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JPMPH : Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health

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2 "health-related behaviors"
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Original Articles
Health-Related Behaviors: Theoretical Models And Research Findings.
Sang Soo Bae
Korean J Prev Med. 1993;26(4):508-533.
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  • 32 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
A wide range of health professionals have interest in changing the health behavior of individuals. To intervene effectively and to make informed judgements about how to measure the success of such interventions, health professionals must have an deep understanding of health behavior. This paper provides and overview of the thories of health-related behaviors and the strength and weakness of each, how the theories relate to others, and how they can be used in practice. The theories reviewed include Suchmann's stages of illness experience, Health belief model, Attribution theory, Fishbein's theory of reasoned action, Multiattribute utility models, Consumer information processing, and Andersen's models. Finally, this paper introduces the reader to interesting research findings in our country.
Summary
Health-Related Behaviors and Subjective Symptoms Associated with Smoking of Freshmen in a University.
Jong Park, Byong Woo Kim, Yang Ok Kim, Ki Soon Kim
Korean J Prev Med. 1992;25(3):223-237.
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  • 20 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
This study was to examine the association of the health-related behaviors and subjective symptoms with smoking. Data were collected by questionnaire survey during regular health examination from Mar. 23 to Mar. 31, 1992 for 1,615 male freshmen of a university in Kwangju City. The results obtained were as follows; 1. Among the freshmen, 26.9% reported that they were smokers. 69.4% for smokers started smoking for the recent 4 years, and 63.4% for smokers smoked 10 cigarettes or more a day. 2. Meal regularity, meat eating, use of coffee or tea and alcohol drinking were positively associated with the status, the duration and the amount of smoking while the vegetable preference was negatively associated with the status and the duration of smoking. 3. There was no evidence of familial aggregation in smoking status except that of siblings. 4. Respiratory symptoms like cough or phlegm, dyspnea were positively associated with the status, the duration, and the amount of smoking. General symptoms like chest pain, fatigue, back pain, facial edema, and weight loss were positively associated with the duration and the amount of smoking. Other symptoms like headache, dizziness, and myalgia were not associated with smoking. 5. In multivariate' logistic regression analysis, cough or phlegm, dyspnea, chest pain, facial edema, and back pain were related to smoking status.
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JPMPH : Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health