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Jin Seok Lee 15 Articles
Patterns of Unintentional Domestic Injuries in Korea.
Eun Jung Lee, Jin Seok Lee, Yoon Kim, Kunhee Park, Sang Jun Eun, Soo Kyung Suh, Yong Ik Kim
J Prev Med Public Health. 2010;43(1):84-92.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2010.43.1.84
  • 5,282 View
  • 57 Download
  • 6 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
To investigate the patterns of unintentional home injuries in Korea. METHODS: The study population was 12,382,088 people who utilized National Health Insurance services due to injuries (main diagnosis codes S00 to T28) during 2006. Stratified samples(n=459,501) were randomly selected by sex, age group and severity of injury. A questionnaire was developed based on the International Classification of External Causes of Injury and 18,000 cases surveyed by telephone were analyzed after being projected into population proportionately according to the response rates of their strata. Domestic injury cases were finally included. RESULTS: Domestic injuries (n=3,804) comprised 21.1% of total daily life injuries during 2006. Women were vulnerable to home injuries, with the elderly and those of lower income (medical-aid users) tending to suffer more severe injuries. Injury occurred most often due to a slipping fall (33.9%), overexertion (15.3%), falling (9.5%) and stumbling (9.4%), with severe injury most often resulting from slipping falls, falls and stumbles. Increasing age correlated with domestic injury-related disability. CONCLUSIONS: The present findings provide basic information for development of home injury prevention strategies, with focus on the elderly.
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  • Associations between traumatic dental injuries due to violence and various drinking behaviors in Korea: A cross‐sectional study
    Ji‐Young Son, Jaehyung Lim, Dong‐Hun Han
    Dental Traumatology.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Relationships between trauma death, disability, and geographic factors: a systematic review
    Bona Hwang, Taewook Jeong, Jiyeon Jo
    Clinical and Experimental Emergency Medicine.2023; 10(4): 426.     CrossRef
  • The Relationship between Injury and Socioeconomic Status in Reference to the Fourth Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey
    Sung-Kyung Kim, Hyocher Kim, Kyungsuk Lee, Hee-Tae Kang, Sung-Soo Oh, Sang Baek Ko
    Annals of Occupational and Environmental Medicine.2014;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • The Relationship between Waist Circumference and Work-related Injury in Reference to the Fourth Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey
    Sung-Kyung Kim, Ji-Min Son, Jae-Young So, Hyocher Kim, Kyungsuk Lee, Sung-Soo Oh, Sang Ko
    Annals of Occupational and Environmental Medicine.2013; 25(1): 29.     CrossRef
  • Multilevel Analysis on Factors Influencing Death and Transfer in Inpatient with Severe Injury
    Young Eun Choi, Kang Suk Lee
    Health Policy and Management.2013; 23(3): 233.     CrossRef
  • Spring cleaning as a safety risk: results of a population-based study in two consecutive years
    Soheil Saadat, Mojgan Karbakhsh
    BMC Public Health.2011;[Epub]     CrossRef
Medical Care Utilization Status and Associated Factors with Extended Hospitalization of Psychiatric Patients in Korea.
Soo Kyung Suh, Yoon Kim, Jong Ik Park, Myung Soo Lee, Hong Suk Jang, Sun Young Lee, Jin Seok Lee
J Prev Med Public Health. 2009;42(6):416-423.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2009.42.6.416
  • 5,023 View
  • 60 Download
  • 10 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
This study was performed to examine medical care utilization of psychiatric patients and to explore patients' characteristics associated with extended hospitalization. METHODS: Data were extracted from information of Korean Health Insurance Review and Assessment Service. All data associated with admission and outpatient clinic visit were analysed by patient characteristics. We selected first psychiatric admission patients who diagnosed mental and behavioral disorders due to use of alcohol (main disease code: F10), schizophrenia and related disorders (F20-29) and mood disorders (F30~33) from January to June 2005. We analysed status of admission, mean length of stay, regular access to outpatient clinic and rates of extended hospitalization during 3 years. Bivariate and multivariate analyses were conducted to identify factors associated with extended hospitalization. RESULTS: The number of psychiatric patients during the first six month of 2005 was 30,678. The mean length of stay was longest for schizophrenia and related disorders but shortest for mood disorders. Patients who experienced an extended hospitalization were 18.8% of total subjects. An extended hospitalization was more common in schizophrenia and related disorders than other diagnostic groups. The factors associated with the extended hospitalization were age, sex, diagnostic group, type of insurance and medical care utilization groups. CONCLUSIONS: The study indicates the problem of an extended hospitalization for psychiatric patients in Korea. It is suggested that variations in rates of extended hospitalization among medical care utilization group may need an active early intervention system in psychiatric treatment service. Particular attention needs to be devoted to planning and funding for reducing extended hospitalization.
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  • A Study on the Characteristics of People With Severe Mental Illness in Seoul
    Jiho Kim, Hae-Woo Lee, Mi Yang, Hyo Been Lee, Yong Lee Jang, Eun Jin Na
    Journal of Korean Neuropsychiatric Association.2024; 63(1): 49.     CrossRef
  • Effectiveness of a Community-Based Intensive Case Management Model on Reducing Hospitalization for People With Severe Mental Illness in Seoul
    Jee Hoon Sohn, Sung Joon Cho, Hae Woo Lee, Hyun Kim, Seung Yeon Lee, Yoomi Park, Hwo Yeon Seo, Eun Soo Kim, Jee Eun Park, Bong Jin Hahm
    Psychiatry Investigation.2023; 20(12): 1133.     CrossRef
  • Differences in Social and Clinical Characteristics between Readmission and Dehospitalization in Long-Term Inpatients with Schizophrenia
    Min-Sun Kim, Sunyoung Park, Jin-sook Choi
    Korean Journal of Schizophrenia Research.2020; 23(1): 38.     CrossRef
  • Continuation of schizophrenia treatment with three long-acting injectable antipsychotics in South Korea: A nationwide population-based study
    Sung Woo Joo, Seung-Hyun Shon, GumJee Choi, MinJung Koh, Seung Woo Cho, Jungsun Lee
    European Neuropsychopharmacology.2019; 29(9): 1051.     CrossRef
  • The Significance and Limitations of Korean Diagnosis-Related Groups in Psychiatric Inpatients' Hospital Charges
    Keun-Ho Joe, Jeong-Ho Seok, Woon Jin Jeong, Boung Chul Lee, Ae Ryun Kim, Eun kyoung Choi, Boyoon Won, Chung-Suk Lee
    Journal of Korean Neuropsychiatric Association.2017; 56(1): 10.     CrossRef
  • A Study on Factors Related to Long-term Hospitalization in Patients with Chronic Schizophrenia
    Oak-Jin Jang, Byung-Dae Lee, Young-In Chung
    Journal of Korean Neuropsychiatric Association.2015; 54(1): 76.     CrossRef
  • Efficacy of Case Management for the Community Dwelling Schizophrenia Patients : A 36-Month Prospective Follow-Up Study
    Jee Hoon Sohn, Seung-Hee Ahn, Su Jeong Sung, Ji Min Ryu, Ji Eun Park, Maeng Je Cho
    Journal of Korean Neuropsychiatric Association.2015; 54(4): 578.     CrossRef
  • Factors Affecting the Downward Mobility of Psychiatric Patients: A Korean Study of National Health Insurance Beneficiaries
    Un-Na Kim, Yeon-Yong Kim, Jin-Seok Lee
    Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health.2015; 49(1): 53.     CrossRef
  • The Current Situation of Treatment Systems for Alcoholism in Korea
    Jee Wook Kim, Boung Chul Lee, Tae-Cheon Kang, Ihn-Geun Choi
    Journal of Korean Medical Science.2013; 28(2): 181.     CrossRef
  • Psychosocial Correlates of Length of Stay of Institutionalized Patients with Mental Illness
    Jung Kyoo Choi, Hong-Suk Jang, Myung-Soo Lee, Jin Pyo Hong, Jong-Ik Park
    Journal of Korean Neuropsychiatric Association.2013; 52(2): 98.     CrossRef
Association between the Pattern of Prophylactic Antibiotic Use and Surgical Site Infection Rate for Major Surgeries in Korea.
Pilyong Sakong, Jin Seok Lee, Eun Jung Lee, Kwang Pil Ko, Cheol Hwan Kim, Yoon Kim, Yong Ik Kim
J Prev Med Public Health. 2009;42(1):12-20.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2009.42.1.12
  • 5,348 View
  • 89 Download
  • 15 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
The purpose of this study was to analyze the association between the pattern of prophylactic antibiotic use (PAU) and the surgical site infection (SSI) rate for major surgeries in Korea. METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of patients who underwent cardiac, colon and gastric surgery, hysterectomies and hip/knee replacements at 20 hospitals, and inclusive of over 500 beds. We randomly sampled 60 cases per surgery type for patients discharged between September and November, 2006. A total fo 2,924 cases were included in our analysis. Cox's proportional hazard analysis was conducted to evaluate the association between the pattern of PAU and SSI rate. RESULTS: The proportion of patients who received their first prophylactic antibiotics (PA) 1 hour before incision was 65.5%, who received inappropriate PAs was 80.8%, and the proportion of patients whose PA was discontinued within 24 hours of surgery was 0.5%. The average duration of PAU after surgery was 9 days. The relative risk (RR) of SSI in patients who received their first PA more than 1 hour before incision was significantly higher than for those who received it within 1 hour prior to incision (RR=8.20, 95% CI=4.81-13.99). Inappropriate PA selection increased SSI rate, albeit with marginal significance (RR=1.97, 95% CI=0.96-4.03). Also, prolonged PAU following surgery had no effect on SSI rate. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that the pattern of PAU in the surgeries examined was not appropriate. Errors in the timing of PAU and of PA selection increase SSI rate. SSI rate remained unaltered following prolonged PAU after surgery.
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  • The effect of first- and third-generation prophylactic antibiotics on hospitalization and medical expenditures for cardiac surgery
    Sung-Jin Bae, Inah Kim, Jaechul Song, Euy-Suk Chung
    Journal of Cardiothoracic Surgery.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Comparison of erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein in patients with distal radius fractures according to the prophylactic antibiotic period: 1 day versus 1 week
    Dae-Geun Kim, Byung Hoon Kwack
    Archives of Hand and Microsurgery.2022; 27(2): 149.     CrossRef
  • Influence of Duration of Prophylactic Antibiotics Therapy on Uncertainty of Recovery in Elective Laparoscopic Uterine Myomectomy Patients
    Mi Young Jung, Kyung-Yeon Park
    Journal of Korean Academy of Fundamentals of Nursing.2018; 25(4): 240.     CrossRef
  • Comparing the Postoperative Complications, Hospitalization Days and Treatment Expenses Depending on the Administration of Postoperative Prophylactic Antibiotics to Hysterectomy
    Mi Young Jung, Kyung-Yeon Park
    Korean Journal of Women Health Nursing.2017; 23(1): 42.     CrossRef
  • Factors affecting the rate of antibiotic prescription in dental practices
    Hyesung Kim, Myeng Ki Kim, Hyungkil Choi
    Journal of Korean Academy of Oral Health.2017; 41(1): 28.     CrossRef
  • Convergence Research on Periodic Changes in the Quality Assessment of Surgical Prophylactic Antibiotics
    Sae-Yie Yang, Kwang-Hwan Kim
    Journal of Digital Convergence.2016; 14(6): 325.     CrossRef
  • Risk Factors for Surgical Site Infections According to Electronic Medical Records Data
    Young Hee Kim, Young-Hee Yom
    Journal of Korean Academy of Fundamentals of Nursing.2014; 21(2): 151.     CrossRef
  • Appropriateness of Surgical Antibiotic Prophylaxis in a Tertiary Hospital
    Eun Young Nam, Hong Bin Kim, Hyunok Bae, Soyoung Moon, Sun Hee Na, Se Yong Kim, Doran Yoon, Ha Youn Lee, Joohae Kim, Chung-Jong Kim, Kyoung-Ho Song, Eu Suk Kim, Nam Joong Kim
    Korean Journal of Nosocomial Infection Control.2014; 19(2): 64.     CrossRef
  • Incidence and Risk Factors for Surgical Site Infection after Gastric Surgery: A Multicenter Prospective Cohort Study
    Su Jin Jeong, Hea Won Ann, Jae Kyung Kim, Heun Choi, Chang Oh Kim, Sang Hoon Han, Jun Yong Choi, Kyong Ran Peck, Cheol-In Kang, Joon-Sup Yeom, Young Hwa Choi, Seung-Kwan Lim, Young Goo Song, Hee Jung Choi, Hee Jung Yoon, Hyo-Youl Kim, Young-Keun Kim, Min
    Infection & Chemotherapy.2013; 45(4): 422.     CrossRef
  • Overview of Antibiotic Use in Korea
    Baek-Nam Kim
    Infection & Chemotherapy.2012; 44(4): 250.     CrossRef
  • The epidemiology and cost of surgical site infections in Korea: a systematic review
    Kil Yeon Lee, Kristina Coleman, Dan Paech, Sarah Norris, Jonathan T Tan
    Journal of the Korean Surgical Society.2011; 81(5): 295.     CrossRef
  • A Prospective Study of Single-Dose Antibiotic Prophylaxis in Live Donor Nephrectomy
    Ho Sung Jang, Kyung Hwa Choi, Seung Choul Yang, Woong Kyu Han
    Korean Journal of Urology.2011; 52(2): 115.     CrossRef
  • Association Between Prophylactic Antibiotic Use and Surgical Site Infection Based on Quality Assessment Data in Korea
    Kyoung Hoon Kim, Choon Seon Park, Jin Hee Chang, Nam Soon Kim, Jin Seo Lee, Bo Ram Choi, Byung Ran Lee, Kyoo Duck Lee, Sun Min Kim, Seon A Yeom
    Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health.2010; 43(3): 235.     CrossRef
  • Antimicrobial Prophylaxis Using a 2nd Generation Cephalosporin after Laparoscopic Colorectal Resection: A Randomized Trial of 1-day vs. 3-day
    Han Deok Kwak, Dong Jin Choi, Si Uk Woo, Jin Kim, Jun Won Um, Seon Hahn Kim
    Journal of the Korean Surgical Society.2010; 78(6): 385.     CrossRef
  • A Prospective, Multicenter, Randomized Trial for Duration of the Prophylactic Antibiotics after Elective Colorectal Surgery: 3 Days versus 5 Days
    Ji Won Park, Jae Hwan Oh, Hyo Seong Choi, Sang-Bum Yoo, Young-Ju Choe, Sohee Park, Jung Man Kim, Kang Young Lee, Seung Kook Sohn, Hae Ran Yun, Ho-Kyung Chun, Woo Yong Lee
    Journal of the Korean Society of Coloproctology.2010; 26(2): 123.     CrossRef
The Socioeconomic Cost of Injuries in South Korea.
Kunhee Park, Jin Seok Lee, Yoon Kim, Yong Ik Kim, Jaiyong Kim
J Prev Med Public Health. 2009;42(1):5-11.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2009.42.1.5
  • 5,376 View
  • 60 Download
  • 10 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
This study was conducted to estimate the socioeconomic cost of injuries in South Korea. METHODS: We matched claims data from national health insurance, automobile insurance and industrial accident compensation insurance (IACI), and mortality data obtained from the national statistical office from 2001 to 2003 by patients' unique identifier. Socioeconomic cost included both direct cost and indirect cost: the direct cost was injury-related medical expenditure and the indirect cost included loss of productivity due to healthcare utilization and premature death. RESULTS: The socioeconomic cost of injuries in Korea was approximately 1.9% of the GDP from 2001 to 2003. That is, 12.1 trillion KRW (Korean Won) in 2001, 12.3 trillion KRW in 2002, and 13.7 trillion KRW in 2003. In 2003, direct medical costs were 24.6% (3.4 trillion KRW), the costs for loss of productivity by healthcare utilization were 13.0% (1.8 trillion KRW), and the costs for loss of productivity by premature death were 62.4% (8.6 trillion KRW). CONCLUSIONS: In this study, the socioeconomic cost of injuries in Korea between 2001 and 2003 was estimated by using not only health insurance claims data, but also automobile insurance, IACI claims and mortality data. We conclude that social efforts are required to reduce the socioeconomic cost of injuries in Korea, which represented approximately 1.9% of the GDP for the time period specified.
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  • Relationships between trauma death, disability, and geographic factors: a systematic review
    Bona Hwang, Taewook Jeong, Jiyeon Jo
    Clinical and Experimental Emergency Medicine.2023; 10(4): 426.     CrossRef
  • Positive correlation between regional emergency medical resources and mortality in severely injured patients: results from the Korean National Hospital Discharge In-depth Survey
    Hyo Jung Lee, Yeong Jun Ju, Eun-Cheol Park
    CJEM.2017; 19(06): 450.     CrossRef
  • Characteristics and Outcomes of Trauma Patients via Emergency Medical Services
    Dae Hyun Cho, Jae Gil Lee
    Journal of Trauma and Injury.2017; 30(4): 120.     CrossRef
  • Disability-Adjusted Life Years (DALYs) for Injuries Using Death Certificates and Hospital Discharge Survey by the Korean Burden of Disease Study 2012
    Won Kyung Lee, Dohee Lim, Hyesook Park
    Journal of Korean Medical Science.2016; 31(Suppl 2): S200.     CrossRef
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    Kang Hyun Lee
    Journal of the Korean Medical Association.2016; 59(12): 917.     CrossRef
  • Characteristics of Korean Trauma Patients: A Single-center Analysis Using the Korea Trauma Database
    Youngeun Park, Min Chung, Gil Jae Lee, Min A Lee, Jae Jeong Park, Kang Kook Choi, Sung Youl Hyun, Yang Bin Jeon, Dae Sung Ma, Yong-Cheol Yoon, Jungnam Lee, Byungchul Yoo
    Journal of Trauma and Injury.2016; 29(4): 155.     CrossRef
  • Analysis of KTDB Registered Trauma Patients from a Single Trauma Center in Korea
    Byungchul Yu, Min Chung, Giljae Lee, Mina Lee, Jaejeong Park, Kangkook Choi, Sungyeol Hyun, Yangbin Jeon, Daesung Ma, Young-cheol Yoon, Jungnam Lee
    Journal of Trauma and Injury.2015; 28(3): 123.     CrossRef
  • The costs of hepatitis A infections in South Korea
    Kyohyun Kim, Baek-Geun Jeong, Moran Ki, Mira Park, Jin Kyung Park, Bo Youl Choi, Weon-Seob Yoo
    Epidemiology and Health.2014; 36: e2014011.     CrossRef
  • Multilevel Analysis on Factors Influencing Death and Transfer in Inpatient with Severe Injury
    Young Eun Choi, Kang Suk Lee
    Health Policy and Management.2013; 23(3): 233.     CrossRef
  • Trend of Mortality Rate and Injury Burden of Transport Accidents, Suicides, and Falls
    Ki Sook Kim, Soon Duck Kim, Sang Hee Lee
    Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health.2012; 45(1): 8.     CrossRef
Factors Affecting Social Distance toward Mental Illness: A Nationwide Telephone Survey in Korea.
Sangjun Moon, Jin Seok Lee, Sue Kyung Park, Sun Young Lee, Yoon Kim, Yong Ik Kim, Youngsoo Shin
J Prev Med Public Health. 2008;41(6):419-426.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2008.41.6.419
  • 4,880 View
  • 66 Download
  • 4 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVE
The purpose of this study was to investigate impact of knowledge, familiarity, and prejudice about mental illness as well as demographic factors on the social distance from mentally ill people, which is a proxy measure of discrimination. METHOD: To assess the impact of knowledge and familiarity, prejudice about mental illness and demographic factors on the social distance from mental illness, we conducted a telephone survey in South Korea with the responders being nationally representative people who were 18 years old or over (n=1040). Independent samples T-tests, one way ANOVA and linear regression analysis were performed to analyze the results of the survey. RESULT: The social distance from mental illness decreased as the knowledge and familiarity increased, but the social distance was increased as prejudice was increased. Prejudice had a greater impact on social distance than familiarity and knowledge. Females showed greater social distance than did males. A higher education level had a negative effect on social distance. CONCLUSION: To reduce the social distance from mentally ill people, efforts to increase the familiarity about mental illness as well as efforts to educate people about mental illness are important.
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  • Social Distance Attitudes of Nursing Students towards Adults with Mental Disorders
    So Young Lee, Kyunghee Lee
    Journal of Korean Academy of Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing.2016; 25(4): 356.     CrossRef
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    Claire Nee, Clare Witt
    Psychiatry Research.2013; 209(3): 675.     CrossRef
  • Factors Affecting Public Prejudice and Social Distance on Mental Illness: Analysis of Contextual Effect by Multi-level Analysis
    Hyeongap Jang, Jun-Tae Lim, Juhwan Oh, Seon-Young Lee, Yong-Ik Kim, Jin-Seok Lee
    Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health.2012; 45(2): 90.     CrossRef
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    Mia Seo, Hyun Lye Kim
    Asian Nursing Research.2010; 4(2): 90.     CrossRef
The Incidence and Patterns of Unintentional Injuries in Daily Life in Korea: A Nationwide Study.
Kunhee Park, Sang Jun Eun, Eun Jung Lee, Chae Eun Lee, Doo Yong Park, Kyounghun Han, Yoon Kim, Jin Seok Lee
J Prev Med Public Health. 2008;41(4):265-271.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2008.41.4.265
  • 5,665 View
  • 53 Download
  • 15 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
This study was conducted to estimate the cumulative incidence rate (CIR) of unintentional injuries in Korean daily life and to describe the pattern of unintentional injuries. METHODS: The study population was the people who used the National Health Insurance because of injuries (ICD code: S00~T98) during 2006. The stratified sample according to gender, age and the severity of injury (NISS, New Injury Severity Score) was randomly selected. The questions on the questionnaire were developed as a reference for an international classification tool (ICECI, International Classification of External Causes of Injury). The questions included the locations of injury, the mechanisms of injury and the results of injury. Moreover, we used age, gender, region and income variables for analysis. RESULTS: The CIR of unintentional injuries that occurred in daily life for 1 year per 100,000 persons was 17,606, and the CIR of severe injuries was 286. Many injuries were occurred at home (29.6%), public places (19.0%), school (13.7%) and near home (12.0%). The major mechanisms of injuries were slipping (48.8%), contact (14.0%), physical over-exertion (13.8%), and fall (6.6%). Infants and old aged people were vulnerable to injuries, and those who lived rural area and who were in a low income level were vulnerable too. CONCLUSIONS: We signified the risk groups and risk settings of unintentional injuries in Korean daily life. These results could contribute to establishing strategies for injury prevention and implementing these strategies.
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    Korean Journal of Health Education and Promotion.2023; 40(1): 101.     CrossRef
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    Ah-Ra Jo, Mi-Jeong Park, Byung-Gue Lee, Young-Gyun Seo, Hong-Ji Song, Yu-Jin Paek, Kyung-Hee Park, Hye-Mi Noh
    Korean Journal of Family Medicine.2020; 41(2): 111.     CrossRef
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    Kun Zhang, Yoshifumi Nishida, Koji Kitamura, Yoshiki Mikami
    Safety Science.2019; 115: 199.     CrossRef
  • The Pyramid of Injury: Estimation of the Scale of Adolescent Injuries According to Severity
    Hyejin Han, Bomi Park, Bohyun Park, Namsoo Park, Ju Ok Park, Ki Ok Ahn, Yang Ju Tak, Hye Ah Lee, Hyesook Park
    Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health.2018; 51(3): 163.     CrossRef
  • Epidemiology and Regional Distribution of Pediatric Unintentional Emergency Injury in Korea from 2010 to 2011
    Jin Hee Jung, Do Kyun Kim, Hye Young Jang, Young Ho Kwak
    Journal of Korean Medical Science.2015; 30(11): 1625.     CrossRef
  • Estimating social and economic costs for outpatient injuries by using Korea medical panel data
    Eun-Mi Choi, In-Sook Yoo
    Journal of the Korea Industrial Information Systems Research.2015; 20(4): 55.     CrossRef
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    In Sook Yoo
    The journal of the convergence on culture technology.2015; 1(4): 87.     CrossRef
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    In-Sook Yoo, Eun-Mi Choi, Ho-Jang Kwon, Sang-Gyu Lee
    Journal of the Korea Academia-Industrial cooperation Society.2012; 13(4): 1690.     CrossRef
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    Ki Sook Kim, Soon Duck Kim, Sang Hee Lee
    Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health.2012; 45(1): 8.     CrossRef
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    K. McKenzie, L. Fingerhut, S. Walker, A. Harrison, J. E. Harrison
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    Boyoung Park, Yeon-Kyeng Lee, Lisa Y. Cho, Un Yeong Go, Jae Jeong Yang, Seung Hyun Ma, Bo-Youl Choi, Moo-Sik Lee, Jin-Seok Lee, Eun Hwa Choi, Hoan Jong Lee, Sue K. Park
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    Eun-Ha Lee, Hoo-Yeon Lee, Kui Son Choi, Jae Kwan Jun, Eun-Cheol Park, Jin Soo Lee
    Cancer Research and Treatment.2011; 43(3): 141.     CrossRef
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    Sung-Soo Kim, Won-Joong Kim, Sung-Hong Kang
    Journal of the Korea Academia-Industrial cooperation Society.2011; 12(6): 2668.     CrossRef
  • Patterns of Unintentional Domestic Injuries in Korea
    Eun-Jung Lee, Jin-Seok Lee, Yoon Kim, Kunhee Park, Sang Jun Eun, Soo Kyung Suh, Yong-Ik Kim
    Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health.2010; 43(1): 84.     CrossRef
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Factors Affecting Comsumer's Usage of Health Information on the Internet.
Jong Hyock Park, Jin Seok Lee, Hyejung Jang, Yoon Kim
J Prev Med Public Health. 2008;41(4):241-248.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2008.41.4.241
  • 4,920 View
  • 56 Download
  • 2 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
The purpose of the study was to identify a gap between consumer characteristics and utilization of health information on the Internet. METHODS: A telephone survey of nationally representative samples was conducted using structured questionnaires, and 1,000 of the 1,189 responses obtained were included in our analysis. The following variables were included in the analysis as potential predictors of health information use on the Internet: predisposing factors such as gender, age, and education status; enabling factors such as region and monthly household income; consumer need for health information; and attitude to health. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to evaluate the association between utilization rate and the potential predictors. RESULTS: Thirty-nine percent of consumers had obtained health information on the Internet over a one-year period. The utilization rates were higher for consumers who were young, educated, worked in the office setting, had higher incomes, wanted health information, and were able to use the Internet. The utilization rate was 5.35 times higher in the younger group (20-30 years) than in the elderly group (95% CI=2.21-12.97); 2.21 times higher for office workers than for manual workers (95% CI=1.16-4.20); 3.61 times higher for college graduates than for middle school graduates and below (95% CI=1.07-11.59); 1.99 times higher for people with monthly household incomes over 3,000,000 won than for those with monthly household incomes below 1,500,000 won (95% CI=1.01-3.92). CONCLUSIONS: There needs to be a paradigm shift, with consideration of not only Internet accessibility in the digital age, but also consumer ability and attitudes toward utilization of health information.
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  • Medical Professionals' Review of YouTube Videos Pertaining to Exercises for the Constipation Relief
    Tae Hee Lee, Seong-Eun Kim, Kyung Sik Park, Jeong Eun Shin, Seon-Young Park, Han Seung Ryu, Jung-Wook Kim, Yoo Jin Lee, Young Sin Cho, Suyeon Park
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Physician Factors Associated with the Blood Pressure Control among Hypertensive Patients.
So Young Kim, In Sook Cho, Jae Ho Lee, Ji Hyun Kim, Eun Jung Lee, Jong Hyock Park, Jin Seok Lee, Yoon Kim
J Prev Med Public Health. 2007;40(6):487-494.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2007.40.6.487
  • 4,729 View
  • 42 Download
  • 6 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
Little is known about the physician-related factors that are associated with the management of hypertension. The purpose of this study was to determine the physician-related factors associated with blood pressure control in hypertensive patients. METHODS: We surveyed 154 physicians at 117 public health (subhealth) centers in Gyeonggi-do. Forty-one physicians completed the survey (response rates: 26.6%) and 31 physicians were finally included as the study subjects. Using the information obtained from the selfreported survey, we measured the physician-related factors associated with hypertension control, including their perception of hypertension, prescription patterns (combination prescription rates, specific antihypertensives prescription rates among patients with diabetes mellitus), and sociodemographic factors. We then collected data on blood pressure and medication use in patients seen by these physicians from the health center's information system. We compared the physicians' perceived hypertension control rates with the actual rates, and then evaluated the rate of high overestimation (overestimation by more than 25% of the median degree of hypertension control rate overestimation) among the physicians. The physicians' antihypertensive prescription patterns were also evaluated. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to evaluate the independent association between hypertension control and physicianrelated factors. RESULTS: The physicians tended to overestimate the proportion of their patients with controlled blood pressure (79.5% perceived vs. 57.8% actual). The percentage of physicians with high overestimation was 35.5% (11 physicians). The physicians with lower control rates were more likely to highly overestimate their patients' control rates. Physicians with below-median actual control rates tended to prescribe fewer combination treatments for patients with uncontrolled blood pressure and angiotensinconverting enzyme inhibitors or fewer angiotensin receptor blockers for patients with diabetes mellitus. The rate of high overestimation by physicians was 1.31 times higher in patients with uncontrolled blood pressure than in patients with other conditions (OR=1.31, 95% CI: 1.17-1.48). CONCLUSIONS: Physicians have a tendency to overestimate the rates of hypertension control in their patients. Because physicians have a direct role in treatment outcomes, physicians' overestimation about hypertension management contributes to inadequate blood pressure control. Thus, interventions for improving physician' awareness regarding the management of patients with hypertension are needed.
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Factors Affecting National Health Insurance Mass Screening Participation in the Disabled.
Jong Hyock Park, Jin Seok Lee, Jin Yong Lee, Ji Young Hong, So Young Kim, Seong Ok Kim, Byong Hee Cho, Yong Ik Kim, Youngsoo Shin, Yoon Kim
J Prev Med Public Health. 2006;39(6):511-519.
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OBJECTIVES
As the disabled have higher prevalence rates and earlier onsets of chronic diseases than the nondisabled, their participation in mass screening is important for the early detection and intervention of chronic diseases. Nevertheless, in Korea, the disabled have lower participation rates in mass screening services than the nondisabled. The purpose of the study was to find determinants for the participation in the National Health Insurance (NHI) mass screening program among the disabled. METHODS: In this study, the NHI mass screening data of 423,076 disabled people, which were identified using the National Disability Registry (2003), were analyzed. Of the factors affecting the participation rates in mass screenings, the following variables were included for the analysis: socioeconomic stati, such as sex, age, category of health insurance program, region and income; disability characteristics, such as disability type, and severity. A multiple logistic regression analysis was used to evaluate the association between the participation rates, disability characteristics variables and demographic variables. RESULTS: The participation rate in mass screening of the disabled was 41.3%, but was lower in females, an age of more than 70 years, self-employed and for those with an average monthly insurance premium over 133,500 Won and in metropolitan regions. The participation rate was 1.31 times lower in females than males (95% CI=1.29-1.33); 3.50 times lower in the elderly (more than 70 years) than the younger (95% CI=3.33-3.67); 1.43 times lower in those who live in metropolitan areas (95% CI=1.40-1.46); 2.59 times lower for those in a health insurance program for the self-employed than for employees (95% CI=2.56-2.63); 1.19 times lower for the higher income (more than 133,500) than the lower income group (4,400-22,000) for the average monthly insurance premium (95% CI=1.15-1.23); 2.04 times lower for those with brain palsy and stroke disabilities than with auditory impairments (95% CI= 1.97-2.11) and 3.27 times for those with severe compared to mild disabilities (95% CI=3.15-3.40). CONCLUSIONS: The disabled with high severity, and locomotive and communication disabilities have lower participation rates in mass screening services in Korea.
Summary
Differences in Medical Care Utilization Rates of the Disabled and the Non-disabled with Ambulatory Care Sensitive Conditions.
Sang Jun Eun, Jee Young Hong, Jin Yong Lee, Jin Seok Lee, Yoon Kim, Yong Ik Kim, Youngsoo Shin
J Prev Med Public Health. 2006;39(5):411-418.
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OBJECTIVES
The purpose of this study was to determine whether the disabled have worse access to primary care than the non-disabled. METHODS: We used the National Disability Registry data and the National Health Insurance data for the calendar year 2003, and we analyzed 807,380 disabled persons who had been registered until December 2001 and we also analyzed 1,614,760 non-disabled persons for nine ambulatory care sensitive conditions (ACSCs). The rates of physician visits and hospitalizations for the patients with ACSCs were compared between the disabled and the nondisabled. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to evaluate the association between medical care utilization and disability and to assess the association between hospitalization and the number of physician visits while controlling for potential confounders. RESULTS: The numbers of physician visits per 100 patients were 0.78~0.97 times lower for the disabled than that for the non-disabled with five of nine ACSCs. The numbers of hospitalizations per 100 patients were 1.16~1.77 times higher for the disabled than that for the non-disabled with all the ACSCs. While the ORs of a physician visit for the disabled were significantly lower than that for the non-disabled with all the ACSCs (OR: 0.44~0.70), and the ORs of hospitalization for the disabled were significantly higher (OR: 1.16~1.89). The lower physician visit group (number of physician visits < or =1) was more likely to be hospitalized than the higher physician visit group (number of physician visits > or =2) (OR: 1.69~19.77). The effect of the physician visit rate on hospitalization was larger than the effect of disability on hospitalization. CONCLUSIONS: The results suggest that the disabled were more likely to be hospitalized for ACSCs due to their lower access to primary care.
Summary
Changes in Smoking Status among Current Male Smokers and Factors Associated with Smoking Cessation Success.
Jin Seok Lee, Yangjung Kim, Won Nyon Kim, Seung Sik Hwang, Yong Ik Kim
J Prev Med Public Health. 2006;39(4):339-345.
  • 1,916 View
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OBJECTIVES
This study (a) investigated the rate of smoking cessation sucess for current male smokers, and (b) identified the factors that are associated with the smoking cessation success. METHODS: Data were collected from four follow-up surveys of 700 current male smokers. The follow-up period was from December 2004 to June 2005. Success of smoking cessation was defined as "maintaining a smoking cessation status for six months". The demographic and socioeconomic factors included age, the household income level and, occupation. The smoking behavioral factors were composed of the amount of smoking, the duration of smoking, the age of initiating smoking, the willingness to quit, the frequency of trying to quit smoking and the smoker`s attitude toward the anti-smoking policies. RESULTS: The proportion of quitters increased from 6.6% to 11.0% during the follow-up period. The majority of quitters answered that the increase of tobacco price acted as cue to achieve smoking cessation. The agestandardized experience and success rate of smoking cessation were 16.0% (95% C.I.=13.0% to, 19.0%) and 4.5% (95% C.I.=3.0% to, 6.0%), respectively. On the multivariate analysis, success for smoking cessation was associated with the willingness to quit smoking, low prior tobacco consumption, and agreement on the tobacco price increase. CONCLUSIONS: The results of this study suggest that the recent anti-smoking policies provided an opportunity to quit smoking. The results of this study can be used to establish evidence for further anti-smoking policies.
Summary
Current Status and Reasons for the Location Change of Primary Medical Institutions in Korea.
Beom Man Ha, Soon Ae Shin, Jin Seok Lee, Chang Yup Kim, Yong Ik Kim
Korean J Prev Med. 2001;34(3):219-227.
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OBJECTIVES
To understand the current status of the opening, closing and relocation of primary medical institutes in Korea and identify the underlying decision factors. METHODS: Sources of analyzed data included the medical institutional master file at the National Health Insurance Corporation (1998, 2000) and Regional Statistic Annual Bulletins. To investigate changes including the opening, closing and relocation, a total of primary medicalinstitutions (16,757 in 1998, 19,267 in 2000) were analysed. RESULTS: Between 1998 and 2000, there was a 15.0% (2,510) increase in the number of primary medical institutions and the rate of increase in the rural area was higher than the urban area, and higher for specialty clinics than primary practice. However, these findings did not suggestany improvement in the maldistribution of primary medical institutions. During the time period studied, newly opened and closed primary medical institutions numbered 4,085 and 1,573, respectively. Additionally, institutions thatrelocated numbered 2,729, or 16.3%of all primary medical institutions in operation in 1998. These openings and closings were more frequent among young doctors. As a result of our analysis on the underlying regional factors forrelocation, the factors that were statistically significant were local per capita tax burden and the number of schools per ten thousand persons. In the case of institutional factors, movements were significantly associated with gender and the location of primary medical institutions. CONCLUSIONS: In order to establish effective long-term intervention for primary medical institutions, further study and monitoring of primary medical institutions and the dentification of factors influencing opening location and relocation is necessary.
Summary
Severity-Adjusted Mortality Rates: The Case of CABG Surgery.
Hyeung Keun Park, Hyeongsik Ahn, Young Dae Kwon, You Cheol Shin, Jin Seok Lee, Hae Joon Kim, Moon Jun Sohn
Korean J Prev Med. 2001;34(1):21-27.
  • 1,932 View
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OBJECTIVES
To develop a model that will predict the mortality of patients undergoing Coronary Artery Bypass Graft (CABG) and evaluate the performance of hospitals. METHODS: Data from 564 CABGs performed in six general hospitals were collected through medical record abstraction by registered nurses. Variables studied involved risk factors determined by severity measures. Risk modeling was performed through logistic regression and validated with cross-validation. The statistical performance of the developed model was evaluated using c-statistic, R2, and Hosmer-Lemeshow statistic. Hospital performance was assessed by severity-adjusted mortalities. RESULTS: The developed model included age, sex, BUN, EKG rhythm, Congestive Heart Failure at admission, acute mental change within 24 hours, and previous angina pectoris history. The c-statistic and R2 were 0.791 and 0.101, respectively. Hosmer-Lemeshow statistic was 10.3(p value=0.2415). One hospital had a significantly higher mortality rate than the average mortality rate, while others were not significantly different. CONCLUSION: Comparing the quality of service by severity adjusted mortality rates, there were significant differences in hospital performance. The severity adjusted mortality rate of CABG surgery may be an indicator for evaluating hospital performance in Korea.
Summary
Relationship between Percutaneous Transluminal Coronary Angioplasty Volume and Associated Immediate Outcome.
Young Ho Khang, Yong Ik Kim, Chang Yup Kim, Young Sung Lee, Sunmean Kim, Jin Seok Lee, Byung Hee Oh
Korean J Prev Med. 2001;34(1):9-20.
  • 1,915 View
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OBJECTIVES
To explore the relationship between Percutaneous Transluminal Coronary Angioplasty (PTCA) volume and the associated immediate outcome. METHODS: A total of 1,379 PTCAs were performed in 25 hospitals in Korea between October 1 and December 31 in 1997. Data from 1,317 PTCAs (95.5%) were collected through medical record abstraction. Inter-observer reliability of the data was examined using the Kappa statistic on a subsample of 110 PTCA procedures from five hospitals. Intra-observer reliability of the data was also examined. PTCA success and immediate adverse outcomes were selected as the outcome variables. A successful PTCA was defined as a case that shows less than 50% diameter stenosis and more than 20% reduction of diameter stenosis. Immediate adverse outcomes included deaths during the same hospitalization, emergency coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) within 24 hours after PTCA, and acute myocardial infarction within 24 hours after PTCA. The numbers of PTCAs performed in 1997 per hospital were used as the volume variables. RESULTS: Without adjusting for patient risk factors that may affect outcomes, procedures at high volume hospitals (200 cases per year) had a greater success rate (P=0.001) than low volume hospitals. There was a marginally significant difference (P=0.070) in major adverse outcome rates between high and low volume hospitals. After adjusting for risk factors, there were significant differences in procedural failure and major adverse outcome rates between high and low volume hospitals. CONCLUSIONS: After adjusting for patient clinical risk factors, the hospital volume of PTCA was associated with immediate outcomes. It is recommended that a PTCA volume per year be established in order to improve the immediate outcome of this procedure in Korea.
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Factors Affecting Users' Satisfaction with Order Communicating System.
Jin Seok Lee, Chang Yup Kim, Bum Man Ha, Gilwon Kang, Byoung Yik Kim, Yong Ik Kim
Korean J Prev Med. 2000;33(4):436-448.
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OBJECTIVES
To identify the factors affecting users' satisfaction with the Order Communicating System(OCS) and to highlight the factors important for the successful establishment of OCS. METHODS: A Users Satisfaction survey was sent to 4,513 people, consisting of 1,503 doctors, 2,379 nurses, 255 pharmacists and 370 administrative workers in 16 hospitals which had introduced OCS. The response rate was 63.9%. Measurement of users' satisfaction was performed with the instrument which was used in Doll's study. Some aspects of Doll's instrument were adjusted according to the aims of this study. The classifying sections of this survey included age, job and status classification, computer experience , OCS education, duration of daily OCS use, type of order entering, number of personnel in the Hospital Information System's department, cost of OCS, problem frequency, proportion of work managed by hand, OCS type, and Hospital establishment type. RESULTS: There was a positive correlation between satisfaction level and managerial status throughout all job classifications. Irrespective of the importance of OCS education as a factor relating to users' satisfaction, the additional work load caused by OCS lowered users' satisfaction. Different factors affected users' satisfaction according to job and status classification. The composition of factors affecting the pharmacist and administrative worker satisfaction levels was simpler than that of the doctor and nurse levels. There were no statistically significant differences between the actual computer experience duration of daily OCS use and users' satisfaction with OCS. CONCLUSIONS: There was an understandable relationship between users' attitude to OCS and factors affecting users' satisfaction. The results of this study could be used as a basis for the successful expansion of the operation of OCS. But more detailed studies on users' satisfaction and further improvements of methodologies are required for the successful establishment of OCS.
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JPMPH : Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health