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The Impact of Socioeconomic Factors on the Gender Differences of Disability and Subjective Health Among Elderly Koreans.
Gyeong Suk Jeon, Soong Nang Jang, Seon Ja Rhee
J Prev Med Public Health. 2009;42(3):199-207.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2009.42.3.199
  • 4,893 View
  • 55 Download
  • 9 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
Research on the gender differences of health among older Korean people has been limited compared with the research for other stages of life. This study first examined the patterns and magnitude of the gender differences of health in later life. Second, we examined the gender differences in the health of older men and women that were attributable to differing socioeconomic conditions. METHODS: Using the nationally representative 2005 Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, the gender differences in disability and subjective poor health were assessed by calculating the age adjusted and gender-specific prevalence. Logistic regression analyses were used to assess if the differences between the men and women for health could be explained by differential exposure to socioeconomic factors and/or the differential vulnerability of men and women to these socioeconomic factors. RESULTS: Our results indicated that older women were more likely than the men to report disability and poor subjective health. The health disadvantage of older women was diminished by differential experiences with socioeconomic factors, and especially education. The differences shrink as much as 43.7% in the case of disability and 35.4% in the case of poor subjective health by the differential exposure to educational attainment. Any differential vulnerability to socioeconomic factors was not found between the men and women, which means that socioeconomic factors may have similar effect on health in both genders. CONCLUSIONS: Differential socioeconomic experience and exposure between the men and women might cause gender difference in health in old age Koreans.
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Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Socioeconomic Inequalities in Depressive Symptoms among Korean Older Men and Women: Contribution of Social Support Resources
    Jeong Lee, Kyungwon Choi, Gyeong-Suk Jeon
    Journal of Korean Academy of Community Health Nursing.2020; 31(1): 13.     CrossRef
  • Predictive Model for Quality of Life of the Older Men Living Alone
    Su Jin Kim, Gyeong-Suk Jeon
    Journal of Korean Academy of Nursing.2020; 50(6): 799.     CrossRef
  • Care inequality: care received according to gender, marital status, and socioeconomic status among Korean older adults with disability
    Soong-nang Jang, Ichiro Kawachi
    International Journal for Equity in Health.2019;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • The effects of medication adherence and health literacy on health‐related quality of life in older people with hypertension
    Nam Hee Park, Mi Sook Song, So Young Shin, Ji‐hye Jeong, Hyo Young Lee
    International Journal of Older People Nursing.2018;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Socioeconomic and Social Support Factors of Malnutrition among Korean Elderly in the Community
    Su-Jin Kim, Gyeong-Suk Jeon
    The Korean Journal of Health Service Management.2017; 11(3): 79.     CrossRef
  • Activities of Daily Living, Depression, and Self-rated Health and Related Factors in Korean Elderly: Focused on Socioeconomic Status and Family Support
    Seieun Oh, Young Ko
    Journal of Korean Academy of Community Health Nursing.2015; 26(2): 140.     CrossRef
  • Perceived Health, Life Satisfaction, and Cardiovascular Risk Factors Among Elderly Korean Immigrants and Elderly Koreans
    Mo-Kyung Sin, Young-Ran Chae, Myoung-Ae Choe, Patrick Murphy, Jeungim Kim, Mi-Yang Jeon
    Journal of Gerontological Nursing.2011; 37(3): 43.     CrossRef
  • Analysis for the Impact of Adulthood and Childhood Socioeconomic Positions and Intergenerational Social Mobility on Adulthood Health
    Jae-Hee Seo, Ho Kim, Young-Jeon Shin
    Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health.2010; 43(2): 138.     CrossRef
  • Trends in the Health Status of Older Koreans
    Soong‐Nang Jang, Dong‐Hyun Kim
    Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.2010; 58(3): 592.     CrossRef
Multiple Roles and Health among Korean Women.
Su Jin Cho, Soong Nang Jang, Sung Il Cho
J Prev Med Public Health. 2008;41(5):355-363.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2008.41.5.355
  • 5,277 View
  • 51 Download
  • 7 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
Most studies about multiple roles and women's health suggested that combining with paid job, being married and having children was more likely to improve health status than in case of single or traditional roles. We investigated whether there was better health outcome in multiple roles among Korean women coinciding with previous studies of other nations. METHODS: Data were from the 2005 Korea National Health & Nutritional Examination Survey, a subsample of women aged 25-59 years (N=2,943). Health status was assessed for self-rated poor health, perceived stress and depression, respectively based on one questionnaire item. The age-standardized prevalence of all health outcomes were calculated by role categories and socioeconomic status. Multiple logistic regression was used to assess the association of self rated health, perceived stress, and depression with multiple roles adjusted for age, education, household income, number of children and age of children. RESULTS: Having multiple roles with working role was not associated with better health and psychological wellbeing. Compared to those with traditional roles, employed women more frequently experienced perceived stress, with marital and/or parental roles. Non-working single mothers suffered depression more often than women with traditional roles or other role occupancy. Socioeconomic status indicators were potent independent correlates of self-rated health and perceived stress. CONCLUSIONS: Employment of women with other roles did not confer additional health benefit to traditional family responsibility. Juggling of work and family responsibility appeared more stressful than traditional unemployed parental and marital role in Korean women.
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Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Comparison of Health Behaviors and Nutrient Intake according to Work Type among Women Aged 30-60 Years: Using Data from the Korea National Health and Nutrition Survey (2015-2018)
    Sol Lee, Bok-Mi Jung
    The Korean Journal of Community Living Science.2024; 35(1): 61.     CrossRef
  • Effects of Women’s Work-Family Multiple Role and Role Combination on Depressive Symptoms in Korea
    Ji-won Kang, Soong-nang Jang
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2020; 17(4): 1249.     CrossRef
  • Working Poverty and Health Disparities in Korean Workers
    Jin-Hwa Lee, Bokim Lee
    Journal of Korean Academy of Community Health Nursing.2020; 31(4): 514.     CrossRef
  • Relationship between the number of family members and stress by gender: Cross-sectional analysis of the fifth Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey
    Jin-Won Noh, Kyoung-Beom Kim, Jumin Park, Janghun Hong, Young Dae Kwon, Massimo Ciccozzi
    PLOS ONE.2017; 12(9): e0184235.     CrossRef
  • Unequal Geographic Distribution of Life Expectancy in Seoul
    Sangmi Kim, Seonju Yi, Meekyung Kim, Bokyung Kim, Hwayoung Lee, Taekryeon Jeon, Youngtae Cho
    Asia Pacific Journal of Public Health.2015; 27(2): NP1002.     CrossRef
  • Post‐partum blues among Korean mothers: A structural equation modelling approach
    Sung Suk Chung, Il Young Yoo, Kyoung Hwa Joung
    International Journal of Mental Health Nursing.2013; 22(4): 359.     CrossRef
  • Depression of married and employed women based on social-role theory
    Insook Cho, Sukhee Ahn, Souk Young Kim, Young Sook Park, Hae Won Kim, Sun Ok Lee, Sook Hee Lee, Chae Weon Chung
    Journal of Korean Academy of Nursing.2012; 42(4): 496.     CrossRef

JPMPH : Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health