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So Young Kim 3 Articles
Costs of Initial Cancer Care and its Affecting Factors.
So Young Kim, Sung Gyeong Kim, Jong Hyock Park, Eun Cheol Park
J Prev Med Public Health. 2009;42(4):243-250.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2009.42.4.243
  • 5,433 View
  • 96 Download
  • 9 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
The purposes of this study is to estimate the cost of cancer care after its diagnosis and to identify factors that can influence the cost of cancer care. METHODS: The study subjects were patients with an initial diagnosis one of four selected tumors and had their first two-years of cancer care at a national cancer center. The data were obtained from medical records and patient surveys. We classified cancer care costs into medical and nonmedical costs, and each cost was analyzed for burden type, medical service, and cancer stage according to cancer types. Factors affecting cancer care costs for the initial phase included demographic variables, socioeconomic status and clinical variables. RESULTS: Cancer care costs for the initial year following diagnosis were higher than the costs for the following successive year after diagnosis. Lung cancer (25,648,000 won) had higher costs than the other three cancer types. Of the total costs, patent burden was more than 50% and medical costs accounted for more than 60%. Inpatient costs accounted for more than 60% of the medical costs for stomach and liver cancer in the initial phase. Care for late-stage cancer was more expensive than care for early-stage cancer. Nonmedical costs were estimated to be between 4,500,000 to 6,000,000 won with expenses for the caregiver being the highest. The factors affecting cancer care costs were treatment type and cancer stage. CONCLUSIONS: The cancer care costs after diagnosis are substantial and vary by cancer site, cancer stage and treatment type. It is useful for policy makers and researchers to identify tumor-specific medical and nonmedical costs. The effort to reduce cancer costs and early detection for cancer can reduce the burden to society and improve quality of life for the cancer patients.
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  • Projecting Lifetime Health Outcomes and Costs Associated with the Ambient Fine Particulate Matter Exposure among Adult Women in Korea
    Gyeyoung Choi, Yujeong Kim, Gyeongseon Shin, SeungJin Bae
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2022; 19(5): 2494.     CrossRef
  • Expenditure and Financial Burden for Stomach Cancer Diagnosis and Treatment in China: A Multicenter Study
    Kai Zhang, Jian Yin, Huiyao Huang, Le Wang, Lanwei Guo, Jufang Shi, Min Dai
    Frontiers in Public Health.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Early Detection is Important to Reduce the Economic Burden of Gastric Cancer
    Jie-Hyun Kim, Sung Soo Kim, Jeong Hoon Lee, Da Hyun Jung, Dae Young Cheung, Woo-Chul Chung, Soo-Heon Park
    Journal of Gastric Cancer.2018; 18(1): 82.     CrossRef
  • Supporting Low-income Cancer Patients: Recommendations for the Public Financial Aid Program in the Republic of Korea
    Hye Sook Min, Hyung Kook Yang, Keeho Park
    Cancer Research and Treatment.2018; 50(4): 1074.     CrossRef
  • The Relief Effect of Copayment Decreasing Policy on Unmet Needs in Targeted Diseases
    Jae-Woo Choi, Jae-Hyun Kim, Eun-Cheol Park
    Health Policy and Management.2014; 24(1): 24.     CrossRef
  • Changes in Economic Status of Households Associated with Catastrophic Health Expenditures for Cancer in South Korea
    Jae-Woo Choi, Kyoung-Hee Cho, Young Choi, Kyu-Tae Han, Jeoung-A Kwon, Eun-Cheol Park
    Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention.2014; 15(6): 2713.     CrossRef
  • Medicaid inpatient costs and nested structural analysis using a hierarchical linear modeling (HLM) approach
    Keon-Hyung Lee, Sang-Chul Park, Jungwon Park, Seunghoo Lim
    Health Services and Outcomes Research Methodology.2013; 13(2-4): 157.     CrossRef
  • Costs During the First Five Years Following Cancer Diagnosis in Korea
    Ji-Yeon Shin, So Young Kim, Kun-Sei Lee, Sang-Il Lee, Young Ko, Young-Soon Choi, Hong Gwan Seo, Joo-Hyuk Lee, Jong-Hyock Park
    Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention.2012; 13(8): 3767.     CrossRef
  • Cost‐effectiveness of bevacizumab‐based therapy versus cisplatin plus pemetrexed for the first‐line treatment of advanced non‐squamous NSCLC in Korea and Taiwan
    Myung‐Ju AHN, Chun‐Ming TSAI, Te‐Chun HSIA, Elaine WRIGHT, John Wen‐Cheng CHANG, Heung Tae KIM, Joo‐Hang KIM, Jin Hyoung KANG, Sang‐We KIM, Eun‐Jin BAE, Mijeong KANG, Johanna LISTER, Stefan WALZER
    Asia-Pacific Journal of Clinical Oncology.2011; 7(s2): 22.     CrossRef
Physician Factors Associated with the Blood Pressure Control among Hypertensive Patients.
So Young Kim, In Sook Cho, Jae Ho Lee, Ji Hyun Kim, Eun Jung Lee, Jong Hyock Park, Jin Seok Lee, Yoon Kim
J Prev Med Public Health. 2007;40(6):487-494.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2007.40.6.487
  • 4,685 View
  • 42 Download
  • 6 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
Little is known about the physician-related factors that are associated with the management of hypertension. The purpose of this study was to determine the physician-related factors associated with blood pressure control in hypertensive patients. METHODS: We surveyed 154 physicians at 117 public health (subhealth) centers in Gyeonggi-do. Forty-one physicians completed the survey (response rates: 26.6%) and 31 physicians were finally included as the study subjects. Using the information obtained from the selfreported survey, we measured the physician-related factors associated with hypertension control, including their perception of hypertension, prescription patterns (combination prescription rates, specific antihypertensives prescription rates among patients with diabetes mellitus), and sociodemographic factors. We then collected data on blood pressure and medication use in patients seen by these physicians from the health center's information system. We compared the physicians' perceived hypertension control rates with the actual rates, and then evaluated the rate of high overestimation (overestimation by more than 25% of the median degree of hypertension control rate overestimation) among the physicians. The physicians' antihypertensive prescription patterns were also evaluated. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to evaluate the independent association between hypertension control and physicianrelated factors. RESULTS: The physicians tended to overestimate the proportion of their patients with controlled blood pressure (79.5% perceived vs. 57.8% actual). The percentage of physicians with high overestimation was 35.5% (11 physicians). The physicians with lower control rates were more likely to highly overestimate their patients' control rates. Physicians with below-median actual control rates tended to prescribe fewer combination treatments for patients with uncontrolled blood pressure and angiotensinconverting enzyme inhibitors or fewer angiotensin receptor blockers for patients with diabetes mellitus. The rate of high overestimation by physicians was 1.31 times higher in patients with uncontrolled blood pressure than in patients with other conditions (OR=1.31, 95% CI: 1.17-1.48). CONCLUSIONS: Physicians have a tendency to overestimate the rates of hypertension control in their patients. Because physicians have a direct role in treatment outcomes, physicians' overestimation about hypertension management contributes to inadequate blood pressure control. Thus, interventions for improving physician' awareness regarding the management of patients with hypertension are needed.
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  • Clinical Pharmacist Team-Based Care in a Safety Net Medical Home: Facilitators and Barriers to Chronic Care Management
    Eboni G. Price-Haywood, Sarah Amering, Qingyang Luo, John J. Lefante
    Population Health Management.2017; 20(2): 123.     CrossRef
  • Psychometric Properties of a Short Self-Reported Measure of Medication Adherence Among Patients With Hypertension Treated in a Busy Clinical Setting in Korea
    Jeung-Hee Kim, Weon-Young Lee, Yeon-Pyo Hong, Wang-Seong Ryu, Kwang Je Lee, Wang-Soo Lee, Donald E. Morisky
    Journal of Epidemiology.2014; 24(2): 132.     CrossRef
  • Health Incentive Program and Hypertensive Patients' Blood Pressure Control
    Kyunghee Kang
    Journal of the Korea Academia-Industrial cooperation Society.2013; 14(9): 4388.     CrossRef
  • Comparison of agreement between different measures of blood pressure in normotensive females
    Ülkü Yapucu Güneş
    Applied Nursing Research.2010; 23(3): 159.     CrossRef
  • How to improve DAS28 use in daily clinical practice?--a pilot study of a nurse-led intervention
    L. T. C. van Hulst, M. C. W. Creemers, J. Fransen, L. C. Li, R. Grol, M. E. J. L. Hulscher, P. L. C. M. van Riel
    Rheumatology.2010; 49(4): 741.     CrossRef
  • The Effect of Re-building of Public Health Facilities on the Hypertension Control in the Rural Area
    Sung-A Chun, Baeg-Ju Na, Chul-Woung Kim, Moo-Sik Lee
    Journal of agricultural medicine and community health.2008; 33(1): 37.     CrossRef
Factors Affecting National Health Insurance Mass Screening Participation in the Disabled.
Jong Hyock Park, Jin Seok Lee, Jin Yong Lee, Ji Young Hong, So Young Kim, Seong Ok Kim, Byong Hee Cho, Yong Ik Kim, Youngsoo Shin, Yoon Kim
J Prev Med Public Health. 2006;39(6):511-519.
  • 3,037 View
  • 50 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
As the disabled have higher prevalence rates and earlier onsets of chronic diseases than the nondisabled, their participation in mass screening is important for the early detection and intervention of chronic diseases. Nevertheless, in Korea, the disabled have lower participation rates in mass screening services than the nondisabled. The purpose of the study was to find determinants for the participation in the National Health Insurance (NHI) mass screening program among the disabled. METHODS: In this study, the NHI mass screening data of 423,076 disabled people, which were identified using the National Disability Registry (2003), were analyzed. Of the factors affecting the participation rates in mass screenings, the following variables were included for the analysis: socioeconomic stati, such as sex, age, category of health insurance program, region and income; disability characteristics, such as disability type, and severity. A multiple logistic regression analysis was used to evaluate the association between the participation rates, disability characteristics variables and demographic variables. RESULTS: The participation rate in mass screening of the disabled was 41.3%, but was lower in females, an age of more than 70 years, self-employed and for those with an average monthly insurance premium over 133,500 Won and in metropolitan regions. The participation rate was 1.31 times lower in females than males (95% CI=1.29-1.33); 3.50 times lower in the elderly (more than 70 years) than the younger (95% CI=3.33-3.67); 1.43 times lower in those who live in metropolitan areas (95% CI=1.40-1.46); 2.59 times lower for those in a health insurance program for the self-employed than for employees (95% CI=2.56-2.63); 1.19 times lower for the higher income (more than 133,500) than the lower income group (4,400-22,000) for the average monthly insurance premium (95% CI=1.15-1.23); 2.04 times lower for those with brain palsy and stroke disabilities than with auditory impairments (95% CI= 1.97-2.11) and 3.27 times for those with severe compared to mild disabilities (95% CI=3.15-3.40). CONCLUSIONS: The disabled with high severity, and locomotive and communication disabilities have lower participation rates in mass screening services in Korea.
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JPMPH : Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health