Skip Navigation
Skip to contents

JPMPH : Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health

OPEN ACCESS
SEARCH
Search

Search

Page Path
HOME > Search
6 "Type 2 diabetes mellitus"
Filter
Filter
Article category
Keywords
Publication year
Authors
Systematic Review
Low Social Support and Risk for Depression in People With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis
Akhmad Azmiardi, Bhisma Murti, Ratih Puspita Febrinasari, Didik Gunawan Tamtomo
J Prev Med Public Health. 2022;55(1):37-48.   Published online January 10, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.21.490
  • 4,837 View
  • 197 Download
  • 9 Web of Science
  • 11 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
Depression is a frequent complication of type 2 diabetes mellitus. This study aimed to investigate the relationship between low social support and risk for depression in people with type 2 diabetes through a meta-analysis.
Methods
PubMed, ProQuest, SpringerLink, ScienceDirect, Scopus, the Cochrane Library, Embase, and Google Scholar were searched for English-language articles published up to 2021. Pooled adjusted odds ratios (aORs) were calculated using a random-effect model with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Heterogeneity was evaluated by using the Cochrane Q test and I2 statistics. The risk of publication bias was estimated using a funnel plot, the Egger test, and the Begg test. The Joanna Briggs Institute Critical Appraisal Tools were used to assess the quality of evidence and the risk of bias.
Results
Eleven studies were included in this meta-analysis, containing a total of 3151 people with type 2 diabetes mellitus. The pooled analysis showed that people with type 2 diabetes mellitus who had low social support had twice as high a risk of depression as those with high social support (aOR, 2.02; 95% CI, 1.51 to 2.70; p<0.001). A random-effect model was used because the heterogeneity was high (I2= 87%).
Conclusions
Low social support was found to increase the risk of depression among people with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Further investigation into factors that may moderate this relationship is required.
Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Staying connected: An umbrella review of meta-analyses on the push-and-pull of social connection in depression
    Luisa De Risio, Mauro Pettorruso, Rebecca Collevecchio, Barbara Collacchi, Marta Boffa, Mario Santorelli, Massimo Clerici, Giovanni Martinotti, Francesca Zoratto, Marta Borgi
    Journal of Affective Disorders.2024; 345: 358.     CrossRef
  • The risk factors for mental health disorders in patients with type 2 diabetes: An umbrella review of systematic reviews with and without meta-analysis
    Amani Busili, Kanta Kumar, Laura Kudrna, Idris Busaily
    Heliyon.2024; 10(7): e28782.     CrossRef
  • Distress and Coping Strategy among Indonesian Men with Type-2 Diabetes Mellitus
    Fajar Ari Nugroho, Rico Budhiarta Chandra, Nike Laila, Sera Rukia, Inggita Kusumastuty, Anggun Rindang Cempaka, Lola Ayu Istifiani, Atifa Nafia Hasantie Latif
    Nurse Media Journal of Nursing.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Effectiveness of social support-based interventions in preventing depression in people without clinical depression: A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials
    Henar Campos-Paíno, Patricia Moreno-Peral, Irene Gómez-Gómez, Sonia Conejo-Cerón, Santiago Galán, Sara Reyes-Martín, Juan Ángel Bellón
    International Journal of Social Psychiatry.2023; 69(2): 253.     CrossRef
  • Individuelle Behandlung bei Glaukompatienten mit einem Diabetes mellitus
    Jan Luebke
    Klinische Monatsblätter für Augenheilkunde.2023; 240(02): 142.     CrossRef
  • Prevalence of comorbid depression and associated factors among hospitalized patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus in Hunan, China
    Rehanguli Maimaitituerxun, Wenhang Chen, Jingsha Xiang, Atipatsa C. Kaminga, Xin Yin Wu, Letao Chen, Jianzhou Yang, Aizhong Liu, Wenjie Dai
    BMC Psychiatry.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • The prevalence and predictors of depression and disability in older adults and elderly patients with Diabetes in India: Cross-sectional analysis from the Longitudinal Study on Ageing
    Baani Sodhi, Mansi Malik, Paras Agarwal, Saurav Basu
    Diabetes & Metabolic Syndrome: Clinical Research & Reviews.2023; 17(4): 102765.     CrossRef
  • Depression and determinants among diabetes mellitus patients in Ethiopia, a systematic review and meta-analysis
    Kirubel Dagnaw Tegegne, Natnael Atnafu Gebeyehu, Mesfin Wudu Kassaw
    BMC Psychiatry.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Individuelle Behandlung bei Glaukompatienten mit einem Diabetes mellitus
    Jan Lübke
    Diabetes aktuell.2023; 21(02): 68.     CrossRef
  • Diabetes and Mental Health
    David J. Robinson, Kimberley Hanson, Akshay B. Jain, Jessica C. Kichler, Gaurav Mehta, Osnat C. Melamed, Michael Vallis, Harpreet S. Bajaj, Tracy Barnes, Jeremy Gilbert, Kristin Honshorst, Robyn Houlden, James Kim, Joanne Lewis, Barbara MacDonald, Dylan M
    Canadian Journal of Diabetes.2023; 47(4): 308.     CrossRef
  • The association between screen time and depression symptoms severity among adults with diabetes: A cross-sectional study
    Layan Sukik, Bushra Hoque, Linda Boutefnouchet, Mohamed Elhadary, Hiba Bawadi, Mujahed Shraim
    Primary Care Diabetes.2023; 17(6): 619.     CrossRef
Original Articles
Smoking Is Associated With Abdominal Obesity, Not Overall Obesity, in Men With Type 2 Diabetes
Ji Eun Yun, Heejin Kimm, Young Ju Choi, Sun Ha Jee, Kap Bum Huh
J Prev Med Public Health. 2012;45(5):316-322.   Published online September 28, 2012
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2012.45.5.316
  • 9,294 View
  • 98 Download
  • 17 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives

Abdominal obesity increases mortality and morbidity from cardiovascular disease and there is a possibility that smoking effects obesity. However, previous studies concerning the effects of smoking on obesity are inconsistent. The objective of this study was to examine whether smoking is positively related to abdominal obesity in men with type 2 diabetes.

Methods

Subjects consisted of 2197 type 2 diabetic patients who visited Huh's Diabetes Center from 2003 to 2009. Indices of abdominal obesity were defined as visceral fat thickness (VFT) measured by ultrasonography and waist circumference (WC). Overall obesity was defined as body mass index (BMI).

Results

Statistically significant differences in WC and VFT by smoking status were identified. However, there was no statistical difference in BMI according to smoking status. Means of WC and VFT were not significantly higher in heavy smokers and lower in mild smokers. Compared to nonsmokers, the BMI confounder adjusted odds ratio and 95% confidence interval for VFT in ex-smokers and current-smokers were 1.70 (1.21 to 2.39) and 1.86 (1.27 to 2.73), respectively.

Conclusions

Smoking status was positively associated with abdominal obesity in type 2 diabetic patients.

Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Nutritional status of people who inject drugs in Coastal Kenya: a cross-sectional study
    Valentine Budambula, Moses Ngari, Nancy L.M. Budambula, Aabid A. Ahmed, Tom Were
    BMC Nutrition.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Smoking and cardiovascular disease in patients with type 2 diabetes: a prospective observational study
    Peder af Geijerstam, Fredrik Janryd, Fredrik H. Nyström
    Journal of Cardiovascular Medicine.2023; 24(11): 802.     CrossRef
  • Prevalence and Predictors of Combined Body Mass Index and Waist Circumference Among Indian Adults
    Neha Shri, Saurabh Singh, Akancha Singh
    International Journal of Public Health.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Prevalence and related factors of abdominal obesity among urban adults aged 35 to 79 years in southwest China
    Chuan Huang, Ying Zhang, Ya Liu, Jian-Xiong Liu, Yong-Mei Hu, Wei-Wei Tang, Tzung-Dau Wang, Xiao-bo Huang
    Frontiers in Public Health.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Exploring the Impact of the Obesity Paradox on Lung Cancer and Other Malignancies
    Lindsay Joyce Nitsche, Sarbajit Mukherjee, Kareena Cheruvu, Cathleen Krabak, Rohit Rachala, Kalyan Ratnakaram, Priyanka Sharma, Maddy Singh, Sai Yendamuri
    Cancers.2022; 14(6): 1440.     CrossRef
  • Long-Term Adverse Effects of Cigarette Smoking on the Incidence Risk of Metabolic Syndrome With a Dose-Response Relationship: Longitudinal Findings of the Korean Genome and Epidemiology Study Over 12 Years
    Ae Hee Kim, In-Ho Seo, Hye Sun Lee, Yong-Jae Lee
    Endocrine Practice.2022; 28(6): 603.     CrossRef
  • Sex-Dependent Effects of Inhaled Nicotine on the Gut Microbiome
    Anna K Whitehead, Margaret C Meyers, Christopher M Taylor, Meng Luo, Scot E Dowd, Xinping Yue, Lauri O Byerley
    Nicotine & Tobacco Research.2022; 24(9): 1363.     CrossRef
  • Determinants of Metabolic Health Across Body Mass Index Categories in Central Europe: A Comparison Between Swiss and Czech Populations
    Sarka Kunzova, Andrea Maugeri, Jose Medina-Inojosa, Francisco Lopez-Jimenez, Manlio Vinciguerra, Pedro Marques-Vidal
    Frontiers in Public Health.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • From Pre-Diabetes to Diabetes: Diagnosis, Treatments and Translational Research
    Radia Khan, Zoey Chua, Jia Tan, Yingying Yang, Zehuan Liao, Yan Zhao
    Medicina.2019; 55(9): 546.     CrossRef
  • Cigarette Smoking Is Negatively Associated with the Prevalence of Type 2 Diabetes in Middle-Aged Men with Normal Weight but Positively Associated with Stroke in Men
    Su Wang, Jie Chen, Yuzhong Wang, Yu Yang, Danyu Zhang, Chao Liu, Kun Wang
    Journal of Diabetes Research.2019; 2019: 1.     CrossRef
  • Forecasting obesity prevalence in Korean adults for the years 2020 and 2030 by the analysis of contributing factors
    Inkyung Baik
    Nutrition Research and Practice.2018; 12(3): 251.     CrossRef
  • Obesity in Older Type 2 Diabetic Patients: Does Working Environment Add Vulnerability?
    Maria Brandão, Margarida Cardoso
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2018; 15(12): 2677.     CrossRef
  • Smoking and the risk of type 2 diabetes
    Judith Maddatu, Emily Anderson-Baucum, Carmella Evans-Molina
    Translational Research.2017; 184: 101.     CrossRef
  • Risk for metabolic diseases in normal weight individuals with visceral fat accumulation: a cross-sectional study in Japan
    Yukako Tatsumi, Yoko M Nakao, Izuru Masuda, Aya Higashiyama, Misa Takegami, Kunihiro Nishimura, Makoto Watanabe, Takayoshi Ohkubo, Tomonori Okamura, Yoshihiro Miyamoto
    BMJ Open.2017; 7(1): e013831.     CrossRef
  • Metabolic effects of smoking cessation
    Kindred K. Harris, Mohan Zopey, Theodore C. Friedman
    Nature Reviews Endocrinology.2016; 12(5): 299.     CrossRef
  • Smoking status and abdominal obesity among normal- and overweight/obese adults: Population-based FINRISK study
    Eeva-Liisa Tuovinen, Suoma E. Saarni, Satu Männistö, Katja Borodulin, Kristiina Patja, Taru H. Kinnunen, Jaakko Kaprio, Tellervo Korhonen
    Preventive Medicine Reports.2016; 4: 324.     CrossRef
  • Joint Association of Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor Variants with Abdominal Obesity in American Indians: The Strong Heart Family Study
    Yun Zhu, Jingyun Yang, Fawn Yeh, Shelley A. Cole, Karin Haack, Elisa T. Lee, Barbara V. Howard, Jinying Zhao, Mohammed Akaaboune
    PLoS ONE.2014; 9(7): e102220.     CrossRef
Intraocular Pressure and Its Determinants in Subjects With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in India
Sayantan Biswas, Rajiv Raman, Vaitheeswaran Koluthungan, Tarun Sharma
J Prev Med Public Health. 2011;44(4):157-166.   Published online July 29, 2010
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2011.44.4.157
  • 8,832 View
  • 75 Download
  • 6 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives

This study was conducted to show the intraocular pressure (IOP) distribution and the factors affecting IOP in subjects with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) in India.

Methods

We measured the anthropometric and biochemical parameters for confirmed type 2 DM patients. A comprehensive ocular examination was performed for 1377 subjects aged > 40 years and residing in Chennai.

Results

A significant difference in IOP (mean ± standard deviation) was found between men and women (14.6±2.9 and 15.0±2.8 mmHg, p = 0.005). A significantly elevated IOP was observed among smokers, subjects with systemic hypertension and women with clinically significant macular edema (CSME). After a univariate analysis, factors associated significantly with higher IOP were elevated systolic blood pressure, elevated resting pulse rate and thicker central corneal thickness (CCT). In women, elevated glycosylated hemoglobin was associated with a higher IOP. After adjusting for all variables, the elevated resting pulse rate and CCT were found to be associated with a higher IOP.

Conclusions

Systemic hypertension, smoking, pulse rate and CCT were associated with elevated intraocular pressure in type 2 DM. Women with type 2 DM, especially those with CSME, were more prone to have an elevated IOP.

Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Cyclodiode vs micropulse transscleral laser treatment
    Monica Kelada, Eduardo M. Normando, Francesca M. Cordeiro, Laura Crawley, Faisal Ahmed, Sally Ameen, Niten Vig, Philip Bloom
    Eye.2024; 38(8): 1477.     CrossRef
  • Neuroinflammation and neovascularization in diabetic eye diseases (DEDs): identification of potential pharmacotherapeutic targets
    Siva Prasad Panda, P Hemachandra Reddy, Uma Sankar Gorla, DSNBK Prasanth
    Molecular Biology Reports.2023; 50(2): 1857.     CrossRef
  • Image-based insilico investigation of hemodynamics and biomechanics in healthy and diabetic human retinas
    Kartika Chandra Tripathy, Ashish Siddharth, Ajay Bhandari
    Microvascular Research.2023; 150: 104594.     CrossRef
  • Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer Loss Is Associated with Urinary Albumin Excretion in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes
    Jin A. Choi, Sun-Hee Ko, Yi Ryeung Park, Dong-Hyun Jee, Seung-Hyun Ko, Chan Kee Park
    Ophthalmology.2015; 122(5): 976.     CrossRef
  • The distribution of intraocular pressure and associated systemic factors in a Korean population: The Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey
    Mi Jeung Kim, Ki Ho Park, Chan Yun Kim, Jin Wook Jeoung, Seok Hwan Kim
    Acta Ophthalmologica.2014;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Association between Urinary Albumin Excretion and Intraocular Pressure in Type 2 Diabetic Patients without Renal Impairment
    Jin A. Choi, Kyungdo Han, Hyuk-Sang Kwon, Ariela Benigni, PhD.
    PLoS ONE.2014; 9(5): e96335.     CrossRef
English Abstracts
The Association of Central Obesity with Type 2 Diabetes among Koreans according to the Serum Gamma-Glutamyltransferase Level: Korean Genome and Epidemiology Study.
Ji Yeon Shin, Jun Hyun Hwang, Jin Young Jeong, Sung Hi Kim, Jai Dong Moon, Sang Chul Roh, Young Wook Kim, Yangho Kim, Jong Han Leem, Young Su Ju, Young Seoub Hong, Eun Hee Ha, Yong Hwan Lee, Duk Hee Lee, Dong Hyun Kim
J Prev Med Public Health. 2009;42(6):386-391.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2009.42.6.386
  • 5,407 View
  • 64 Download
  • 3 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
This cross-sectional study was performed to examine if the serum gamma-glutamyltransferase (GGT) level that is within its normal range is associated with the risk of type 2 diabetes and if the association between the waist hip ratio (WHR) and type 2 diabetes is different depending on the serum GGT levels. METHODS: The study subjects were 23,436 persons aged 40 years or older and who participated in regular health check-ups at 11 hospitals (males: 5,821, females: 17,615). The gender-specific quintiles of the serum GGT and WHR were used to examine the associations with type 2 diabetes. RESULTS: The serum GGT levels within their normal range were positively associated with type 2 diabetes only in women. The adjusted odds ratios (ORs) were 1.0, 1.0, 1.4, 2.1, and 2.5 according to the quintiles of the serum GGT (p(trend)<0.01). The WHR was more strongly associated with the prevalence of diabetes among the women with a high-normal serum GGT level as compared with those with a low-normal serum GGT level (p for interaction=0.02). For example, the adjusted ORs for women with a low normal serum GGT level were 1.0, 1.2, 1.5, 2.2, and 2.4 according to the quintiles of the WHR, while those figures were 1.0, 2.4, 3.6, 5.0, and 8.3 among the women with a high normal serum GGT level. However, in men, the serum GGT was very weakly associated with type 2 diabetes and the association between the WHR and type 2 diabetes was not different depending on the serum GGT level. CONCLUSIONS: Serum GGT within its normal range was positively associated with type 2 diabetes, and central obesity was more strongly associated with the prevalence of type 2 diabetes when the serum GGT level was high-normal. However, these associations were observed only in women, which is different from the previous findings. The stronger relation between central obesity and type 2 diabetes among women with a high-normal serum GGT level can be useful for selecting a group that is at high risk for type 2 diabetes irregardless of whatever the underlying mechanism is.
Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Serum gamma-glutamyl transferase and risk of type 2 diabetes in the general Korean population: a Mendelian randomization study
    Youn Sue Lee, Yoonsu Cho, Stephen Burgess, George Davey Smith, Caroline L. Relton, So-Youn Shin, Min-Jeong Shin
    Human Molecular Genetics.2016; 25(17): 3877.     CrossRef
  • Different associations between obesity and impaired fasting glucose depending on serum gamma-glutamyltransferase levels within normal range: a cross-sectional study
    Nam Soo Hong, Jeong-Gook Kim, Yu-Mi Lee, Hyun-Woo Kim, Sin Kam, Keon-Yeop Kim, Ki-Su Kim, Duk-Hee Lee
    BMC Endocrine Disorders.2014;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Endobiogeny: A Global Approach to Systems Biology (Part 1 of 2)
    Jean-Claude, Lapraz, Kamyar M. Hedayat
    Global Advances in Health and Medicine.2013; 2(1): 64.     CrossRef
The Effect of Smoking Status upon Occurrence of Impaired Fasting Glucose or Type 2 Diabetes in Korean Men.
Chang Hae Park, Hyuk Ga, Jong Han Leem, Seung Min Kwak, Hwan Cheol Kim, Ji Ho Choi
J Prev Med Public Health. 2008;41(4):249-254.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2008.41.4.249
  • 5,162 View
  • 68 Download
  • 8 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
To investigate whether smoking and the smoking status are predictors of the incident impaired fasting glucose (IFG) or type 2 diabetes in Korean men. METHODS: A cohort of 1,717 Korean men without IFG or diabetes, who underwent annual periodic health examinations for 4 years (2002-2006), were retrospectively investigated. IFG and diabetes were defined as a serum fasting glucose concentration of 100-125 mg/dL and more than 126 mg/dL, respectively. Cox's proportional hazards model was used to evaluate the association between smoking and development of IFG or type 2 diabetes. RESULTS: A total of 558 cases (32.5%) of incident IFG and 50 cases (2.9%) of diabetes occurred. After controlling for the potential predictors of diabetes, the relative risk for IFG, compared with the never smokers, was 1.02 (95% CI=0.88 to 1.19) for the ever-smokers, 0.96 (95% CI=0.79-1.16) for those who smoked 1-9 cigarettes/d, 1.15 (95% CI=1.01 to 1.30) for those who smoked 10-19 cigarettes/d, and 1.31 (95% CI=1.10 to 1.57) for those who smoked 20 or more cigarettes/d (the P value for the current smokers was only p<0.002). The respective multivariate adjusted relative risks for type 2 diabetes, compared with the neversmokers, were 1.07 (95% CI=0.64 to 1.92), 1.47 (95% CI=0.71 to 3.04), 1.84 (95% CI=0.92-3.04), and 1.87 (95% CI=1.13-3.67), respectively (the P value for the current smokers was only p=0.004). CONCLUSIONS: The smoking status and the number of cigarettes smoked daily are associated with an increased risk for developing IFG or type 2 diabetes in Korean men.
Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Health effects associated with smoking: a Burden of Proof study
    Xiaochen Dai, Gabriela F. Gil, Marissa B. Reitsma, Noah S. Ahmad, Jason A. Anderson, Catherine Bisignano, Sinclair Carr, Rachel Feldman, Simon I. Hay, Jiawei He, Vincent Iannucci, Hilary R. Lawlor, Matthew J. Malloy, Laurie B. Marczak, Susan A. McLaughlin
    Nature Medicine.2022; 28(10): 2045.     CrossRef
  • Systematic review with meta-analysis of the epidemiological evidence relating smoking to type 2 diabetes
    Peter N Lee, Katharine J Coombs
    World Journal of Meta-Analysis.2020; 8(2): 119.     CrossRef
  • The 2016 global and national burden of diabetes mellitus attributable to PM 2·5 air pollution
    Benjamin Bowe, Yan Xie, Tingting Li, Yan Yan, Hong Xian, Ziyad Al-Aly
    The Lancet Planetary Health.2018; 2(7): e301.     CrossRef
  • The impact of smoking on the development of diabetes and its complications
    Mariola Śliwińska-Mossoń, Halina Milnerowicz
    Diabetes and Vascular Disease Research.2017; 14(4): 265.     CrossRef
  • Effects of Nutrition Education on Improvement of Blood Glucose in Type 2 Diabetic Patients with Low Income
    Eun-Jin Lim, Mi Jeong Kim, Ji-Sook Han
    Journal of the Korean Society of Food Science and Nutrition.2014; 43(1): 141.     CrossRef
  • Associated Factors of Impaired Fasting Glucose in Some Korean Rural Adults
    Hye Eun Yun, Mi-ah Han, Ki Soon Kim, Jong Park, Myeng Guen Kang, So Yeon Ryu
    Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health.2010; 43(4): 309.     CrossRef
  • Association of passive and active smoking with incident type 2 diabetes mellitus in the elderly population: the KORA S4/F4 cohort study
    Bernd Kowall, Wolfgang Rathmann, Klaus Strassburger, Margit Heier, Rolf Holle, Barbara Thorand, Guido Giani, Annette Peters, Christine Meisinger
    European Journal of Epidemiology.2010; 25(6): 393.     CrossRef
  • Diabetes and impaired fasting glucose in Mongolian population, Inner Mongolia, China
    Shaoyan Zhang, Weijun Tong, Tan Xu, Burenbatu Wu, Yonghong Zhang
    Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice.2009; 86(2): 124.     CrossRef
A Prospective Cohort Study of Exercise and the Incidence of Type 2 Diabetes in Impaired Fasting Glucose Group.
Hong Dae Um, Duck Chul Lee, Sang Yi Lee, Yeon Soo Kim
J Prev Med Public Health. 2008;41(1):45-50.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2008.41.1.45
  • 5,171 View
  • 78 Download
  • 8 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
To determine the relationship between exercise and the incidence of type 2 diabetes in an impaired fasting glucose group. METHODS: This prospective cohort study was conducted in 19,440 men and 4,297 women, aged 30-69 years, with impaired fasting glucose at baseline who had undergone biennial medical evaluation through the National Health Insurance Corporation from 2000 to 2004. Impaired fasting glucose was defined as fasting glucose of 100 to 125 mg/dl and the subjects were divided into 3 groups depending on weekly exercise frequency. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to evaluate the association between the baseline exercise status and incidence of type 2 diabetes. RESULTS: During the 4-year follow-up, a total of 3,239 men and 283 women developed type 2 diabetes, a cumulative incidence of 16.6% for men, and 6.5% for women. Also, 1,688 men (21.2%) and 127 women (15.2%) developed type 2 diabetes in the obese group. The adjusted relative risk (RR) of developing type 2 diabetes in non-exercising men was significantly higher than exercising men regularly (RR= 1.375, 95% CI=1.236-1.529)(p<0.0001), and the RR for non-exercising women was higher than exercising women regularly (RR=1.124, 95% CI=0.711-1.778). The RR for non-exercise men/women in the obese group was 1.571 (95% CI=1.351-1.827)(p<0.0001)/1.869(95% CI=0.846-4.130). CONCLSIONS: Regular exercise is effective in preventing type 2 diabetes in people with impaired fasting glucose, and particularly in obese people. People with risk factors for diabetes should participate in a regular exercise program.
Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Effects of Vitamin Intake on Blood Glucose in Cancer Patients Undergoing Chemotherapy: Quantitative and Descriptive Research
    Ji Yeong Kim, Kyung Hee Lim
    Korean Journal of Adult Nursing.2023; 35(2): 148.     CrossRef
  • Prognostic Factors for Hyperglycemia in Patients Receiving Chemotherapy
    Jiyeong Kim, Kyung Hee Lim
    Cancer Nursing.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Association between Nighttime Work and HbA1c Levels in South Korea
    Yeon-Suk Lee, Jae Hong Joo, Eun-Cheol Park
    Healthcare.2022; 10(10): 1977.     CrossRef
  • Factors related to the regular exercise participation of middle-aged and older people
    Yongha Seo, Seungjae Hyun, Sangshin Park
    Korean Journal of Health Education and Promotion.2020; 37(5): 23.     CrossRef
  • Hospital-Based Korean Diabetes Prevention Study: A Prospective, Multi-Center, Randomized, Open-Label Controlled Study
    Sang Youl Rhee, Suk Chon, Kyu Jeung Ahn, Jeong-Taek Woo
    Diabetes & Metabolism Journal.2019; 43(1): 49.     CrossRef
  • The Epidemiology of Diabetes in Korea
    Dae Jung Kim
    Diabetes & Metabolism Journal.2011; 35(4): 303.     CrossRef
  • Adiponectin is Associated with Impaired Fasting Glucose in the Non-Diabetic Population
    Sang Yeun Kim, Sun Ju Lee, Hyoun Kyoung Park, Ji Eun Yun, Myoungsook Lee, Jidong Sung, Sun Ha Jee
    Epidemiology and Health.2011; 33: e2011007.     CrossRef
  • Associated Factors of Impaired Fasting Glucose in Some Korean Rural Adults
    Hye Eun Yun, Mi-ah Han, Ki Soon Kim, Jong Park, Myeng Guen Kang, So Yeon Ryu
    Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health.2010; 43(4): 309.     CrossRef

JPMPH : Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health