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In Ho Chu 3 Articles
An Observation on the Incidence of Drowning Death in Korea.
Chang Yong Chee, Young Chun Kim, Byung Joo Lee, In Ho Chu
Korean J Prev Med. 1968;1(1):79-86.
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  • 33 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
This paper describes the incidence and some epidemiological features of drowning accident out of a series of our study on the epidemiology of various accidents in Korea. By the daily press it is apparent from the frequent reporting of swimming accidents that the incidence would be high. In the rural areas, there are, at present about 1,250 artificial lakes and farm ponds to be utilized for rice production. The reservoirs, irrigation ditches and riversides are also used for recreation. In most places facilities for aquatic activities is meager, and safety measures for the prevention of drowning is not sufficiently enforced. In the survey crude data on drowning were collected from the concerned governmental statistic books for the period 1955 to 1967 which were compiled not in a uniform way. Drowning were classified into two categories, one is accidental drowning, E929 and the other is due to cataclysm, E934, according to the WHO international classification of diseases. Epidemiological variables in relation to drowning accident were obtained through qualitative analysis of informations from the popular newspapers. The following summary may be drawn; 1. The average number of deaths due to accidental drowning totaled 1,088 annually and the mortality rate per 100,000 population was 3.4. The 42.0% of all drowning were rescued and the remaining were not saved. 2. The sex ration(M/F) of the victims for all ages was 5 to 1, which had a wide range of difference among the age groups. The young ages less than 20 years occupied 68.0% of all deaths. 3. The percentage distribution of the causes of accidents revealed 31.9% for careless swimming, 45.5% for unskilled, 16.6% for swimmer's cramp and 6.0% for drunken. The distribution of places where accidents occurred showed 88.0% for rivers, water reservoirs, irrigation ditches and 12.0% for regular swimming pools. The seasonal distribution of cases indicated 85.0% of the total were seen during the summer months, June-August, and 50.0% of them occurred on Sundays. 4. The average annual deaths due to cataclysm were 402 and mortality rate per 100,000 population was 1.6, but the number of victims due to cataclysm varied greatly each year. 5. The accident cases due to cataclysm were classified into 60.0% for injuries, 40.0% for deaths. The 26.8% of all deaths were missing cases. 6. The deaths due to either accidental drowning or cataclysm totaled 1,490, and the death rate per 100,000 for the whole country was 5.0.
Summary
An Epidemiological Observation of Fire Accident in Korea.
Chong Dae Lee, Seong Un Han, Soon Duk Bin, In Ho Chu
Korean J Prev Med. 1968;1(1):43-50.
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  • 22 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Epidemiological and statistical observations were made of fire hazards that occurred during the past 18 years, 1948 to 1965. Injury and mortality rates for all ages were computed chronologically. For the years of 1955, 1961 and 1965, all fire accidents were epidemiologically analysed to draw characteristic pattern in relation to the seasonal and 24 hour distribution, causes and sites of accidents etc.. Fire hazards observed herein are the categorys E 916 of the International Classification of Causes of Death, 1955, and includes all accidents caused by fire and explosion of combustible materials. The following conclusion was made: 1. The average umber of annual deaths due to fire was 183 and the number of the injured due to the same cause was 335. The mortality rate per 100,000 population was 0.8 and the ratio of injures per death was 1.8. 2. The casualty rate including both the dead and injured was 5.0 per 100,000 in Seoul, the highest among the provinces and followed by 3.4 in Cheju-Do, 2.1 in Kangwon-Do, 1.7 in Kyunggi-Do accordingly. The other provinces had a range of 0.6 to 1.2. 3. The monthly distribution of fire accidents showed that the winter months, December through February, had more frequent accidents, while the summer season, June through August had less. The 24 hour distribution of accidents showed more cases from 12:00 to 18:00 and less from 4:00 to 10:00 hours. 4. The per cent distribution of causes of accidents showed; 90.0% for careless, 10.0% for arson. The cause of carelessness was further breakdown into; 15.0% for kitchen fire places, 13.8% for fire playing, 9.4% for electrical heating and wires, 8.3% for fuels, 6.3% for matches, 5.2% for ash dumps and the remaining for others. 5. The accidents as classified by place revealed that 56.8% of the total occurred at the common dwelling houses, 11.3 at various industrial workshops, 9.3% at the street shops and the remaining at the miscellaneous places.
Summary
An Observation on the Mortality Rates of Transport Accidents in Korea.
In Ho Chu, Jung Ja Park, Suk Hwan Oh, Jae Hee Han
Korean J Prev Med. 1968;1(1):1-8.
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  • 48 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
This paper describes the incidence of transport accident for the period, 1955-1965. Transport accidents were classified into three categories, viz. railway(WHO Classification of Diseases, E-802), watercraft(E850-E858) and motor vehicle accidents(E810-E835, E840-E841, E844-E845). Crude data on the subject were collected from the various sources of Government Statistical Books including Statistical Year Books edited by the Central Office of Economic Planning Board, Annual Police Reports by the Ministry of Home Affairs, and the national and local associations for road traffic safety. From the data incidence and mortality rates by year, month and local province were computed and other variables relevant to the epidemiology of accidents were observed. The following summary could be drawn: 1. Death rates due to transport accidents per 100,000 population were 12.3 for 1955 and 9.7 and 1965. The incidence of injury due to the same cause were 34.0 for 1955 and 35.9 for 1965. 2. Death rates by transportation vehicle showed 9.0 due to motor vehicle accidents, 1.7 due to water-crafts, and 1.6 due to railway trains for 1955. In 1965 death rates were 6.0 due to motor vehicles, 1.2 to water-crafts and 2.4 to railway. 3. Seasonal distribution of transport accidents revealed that car accidents occur more frequently in spring and fall seasons while ship accidents do in winter and train accidents more in summer. 4. Both car and ship accidents slightly decreased during the past decade, 1955-1965, whereas the accidents of railway trains showed a tendency of increase. 5. Although the survey on railway accidents excluded the injuries of passengers or railway employees corresponding to WHO classification of diseases, E801, due to inaccuracy of data, it is roughly estimated that the same number of causalities as the incidence among pedestrians or any other than passengers or employees assumed to be at work(E 802).
Summary

JPMPH : Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health