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Kang Hyeon Choe 3 Articles
Effects of Oxidative DNA Damage and Genetic Polymorphism of the Glutathion Peroxidase 1 (GPX1) and 8-Oxoguanine Glycosylase 1 (hOGG1) on Lung Cancer.
Chul Ho Lee, Kye Young Lee, Kang Hyeon Choe, Yun Chul Hong, Sung Il Noh, Sang Yong Eom, Young Jun Ko, Yan Wei Zhang, Dong Hyuk Yim, Jong Won Kang, Heon Kim, Yong Dae Kim
J Prev Med Public Health. 2006;39(2):130-134.
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AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
Oxidative DNA damage is a known risk factor of lung cancer. The glutathione peroxidase (GPX) antioxidant enzyme that reduces hydrogen peroxide and lipid peroxides plays a significant role in protecting cells from the oxidative stress induced by reactive oxygen species. The aim of this case-control study was to investigate effects of oxidative stress and genetic polymorphisms of the GPX1 genes and the interaction between them in the carcinogenesis of lung cancer. METHODS: Two hundreds patients with lung cancer and 200 age- and sex-matched controls were enrolled in this study. Every subject was asked to complete a questionnaire concerning their smoking habits and their environmental exposure to PAHs. The genotypes of the GPX1 and 8-oxoguanine glycosylase 1 (hOGG1) genes were examined and the concentrations of urinary 1-hydroxypyrene (1-OHP), 2-naphthol and 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OH-dG) were measured. RESULTS: Cigarette smoking was a significant risk factor for lung cancer. The levels of urinary 8-OH-dG were higher in the patients (p<0.001), whereas the urinary 1-OHP and 2-naphthol levels were higher in the controls. The GPX1 codon 198 polymorphism was associated with an increased risk of lung cancer. Individuals carrying the Pro/Leu or Leu/Leu genotype of GPX1 were at a higher risk for lung cancer (adjusted OR=2.29). In addition, these individuals were shown to have high urinary 8-OH-dG concentrations compared to the individuals with the GPX1 Pro/Pro genotype. On the other hand, the polymorphism of the hOGG1 gene did not affect the lung cancer risk and the oxidative DNA damage. CONCLUSIONS: These results lead to a conclusion that individuals with the GPX1 Pro/Leu or Leu/Leu genotype would be more susceptible to the lung cancer induced by oxidative stress than those individuals with the Pro/Pro genotype.
Summary
Effects of Oxidative DNA Damage Induced by Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons and Genetic Polymorphism of the Paraoxonase-1 (PON1) Gene on Lung Cancer.
Chul Ho Lee, Kye Young Lee, Kang Hyeon Choe, Yun Chul Hong, Yong Dae Kim, Jong Won Kang, Heon Kim
J Prev Med Public Health. 2005;38(3):345-350.
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AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVE
Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), which are risk factors for lung cancer, have been reported to induce oxidative DNA damage. The paraoxonase (PON) plays a significant role in the detoxification of a variety of organophosphorous compounds, with paraoxonase-1 (PON1) being one of the endogenous free-radical scavenging systems in the human body. The aim of this case-control study was to investigate the effects of PAH exposure, oxidative stress and the Q192R polymorphism of PON1 genes, and their interactions in the carcinogenesis of lung cancer. METHODS: One hundred and seventy seven lung cancer patients and 177 age- and sex-matched controls were enrolled in this study. Each subject was asked to complete a questionnaire concerning their smoking habits and environmental exposure to PAHs. The Q192R genotypes of the PON1 gene was examined, and the concentrations of urinary 1-hydroxypyrene (1-OHP), 2-naphthol and 8- hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OH-dG) measured. RESULTS: Cigarette smoking was found to be a significant risk factor for lung cancer. The urinary 8-OH-dG level was higher in the patients, whereas the urinary 1-OHP and 2- naphthol levels were higher in the controls. There was a significant correlation between the urinary levels of 8-OHdG and 1-OHP in both the cases and controls. The PON1 polymorphism was associated with an increased risk of lung cancer. Individuals carrying the Q/Q genotype of the PON1 gene were found to be at higher risk of developing lung cancer. There was a significant correlation between the urinary levels of 8-OH-dG and 1-OHP in those with the PON1 Q/Q genotype. CONCLUSIONS: These results lead to the conclusion that PAHs would induce oxidative DNA damage, especially in individuals with the PON1 Q/Q genotype. Therefore, people with the PON1 Q/Q genotype would be more susceptible to lung cancer than those with the R/R or Q/R genotypes of the PON1 gene.
Summary
A Case-Control Study on Effects of Genetic Polymorphisms of GSTM1, GSTT1, CYP1A1 and CYP2E1 on Risk of Lung Cancer.
Hong Mei Nan, Heon Kim, Jong Won Kang, Jang Whan Bae, Kang Hyeon Choe, Ki Hyeong Lee, Seung Taik Kim, Choong Hee Won, Yong Min Kim
Korean J Prev Med. 1999;32(2):123-129.
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AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
This study was performed to investigate effects of genetic polymorphisms of glutathione S-transferase M1 (GSTM1), glutathione S-transferase M1 (GSTT1), cytochrome P450 1A1 (CYP1A1) and cytochrome P450 2E1 (CYP2E1) on lung cancer development. METHODS: Ninety-eight lung cancer patients and 98 age-sex matched non-cancer patients hospitalized in Chungbuk National University Hospital from March 1997 to August 1998, were the subjects of this case-control study. Direct interview was done and genotypes of GSTM1, GSTT1, CYP1A1 and CYP2E1 were investigated using multiplex PCR or PCR-RFLP methods with DNA extracted from venous blood. Effects of the polymorphisms of GSTM1, GSTT1, CYP1A1 and CYP2E1, lifestyle factors including smoking, and their interactions on lung cancer were statistically analyzed. RESULTS: GSTM1 was deleted in 67.01% of the cases and 58.16% of the controls, and the odds ratio(95% CI) was 1.46(0.82-2.62). GSTT1 deletion was 58.76% for the lung cancer patients and 50.00% for the controls OR:1.43(0.81-2.51). The frequencies of Ile/Ile, Ile/Val and Val/Val of the CYP1A1 polymorphisms were 59.18%, 35.71%, and 5.10% for the cases, and 52.04%, 45.92%, 2.04% for the controls, respectively. Risk of lung cancer was not associated with polymorphism of CYP1A1 (x2trend=0.253, p-value>0.05). The respective frequency of c1/c1, c1/c2, c2/c2 genotypes for CYP2E1 were 50.00%, 42.86%, 7.14% for the lung cancer patients, and 66.33%, 30.61%, 3.06% for the controls (x2trend=5.783, p<0.05). c2 allele was a significant risk factor for lung cancer. We also observed a significant association of cigarette smoking history with lung cancer risk. The odds ratio(95% CI) of cigarette smoking was 3.03(1.58-5.81). In multiple logistic analysis including genotypes of GSTM1, GSTT1, CYP1A1 and CYP2E1, and smoking habit, only smoking habit came out to be a significant risk factor for lung cancer. CONCLUSION: Genetic polymorphisms of GSTM1, GSTT1, CYP1A1 and CYP2E1 are not so strongly associated with lung cancer as lifestyle factors including cigarette smoking.
Summary

JPMPH : Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health