2008;41(5):355-363.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2008.41.5.355
  • 5,196 View
  • 51 Download
  • 7 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
Most studies about multiple roles and women's health suggested that combining with paid job, being married and having children was more likely to improve health status than in case of single or traditional roles. We investigated whether there was better health outcome in multiple roles among Korean women coinciding with previous studies of other nations. METHODS: Data were from the 2005 Korea National Health & Nutritional Examination Survey, a subsample of women aged 25-59 years (N=2,943). Health status was assessed for self-rated poor health, perceived stress and depression, respectively based on one questionnaire item. The age-standardized prevalence of all health outcomes were calculated by role categories and socioeconomic status. Multiple logistic regression was used to assess the association of self rated health, perceived stress, and depression with multiple roles adjusted for age, education, household income, number of children and age of children. RESULTS: Having multiple roles with working role was not associated with better health and psychological wellbeing. Compared to those with traditional roles, employed women more frequently experienced perceived stress, with marital and/or parental roles. Non-working single mothers suffered depression more often than women with traditional roles or other role occupancy. Socioeconomic status indicators were potent independent correlates of self-rated health and perceived stress. CONCLUSIONS: Employment of women with other roles did not confer additional health benefit to traditional family responsibility. Juggling of work and family responsibility appeared more stressful than traditional unemployed parental and marital role in Korean women.
Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Comparison of Health Behaviors and Nutrient Intake according to Work Type among Women Aged 30-60 Years: Using Data from the Korea National Health and Nutrition Survey (2015-2018)
    Sol Lee, Bok-Mi Jung
    The Korean Journal of Community Living Science.2024; 35(1): 61.     CrossRef
  • Effects of Women’s Work-Family Multiple Role and Role Combination on Depressive Symptoms in Korea
    Ji-won Kang, Soong-nang Jang
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2020; 17(4): 1249.     CrossRef
  • Working Poverty and Health Disparities in Korean Workers
    Jin-Hwa Lee, Bokim Lee
    Journal of Korean Academy of Community Health Nursing.2020; 31(4): 514.     CrossRef
  • Relationship between the number of family members and stress by gender: Cross-sectional analysis of the fifth Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey
    Jin-Won Noh, Kyoung-Beom Kim, Jumin Park, Janghun Hong, Young Dae Kwon, Massimo Ciccozzi
    PLOS ONE.2017; 12(9): e0184235.     CrossRef
  • Unequal Geographic Distribution of Life Expectancy in Seoul
    Sangmi Kim, Seonju Yi, Meekyung Kim, Bokyung Kim, Hwayoung Lee, Taekryeon Jeon, Youngtae Cho
    Asia Pacific Journal of Public Health.2015; 27(2): NP1002.     CrossRef
  • Post‐partum blues among Korean mothers: A structural equation modelling approach
    Sung Suk Chung, Il Young Yoo, Kyoung Hwa Joung
    International Journal of Mental Health Nursing.2013; 22(4): 359.     CrossRef
  • Depression of married and employed women based on social-role theory
    Insook Cho, Sukhee Ahn, Souk Young Kim, Young Sook Park, Hae Won Kim, Sun Ok Lee, Sook Hee Lee, Chae Weon Chung
    Journal of Korean Academy of Nursing.2012; 42(4): 496.     CrossRef

JPMPH : Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health