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Young Hoon Lee 5 Articles
Health Indicators Related to Disease, Death, and Reproduction
Jeoungbin Choi, Moran Ki, Ho Jang Kwon, Boyoung Park, Sanghyuk Bae, Chang-Mo Oh, Byung Chul Chun, Gyung-Jae Oh, Young Hoon Lee, Tae-Yong Lee, Hae Kwan Cheong, Bo Youl Choi, Jung Han Park, Sue K. Park
J Prev Med Public Health. 2019;52(1):14-20.   Published online January 23, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.18.250
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  • 17 Crossref
AbstractAbstract AbstractSummary PDFSupplementary Material
One of the primary goals of epidemiology is to quantify various aspects of a population’s health, illness, and death status and the determinants (or risk factors) thereof by calculating health indicators that measure the magnitudes of various conditions. There has been some confusion regarding health indicators, with discrepancies in usage among organizations such as the World Health Organization the, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), and the CDC of other countries, and the usage of the relevant terminology may vary across papers. Therefore, in this review, we would like to propose appropriate terminological definitions for health indicators based on the most commonly used meanings and/or the terms used by official agencies, in order to bring clarity to this area of confusion. We have used appropriate examples to make each health indicator easy for the reader to understand. We have included practical exercises for some health indicators to help readers understand the underlying concepts.
Summary
Korean summary
본 논문에서는 질병과 사망, 출생 관련 지표들의 개념과 종류를 설명하고, 특히 연구자들이 흔히 혼동하여 사용하는 지표들에 대한 적절한 정의를 제시하였다. 또한 지표들의 예시를 부록으로 수록하여 독자들이 지표의 개념을 보다 쉽게 습득하도록 돕고자 하였다.

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    International Journal of Epidemiology.2022; 51(5): 1408.     CrossRef
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    Revista de Salud Pública.2022; 24(5): 1.     CrossRef
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    Nigerian Journal of Clinical Practice.2021; 24(12): 1808.     CrossRef
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    Heather Bradley, Elizabeth M Rosenthal, Meredith A Barranco, Tomoko Udo, Patrick S Sullivan, Eli S Rosenberg
    The Journal of Infectious Diseases.2020; 222(Supplement): S218.     CrossRef
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    Health Equity.2020; 4(1): 476.     CrossRef
  • SAĞLIK RİSK FAKTÖRLERİNE GÖRE ÜLKELERİN KÜMELENMESİ VE ÇOK KRİTERLİ KARAR VERME TEKNİKLERİYLE SAĞLIK DURUMU GÖSTERGELERİNİN ANALİZİ
    Faruk YILMAZ, Selma SÖYÜK
    Sosyal Guvence.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Ju-Yeun Lee, Sung-il Cho
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2019; 16(18): 3333.     CrossRef
A Comparison of Fasting Glucose and HbA1c for the Diagnosis of Diabetes Mellitus Among Korean Adults.
Woo Jun Yun, Min Ho Shin, Sun Seong Kweon, Kyeong Soo Park, Young Hoon Lee, Hae Sung Nam, Seul Ki Jeong, Yong Woon Yun, Jin Su Choi
J Prev Med Public Health. 2010;43(5):451-454.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2010.43.5.451
  • 5,683 View
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  • 7 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
The American Diabetes Association (ADA) has recently recommended the HbA1c assay as one of four options for making the diagnosis of diabetes mellitus, with a cut-point of > or =6.5%. We compared the HbA1c assay and the fasting plasma glucose level for making the diagnosis of diabetes among Korean adults. METHODS: We analyzed 8710 adults (age 45-74 years), who were not diagnosed as having diabetes mellitus, from the Namwon study population. A fasting plasma glucose level of > or =126 mg/dL and an A1c of > or =6.5% were used for the diagnosis of diabetes. The kappa index of agreement was calculated to measure the agreement between the diagnosis based on the fasting plasma glucose level and the HbA1c. RESULTS: The kappa index of agreement between the fasting plasma glucose level and HbA1c was 0.50. CONCLUSIONS: The agreement between the fasting plasma glucose and HbA1c for the diagnosis of diabetes was moderate for Korean adults.
Summary

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    Journal of Diabetes and its Complications.2014; 28(4): 464.     CrossRef
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  • Discordance between HbA1c and fasting plasma glucose criteria for diabetes screening is associated with obesity and old age in Korean individuals
    Jin Hwa Kim, Ji Hye Shin, Hae Jung Lee, Sang Yong Kim, Hak Yeon Bae
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    Woo-Jun Yun
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Management of Diabetic Mellitus in Low-income Rural Patients.
Hye Yeon Kim, Woo Jun Yun, Min Ho Shin, Sun Seong Kweon, Hye Ran Ahn, Seong Woo Choi, Young Hoon Lee, Dong Hyeok Cho, Jung Ae Rhee
J Prev Med Public Health. 2009;42(5):315-322.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2009.42.5.315
  • 5,555 View
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  • 4 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
Knowledge about the management status of diabetic melitus (DM) is essential to improve diabetic management. Moreover, low income is associated with poor adherence to treatment and increased mortality. This study was performed to evaluate the management status of DM in low-income patients in a rural area. METHODS: We enrolled 370 patients with type 2 DM living in Gokseong county, JeollaNamdo. A well-trained examiner measured the height, weight, waist circumference, blood pressure, total cholesterol, triglyceride, high density lipoprotein cholesterol, fasting blood sugar and glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) levels. Carotid ultrasonography was used to measure carotid artery carotid artery intima media thickness (IMT) and plaque. ankle-brachial index (ABI) was used to evaluate peripheral artery disease. A fundoscopic examination was performed to evaluate diabetic retinopathy. A history of diabetes complications and health-related questionnaires were also completed. RESULTS: The age of diabetic subjects was 68.7+/-8.7 years and the duration of diabetes was 8.9+/-8.2 years. Most (63.5%) had hypertension, and 45.7% had triglycerides below 150 mg/dl, 38.1% had low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL) cholesterol below 100 mg/dl, 48.7% had urine albumin to creatinine ratio (UACR) below 30 mg/g. Less than half (45.9%) achieved the goal of HbA1c less than 7% suggested by the American Diabetes Association (ADA). 10.6% had peripheral vascular disease, 11.9% had retinopathy, and 60.8% had chronic kidney disease. CONCLUSIONS: DM management in low income patients is very poor and requires further work to improve.
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  • Comparison of Health Status in Primary Care Underserved Area Residents and the General Population in Korea
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    Korean Journal of Family Medicine.2020; 41(2): 119.     CrossRef
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    Woo-Jun Yun
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Association of Blood Pressure Levels with Carotid Intima-Media Thickness and Plaques.
Young Hoon Lee, Sun Seog Kweon, Jin Su Choi, Jung Ae Rhee, Sung Woo Choi, So Yeon Ryu, Min Ho Shin
J Prev Med Public Health. 2009;42(5):298-304.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2009.42.5.298
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  • 2 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
The aim of this study was to investigate the association of blood pressure levels with the common carotid artery intima-media thickness (CCA-IMT) and carotid plaques. METHODS: Data were obtained from 2,635 subjects, aged 50 years and over, who participated in the Community Health Survey (a population-based, cross-sectional study) in Dong-gu, Gwangju city between 2007 and 2008. Participants were categorized into three groups according to blood pressure levels; normotensives (<120/80 mmHg), prehypertensives (120-139/80-89 mmHg), and hypertensives (> or =140/90 mmHg). Prehypertensives were further categorized as low prehypertensives (120-129/80-84 mmHg) and high prehypertensives (130-139/85-89 mmHg). Carotid intima-media thickness and plaques were evaluated with a high-resolution B-mode ultrasound. Statistical analyses were performed using chi-square test, ANOVA, and multiple logistic regression. RESULTS: Prehypertensives had significantly greater maximal CCA-IMT values than normotensives, with a multivariate adjusted odds ratio of 1.78 (95% CI=1.36-2.32) for abnormal CCA-IMT (maximal CCA-IMT > or =1.0 mm), and 1.45 (95% CI=1.19-1.77) for carotid plaques. The multivariate adjusted odds ratio of low prehypertensives was 1.64 (95% CI=1.21-2.21) for abnormal CCA-IMT, and 1.30 (95% CI=1.04-1.63) for carotid plaques compared with normotensives. Subject with hypertension had higher frequency of abnormal CCA-IMT (odds ratio, 2.18; 95% CI=1.49-3.18), and carotid plaques (odds ratio, 1.98; 95% CI=1.46-2.67) compared with normotensives after adjustment for other cardiovascular risk factors. CONCLUSIONS: Our results indicate that there is a significant increase in the prevalence of carotid atherosclerosis in subjects with prehypertension (even in low prehypertensives) compared with normotensive subjects. Further studies are required to confirm the benefits and role of carotid ultrasonography in persons with prehypertension.
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  • Association Between Serum Uric Acid and Carotid Intima-Media Thickness in Different Fasting Blood Glucose Patterns: A Case-Control Study
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    Frontiers in Endocrinology.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
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Associations between Carotid Intima-media Thickness, Plaque and Cardiovascular Risk Factors.
Young Hoon Lee, Lian Hua Cui, Min Ho Shin, Sun Seog Kweon, Kyeong Soo Park, Seul Ki Jeong, Eun Kyung Chung, Jin Su Choi
J Prev Med Public Health. 2006;39(6):477-484.
  • 2,806 View
  • 69 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
This study was conducted to examine the association between the carotid artery intima-media thickness (IMT), plaque and cardiovascular risk factors according to gender and age. METHODS: The data used for this study were obtained from 1,507 subjects (691 men, 816 women), aged 20-74 years, who participated in 'Prevalence study of thyroid diseases' in two counties of Jeollanam-do Province during July and August of 2004. The body mass index (BMI) and waist hip ratio (WHR) were calculated by anthropometry. The blood pressure, pulse rate, pulse pressure, total cholesterol, triglyceride, HDL cholesterol and fasting blood sugar level were also measured. Ultrasonography was used to measure the carotid artery IMT and plaque. IMT measurements were performed at 6 sites, including both common carotid arteries, and the bulb and internal carotid arteries. The definition of the 'mean IMT' was mean value obtained from these 6 sites. RESULTS: The mean+/-standard deviation IMT values were 0.65+/-0.14 and 0.60+/-0.13 mm in men and women (p<0.001), respectively. The data were analyzed according to gender and the 50 year age groups.In a multiple linear regression analysis, age and hypertension were positively associated with the mean IMT in both men and women, aged<50 years. Age, total cholesterol and smoking (current) were positively associated with the mean IMT in men (> of =50 years). Age was positively associated with the mean IMT in women (> of =50 years), but the HDL cholesterol level was negatively associated. The prevalence of plaques was 44.2%(196/443) in men and 19.4%(89/459) in women, for those greater than 50 years of age. In a multiple logistic regression analysis, age (OR=1.090, 95%CI=1.053-1.129), HDL cholesterol (OR=0.964, 95%CI=0.944-0.984), total cholesterol (OR=1.009, 95%CI=1.002-1.017) and BMI (OR=0.896, 95%CI=0.818-0.983) were independently associated with plaques in men; whereas, age (OR=1.057, 95%CI=1.012-1.103), HDL cholesterol (OR=0.959, 95%CI=0.932-0.986), pulse pressure (OR=1.029, 95%CI=1.007-1.050) and triglycerides (OR=0.531, 95%CI=0.300-0.941) were independently associated with plaques in women. CONCLUSIONS: There were significant gender and aging differences in the association between the IMT, plaque and cardiovascular risk factors. Therefore, for the prevention of atherosclerosis, selective approaches should be considered with regard to gender and age factors.
Summary

JPMPH : Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health