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2 "Dong-Soo Shin"
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Original Articles
How Much Do Older Adults Living Alone in Rural South Korea Know About Dementia?
Mi Sook Kim, Dong-Soo Shin, Yong-jun Choi, Jin Soon Kim
J Prev Med Public Health. 2018;51(4):188-195.   Published online June 19, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.17.084
  • 6,016 View
  • 145 Download
  • 2 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
This study aimed to examine the level of dementia knowledge of older Korean adults living alone in rural areas and to identify related factors.
Methods
A cross-sectional descriptive design was applied. The participants were 231 older adults living alone who were recruited from 12 of the 13 primary health care posts in the rural area of Chuncheon. Participants’ level of dementia knowledge was assessed using the Dementia Knowledge Scale. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, and the t-test, analysis of variance, chi-square test, and Mann-Whitney test were applied.
Results
Participants’ mean age was 77.3±5.4 years, and women comprised 79.7% of the sample. Over half of the participants (61.9%) had no formal education, and all the participants were enrolled in Medical Aid. The participants’ average percentage of correct answers was 61.6%. The highest rate (94.4%) was for the item “Dementia can change one’s personal character.” The item with the lowest proportion of correct answers was “Dementia is not treatable” (23.4%). Dementia knowledge was significantly associated with age, education, health coverage, source of living expenses, and dementia risk.
Conclusions
Dementia knowledge among Korean rural older adults living alone was relatively low. Participants’ misconceptions about symptoms and treatment could hinder them from seeking early treatment. The results of this study suggest the need for active outreach and health care delivery for rural older adults living alone in South Korea.
Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Estimates of Long-Term Care Utilization and Lifetime Distribution of Medical Cost for Dementia in Korea
    Seok Jong Chung, Jee Eun Lee, Dong Wook Kim, So Ra Yoon, Dong Gyo Shin, Moon Young Choi, Jun Hong Lee
    Korean Journal of Clinical Geriatrics.2021; 22(1): 22.     CrossRef
  • The Changes for Strength of Oropharyngeal Muscles in Patients with Dementia and Dysphagia
    Eun Kyu Ji, Hae Hyun Wang, Sung June Jung, Kyoung Bo Lee, Joon Sung Kim, Bo Young Hong, Tae-Woo Kim, Seong Hoon Lim
    Brain & Neurorehabilitation.2019;[Epub]     CrossRef
Older Adults’ Perception of Chronic Illness Management in South Korea
Minah Kang, Jaiyong Kim, Sang-Soo Bae, Yong-Jun Choi, Dong-Soo Shin
J Prev Med Public Health. 2014;47(4):236-243.   Published online July 31, 2014
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2014.47.4.236
  • 11,156 View
  • 119 Download
  • 11 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
Despite the recent emphasis on a patient-centered chronic care model, few studies have investigated its use in older adults in South Korea. We explored how older Korean adults perceive and cope with their chronic illness. Methods: We conducted focus group interviews in Seoul, Korea in January 2010. Focus groups were formed by disease type (hypertension and type 2 diabetes) and gender using purposive sampling. Inclusion criteria were patients aged 60 and over who had been diagnosed with diabetes or hypertension and received care at a community health center for at least six months prior to participation. Interview data were analyzed through descriptive content analysis. Results: Among personal factors, most participants felt overwhelmed when they received their diagnosis. However, with time and control of their acute symptoms using medication, their worry diminished and participants tended to denying being identified as a patient or sick person. Among socio-familial factors, participants reported experiencing stigma with their chronic illness and feeling it was a symbol of weakness. Instead of modifying their lifestyles, which might interfere with their social relationships, they resorted to only following their medicine regime prescribed by their doctor. Participants also reported feeling that their doctor only prescribed medications and acted in an authoritative and threatening manner to induce and reinforce participants’ compliance with treatment. Conclusions: For successful patient-centered management of chronic illnesses, supportive environments that include family, friends, and healthcare providers should be established.
Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Moderating Effect of Self-Esteem on the Relationship between Depression and Family Conflict Coping Strategies in the Elderly with Chronic Diseases in Korea
    Jae Hee Kim, Hwa-Mi Yang
    Healthcare.2023; 11(18): 2569.     CrossRef
  • Patient Perspectives of Chronic Disease Management and Unmet Care Needs in South Korea: A Qualitative Study
    Kyunghee Yi, Sujin Kim
    Journal of Patient Experience.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Experiences of implementing a coping mechanism for the elderly who face chronic diseases while living with the family: a phenomenology study
    Bahtiar Bahtiar, Junaiti Sahar, sWiwin Wiarsih
    Frontiers of Nursing.2022; 9(1): 87.     CrossRef
  • Development and validation of the Highly Effective Health Behavior Pattern Inventory – Short Form
    Eunkyo Kang, Soojeong Kim, Ye E Rhee, Young H Yun
    Chronic Illness.2021; 17(2): 81.     CrossRef
  • Causal beliefs about hypertension and self-care behaviour in Korean patients
    Hyun-E Yeom
    Collegian.2021; 28(1): 48.     CrossRef
  • Self‐stigma among Korean patients with diabetes: A concept analysis
    Kawoun Seo, Youngshin Song
    Journal of Clinical Nursing.2019; 28(9-10): 1794.     CrossRef
  • The Quality of Family Relationships, Diabetes Self-Care, and Health Outcomes in Older Adults
    Daniel David, Joanne Dalton, Cherlie Magny-Normilus, Maura Moran Brain, Tyler Linster, Sei J. Lee
    Diabetes Spectrum.2019; 32(2): 132.     CrossRef
  • Utilization of traditional, complementary and alternative medicine and mental health among patients with chronic diseases in primary health care settings in Cambodia
    Siyan Yi, Chanrith Ngin, Sovannary Tuot, Pheak Chhoun, Tyler Fleming, Carinne Brody
    International Journal of Mental Health Systems.2017;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Limited understanding, limited services, limited resources: patients’ experiences with managing hypertension and diabetes in Cambodia
    Bart Jacobs, Cheanrithy Men, Maryam Bigdeli, Peter S Hill
    BMJ Global Health.2017; 2(Suppl 3): e000235.     CrossRef
  • Developing a culturally tailored stroke prevention walking programme for Korean immigrant seniors: a focus group study
    Sarah E. Choi, Ivy Kwon, Emiley Chang, Daniel Araiza, Carol Lee Thorpe, Catherine A. Sarkisian
    International Journal of Older People Nursing.2016; 11(4): 255.     CrossRef
  • Type 2 Diabetes Patients and Stigma:
    Asuka Kato
    Iryo To Shakai.2016; 26(2): 197.     CrossRef

JPMPH : Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health