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Byung Chul Chun 13 Articles
Gender Inequalities in Mental Health During the COVID-19 Pandemic: A Population-based Study in Korea
Minku Kang, Sarah Yu, Seung-Ah Choe, Daseul Moon, Myung Ki, Byung Chul Chun
J Prev Med Public Health. 2023;56(5):413-421.   Published online August 19, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.23.170
  • 1,620 View
  • 106 Download
AbstractAbstract AbstractSummary PDFSupplementary Material
Objectives
This study explored the effect of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic on psychosocial stress in prime working-age individuals in Korea, focusing on gender inequalities. We hypothesized that the impact of COVID-19 on mental health would differ by age and gender, with younger women potentially demonstrating heightened vulnerability relative to men.
Methods
The study involved data from the Korea Community Health Survey and included 319 592 adults aged 30 years to 49 years. We employed log-binomial regression analysis, controlling for variables including age, education, employment status, marital status, and the presence of children. The study period included 3 phases: the period prior to the COVID-19 outbreak (pre–COVID-19), the early pandemic, and the period following the introduction of vaccinations (post-vaccination).
Results
The findings indicated that women were at a heightened risk of psychosocial stress during the early pandemic (relative risk [RR], 1.01; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.98 to 1.05) and post-vaccination period (RR, 1.07; 95% CI, 1.04 to 1.10) compared to men. This pattern was prominent in urban women aged 30-34 years (pre–COVID-19: RR, 1.06; 95% CI, 1.02 to 1.10; early pandemic: RR, 1.16; 95% CI, 1.08 to 1.25; post-vaccination period, RR, 1.22; 95% CI, 1.14 to 1.31).
Conclusions
The COVID-19 pandemic has exerted unequal impacts on psychosocial stress among prime working-age individuals in Korea, with women, particularly those in urban areas, experiencing a heightened risk. The findings highlight the importance of addressing gender-specific needs and implementing appropriate interventions to mitigate the psychosocial consequences of the pandemic.
Summary
Korean summary
코로나19 대유행이 국내 경제활동인구의 정신건강에 미친 젠더화된 영향을 조사하였다. 연구대상자는 2017-2021년 지역사회건강조사 조사대상자 319,592명이다. 연구 결과, 대유행 이후 30-39세 연령대 여성의 스트레스 수준이 남성에 비하여 현저히 증가한 것으로 나타났으며, 사회적 거리두기를 엄격하게 시행하였던 도시 지역에서 이러한 경향이 두드러졌다. 이번 연구 결과는 대유행 대응 노력에서 취약 집단을 지원하기 위한 중재 정책의 필요성을 강조한다
Key Message
We investigate the gendered impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the mental health of the working-age population in Korea, focusing on ages 30-49, utilizing data from the Korea Community Health Survey (KCHS) from 2017 to 2021 including 319,592 participants. Findings reveal a notable increase in stress levels among women in the 30-39 age group after the pandemic compared to men, accentuating in urban areas with stringent social distancing measures. Our results underscore the necessity for intervention policies to support vulnerable groups in pandemic response efforts.
Estimating Influenza-associated Mortality in Korea: The 2009-2016 Seasons
Kwan Hong, Sangho Sohn, Byung Chul Chun
J Prev Med Public Health. 2019;52(5):308-315.   Published online August 23, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.19.156
  • 21,330 View
  • 324 Download
  • 14 Crossref
AbstractAbstract AbstractSummary PDF
Objectives
Estimating influenza-associated mortality is important since seasonal influenza affects persons of all ages, causing severe illness or death. This study aimed to estimate influenza-associated mortality, considering both periodic changes and age-specific mortality by influenza subtypes.
Methods
Using the Microdata Integrated Service from Statistics Korea, we collected weekly mortality data including cause of death. Laboratory surveillance data of respiratory viruses from 2009 to 2016 were obtained from the Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. After adjusting for the annual age-specific population size, we used a negative binomial regression model by age group and influenza subtype.
Results
Overall, 1 859 890 deaths were observed and the average rate of influenza virus positivity was 14.7% (standard deviation [SD], 5.8), with the following subtype distribution: A(H1N1), 5.0% (SD, 5.8); A(H3N2), 4.4% (SD, 3.4); and B, 5.3% (SD, 3.7). As a result, among individuals under 65 years old, 6774 (0.51%) all-cause deaths, 2521 (3.05%) respiratory or circulatory deaths, and 1048 (18.23%) influenza or pneumonia deaths were estimated. Among those 65 years of age or older, 30 414 (2.27%) all-cause deaths, 16 411 (3.42%) respiratory or circulatory deaths, and 4906 (6.87%) influenza or pneumonia deaths were estimated. Influenza A(H3N2) virus was the major contributor to influenza-associated all-cause and respiratory or circulatory deaths in both age groups. However, influenza A(H1N1) virus–associated influenza or pneumonia deaths were more common in those under 65 years old.
Conclusions
Influenza-associated mortality was substantial during this period, especially in the elderly. By subtype, influenza A(H3N2) virus made the largest contribution to influenza-associated mortality.
Summary
Korean summary
계절 인플루엔자는 심각한 호흡기 합병증으로 진행할 수 있어 질병 부담의 추산이 중요한 질병이다. 현재까지는 연령별, 인플루엔자 연관 사망을 정확하게 추산하기 어려웠으나, 본 연구에서는 이를 추산하기 위해 고안된 다양한 방법 중 음이항 회귀 분석을 이용하여 2009년부터 2016년간 인플루엔자 아형별 연관 사망을 추산하였다. 그 결과, 전체 사망자 중 65세 미만에서 약 6,774명, 65세 이상에서 약 30,414명의 연간 인플루엔자 사망이 추산되었고, 이는 특히 인플루엔자 아형 중 전체 연령에서 A(H3N2) 연관 사망이 가장 많은 비율을 차지했다.

Citations

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    Boyeon Kim, Eunyoung Kim
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    Journal of Korean Medical Science.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Journal of Infection.2023; 87(3): e54.     CrossRef
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    晓璐 马
    Open Journal of Natural Science.2023; 11(06): 1003.     CrossRef
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    Jeongmin Seo, Juwon Lim, Dong Keon Yon
    PLOS ONE.2022; 17(1): e0262594.     CrossRef
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‘Pneumonia Weather’: Short-term Effects of Meteorological Factors on Emergency Room Visits Due to Pneumonia in Seoul, Korea
Sangho Sohn, Wonju Cho, Jin A Kim, Alaa Altaluoni, Kwan Hong, Byung Chul Chun
J Prev Med Public Health. 2019;52(2):82-91.   Published online February 11, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.18.232
  • 6,785 View
  • 212 Download
  • 18 Crossref
AbstractAbstract AbstractSummary PDF
Objectives
Many studies have explored the relationship between short-term weather and its health effects (including pneumonia) based on mortality, although both morbidity and mortality pose a substantial burden. In this study, the authors aimed to describe the influence of meteorological factors on the number of emergency room (ER) visits due to pneumonia in Seoul, Korea.
Methods
Daily records of ER visits for pneumonia over a 6-year period (2009-2014) were collected from the National Emergency Department Information System. Corresponding meteorological data were obtained from the National Climate Data Service System. A generalized additive model was used to analyze the effects. The percent change in the relative risk of certain meteorological variables, including pneumonia temperature (defined as the change in average temperature from one day to the next), were estimated for specific age groups.
Results
A total of 217 776 ER visits for pneumonia were identified. The additional risk associated with a 1°C increase in pneumonia temperature above the threshold of 6°C was 1.89 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.37 to 2.61). Average temperature and diurnal temperature range, representing within-day temperature variance, showed protective effects of 0.07 (95% CI, 0.92 to 0.93) and 0.04 (95% CI, 0.94 to 0.98), respectively. However, in the elderly (65+ years), the effect of pneumonia temperature was inconclusive, and the directionality of the effects of average temperature and diurnal temperature range differed.
Conclusions
The term ‘pneumonia temperature’ is valid. Pneumonia temperature was associated with an increased risk of ER visits for pneumonia, while warm average temperatures and large diurnal temperature ranges showed protective effects.
Summary
Korean summary
본 연구에서는 기온 등 다양한 기상요인의 건강영향을 나타내는 표현 중 하나로 알려진 'pneumonia weather'가 역학적으로 가진 의미를 파악하고자 하였다. 이를 위해 국가응급진료정보망의 폐렴 진료기록과 기상자료개방포털 일기자료를 일반화가법모형을 이용해 분석하였다. 그 결과 pneumonia weather는 연속된 양일간 평균기온의 차이를 의미하며, 일정 수준 이상의 일간 기온차는 단기간 이후 폐렴으로 인한 응급실 내원 위험을 증가시킨다는 사실을 확인하였다.

Citations

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Health Indicators Related to Disease, Death, and Reproduction
Jeoungbin Choi, Moran Ki, Ho Jang Kwon, Boyoung Park, Sanghyuk Bae, Chang-Mo Oh, Byung Chul Chun, Gyung-Jae Oh, Young Hoon Lee, Tae-Yong Lee, Hae Kwan Cheong, Bo Youl Choi, Jung Han Park, Sue K. Park
J Prev Med Public Health. 2019;52(1):14-20.   Published online January 23, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.18.250
  • 12,414 View
  • 223 Download
  • 17 Crossref
AbstractAbstract AbstractSummary PDFSupplementary Material
One of the primary goals of epidemiology is to quantify various aspects of a population’s health, illness, and death status and the determinants (or risk factors) thereof by calculating health indicators that measure the magnitudes of various conditions. There has been some confusion regarding health indicators, with discrepancies in usage among organizations such as the World Health Organization the, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), and the CDC of other countries, and the usage of the relevant terminology may vary across papers. Therefore, in this review, we would like to propose appropriate terminological definitions for health indicators based on the most commonly used meanings and/or the terms used by official agencies, in order to bring clarity to this area of confusion. We have used appropriate examples to make each health indicator easy for the reader to understand. We have included practical exercises for some health indicators to help readers understand the underlying concepts.
Summary
Korean summary
본 논문에서는 질병과 사망, 출생 관련 지표들의 개념과 종류를 설명하고, 특히 연구자들이 흔히 혼동하여 사용하는 지표들에 대한 적절한 정의를 제시하였다. 또한 지표들의 예시를 부록으로 수록하여 독자들이 지표의 개념을 보다 쉽게 습득하도록 돕고자 하였다.

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    Sosyal Guvence.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
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One Health Perspectives on Emerging Public Health Threats
Sukhyun Ryu, Bryan Inho Kim, Jun-Sik Lim, Cheng Siang Tan, Byung Chul Chun
J Prev Med Public Health. 2017;50(6):411-414.   Published online November 2, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.17.097
  • 10,883 View
  • 547 Download
  • 55 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Antimicrobial resistance and emerging infectious diseases, including avian influenza, Ebola virus disease, and Zika virus disease have significantly affected humankind in recent years. In the premodern era, no distinction was made between animal and human medicine. However, as medical science developed, the gap between human and animal science grew deeper. Cooperation among human, animal, and environmental sciences to combat emerging public health threats has become an important issue under the One Health Initiative. Herein, we presented the history of One Health, reviewed current public health threats, and suggested opportunities for the field of public health through better understanding of the One Health paradigm.
Summary

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Community-acquired Legionnaires’ Disease in a Newly Constructed Apartment Building
Sukhyun Ryu, Kyungho Yang, Byung Chul Chun
J Prev Med Public Health. 2017;50(4):274-277.   Published online June 28, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.17.066
  • 5,826 View
  • 179 Download
  • 5 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
Legionnaires’ disease (LD) is a severe type of pneumonia caused by inhalation of aerosols contaminated with Legionella. On September 22, 2016, a single case of LD was reported from a newly built apartment building in Gyeonggi province. This article describes an epidemiologic investigation of LD and identification of the possible source of infection. Methods: To identify the source of LD, we interviewed the patient’s husband using a questionnaire based on the Legionella management guidelines from the Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Water samples from the site were collected and analyzed. An epidemiological investigation of the residents and visitors in the apartment building was conducted for 14 days before the index patient’s symptoms first appeared to 14 days after the implementation of environmental control measures. Results: Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 was isolated from the heated-water samples from the patient’s residence and the basement of the apartment complex. Thirty-two suspected cases were reported from the apartment building during the surveillance period, yet all were confirmed negative based on urinary antigen tests. Conclusions: The likely source of infection was the building’s potable water, particularly heated water. Further study of effective monitoring systems in heated potable water should be considered.
Summary

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    Water.2022; 14(7): 1129.     CrossRef
  • Surveillance of Legionella pneumophila: Detection in Public Swimming Pool Environment
    Darija Vukić Lušić, Vanda Piškur, Arijana Cenov, Dijana Tomić Linšak, Dalibor Broznić, Marin Glad, Željko Linšak
    Microorganisms.2022; 10(12): 2429.     CrossRef
  • Turnover Intention among Field Epidemiologists in South Korea
    Sukhyun Ryu
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2020; 17(3): 949.     CrossRef
  • Comparison of Legionella K-set® and BinaxNOW® Legionella for diagnosing Legionnaires’ disease on concentrated urine samples
    Aubin Souche, Ghislaine Descours, Anne-Gaëlle Ranc, Gérard Lina, Sophie Jarraud, Laetitia Beraud
    European Journal of Clinical Microbiology & Infectious Diseases.2020; 39(9): 1641.     CrossRef
  • Presence of Legionella spp. in Hot Water Networks of Different Italian Residential Buildings: A Three-Year Survey
    Michele Totaro, Paola Valentini, Anna Costa, Lorenzo Frendo, Alessia Cappello, Beatrice Casini, Mario Miccoli, Gaetano Privitera, Angelo Baggiani
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2017; 14(11): 1296.     CrossRef
Education of Bioterrorism Preparedness and Response in Healthcare-associated Colleges - Current Status and Learning Objectives Development.
Hagyung Lee, Byung Chul Chun, Sung Eun Yi, Hyang Soon Oh, Sun Ju Wang, Jang Wook Sohn, Jee Hee Kim
J Prev Med Public Health. 2008;41(4):225-231.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2008.41.4.225
  • 3,982 View
  • 71 Download
  • 2 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
Bioterrorism (BT) preparedness and response plans are particularly important among healthcare workers who will be among the first involved in the outbreak situations. This study was conducted to evaluate the current status of education for BT preparedness and response in healthcare-related colleges/junior colleges and to develop learning objectives for use in their regular curricula. METHODS: We surveyed all medical colleges/schools, colleges/junior colleges that train nurses, emergency medical technicians or clinical pathologists, and 10% (randomly selected) of them that train general hygienists in Korea. The survey was conducted via mail from March to July of 2007. We surveyed 35 experts to determine if there was a consensus of learning objectives among healthcare workers. RESULTS: Only 31.3% of medical colleges/schools and 13.3% of nursing colleges/junior colleges had education programs that included BT preparedness and responses in their curricula. The most common reason given for the lack of BT educational programs was 'There is not much need for education regarding BT preparedness and response in Korea'. None of the colleges/junior colleges that train clinical pathologists, or general hygienists had an education program for BT response. After evaluating the expert opinions, we developed individual learning objectives designed specifically for educational institutions. CONCLUSIONS: There were only a few colleges/junior colleges that enforce the requirement to provide education for BT preparedness and response in curricula. It is necessary to raise the perception of BT preparedness and response to induce the schools to provide such programs.
Summary

Citations

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  • Predictors of bioterrorism preparedness among clinical nurses: A cross-sectional study
    Suhyun Lee, Yujeong Kim
    Nurse Education Today.2023; 122: 105727.     CrossRef
  • An Assessment of Knowledge and Attitude of Iranian Nurses Towards Bioterrorism
    Hasan Abolghasem Gorji, Noureddin Niknam, Nahid Aghaei, Tahereh Yaghoubi
    Iranian Red Crescent Medical Journal.2017;[Epub]     CrossRef
Curriculum of Health Promotion and Disease Prevention for the 21st Century -The 5th Revision of Preventive Medicine Learning Objectives.
Byung Chul Chun, Bo Yul Choi, Soo Hun Cho
J Prev Med Public Health. 2006;39(4):293-301.
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AbstractAbstract PDF
The preventive medicine learning objectives, first developed in 1977 and subsequently supplemented, underwent necessary revision of the contents for the fourth time to create the fifth revision. However, the required educational contents of health promotion and disease prevention have been changed by the new trends of medical education such as PBL and integrated curriculum, the rapid change of the health and medical environment and the globalization of medicine. The Korean Society of Preventive Medicine formed a task force, led by the Undergraduate Education Committee in 2003, which surveyed all the medical colleges to describe the state of preventive medicine education in Korea, analyzed the changing education demand according to the change of health environment and quantitatively measured the validity and usefulness of each learning objective in the previous curriculum. Based on these data, some temporary objectives were formed and promulgated to all the medical schools. After multiple revisions, an almost completely new series of learning objectives for preventive medicine was created. The objectives comprised 4 classifications and 1 supplement: 1) health and disease, 2) epidemiology and its application, 3) environment and health, 4) patient-doctorsociety, and supplementary clinical occupational health. The total number of learning objectives, contained within 13 sub-classifications, was 221 (including 35 of supplementary clinical occupational health). Future studies of the learning process and ongoing development of teaching materials according to the new learning objectives should be undertaken with persistence in order to ensure the progress of preventive medicine education.
Summary
Modelling the Impact of Pandemic Influenza.
Byung Chul Chun
J Prev Med Public Health. 2005;38(4):379-385.
  • 2,280 View
  • 95 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
The impact of the next influenza pandemic is difficult to predict. It is dependent on how virulent the virus is, how rapidly it spreads from population to population, and the effectiveness of prevention and response efforts. Despite the uncertainty about the magnitude of the next pandemic, estimates of the health and economic impact remain important to aid public health policy decisions and guide pandemic planning for health and emergency sectors. Planning ahead in preparation for an influenza pandemic, with its potentially very high morbidity and mortality rates, is essential for hospital administrators and public health officials. The estimation of pandemic impact is based on the previous pandemics- we had experienced at least 3 pandemics in 20th century. But the epidemiological characteristics - ie, start season, the impact of 1st wave, pathogenicity and virulence of the viruses and the primary victims of population were quite different from one another. I reviewed methodology for estimation and modelling of pandemic impact and described some nations's results using them in their national preparedness plans. And then I showed the estimates of pandemic influenza impact in Korea with FluSurge and FluAid. And, I described the results of pandemic modelling with parameters of 1918 pandemic for the shake of education and training of the first-line responder health officials to the epidemics. In preparing influenza pandemics, the simulation and modelling are the keys to reduce the uncertainty of the future and to make proper policies to manage and control the pandemics.
Summary
Association of Internet Addiction with Health Promotion Lifestyle Profile and Perceived Health Status in Adolescents.
Jung Sook Kim, Byung Chul Chun
J Prev Med Public Health. 2005;38(1):53-60.
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AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
To identify the relationship between the internet addiction of adolescents and their Health Promotion Lifestyle Profile and Perceived Health Status, and thereby to detect the impact of internet addiction on the health of adolescents, produce the basic information necessary to develop a prevention program for internet addiction and to plan for a health promotion program. METHODS: This study was designed as a cross-sectional study, and the subjects were the second-grade students of three junior-high and three high schools located in the city of K in Kyung Gi Province. Out of 769 subjects, 764 completed the questionnaires (99.3%) ; 369 (48.3%) junior-high school students and 395 (51.7%) high school students. The questionnaires were composed of Young's Internet Addiction, Health Promotion Lifestyle Profile, Perceived Health Status, and general characteristics. We used t-test, ANOVA in means comparison between groups, X2-test in frequency analysis, and multiple regression analysis in multivariate analysis, using the SAS 8.1 (R) program. RESULTS: There was a statistically significant difference in Health Promotion Lifestyle Profile according to internet addiction status (severe addiction vs. other status, p< 0.0001). The Perceived Health Status scores was lowest in the severe addiction group (p< 0.001). There was also a significant negative correlation between internet addiction and Health Promotion Lifestyle Profile (p< 0.0001). The results of multiple regression showed that Young's Addiction Score was significant for the subjects' Health Promotion Lifestyle Profile after controlling for other variables (p< 0.0001). CONCLUSIONS: This study showed that the severe internet addiction group had the lowest score in Health Promotion Lifestyle Profile and Perceived Health Status, which suggests that the addiction could have a negative effect on the health status of adolescents.
Summary
Community Based Cross-sectional Study on the Risk Factors of Dementia among the Elderly in a City.
Ihn Sook Jeong, Jung Soon Kim, Byung Chul Chun, Eu Soo Cho
Korean J Prev Med. 2002;35(4):313-321.
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  • 38 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
To identify the risk factors of dementia among the elderly in a large city. METHODS: A cross-sectional study was conducted in July 2001, with potential participants selected by stratified two stage cluster sampling of the elderly population of Keumgog dong, Busan. A total of 452 elderly people aged 65 years and over, underwent a two phase diagnostic procedure. Mini-mental State Examination-Korean (MMSE-K) and Samsung Dementia Questionnaire were used for the 1st stage, and the Clinical Dementia Rating Scale (CDR), the Bartel ADL, and IADL Index, the Korean Geriatric Depression Scale (KGDS), the Modified Hatchinski Ischemic Scale (MHIS), and other laboratory tests were used for the 2nd stage. RESUJLTS: Of the 446 participants finally chosen, 45 were confirmed with dementia, and 363 as normal, with the rests not confirmed with dementia or as normal, were excluded from the analysis. According to the logistic regression analysis, the risk of dementia was significantly higher in; people aged 80 and above (OR=4.36, 95% CI=1.97-9.62), illiterate (OR=3.58, 95% CI=1.71-7.46), who had a history of strokes (OR=6.35, 95% CI=2.71-14.87), or who had a history of hyperlipidemia (OR=4.74, 95% CI=1.65-13.61), compared to their counterparts. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that efforts to prevent strokes and hyperlipidemia can significantly decrease the risk of dementia.
Summary
Heart Diseases Prevalence of Elementary School Children in Kyonggi Province.
Byung Chul Chun, Soon Duck Kim, Yong Tae Yum
Korean J Prev Med. 2000;33(1):36-44.
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AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVE
The heart diseases are known as a major cause of sudden death, as well as a cause of poor life-quality of school-age children. But there have been few mass screening of heart diseases in these children in Korea. This study was done to estimate the prevalence of heart diseases of these population. METHODS: We screened all elementary students(grade 1) in 12 cities and 16 counties(Gun) in Kyonggi province from 1992 to 1995. The first screening was done by auscultation of doctors and simultaneously by checking using 'auto-interpreter of EKG-cardiac sound'(Fukuda Densi ECP 50A). We conducted futher examinations to whom classified as being abnormal condition in first screening, by using EKG, chest x-ray, doppler echocardiograpy(if needed). RESULTS: The total number of examined students was 161,308(92% of the population), the male were 83,238 and female were 78,070. The congenital heart diseases(CHD) patients were 290(18 per 10,000) - male 155(18.6 per 10,000) and female 135(17.3 per 10,000). The most frequent disease was ventricula septal defect(VSD, 45.5%), Atrial septal defect(ASD, 14.8%), Tetralogy of Follot(TOF, 11.7%), and Patent Dutus Arteriosis(PDA, 7.6%) in order. In female, the order was VSD(48.1%), ASD(13.3%), TOF(11.1%), and PDA(10.4%). The total number of EKG abnormality were 433(62.7 per 10,000) among 69,056 screened children in 1995. The complete right bundle branch block(CRBBB) and paroxymal ventricular contraction(PVC) were frequent(26.6%, 26.3% in each), and incomplete right bunddle branch block(IRBBB,14.6%), paroxymal atrial contraction(PAC, 6.7%), abnormal Q(5.8%), Wolf-Pakinson-White syndrom (5.5%) in order. In female, the most frequent abnormality was PVC(29.8%), and CRBBB(19.9%) in order. CONCLUSION: We could present the stable prevalence of the rare heart disease. The prevalence of congenital heart diseases was 18.0 per 10,000 and of EKG abnormality was 62.7 per 10,000 among school children.
Summary
A study on dermatologic diseases of workers exposed to cutting oil.
Byung Chul Chun, Hee Ok Kim, Soon Duck Kim, Chil Hwan Oh, Yong Tae Yum
Korean J Prev Med. 1996;29(4):785-800.
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We investigated the 1,004 workers who worked in a automobile factory to study the epidemiologic characterist of dermatoses due to cutting oils. Among the workers, 667(66.4%) answered the questionnaire. They are belong to 5 departments of the factory-the Engine-Work(86), Power train Assembly(17). We measured the oil mist concentration in air of the departments and examined the workers who had dermatologic symptoms. The results were follows; 1) Oil mist concentration; Of all measured points(52), 9 points(17.2%) exceeded 5mg/m3-the time-weighed PEL- and one department had a upper confidence limit(95%) higher than 5mg/m3. 2) Dermatologists examined 213 workers. 172 of them complained any skin symptoms at that time-itching(32.5%), papule(21.6%), scale(15.7%), vesicle(12.5%) in order. The abnormal skin site found by dermatologist were palm(29.3%), finger & nail(24.6%), forearm(16.2%), back of hand(8.4%) in order. 3) As the result of physical examination, we found that 160 workers had skin diseases. Contact dermatitis was the most common; 69 workers had contact dermatitis alone(43.1%), 11 had contact dermatitis with acne(6.9%), 10 had contact dermatitis with folliculitis(6.3%), 1 had contact dermatitis with acne & folliculitis, and 1 had contact dermatitis with abnormal pigmentation. Others were folliculitis(9 workers, 5.6%), acne(8, 5.0%), folliculitis & acne(2, 1.2%), keratosis(1, 0.6%), abnormal pigmentation(1, 0.6%), and non-specific hand eczema(47, 29.3%). 4) The prevalence of any skin diseases was 34.0 per 100 in cutting oil users, and 13.3 per 100 in non-users. Especially, the prevalence of contact dermatitis was 23.0 per 100 in cutting oil users and 4.3 per 100 in non-users. 5) We tried patch test(standard series, oil series, organic solvents) on 49 patients to differentiate allergic contact dermatitis from irritant contact dermatitis and found 20 were positive. 6) In a multivariate analysis(independent=age, tenure, kinds of cutting oil), the risk of skin diseases was higher in the water-based cutting oil user and both oil user than non-user or neat oil user(odds ratio were 2.16 and 2.78, respectively). And the risk of contact dermatitis was much higher at the same groups(odds ratio were 5.16 and 6.82, respectively).
Summary

JPMPH : Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health