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Original Articles
Changes in Adolescent Health Behavior and the Exacerbation of Economic Hardship During the COVID-19 Pandemic: A Cross-sectional Study From the Korea Youth Risk Behavior Survey
Chaeeun Kim, Haeun Lee, Kyunghee Jung-Choi, Hyesook Park
J Prev Med Public Health. 2024;57(1):18-27.   Published online November 11, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.23.306
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  • 168 Download
AbstractAbstract AbstractSummary PDFSupplementary Material
Objectives
This study investigated the association between exacerbated economic hardship during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic and changes in the health behaviors of Korean adolescents.
Methods
We analyzed data from the 2021 Korea Youth Risk Behavior Survey and included 44 908 students (22 823 boys and 22 085 girls) as study subjects. The dependent variables included changes in health behaviors (breakfast habits, physical activity, and alcohol use) that occurred during the COVID-19 pandemic. The aggravation of economic hardship by COVID-19 and the subjective economic status of the family were used as exposure variables. Multiple logistic regression analysis was utilized to calculate the prevalence odds ratios (PORs).
Results
Severe exacerbation of a family’s economic hardship due to COVID-19 was negatively associated with the health behaviors of adolescents, including increased breakfast skipping (POR, 1.85; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.55 to 2.21 for boys and POR, 1.56; 95% CI, 1.27 to 1.92 for girls) and decreased physical activity (POR, 1.37; 95% CI, 1.19 to 1.57 for boys and POR, 1.38; 95% CI, 1.19 to 1.60 for girls). These negative changes in health behaviors were further amplified when combined with a low subjective family economic status.
Conclusions
The experience of worsening household hardship can lead to negative changes in health behavior among adolescents. It is crucial to implement measures that address the economic challenges that arise from stressful events such as COVID-19 and to strive to improve the lifestyles of adolescents under such circumstances.
Summary
Korean summary
이 연구는 코로나바이러스감염증-19 (COVID-19) 대유행 기간 악화된 가구의 경제적 상황과 청소년의 건강 행태 변화의 관련성을 청소년건강행태조사를 이용하여 분석하였다. 가구의 경제적 상황이 COVID-19로 인해 심각하게 악화된 경우, 청소년 건강 행태의 부정적인 변화와 연관성이 관찰되었다. 가구의 경제적 상황이 악화되는 경험은 청소년들의 건강 행태에 부정적인 변화를 초래할 수 있다. COVID-19와 같은 사회적 사건으로 인해 발생하는 경제적 어려움에 대응하는 조치를 마련하고, 이러한 상황에서 청소년들의 건강 행태를 개선하기 위한 개입이 필요하다.
Key Message
This study investigated the association between exacerbated economic hardship during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic and changes in the health behaviors of Korean adolescents using the 2021 Korea Youth Risk Behavior Survey. Severe exacerbation of a family’s economic hardship due to COVID-19 was negatively associated with the health behaviors of adolescents. The experience of worsening household hardship can lead to negative changes in health behavior among adolescents. It is crucial to implement measures that address the economic challenges that arise from stressful events such as COVID-19 and to strive to improve the lifestyles of adolescents under such circumstances.
Comorbid Conditions in Persons Exposed to Ionizing Radiation and Veterans of the Soviet–Afghan War: A Cohort Study in Kazakhstan
Saule Sarkulova, Roza Tatayeva, Dinara Urazalina, Ekaterina Ossadchaya, Venera Rakhmetova
J Prev Med Public Health. 2024;57(1):55-64.   Published online November 1, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.23.333
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AbstractAbstract AbstractSummary PDF
Objectives
This study investigated the prevalence and characteristics of comorbid conditions in patients exposed to ionizing radiation and those who were involved in the Soviet–Afghan war.
Methods
This study analyzed the frequency and spectrum of morbidity and comorbidity in patients over a long-term period (30-35 years) following exposure to ionizing radiation at the Semipalatinsk nuclear test site or the Chornobyl nuclear power plant, and among participants of the Soviet–Afghan war. A cohort study, both prospective and retrospective, was conducted on 675 patients who underwent comprehensive examinations.
Results
Numerical data were analyzed using the Statistica 6 program. The results are presented as the mean±standard deviation, median, and interquartile range (25-75th percentiles). The statistical significance of between-group differences was assessed using the Student t-test and Pearson chi-square test. A p-value of less than 0.05 was considered statistically significant. We found a high prevalence of cardiovascular diseases, including hypertension (55.0%) and cardiac ischemia (32.9%); these rates exceeded the average for this age group in the general population.
Conclusions
The cumulative impact of causal occupational, environmental, and ultra-high stress factors in the combat zone in participants of the Soviet–Afghan war, along with common conventional factors, contributed to the formation of a specific comorbidity structure. This necessitates a rational approach to identifying early predictors of cardiovascular events and central nervous system disorders, as well as pathognomonic clinical symptoms in this patient cohort. It also underscores the importance of selecting suitable methods and strategies for implementing treatment and prevention measures.
Summary
Key Message
This study investigated the long-term health effects on 675 individuals exposed to ionizing radiation at Semipalatinsk and Chornobyl, and those involved in the Soviet–Afghan war. Results showed a higher prevalence of cardiovascular diseases, notably hypertension (55%) and cardiac ischemia (32.9%), compared to the general population. The findings highlight the need for early detection of cardiovascular and central nervous system disorders in these groups, emphasizing tailored treatment and prevention strategies.
Gender Inequalities in Mental Health During the COVID-19 Pandemic: A Population-based Study in Korea
Minku Kang, Sarah Yu, Seung-Ah Choe, Daseul Moon, Myung Ki, Byung Chul Chun
J Prev Med Public Health. 2023;56(5):413-421.   Published online August 19, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.23.170
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  • 106 Download
AbstractAbstract AbstractSummary PDFSupplementary Material
Objectives
This study explored the effect of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic on psychosocial stress in prime working-age individuals in Korea, focusing on gender inequalities. We hypothesized that the impact of COVID-19 on mental health would differ by age and gender, with younger women potentially demonstrating heightened vulnerability relative to men.
Methods
The study involved data from the Korea Community Health Survey and included 319 592 adults aged 30 years to 49 years. We employed log-binomial regression analysis, controlling for variables including age, education, employment status, marital status, and the presence of children. The study period included 3 phases: the period prior to the COVID-19 outbreak (pre–COVID-19), the early pandemic, and the period following the introduction of vaccinations (post-vaccination).
Results
The findings indicated that women were at a heightened risk of psychosocial stress during the early pandemic (relative risk [RR], 1.01; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.98 to 1.05) and post-vaccination period (RR, 1.07; 95% CI, 1.04 to 1.10) compared to men. This pattern was prominent in urban women aged 30-34 years (pre–COVID-19: RR, 1.06; 95% CI, 1.02 to 1.10; early pandemic: RR, 1.16; 95% CI, 1.08 to 1.25; post-vaccination period, RR, 1.22; 95% CI, 1.14 to 1.31).
Conclusions
The COVID-19 pandemic has exerted unequal impacts on psychosocial stress among prime working-age individuals in Korea, with women, particularly those in urban areas, experiencing a heightened risk. The findings highlight the importance of addressing gender-specific needs and implementing appropriate interventions to mitigate the psychosocial consequences of the pandemic.
Summary
Korean summary
코로나19 대유행이 국내 경제활동인구의 정신건강에 미친 젠더화된 영향을 조사하였다. 연구대상자는 2017-2021년 지역사회건강조사 조사대상자 319,592명이다. 연구 결과, 대유행 이후 30-39세 연령대 여성의 스트레스 수준이 남성에 비하여 현저히 증가한 것으로 나타났으며, 사회적 거리두기를 엄격하게 시행하였던 도시 지역에서 이러한 경향이 두드러졌다. 이번 연구 결과는 대유행 대응 노력에서 취약 집단을 지원하기 위한 중재 정책의 필요성을 강조한다
Key Message
We investigate the gendered impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the mental health of the working-age population in Korea, focusing on ages 30-49, utilizing data from the Korea Community Health Survey (KCHS) from 2017 to 2021 including 319,592 participants. Findings reveal a notable increase in stress levels among women in the 30-39 age group after the pandemic compared to men, accentuating in urban areas with stringent social distancing measures. Our results underscore the necessity for intervention policies to support vulnerable groups in pandemic response efforts.
Special Article
Examining the Role of Psychosocial Stressors in Hypertension
Komal Marwaha
J Prev Med Public Health. 2022;55(6):499-505.   Published online November 30, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.21.266
  • 4,724 View
  • 234 Download
  • 5 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Despite advances in medicine and preventive strategies, fewer than 1 in 5 people with hypertension have the problem under control. This could partly be due to gaps in fully elucidating the etiology of hypertension. Genetics and conventional lifestyle risk factors, such as the lack of exercise, unhealthy diet, excess salt intake, and alcohol consumption, do not fully explain the pathogenesis of hypertension. Thus, it is necessary to revisit other suggested risk factors that have not been paid due attention. One such factor is psychosocial stress. This paper explores the evidence for the association of psychosocial stressors with hypertension and shows that robust evidence supports the role of a chronic stressful environment at work or in marriage, low socioeconomic status, lack of social support, depression, anxiety, post-traumatic stress, childhood psychological trauma, and racial discrimination in the development or progression of hypertension. Furthermore, the potential pathophysiological mechanisms that link psychosocial stress to hypertension are explained to address the ambiguity in this area and set the stage for further research.
Summary

Citations

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  • Health-related factors and dysregulation of epigenetic related genes in metabolic syndrome trigger finger patients and smoker trigger finger patients: preliminary analysis of patient-derived sample
    Abdulaziz M. F. Shayea, Amna A. Alshatti, Danah H. Alfadhli, Almutairi Fatimah Ibrahim, Mariam Kh. Almutairi, Mohammed Sh. Nadar
    Journal of Orthopaedic Surgery and Research.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Adjustment disorders, hypertension and type 2 diabetes: a cardiologist’s view (literature review)
    D.K. Miloslavsky, S.M. Koval
    INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF ENDOCRINOLOGY (Ukraine).2023; 19(5): 383.     CrossRef
  • Letter to the Editor: Insights on Health, Religion/Spirituality, and Vulnerable Populations
    Fides A. del Castillo
    Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health.2023; 56(1): 97.     CrossRef
  • Moderating effect of mindfulness on the relationship between anxiety and somatization symptoms in middle‐aged and elderly female patients with hypertension
    Haifei Shen, Ri Zhang, XiuJie Zhang, Ying Zhang, Yan Liu, Wei Song, Yunpeng Cheng, Minghui Yang, Yinong Jiang, Yan Lu
    The Journal of Clinical Hypertension.2023; 25(7): 647.     CrossRef
  • Exploring the health of child protection workers: A call to action
    Javier F. Boyas, Debra Moore, Maritza Y. Duran, Jacqueline Fuentes, Jana Woodiwiss, Leah McCoy, Antonella Cirino
    Health Promotion Perspectives.2022; 12(4): 381.     CrossRef
Brief Report
Effects of Forest Therapy on Psychological Improvement in Middle-aged Women in Korea
Bum-Jin Park, Won-Sop Shin, Chang-Seob Shin, Poung-Sik Yeon, Chung-Yeub Chung, Si-Hyung Lee, Dong-Jun Kim, Youn-Hee Kim, Chang-Eun Park
J Prev Med Public Health. 2022;55(5):492-497.   Published online September 20, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.22.086
  • 2,951 View
  • 137 Download
  • 1 Web of Science
  • 3 Crossref
AbstractAbstract AbstractSummary PDFSupplementary Material
Objectives
Women experience more stress in middle age than in other periods of their lives. Therefore, health management programs that enable middle-aged women to cope with and manage stress are needed. This study investigated the psychological effects of a meditation-focused forest therapy program among 53 middle-aged women living in urban areas in Korea.
Methods
Participants were divided into 2 groups: one group underwent the program for 3 days in a forest, followed by 3 days in an urban environment, and the other group underwent the program for 3 days in the urban environment, followed by 3 days in the forest. The psychological effects of the forest therapy program were evaluated using the Profile of Mood States-Brief (POMS-B). Differences in mood state before and after the program conducted in the forest (experimental group) and in the urban environment (control group) were evaluated using the paired-samples t-test.
Results
The program in the forest significantly reduced tension, depression, anger, fatigue, and confusion among the domains of the POMS-B. The program in the urban area significantly reduced tension, but not depression, anger, fatigue, or confusion.
Conclusions
Meditation-focused forest therapy programs are expected to contribute to promoting psychological health and enhancing the quality of life of middle-aged women.
Summary
Korean summary
중년 여성이 건강을 관리할 수 있는 프로그램이 필요하다. 이 연구는 명상 중심의 산림치유 프로그램이 중년 여성의 심리적 건강 증진에 효과적인지 검증하기 위해 프로그램 시행 전후에 참가자의 기분상태(POMS-B)를 측정하여 비교하였다. 결과에 의하면 긴장, 우울, 분노, 피곤, 혼돈이 통계적으로 유의하게 감소하였다.

Citations

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  • Effect of Anti-Aging Standard Forest Healing Program With Multiple Visits to a Forest Facility on Cognition in Older Age Patients
    Jinseok Park, Sheng-Min Wang, Dong Woo Kang, Beom Lee, Hojin Choi
    Dementia and Neurocognitive Disorders.2024; 23(1): 44.     CrossRef
  • Supporting Wellness, Resilience, and Community With Forest Therapy
    Susan A Abookire, Sujata G Ayala, Nancy A Shadick
    Global Advances in Integrative Medicine and Health.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • The Impact of Forest Therapy Programs on Stress Reduction: A Systematic Review
    Yawei Zhang, Lu Feng, Wenjie Duan
    Forests.2023; 14(9): 1851.     CrossRef
COVID-19: Original Article
Associations Between General Perceptions of COVID-19 and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder in Korean Hospital Workers: Effect Modification by Previous Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus Experience and Occupational Type
Youngrong Lee, Kwanghyun Kim, Sungjin Park, Sun Jae Jung
J Prev Med Public Health. 2021;54(2):86-95.   Published online January 19, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.20.540
  • 5,213 View
  • 209 Download
  • 3 Web of Science
  • 2 Crossref
AbstractAbstract AbstractSummary PDFSupplementary Material
Objectives
This study investigated associations between perceptions of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and the prevalence of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in workers at hospitals designated to treat COVID-19, as well as the difference in the magnitude of these associations by occupational type and previous Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) experience.
Methods
The participants were workers at hospitals designated to treat COVID-19 who completed a questionnaire about their perceptions related to COVID-19, work experience during the previous MERS-CoV outbreak, and symptoms of PTSD ascertained by the PTSD Checklist for the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders. Participants’ characteristics were compared using the chi-square test. Multivariable logistic regression was performed to evaluate the associations between perceptions and the prevalence of PTSD, stratified by occupational type and previous MERS-CoV experience.
Results
Non-medical personnel showed stronger associations with PTSD than medical personnel according to general fear (odds ratio [OR], 6.67; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.92 to 23.20), shortages of supplies (OR, 1.29; 95% CI, 1.07 to 1.56), and issue-specific fear (OR, 1.29; 95% CI, 1.05 to 1.59). Those with prior MERS-CoV quarantine experience were more prone to PTSD than those without such experience in terms of general fear (OR, 1.70; 95% CI, 1.22 to 2.37), shortages of supplies (OR, 1.24; 95% CI, 1.10 to 1.40), and issue-specific fear (OR, 1.21; 95% CI, 1.06 to 1.38).
Conclusions
During the COVID-19 pandemic, non-medical personnel tended to have higher odds of being categorized as having PTSD. Workers with prior MERS-CoV experience were more susceptible than those without such experience. These findings suggest the need for timely interventions to manage human resources for a sustainable quarantine system.
Summary
Korean summary
본 연구는 COVID-19관련 인식과 COVID-19 안심 병원 근로자들의 외상 후 스트레스 장애 (PTSD) 유병률 사이의 연관성에서 직업 유형과 이전 중동 호흡기 증후군 (MERS-CoV) 방역 경험 여부로 인한 연관성의 크기 차이를 조사하였다. 비의료인이 의료인보다 PTSD유병에 더 강한 연관성을 보였고, 이전 메르스 방역 경험이 있는 근로자들이 COVID-19에 대한 "일반적 공포", "물품 부족 공포" 및 "특정 문제에 따른 공포"로 구분한 인식의 크기가 클 수록 방역 경험이 없는 근로자들보다 PTSD유병과의 관련성이 더 컸다. 결론적으로 COVID-19 대유행 기간 중 비의료 인력은 PTSD유병 확률이 더 높은 경향이 있었다. 이전 MERS-CoV 경험이 있는 근로자는 그러한 경험이 없는 근로자보다 더 취약했다.

Citations

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  • Association between social networks and symptoms of post-traumatic stress during the pandemic: Cohort study in South Korea
    Ji Su Yang, Yu Jin Lee, Hyeon Chang Kim, Chul-Hyun Cho, Alexander C. Tsai, Sun Jae Jung
    Comprehensive Psychiatry.2023; 127: 152432.     CrossRef
  • Development and Validation of COVID-19 Stress Scale (CSS) in an Iranian Non-clinical Population
    Roghieh Nooripour, Nikzad Ghanbari, Laurel E. Radwin, Simin Hosseinian, Peyman Hassani-Abharian, Mohsen Hosseinbor, Keyvan Kakabraee, Mojtaba Amiri Majd, Serge Brand, Esmaeil Soleimani, Hossein Ilanloo
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Original Articles
Public Sector Workers’ Mental Health in Argentina: Comparative Psychometrics of the Perceived Stress Scale
Agustín Ramiro Miranda, Ana Veronica Scotta, Ana Lucía Méndez, Silvana Valeria Serra, Elio Andrés Soria
J Prev Med Public Health. 2020;53(6):429-438.   Published online October 5, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.20.229
  • 5,326 View
  • 183 Download
  • 8 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
Given that Argentinian public-sector workers are highly exposed to stressful conditions, and that the psychometric properties of the widely used Perceived Stress Scale (PSS) should be evaluated in different settings, this work aimed to compare the psychometric properties of the Latin American Spanish PSS-10 and PSS-4 and to identify the optimal scale for stress assessment.
Methods
A sample of 535 participants was randomly divided into 2 groups to evaluate dimensionality by exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses. The reliability of both scales was also evaluated. Convergent validity was estimated using the Executive Complaints Questionnaire, the average variance extracted, and the composite reliability. Discriminant validity was based on the correlation with the Utrecht Work Engagement Scale and the phi-square correlation between the components.
Results
The factor analyses supported bidimensionality of the PSS-10 (stress and coping), which showed a better fit than the PSS-4. Moreover, the reliability of the PSS-10 was higher, whereas the PSS-4 did not achieve adequate values of internal consistency. The PSS-10 was also correlated significantly with all validation scales, and presented proper internal convergent and divergent validity.
Conclusions
The PSS-10 is a reliable and structurally valid instrument to measure perceived stress and coping in a Latin American Spanish-speaking population with high work demands, and the findings of this study expand our knowledge on the geographical and sociocultural applicability of the PSS.
Summary

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  • Psychometric properties of the Perceived Stress Scale (PSS-10) in silica-exposed workers from diverse cultural and linguistic backgrounds
    Fiona Hore-Lacy, StellaMay Gwini, Deborah C. Glass, Christina Dimitriadis, Javier Jimenez-Martin, Ryan F. Hoy, Malcolm R. Sim, Karen Walker-Bone, Jane Fisher
    BMC Psychiatry.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Norfadhillaton Zahari, Maniam Kaliannan
    Review of Public Personnel Administration.2023; 43(3): 557.     CrossRef
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    Batul A. Yawer, Julie Liss, Visar Berisha
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    Agustín R. Miranda, Mariela V. Cortez, Ana V. Scotta, Elio A. Soria
    Midwifery.2022; 108: 103290.     CrossRef
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Effect of Burnout on Post-traumatic Stress Disorder Symptoms Among Firefighters in Korea: Data From the Firefighter Research on Enhancement of Safety & Health (FRESH)
Woojin Kim, Munjoo Bae, Sei-Jin Chang, Jin-Ha Yoon, Da Yee Jeong, Dae-Sung Hyun, Hye-Yoon Ryu, Ki-Soo Park, Mi-Ji Kim, Changsoo Kim
J Prev Med Public Health. 2019;52(6):345-354.   Published online October 24, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.19.116
  • 9,075 View
  • 237 Download
  • 18 Crossref
AbstractAbstract AbstractSummary PDFSupplementary Material
Objectives
It is well-known that post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) among firefighters contributes to their job-related stress. However, the relationship between burnout and PTSD in firefighters has rarely been studied. This study therefore explored the association between burnout and its related factors, such as trauma and violence, and PTSD symptoms among firefighters in Korea.
Methods
A total of 535 firefighters participated in the Firefighter Research on Enhancement of Safety & Health study at 3 university hospitals from 2016 to 2017. The 535 participants received a baseline health examination, including questionnaires assessing their mental health. A Web-based survey was also conducted to collect data on job-related stress, history of exposure to violence, burnout, and trauma experience. The associations among burnout, its related factors, and PTSD symptoms were investigated using structural equation modeling.
Results
Job demands (β=0.411, p<0.001) and effort-reward balance (β=-0.290, p<0.001) were significantly related to burnout. Burnout (β=0.237, p<0.001) and violence (β=0.123, p=0.014) were significantly related to PTSD risk. Trauma (β=0.131, p=0.001) was significantly related to burnout; however, trauma was not directly associated with PTSD scores (β=0.085, p=0.081).
Conclusions
Our results show that burnout and psychological, sexual, and physical violence at the hands of clients directly affected participants’ PTSD symptoms. Burnout mediated the relationship between trauma experience and PTSD.
Summary
Korean summary
535명의 현직소방관을 대상으로 소방공무원에서 업무관련스트레스, 폭력노출, 외상노출, 소진(번아웃), 외상후 스트레스 장애(PTSD) 증상 설문을 시행하였고, 구조방정식 통해 업무스트레스에 의한 소진이 PTSD에 주는 영향과 다른 요인간의 연관성을 분석하였다. 그 결과, 업무 환경에서의 높은 직무요구수준과 낮은 노력-보상 균형은 소진을 증가시키며, 업무스트레스에 의한 소진과 근무 중 겪게 되는 폭력노출 경험은 PTSD 점수와 양의 연관관계를 보였다. 반면, 업무 도중 외상사건 경험은 PTSD 점수와 직접적으로 유의한 연관관계를 보이지 않았으나, 소진을 통한 간접적으로 영향을 주는 것을 확인하였다.

Citations

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  • Association between burnout and post‐traumatic stress disorder among frontline nurse during COVID‐19 pandemic: A moderated mediation analysis
    Leilei Liang, Yuanchao Hu, Junsong Fei, Tongshuang Yuan, Ren Gao, Jingyi Yue, Qianqian Song, Xixi Zhao, Songli Mei
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The Relationship Between Job Stress, Job Satisfaction, and the Symptom Checklist-90-Revision (SCL-90-R) in Marine Officers on Board
Jae Hee Kim, Soong-nang Jang
J Prev Med Public Health. 2016;49(6):376-385.   Published online September 12, 2016
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.16.046
  • 12,145 View
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AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
This study was conducted to investigate the relationships among job stress, job satisfaction, and mental health in marine officers.
Methods
The researchers gathered data on marine officers working at a harbor in Chungcheong Province, South Korea, using a self-reported questionnaire. Mental health was measured by the Symptom Checklist-90-Revision (SCL-90-R), and general characteristics including socioeconomic factors, job stress, and job satisfaction were measured by structured questionnaires. Multiple regression analysis was performed to investigate the relationships among job stress, job satisfaction, and mental health status according to the symptom dimensions of the SCL-90-R.
Results
Among the marine officers, obsessive-compulsive behavior, depression, and somatization were the most problematic symptoms. Those who reported poor health, low job satisfaction, and high job stress had a higher prevalence of psychoticism, somatization, depression, anxiety, and phobic anxiety.
Conclusions
An occupational health system should be introduced that would regularly check the mental health of marine officers in charge of ships and sailors, in order to help reduce their stress levels, enhance their job satisfaction, and thereby improve their mental health.
Summary

Citations

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The Association Between Oxidative Stress and Depressive Symptom Scores in Elderly Population: A Repeated Panel Study
Changwoo Han, Youn-Hee Lim, Yun-Chul Hong
J Prev Med Public Health. 2016;49(5):260-274.   Published online August 23, 2016
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.16.029
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AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Objectives
Previous epidemiological studies about oxidative stress and depression are limited by hospital-based case-control design, single-time measurements of oxidative stress biomarkers, and the small number of study participants. Therefore, in this study, we analyzed the association between biomarker of oxidative stress and depressive symptom scores using repeatedly measured panel data from a community-dwelling elderly population.
Methods
From 2008 to 2010, a total of 478 elderly participants residing in Seoul, Korea, were evaluated three times. Participants underwent the Korean version of the Short Form Generic Depression Scale (SGDS-K) test for screening depression, and urinary malondialdehyde (MDA) levels were measured as an oxidative stress biomarker. We used a generalized estimating equation with a compound symmetry covariance structure to estimate the effects of oxidative stress on depressive symptom scores.
Results
A two-fold increase in urinary MDA concentration was significantly associated with a 33.88% (95% confidence interval [CI], 21.59% to 47.42%) increase in total SGDS-K scores. In subgroup analyses by gender, a two-fold increase in urinary MDA concentration was significantly associated with increased SGDS-K scores in both men and women (men: 30.88%; 95% CI, 10.24% to 55.37%; women: 34.77%; 95% CI, 20.09% to 51.25%). In bivariate analysis after an SGDS-K score ≥8 was defined as depression, the third and the fourth urinary MDA quartiles showed a significantly increased odds ratio(OR) of depression compared to the lowest urinary MDA quartile (third quartile OR, 6.51; 95% CI, 1.77 to 24.00; fourth quartile OR, 7.11; 95% CI, 1.99 to 25.42).
Conclusions
Our study suggests a significant association between oxidative stress and depressive symptoms in the elderly population.
Summary

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Replication of Early B-cell Factor 1 (EBF1) Gene-by-psychosocial Stress Interaction Effects on Central Adiposity in a Korean Population
Hyun-Jin Kim, Jin-Young Min, Kyoung-Bok Min
J Prev Med Public Health. 2016;49(5):253-259.   Published online July 10, 2016
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.16.028
  • 10,052 View
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AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
Central obesity plays a major role in the development of many chronic diseases, including cardiovascular disease and cancer. Chronic stress may be involved in the pathophysiology of central obesity. Although several large-scale genome-wide association studies have reported susceptibility genes for central adiposity, the effects of interactions between genes and psychosocial stress on central adiposity have rarely been examined. A recent study focusing on Caucasians discovered the novel gene , which was associated with central obesity-related traits via interactions with stress levels. We aimed to evaluate EBF1 gene-by-stress interaction effects on central adiposity traits, including visceral adipose tissue (VAT), in Korean adults.
Methods
A total of 1467 Korean adults were included in this study. We selected 22 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the EBF1 gene and analyzed their interactions with stress on central adiposity using additive, dominant, and recessive genetic modeling.
Results
The four SNPs that had strong linkage disequilibrium relationships (rs10061900, rs10070743, rs4704967, and rs10056564) demonstrated significant interactions with the waist-hip ratio in the dominant model (pint<0.007). In addition, two other SNPs (rs6556377 and rs13180086) were associated with VAT by interactions with stress levels, especially in the recessive genetic model (pint<0.007). As stress levels increased, the mean values of central adiposity traits according to SNP genotypes exhibited gradual but significant changes (p<0.05).
Conclusions
These results suggest that the common genetic variants for EBF1 are associated with central adiposity through interactions with stress levels, emphasizing the importance of managing stress in the prevention of central obesity.
Summary

Citations

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    Michael J. Griffin
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The Effects of Temperature on Heat-related Illness According to the Characteristics of Patients During the Summer of 2012 in the Republic of Korea
Wonwoong Na, Jae-Yeon Jang, Kyung Eun Lee, Hyunyoung Kim, Byungyool Jun, Jun-Wook Kwon, Soo-Nam Jo
J Prev Med Public Health. 2013;46(1):19-27.   Published online January 31, 2013
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2013.46.1.19
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AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives

This study was conducted to investigate the relationship between heat-related illnesses developed in the summer of 2012 and temperature.

Methods

The study analyzed data generated by a heat wave surveillance system operated by the Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention during the summer of 2012. The daily maximum temperature, average temperature, and maximum heat index were compared to identify the most suitable index for this study. A piecewise linear model was used to identify the threshold temperature and the relative risk (RR) above the threshold temperature according to patient characteristics and region.

Results

The total number of patients during the 3 months was 975. Of the three temperature indicators, the daily maximum temperature showed the best goodness of fit with the model. The RR of the total patient incidence was 1.691 (1.641 to 1.743) per 1℃ after 31.2℃. The RR above the threshold temperature of women (1.822, 1.716 to 1.934) was greater than that of men (1.643, 1.587 to 1.701). The threshold temperature was the lowest in the age group of 20 to 64 (30.4℃), and the RR was the highest in the ≥65 age group (1.863, 1.755 to 1.978). The threshold temperature of the provinces (30.5℃) was lower than that of the metropolitan cities (32.2℃). Metropolitan cities at higher latitudes had a greater RR than other cities at lower latitudes.

Conclusions

The influences of temperature on heat-related illnesses vary according to gender, age, and region. A surveillance system and public health program should reflect these factors in their implementation.

Summary

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The Relationship Between Psychosocial Stress and Allergic Disease Among Children and Adolescents in Gwangyang Bay, Korea
Mee-Ri Lee, Bu-Soon Son, Yoo-Ri Park, Hye-Mi Kim, Jong-Youn Moon, Yong-Jin Lee, Yong-Bae Kim
J Prev Med Public Health. 2012;45(6):374-380.   Published online November 29, 2012
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2012.45.6.374
  • 9,693 View
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AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives

Stress is considered a causal factor in many diseases, allergic disease being one of them. The prevalence of allergic disease is increasing in Korea, but the relationship between allergic symptoms and stress is not empirically well known. We aimed to evaluate the relationship between allergy-related symptoms and stress in children and adolescents.

Methods

We investigated 698 children and adolescents living in Gwangyang Bay, Korea, using a multi-stage cluster sampling method. Using the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood and the Psychosocial Well-being Index, these subjects were surveyed on allergy-related symptoms and psychosocial stressors in their lives, respectively. We used a multivariate logistic analysis for odds ratios for the complaint rate of allergic symptoms, after adjusting for age, gender, household income, body mass index, and residence.

Results

After adjustments, lifetime rhinitis (odds ratio [OR], 1.024), rhinoconjunctivitis (OR, 1.090), diagnosis of itchy eczema (OR, 1.040), treatment of itchy eczema (OR, 1.049), 12-month allergic conjunctivitis (OR, 1.026), diagnosis of allergic conjunctivitis (OR, 1.031), and treatment of allergic conjunctivitis (OR, 1.034) were found to be significantly associated with stress.

Conclusions

Our results support the notion that there is a relationship between stress and allergic symptoms in children and adolescents. Further research into any causal relationship between stress and allergies, as well as preventative public health plans for decreasing stress in children and adolescents are needed.

Summary

Citations

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Placental Superoxide Dismutase, Genetic Polymorphism, and Neonatal Birth Weight.
Yun Chul Hong, Kwan Hee Lee, Moon Whan Im, Young Ju Kim, Eun Hee Ha
J Prev Med Public Health. 2004;37(4):306-311.   Published online November 30, 2004
  • 1,976 View
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AbstractAbstract PDF
BACKGROUND
The roles of antioxidants in the placenta and genetic susceptibility to oxidant chemicals in relation to neonatal birth weight have not been elucidated. We determined whether the level of placental manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) and its genetic polymorphism plays any role in oxidative stress and neonatal birth weight. METHODS: We measured placental MnSOD and determined MnSOD genetic polymorphism among 108 pregnant women who were hospitalized for delivery and their singleton live births in Korea. Main outcome measurements are maternal urinary malondialdehyde (MDA) and birth weight. RESULTS: Maternal urinary concentrations of MDA were significantly associated with neonatal birth weight (P=0.04). The enzyme level of placental MnSOD was also significantly associated with MDA concentration (P=0.04) and neonatal birth weight (P< 0.01). We observed dose-response relationships between placental MnSOD and maternal urinary MDA, and neonatal birth weight after adjusting for maternal weight, height, age, and neonatal sex. After controlling for covariates, MnSOD variant genotype increased maternal urinary MDA concentrations (P< 0.01) and reduced birth weight by 149 gm (P=0.08). CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrates that the placental level of MnSOD during pregnancy significantly affects fetal growth by reducing oxidative stress, and that genetic polymorphism of MnSOD probably modulate the effects of oxidants on fetal growth.
Summary
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Relationship Between Depression Anxiety Stress Scale (DASS) and Urinary Hydroxyproline and Proline Concentrations in Hospital Workers.
Keou Won Lee, Soo Jeong Kim, Jae Beom Park, Kyung Jong Lee
J Prev Med Public Health. 2011;44(1):9-13.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2011.44.1.9
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  • 145 Download
  • 19 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
Although increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) is caused by stress accelerates collagen degradation, there was no data on the relationship between stress and urinary hydroxyproline (Hyp) and proline (Pro), a good marker of collagen degradation. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relationship between depression, anxiety, and stress (DAS) and concentrations of urinary Hyp and Pro. METHODS: 97 hospital employees aged 20 to 58 were asked to fill out comprehensive self-administrated questionnaires containing information about their medical history, lifestyle, length of the work year, shit-work and DAS. Depression Anxiety Stress Scale (DASS) was applied to evaluate chronic mental disorders. Urine samples were analyzed using High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) with double derivatization for the assay of hydroxyproline and proline. RESULTS: The mean value of Hyp and Pro concenturation in all subjects was 194.1+/-113.4 micromol/g and 568.2+/-310.7 micromol/g. DASS values and urinary Pro concentrations were differentiated by sex (female > male, p < 0.05) and type of job (nurse > others, p < 0.05). In the stepwise multiple linear regressions, urinary Hyp and Pro concentrations were influenced by stress (Adjusted r2 = 0.051) and anxiety and job (Adjusted r2 = 0.199), respectively. CONCLUSIONS: We found that stress and anxiety were correlated with urinary Hyp and Pro concentrations. To identifying a definite correlation, further study in large populations will be needed.
Summary

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JPMPH : Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health