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Volume 44(1); January 2011
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Editorial
A More Efficient Way to Publish: JPMPH Goes Electronic.
Yunhwan Lee
J Prev Med Public Health. 2011;44(1):1-1.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2011.44.1.1
  • 3,002 View
  • 35 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
No abstract available.
Summary
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov'ts
Effect of Repeated Public Releases on Cesarean Section Rates.
Won Mo Jang, Sang Jun Eun, Chae Eun Lee, Yoon Kim
J Prev Med Public Health. 2011;44(1):2-8.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2011.44.1.2
  • 5,332 View
  • 94 Download
  • 13 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
Public release of and feedback (here after public release) on institutional (clinics and hospitals) cesarean section rates has had the effect of reducing cesarean section rates. However, compared to the isolated intervention, there was scant evidence of the effect of repeated public releases (RPR) on cesarean section rates. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the effect of RPR for reducing cesarean section rates. METHODS: From January 2003 to July 2007, the nationwide monthly institutional cesarean section rates data (1 951 303 deliveries at 1194 institutions) were analyzed. We used autoregressive integrated moving average (ARIMA) time-series intervention models to assess the effect of the RPR on cesarean section rates and ordinal logistic regression model to determine the characteristics of the change in cesarean section rates. RESULTS: Among four RPR, we found that only the first one (August 29, 2005) decreased the cesarean section rate (by 0.81 percent) and continued to have an impact period through the last observation in May 2007. Baseline cesarean section rates (OR, 4.7; 95% CI, 3.1 to 7.1) and annual number of deliveries (OR, 2.8; 95% CI, 1.6 to 4.7) of institutions in the upper third of each category at before first intervention had a significant contribution to the decrease of cesarean section rates. CONCLUSIONS: We could not found the evidence that RPR has had the significant effect of reducing cesarean section rates. Institutions with upper baseline cesarean section rates and annual number of deliveries were more responsive to RPR.
Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
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    YouHyun Park, Jae-hyun Kim, Kwang-soo Lee
    Medicine.2022; 101(33): e29952.     CrossRef
  • Mechanisms and impact of public reporting on physicians and hospitals’ performance: A systematic review (2000–2020)
    Khic-Houy Prang, Roxanne Maritz, Hana Sabanovic, David Dunt, Margaret Kelaher, Lamberto Manzoli
    PLOS ONE.2021; 16(2): e0247297.     CrossRef
  • Ordinal classification of the affectation level of 3D-images in Parkinson diseases
    Antonio M. Durán-Rosal, Julio Camacho-Cañamón, Pedro Antonio Gutiérrez, Maria Victoria Guiote Moreno, Ester Rodríguez-Cáceres, Juan Antonio Vallejo Casas, César Hervás-Martínez
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    Astrid Van Wilder, Luk Bruyneel, Dirk De Ridder, Deborah Seys, Jonas Brouwers, Fien Claessens, Bianca Cox, Kris Vanhaecht
    International Journal for Quality in Health Care.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews.2018;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Health Services Research.2017; 52(3): 1079.     CrossRef
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    Na Young Ahn, Hye-Ja Park
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    Pedro Antonio Gutierrez, Maria Perez-Ortiz, Javier Sanchez-Monedero, Francisco Fernandez-Navarro, Cesar Hervas-Martinez
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    Xiaopeng Zhang, Lijun Wang, Xinping Zhang
    BMC Health Services Research.2014;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Changes in the Cesarean Section Rate in Korea (1982-2012) and a Review of the Associated Factors
    Sung-Hoon Chung, Hyun-Joo Seol, Yong-Sung Choi, Soo-young Oh, Ahm Kim, Chong-Woo Bae
    Journal of Korean Medical Science.2014; 29(10): 1341.     CrossRef
  • Managing the Primary Cesarean Delivery Rate
    DAVID WARE BRANCH, ROBERT M. SILVER
    Clinical Obstetrics & Gynecology.2012; 55(4): 946.     CrossRef
Relationship Between Depression Anxiety Stress Scale (DASS) and Urinary Hydroxyproline and Proline Concentrations in Hospital Workers.
Keou Won Lee, Soo Jeong Kim, Jae Beom Park, Kyung Jong Lee
J Prev Med Public Health. 2011;44(1):9-13.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2011.44.1.9
  • 6,377 View
  • 145 Download
  • 19 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
Although increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) is caused by stress accelerates collagen degradation, there was no data on the relationship between stress and urinary hydroxyproline (Hyp) and proline (Pro), a good marker of collagen degradation. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relationship between depression, anxiety, and stress (DAS) and concentrations of urinary Hyp and Pro. METHODS: 97 hospital employees aged 20 to 58 were asked to fill out comprehensive self-administrated questionnaires containing information about their medical history, lifestyle, length of the work year, shit-work and DAS. Depression Anxiety Stress Scale (DASS) was applied to evaluate chronic mental disorders. Urine samples were analyzed using High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) with double derivatization for the assay of hydroxyproline and proline. RESULTS: The mean value of Hyp and Pro concenturation in all subjects was 194.1+/-113.4 micromol/g and 568.2+/-310.7 micromol/g. DASS values and urinary Pro concentrations were differentiated by sex (female > male, p < 0.05) and type of job (nurse > others, p < 0.05). In the stepwise multiple linear regressions, urinary Hyp and Pro concentrations were influenced by stress (Adjusted r2 = 0.051) and anxiety and job (Adjusted r2 = 0.199), respectively. CONCLUSIONS: We found that stress and anxiety were correlated with urinary Hyp and Pro concentrations. To identifying a definite correlation, further study in large populations will be needed.
Summary

Citations

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    Hyeongyeong Yoon
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    Stephan van Vliet, Amanda D. Blair, Lydia M. Hite, Jennifer Cloward, Robert E. Ward, Carter Kruse, Herman A. van Wietmarchsen, Nick van Eekeren, Scott L. Kronberg, Frederick D. Provenza
    Journal of Animal Science and Biotechnology.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Yun Ji, Yu He, Ying Yang, Zhaolai Dai, Zhenlong Wu
    Animal Nutrition.2022; 9: 7.     CrossRef
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    Kuan Tao, Yuhan Huang, Yanfei Shen, Lixin Sun
    IEEE Transactions on Neural Systems and Rehabilitation Engineering.2022; 30: 2060.     CrossRef
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    Yiwen Zhu, Shaili C. Jha, Katherine H. Shutta, Tianyi Huang, Raji Balasubramanian, Clary B. Clish, Susan E. Hankinson, Laura D. Kubzansky
    Neuroscience & Biobehavioral Reviews.2022; 143: 104954.     CrossRef
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    Yuxiao Yao, Weiping Han
    Molecules and Cells.2022; 45(11): 781.     CrossRef
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    Gyehyun Jung, Jihyun Oh
    Medicina.2022; 59(1): 38.     CrossRef
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    Min-Young Kim, Yun-Yi Yang
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Changes in Labor Regulations During Economic Crises: Does Deregulation Favor Health and Safety?.
Won Gi Jhang
J Prev Med Public Health. 2011;44(1):14-21.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2011.44.1.14
  • 4,091 View
  • 51 Download
  • 2 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
The regulatory changes in Korea during the national economic crisis 10 years ago and in the current global recession were analyzed to understand the characteristics of deregulation in labor policies. METHODS: Data for this study were derived from the Korean government's official database for administrative regulations and a government document reporting deregulation. RESULTS: A great deal of business-friendly deregulation took place during both economic crises. Occupational health and safety were the main targets of deregulation in both periods, and the regulation of employment promotion and vocational training was preserved relatively intact. The sector having to do with working conditions and the on-site welfare of workers was also deregulated greatly during the former economic crisis, but not in the current global recession. CONCLUSIONS: Among the three main areas of labor policy, occupational health and safety was most vulnerable to the deregulation in economic crisis of Korea. A probable reason for this is that the impact of deregulation on the health and safety of workers would not be immediately disclosed after the policy change.
Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • The Vulnerability of Occupational Health and Safety to Deregulation: The Weakening of Information Regulations during the Economic Crisis in Korea
    Won Gi Jhang
    NEW SOLUTIONS: A Journal of Environmental and Occupational Health Policy.2018; 28(1): 151.     CrossRef
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    Hyoung‐June Im, Dae‐gyu Oh, Young‐Su Ju, Young‐Jun Kwon, Tae‐Won Jang, Jun Yim
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Gender, Professional and Non-Professional Work, and the Changing Pattern of Employment-Related Inequality in Poor Self-Rated Health, 1995-2006 in South Korea.
Il Ho Kim, Young Ho Khang, Sung Il Cho, Heeran Chun, Carles Muntaner
J Prev Med Public Health. 2011;44(1):22-31.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2011.44.1.22
  • 6,040 View
  • 102 Download
  • 25 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
We examined gender differential changes in employment-related health inequalities according to occupational position (professional/nonprofessional) in South Korea during the last decade. METHODS: Data were taken from four rounds of Social Statistical Surveys of South Korea (1995, 1999, 2003, and 2006) from the Korean National Statistics Office. The total study population was 55435 male and 33 913 female employees aged 25-64. Employment arrangements were divided into permanent, fixed-term, and daily employment. RESULTS: After stratification according to occupational position (professional/nonprofessional) and gender, different patterns in employment - related health inequalities were observed. In the professional group, the gaps in absolute and relative employment inequalities for poor self-rated health were more likely to widen following Korea's 1997 economic downturn. In the nonprofessional group, during the study period, graded patterns of employment-related health inequalities were continuously observed in both genders. Absolute health inequalities by employment status, however, decreased among men but increased among women. In addition, a remarkable increase in relative health inequalities was found among female temporary and daily employees (p = 0.009, < 0.001, respectively), but only among male daily employees (p = 0.001). Relative employment-related health inequalities had clearly widened for female daily workers between 2003 and 2006 (p = 0.047). The 1997 Korean economic downturn, in particular, seemingly stimulated a widening gap in employment health inequalities. CONCLUSIONS: Our study revealed that whereas absolute health inequalities in relation to employment status increased in the professional group, relative employment-related health inequalities increased in the nonprofessional group, especially among women. In view of the high concentration of female nonstandard employees, further monitoring of inequality should consider gender specific patterns according to employee's occupational and employment status.
Summary

Citations

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    Seong-Uk Baek, Min-Seok Kim, Myeong-Hun Lim, Taeyeon Kim, Jin-Ha Yoon, Yu-Min Lee, Jong-Uk Won
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    Courtney McNamara
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Age and Gender Differences in the Relation of Chronic Diseases to Activity of Daily Living (ADL) Disability for Elderly South Koreans: Based on Representative Data.
Il Ho Kim
J Prev Med Public Health. 2011;44(1):32-40.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2011.44.1.32
  • 6,115 View
  • 157 Download
  • 30 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
This study investigated the gender and age differential effect of major chronic diseases on activity of daily living (ADL) disability. METHODS: Surveyfreq and Surveylogistic regression analyses were employed on the 2005 Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES) with a sample of 3,609 persons aged 65 - 89. RESULTS: After adjusting for potential covariates, stroke, among elderly men more so than women, had a 2-3 times greater odds of engendering ADL disability in the 65-69 (p < 0.05) and 70-79 age groups (p < 0.01). In comparison to elderly women, cancer, diabetes, and incontinence in elderly men was associated with a higher risk of ADL disability in the 70 - 79 age group (p < 0.05), and this association was also observed for pulmonary disease in the 80-89 age group. Among elderly women, however, a significant association between incontinence and ADL disability was identified in all three age groups. In addition, this association was found in pulmonary disease and diabetes in elderly women aged 70 - 79 years. Significant gender differences were observed in the association between stroke in the 60 - 79 age group and cancer in the 70 - 79 age group. CONCLUSIONS: Age and gender differences were observed in the effect of chronic diseases on ADL disability.
Summary

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English Abstracts
The Effect of Exposure Factors on the Concentration of Heavy Metals in Residents Near Abandoned Metal Mines.
Sanghoo Kim, Yong Min Cho, Seung Hyun Choi, Hae Joon Kim, Jaewook Choi
J Prev Med Public Health. 2011;44(1):41-47.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2011.44.1.41
  • 4,877 View
  • 77 Download
  • 6 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
This study assessed the factors that have an influence on the residents exposed to heavy metals, and we utilized the findings to establish the proper management of abandoned metal mines in the future. METHODS: For a total of 258 residents who lived close to abandoned mines in Gangwon-province and Gyeonggi-province, the exposure factors and biomarkers in their blood and urine were comparatively analyzed via multiple regression analysis. RESULTS: The blood levels of lead and mercury and the cadmium levels in urine were found to be higher in the study group than that in the average Korean. For the blood levels of heavy metals according to each exposure factor, all of them were found to be significantly higher in both of the group residing for a longer period of time and the group living closer to the source of pollutants. Multiple regression analysis disclosed that all the heavy metals, except lead, in their blood were significantly reduced in proportion to the increased distance of inhabitancy from the mines. Their other biomarkers were within the normal ranges. CONCLUSIONS: We found that the distance between the residential village and the mines was a factor that affects the blood level of heavy metals in the villagers. This finding could be an important factor when developing a management model for the areas that surround abandoned metal mines. (ED note: I much like this important study.)
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  • Assessment of exposure to heavy metals and health risks among residents near abandoned metal mines in Goseong, Korea
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  • Relationship between Heavy Metal Concentrations in the Soil with the Blood and Urine of Residents around Abandoned Metal Mines
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Impact of DRG Payment on the Length of Stay and the Number of Outpatient Visits After Discharge for Caesarean Section During 2004-2007.
Changwoo Shon, Seolhee Chung, Seonju Yi, Soonman Kwon
J Prev Med Public Health. 2011;44(1):48-55.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2011.44.1.48
  • 5,071 View
  • 150 Download
  • 9 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of Diagnosis-Related Group (DRG)-based payment on the length of stay and the number of outpatient visits after discharge in for patients who had undergone caesarean section. METHODS: This study used the health insurance data of the patients in health care facilities that were paid by the Fee-For-Service (FFS) in 2001-2004, but they participated in the DRG payment system in 2005-2007. In order to examine the net effects of DRG payment, the Difference-In-Differences (DID) method was adopted to observe the difference in health care utilization before and after the participation in the DRG payment system. The dependent variables of the regression model were the length of stay and number of outpatient visits after discharge, and the explanatory variables included the characteristics of the patients and the health care facilities. RESULTS: The length of stay in DRG-paid health care facilities was greater than that in the FFS-paid ones. Yet, DRG payment has no statistically significant effect on the number of outpatient visits after discharge. CONCLUSIONS: The results of this study that DRG payment was not effective in reducing the length of stay can be related to the nature of voluntary participation in the DRG system. Only those health care facilities that are already efficient in terms of the length of stay or that can benefit from the DRG payment may decide to participate in the program.
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The Prevalence of High Myopia in 19 Year-Old Men in Busan, Ulsan and Gyeongsangnam-Do.
Sang Joon Lee, Sang Hwa Urm, Byeng Chul Yu, Hae Sook Sohn, Young Seoub Hong, Maeng Seok Noh, Yong Hwan Lee
J Prev Med Public Health. 2011;44(1):56-64.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2011.44.1.56
  • 5,862 View
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AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
The purpose of this study was to estimate the prevalence and correlated factors of high myopia in 19 year-old men in Southeast Korea. METHODS: This retrospective study was based on the medical checkup data of conscription during 2005. The study subjects were 19 years old men in Busan, Ulsan and Gyeongsangnam-do. The health checkup data of the conscripts consisted of noncycloplegic autorefraction test, the biometric data and social factors. To analyze the social and biometric effects, we classified the biometric factors into 4 or 5 groups and the social factors into 3 groups. High myopia was defined as a spherical equivalent of under -6.0 diopter. Data analysis was performed using the chi square test for trends and multiple logistic regression analysis. The SAS(version 9.1) program was used for all the analyses. RESULTS: The prevalence of high myopia was 12.39% (6256 / 50 508). The factors correlated with high myopia were the residence area (OR, 2.07; 95% CI, 1.77 to 2.4 for small city; OR, 2.01; 95% CI, 1.72 to 2.34 for metropolis; the reference group was rural area), academic achievement (OR, 1.43; 95% CI, 1.34 to 1.53 for students of 4-and 6-year-course university; the reference group was high school graduates & under) and blood pressure (OR, 1.54; 95% CI, 1.10 to 2.16 for hypertension; OR, 1.09; 95% CI, 1.02 to 1.17 for prehypertension; OR, 1.10; 95% CI, 1.01 to 1.20 for hypotension; the reference group was normal blood pressure). CONCLUSIONS: More than one tenth of the young men were high myopia as one of the risk factor for visual loss. Further studies on high myopia and its complications are needed to improve eye health in Southeast Korea.
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JPMPH : Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health